<%BANNER%>

USF UNF



Florida dispatch
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00035
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: November 20, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00035
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

Full Text




























itvoted to the Aqgricultural,

Vol. 1.--No. 35. New Series.
Monday, November 20, 1882.

PREPAYMENT OF FREIGHT ON FRUIT
Not Required by the Florida Dispatch Line.
From correspondence with this office, the im-
pression seems to prevail among some shippers
that freight on fruit to interior Western points
ha ot be prepaid, Such is not the case. The
Florida Dispatch Line receivess the fruit at
Jaakitinvilte and ,Callahan frow. its connec-
tions, paying theoi their charges' to those points,
forwards to destination-, and collect as per con-
ditions under tariff published in THE FLORIDA
DISPATCH.
Rates to the principal points only are pub-
lished, as it would be impracticable to quote
rates in this paper to all points.
We issue bills of lading to the points named
-therein; also, can and would publish rates to
any other point to which sufficient quantity was
shipped to justify it. But until such points are
developed into an important market, the rates
;are guaranteed, and protected by bill of lading
to the nearest principal point. From this to its
final destination the current rate applies and
the fruit ca tried, collect freight on delivery.
We, as yet, have no rates to interior points
*in the Carolinas and Virginia, and no rates in
connection with the "Atlantic Coast Line,"
hence do not and cannot receive freight for that
line, or to interior points in the Carolinas and
Virginia, except Charleston, S. C., to which
point we quote rates and carry fruit all-rail,
being via Savannah, Florida and Western and
Charleston and Savannah Railway.
Your special attention is called to our tariff
and conditions underneath. If not fully umn-
.derstood, address D. H. ELLIOTT,
Gen'l Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jackson-
ville, Florida.
At the bottom of a good deal of the bravery\
that appears in the world there lurks a miser-
able cowardice. Men will face powder and
steel because they cannot face public opinion.-
Chap in.


Manufacturing and Industrial Interests of Florida and the South.

--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla. Price 5 cents.


$1.00 per Year, in advance; pos


Commercial Fertilizers.
A correspondent of the South Florida Jotura-
al thus takes up the cudjels for commercial ma-
nures :
We notice that some of our Orange County
citizens write long letters to prove that com-
mercial fertilizers are useless, which we fail to
endorse, as our, experience has been so much tQ.
the contrary. It is impossible to get animal
manure, first, because we have not the stock,
and secondly, because if we had we could not
save the manure while stock is on the range
the entire year. It is during the winter that
the Northern farmers accumulate the dung
while the stock is housed.
Now we can site to many instances where
groves and gardens have been and will be made
with commercial fertilizers. exclusively. That
part of Belair grove which has been fertilized
with commercial manures, is much better than
the part that was cow-penned.
Dr. Foster's grove on Lake Jessup,which has
been made with nothing but commercial fer-
tilizer, will clip somewhere about 40,000 this
year, and that from three-year-old buds. We
don't believe in trying to make a grove with-
out manure. We, cannot get animal dung-
we know.we can make a grove with fertilizers,
and werinow we can raise the finest vegetables*
at a profit with chemicals, therefore we shall
continue to make our garden and our grove, to
use reliable chemical fertilizers, and advise our
friends to buy and use all they can afford to,
as we are convinced that it is the best, cheap-
est and almost the only fertilizer we can
get. __
How Sanford was Named.
Hon. H. S. Sanford will arrive in New York
next week, and will soon after be in Sanford.
He has long been absent from the town that
has assumed his name, and we hope he will be so
'surprised at the improvements that have been
made during his absence, that he will develop
some scheme, as he generally does, for its fur-
ther advancement.
Mr. Editor: On reading the above para-
graph, in your issue of November 2d, it oc-
curred to me it would be worth while to pre-
serve the truth of history relating to the growth
of our town.


tage free.


Sanford did not assume its own name. When
I settled where I still live, the present site of
the town was a wild hunting ground, at points
almost impenetrable.
On joint account with Mr. Sanford I built a
wharf and small warehouse. Soon after, a
small stock of goods for sale was put in a small
house' by a small tradesman, and so business
beg -.
My wife and daughter and myself, on sug-
gestion that this might be the beginning of a
town, were casting about for a name when my
daughter suggested SANFORD, in honor of the
principal landed proprietor of the neighbor-
hood; and thus it was called. This was in the
autumn of 1870.---J. Wofford Tacker, in South
Florida Jourpal.
Good Farming in Georgia.
The Cochran (Ga.) Banner says: It is time
for the "up country" people to quit turning up
their noses at the "poor pine barrens of wire-
grass Georgia," when we state as the truth the
following facts: Mr. John NeSmith, who farms
just out of town, this year, with one horse, made
with his own labor, fourteen bales of cotton and
three hundred bushels of corn. Where is the
one-horse farm' in any part of Georgia that can'
beat that ? Mr. NeSmith also made an abund-
ance of vegetables for his family-potatoes, etc.
The Wrightsville Record also gives the fol-
lowing instance of good farming in the wire-
grass regions: "Mr. Blaxton, living oni the
place of B. G. Smith, on the line of this county
and Jefferson, made this year on about fifty-
five acres of land, with a.nineteen-year-old horse,
20 bales of cotton, 125 bushels of corn, and
about 500 bushels of potatoes and other pro-
duce usually made upon a farm. The work was
done by Mr. Blaxton and his two sons; all the
plowing was done by one horse except about
five days."
-I saw one excellency was within my reach;
it was brevity, and I was determined to obtain
it.-Jay.
-It is the misfortunes of all miscellaneous
political combinations, that with the purest mo-
tives of their more generous members are ever
mixed the most sordid interests and the fiercest
passions of mean confederates.-*-Bulwer-Lytton.


1


1


I






5rTHE FLtORIDA DISPATCH H'.


ve apd vp)3^ ^e.

Varieties of the Citrus Family.

As the season has arrived for transplanting
orange trees and starting young groves, our
readers and newcomers to our State, who con-
template entering into this lucrative employ-
ment, will find below a good description of the
different species of the orange, important hints
as to choice varieties to plant, &Ac., which we
copy by permission from the "Manville Nur-
sery Catalogue."
THE SWEET ORANGE, (Citrus aurantium.)
The characteristics of the varieties described
follow the common type of the species except
in the particulars noted.
Varieties marked with an asterisk (*) are
best known and most esteemed.
To facilitate selection, we divide the varie-
Sties of this species into five classes.
CLASS I.-Varieties fruiting early in season.
Egg.-Synonyms, Beach's No. 1, Thornless
Bell, Early Oblong.--Small, oval, thin-skinned,
sweet, lacking the sub-acid of other sorts. At-
tains its perfection in September or October.
Esteemed for home use. There is a sub-variety
which is large, coarse, insipid, and inferior.
Like the varieties under Class III, it is easily
distinguished by the appearance of fruit or fo-
liage.
CLASS II.-Varieties fruiting late in the season.
Tardif.-Synonym, Hart's Late. A com-
mon Florida orange, in quality above the av-
erage. Retains its juices until the middle of
July, or even later, and is especially valuable
on this account. Foliage somewhat distinct.
CLASS III.-Varieties readily distinguished by
the appearance of fruit or foliage, whose
marked peculiarities are constant.
Bell.*-Large pear or bell-shaped. Of de-
licious flavor and a good shipper. One of the
best.
Du Roi.*-Size medium, quality superior.
Plainly marked, being ribbed like a muskmel-
on. Skin firm, a good shipper and prolific.
Charley Brown.-Very much flattened at
stem and blossom ends. Thornless; foliage pe-
culiar.
Maltese Blood.-Pulp of a blood-red color.
This appears in the form of flakes when the
fruit begins to ripen, which gradually increases
until the entire pulp is colored. Thornless;
foliage peculiar.
Navel.---Synonyms, Umbilical, Bahia, Em-
biguo.-Large, nearly seedless, pulp melting,
quality very superior. Bears a peculiar um-
bilical formation on the summit or blossomed
of the fruit. Nearly thornless. Bears young.
Claimed by some to be a shy bearer. Foliage
distinct.


St. Michael's.-Medium sized, nearly seedless,
thin-skinned and juicy. Tree prolific; foliage
distinct.
St. Michael's Egg.-Large, oval, thick-
skinned, juicy, but not rich. Prolific.
Mediterranean Sweet.*-Fruit, a first-class
common orange. Tree thornless, prolific, and
bears young. Foliage peculiar.
Sweet Seville.-Synonyms, Sugar Sweet,
Golden Angel. Small, thin-skinned, tender,
juicy, very sweet and delicious. Foliage dis-
tinct.
CLASS IV.-Leading varieties of superior ex-
cellence, practically indistinguishable, most-
ly of native origin, but including some for-
eign varieties long grown and thoroughly
tested in the State. This class includes most
of the best varieties of the justly celebrated
Florida orange. The characteristics of the
Several varieties differing little from the


common type do not require particular de-
scription.
Arcadia, Creole, Homosassa,* Nonpareil,*
Peerless-synonym, Rembert's Best. Tahiti,
Dummit, Higgins, Osceola, Beach's No 3, Ex-
celsior, Magnum Bonum,* Old Vini-synon-
yms, Beach's No. 4, Buena Vista. Acis, Dixon,
Spratt's Harmonv, Parson Brown.
CLASS V.-Imported varieties not yet thor-
oughly tested in Florida. The descriptions
are given as received, and cannot be touched
for.
Botelha.-Said to be superior, with thin rind
and rich pulp. Apparently differs little from
native varieties
Exquisite.-A thin-rinded rich and juicy
fruit.
-Sustain.-Large and remarkable for its
sweet juices.
Acapulco.-Recently from California. Said
to be large and fine. A strong grower.
Jaffa.-Recently from Syria, bearing the
name of a city of that country. Said to
be one of the best on the Eastern Mediterra-
nean.
Dulcissima.-Synonym, Dulcis. Small, very
sweet, generally seedless; prolific. Well known
in Paris.
Prata.-Synonym, Silver Orange. Rind pale
yellow and thin, flesh pale, flavor piquant and
delicious.
White.-Large, pale yellow, flesh pale, flavor
rich and good.
Nicaragua.-A California variety recently
introduced, said to be large and fine.
Portugal.-Recently introduced by way of
California, where it has not been fruited
long enough to determine its quality. Tree
vigorous.
Queen and Rio.-See Portugal.
THE BITTER ORANGE, (Citrus bigaradia.)
This species, including the native wild or-
ange of Florida, comprises many useful and
ornamental varieties, a few of which appear
below. It is largely grown in Europe, princi-
pally for the perfume obtained from the blos-
soms.
Sour.-Native 'wild orange of Florida.
Large, color dark, grain coarse, inner rind bit-
ter, juice acid. Retains its perfection through
the summer, when it is much prized for its re-
freshing acid juice. Used also for making mar-
malade and conserves. The tree makes a desir-
able and ornamental shade tree.
Bitter Sweet.-Native wild orange of Flor-
ida. Medium sized, juice sweet and pleasant
when separated from the inner bitter rind.
Used in summer as a substitute for the sweet
fruit.
Variegated.-Leaves and fruit mottled with
white, pale straw color, and several shades of
green. Highly ornamental.
Golden Variegated.-Leaves mottled with a
rich golden color. Very ornamental.


Myrtle-Leaved.-A handsome dwarf tree,
with small, dense, dark green, glossy leaves;
bearing a small, flattened fruit of little use.
A beautiful shrub for ornamental grounds.
Citrus Japonica.-Synonym, Dwarf Orange.
An ornamental dwarf tree resembling the
sour orange. Fruit small and used for pre-
serving.
THE MANDARIN ORANGE, (Citrus nobilis.)
Regarded by some as a distinct species, by
others as a marked variety of sub-species of
the Sweet Orange, from which it is distinct in
both tree and fruit. It is also called the Tan-
gierine Orange.
China.*-Synonym, Willow-Leaved. Small,
flattened, deep yellow color, skin thin, skin and
segments loosely adherent, flesh dark orange
color, spicy and aromatic. Tree, dwarf, with
willow-like foliage.


St. Michael's.-Fruit slightly pearishaped, in
other respects resembling the China.
Bioou.*-Synonyms, Moragne's Tangierine,
Dancy's Tangierine. Fruit a little larger than,
the China, which it resembles, except in its
deep crimson color. Tree unlike the other va-
rieties-resembles the sweet orange in size and
foliage, though it retains the aroma peculiar to
the species. A seedling identical with the
parent tree first received the name Bijou.
Canusa.-Fruit similar to China, but said
to be of finer flavor; foliage very peculiar;
leaves narrow at the base and widening slightly
their entire length.
Satsuma.-The fruit is medium sized, flat-
tened, deep orange color, smooth, thin skin,
which is sweet, aromatic and easily detached
from the pulp. Color of pulp dark orange;
segments part freely; fine grain, tender, juicy,
sweet and delicious. There is none of that pe-
culiar rank odor which characterizes most
other varieties belonging to the same class and
species. The tree is thornless, the leaves pe-
culiarly thick, lanceolate, serrated medium, pet-
iole, linear; and the fruit is seedless. New
and desirable.
THE LEMON, (Citrus lemonum.)
Bijou.-Small, smooth, thin-skinned, juicy;
acid fine. Foliage distinct.
Everbearing.-Quality fair; bears constant-
ly, and on this account, very desirable for home
use.
Sicily.*-Size medium; rind sweet; skin
smooth, thin, tough and dense; membrane
covering segments of pulp thin and small in
quantity; pulp juicy; acid fine; quality best.
Not a Florida raised seedling, but the genuine
imported lemon of commerce.
Bergamot.-Large, rough, flattened; of little
value; leaves large and broadly winged; ap-
pearance peculiar. Erroneously introduced
under the name of Bijou.
French's Seedling.*-A native variety fully
equal to the imported Sicily, which it closely
resembles. Tree has very few thorns.
Eureka.-Recently introduced from Califor-
nia. Said to be of medium size, with sweet
rind and strong acid. Tree thornless; strong
grower; early and prolific bearer.
Genoa.-Imported by way of California,
where it is esteemed one of the best. Descrip-
tions similar to Eureka.
Lisbon.-Imported by way of California.
Said to be of good quality, though not as high-
ly esteemed as the foregoing.
Imperial.-Imported from Europe and high-
ly recommended.
Lamb.*-A native variety resembling the
imported Sicily. One of the best.
Villa Francha.-Recently imported from
Europe and highly recommended.
Willow-Leaved.-Recently imported from
Europe. Said to be superior. Leaves lanceo-
late; branches flexible with willow-like ap-
pearance.
Sweet.-Same as Dulcis or Sweet Lime, q. v.
Variegated.-Leaves mottled with white,


pale straw color, and several shades of green;
fruit said to be superior. Very ornamental.
THE LIME, (Citrus limetta.)
Florida.*-41edium sized, skin thin and
smooth, acid juice rich and abundant. Best for
general culture.
Sweet.-Synonym, Dulcis.-Large, thick-
skinned; pulpy; juice insipidly sweet. Val-
ued only for variety and for preserving.
Persian.-Imported. Said to be superior.
THE CITRON, (Citrus medical )
Lemon.-Very large, shape like the lemon;
skin irregular and glossy; inner skin thick,
spongy and aromatic.
THE SHADDOCK, (Citrus Decumana.)
Mammoth.-Very large; skin smooth and


V -


_ i__ __ __I__ ____


I


1


i






T FLORIDA bT6PA"ciJ


glossy; riftd thick; glorigy arid bitter; pulp
green, watery and sub-acid.
Blood.-Same as above, with red pulp. "
Pomolo.-Synonym, Grape Fruit.-Small;
akin smooth ; color pale yellow; pulp sub-acid
and refreshing.
MISCELLANEOUS.
Ihe following are of recent introduction,
and do not beloiig to any of the foregoing spe-
cies.
Bergamot.-Known also as the Bergamot
Orange or Bergamot Lemon, probably a hy-
brid. Fruit peat shaped ; pale yellow, with
green sub-acid; firm, fragrant pulp; fruit and
foliage distinct. Grown in Europe, where the
fragrant oil of Bergamot is obtained from the
rind.
Otaheite.-A dwarf variety, bearing an
*bundance of reddish flowers, and small,
ihowy fruit; sweet and thin-skinned. A pret-
ty ornamental shrub, attracting considerable at-
tention as a stock upon which to dwarf the
sweet orange.
Kumquat.-A small species much cultivated
in China and Japan. The* plant is a shrub,
sometimes six feet high, but in cultivation, is
niot allowed to exceed the height of a goose-
berry bush. The fruit is oval, about the size
of a large gooseberry; the rind is sweet and
the juice acid. It is delicious and refreshing.
The Chinese make an excellent sweet meat by
preserving it in sugar.
Desimatus.-One of the curiosities of the
Citrus. Foliage peculiar; leaves of a droop-
ing habit; has the appearance of being var-
nished; no two leaves alike' in shape; fine for
ornamental grounds.



Bananas and Plantains.
i The.New Orleans Times-Democrat has this
ti say-about Bangnae and Plintains:
A pound of bananas contains more nutri-
ment than three pounds of potatoes, while as a
food it is in every sense of the word far supe-
rior to the best wheaten bread. An acre of
ground planted with bananas will return, ac-
cording to Humboldt, as much food material as
thirty-three acres of wheat, or over a hundred
acres of potatoes.
The banana (it should be called plantain, for
until lately there was no such word as banana)
is divided into seven varieties, all of which are
used for food. The plantino mazinito is a
small, delicate fruit, neither longer nor stouter
than a lady's forefinger. It is the most deli-
cious and prized of all the varieties o? plan-
tain.
El plantino guineo, called by us the banana,
is probably more in demand than any other
khid. It is subdivided into different varieties,
the principal of which are the yellow and pur-
ple bananas that we see for sale in our markets;
ut the latter is so little esteemed by the na-
tives of the tropics that it is seldom eaten by
them.


.El plantino grande-known to us as simply
the plantain-is also subdivided into varieties
which are known by their savor and their size.
The kind that reaches our market is almost ten
inches long, yet on the Isthmus oP Darien there
are plantains that grow from 18 to 22 inches.
They are never eaten raw, but are either boiled
or roasted, or are prepared as preserves.

One of the most noted w6men in New York
journalism is Miss Middy Moigan, who does
the cattle reports for four New York papers,
among them the Tribune and Times. She has
acquired a fund of knowledge of cattle and
horses, both on the farm and turf, which may
be envied by the most experienced male sports-
men.


Corn--New Mode of Growing.
It appears (according to "Saunders," in the
Tribune), that Mr. J. S. Winter, of Montgom-
ery, Ala., has been making experiments in
growing corn. From a letter explaining his
views and their results, we extract the follow-
ing, which will explain his method: His first
experiment was in planting in rows fourteen
feet apart and one foot apart in the drill, or at
the rate of 3,640 stalks to the acre, to corre-
spond with the number common to the acre
when sown in the usual three by four feet way.
The returns from this trial induced a further
experiment. Twenty acres were put down in
rows twelve feet wide and one foot apart in the
drill, and notwithstanding the prevailing and
unusual disastrous drouth of the last season,
the crop realized was double the best grown on
the land for years, and twice that grown on
the infinitely richer adjoining bottom lands cul-
tivated with equal care, but planted in the or-
dinary mode, and ordinarily producing double
the crop usual to the land devoted to the ex-
posure of the plants to the influence of light
and air, as also in a measure to the greater
moisture-retaining capacity of the wider and
amply cultivated spaces incident to the change.
After making several efforts in the demon-
stration of the greatly superior advantages of
the wider row system of corn culture, Mr.
Winter rewards with most favor the planting
two rows four feet apart, with the distance in
the drill say from nine inches to two feet, de-
termined and regulated by the quality of the
land; then skipping sixteen feet-two other
four-feet rows, followed as before, and so
throughout, the yet wider beds being necessary,
as he conceives, to the freer and less hindered
use of the intervening spaces for the adjunctive
crops-which he has in view as part of the sys-
tem, such as field peas, millet, fodder corn, etc.,
to be put in after the corn crop has received its
final cultivation.
Mr. Winter remarks that "the distance in
the drill thought best on the particular lands
devoted to these experiments is one foot, so that
the number of stocks to the acre will, in theo-
ry at least, be 4,854, or'just a third more than
the 3,640 due to the current three-by-four
method ; while the latest experiment warrants
expectation, under average condition's, of one-
half more weight of corn to one stalk."
Wr. Winter thus further sums up.the advan-
tages of this system: And thus 20 acres of
the 100, say, ordinarily surrendered to the corn
crop, it seems possible indeed together, and es-
pecially in seasons of protracted drought, for
the wider beds secure absolute immunity from
its usual prejudice-double the corn to be
otherwise produced on the entire 100 acres, and
of vastly better quality; while the field pea
sown as early as the 1st of May may be altern-
ated with German millet, fodder corn, and


other quickly maturing crops, to be put down
in this latitude as late even as the middle of
July and gathered by the first of September,
and these in turn by the native crab grass,
Which will be all the -better for the later
start.
"And the promise is, accordingly, of adjunc-
tive crops rivalling in value and in their uses,
to the practical farmer particularly, the main
or corn crop; while again, the cost of growing
and gathering each and every of the entire of
these products is infinitely reduced, if aided in
the work by the improved power implements
now-a-days at every good and thrifty farmer's
command.
The annual cheese product of the United
States, for an average good season, is now esti-
mated at 400,000,000 pounds, and the butter
product at 1,200,000,000 pounds.


INCREASED VALUE OF FARM PRODUCTS.-
A contemporary says: "In 1816 one bushel of
corn would buy one pound of nails. In 1882
one bushel of corn would buy fifteen poundsof
nails. In 1816 it took from twenty to eighty
dozen of eggs to buy one bushel of salt. In
1882 one dozen of eggs would do the same
thing. In 1816 it required sixty-four bushels
of barley to buy one yard of broad-cloth. In
1882 five bushels of barley would do the busi-
ness. In 1816 it required one bushel of wheat
to purchase one yard of calico. In 1882 one
bushel of wheat would buy thirty-five yards of
a better article. In 1819 a pair of woolen
blankets cost as much as a cow. In 1882 a cow
would buy from six to twenty pairs of blankets
superior in every way."
FLORIDA OYSTERS AND SHELL BANKS.-A
New York oyster dealer, interviewed by a Sun
reporter, gives his theory of the formation of
our shell banks. He said:
There's one man who comes here who al-
ways wants Florida oysters, so I get them. The
bed is right inside the mouth of the St. John's
River, at a little place called Pilot Town, and
they are the sweetest oysters you ever ate when
fat, only they're as fresh as can be. All they
need is plenty of salt. I've eaten them myself
right out of the water, and don't want anything
better.
"The oyster bed is a curiosity itself. The
whole town is built on ancient oyster beds, that
have grown to the surface slowly, and pushed
the river to the south ; this has been going on
for ages, so that if you dig a quarter of a mile
from the shore inland, you will come upon oys-
ter shells solid. I watched a man dig the foun-
dation for a house when I was there, and a foot
down there was nothing but the old beds. In
some places the shells were piled in mounds,
showing that the old settlers must have enjoyed
them, and there you can find all the old pot-
tery you want. In Key West, further down,
there's a part of the place called Conchtown,
on account of the fact that these shell fish are
eaten there. I've tried them also, but excuse
me. I took dinner with an acquaintance there
once, and he asked me if I'd have some conch
stew. It looked just like chicken stew, and
fine chicken at that-rather more like turkey
meat. I said 'Yes,' but I tell you when I took
the first mouthful, I wished I hadn't come."
CASSAVA.-A gentleman in Leon County,
who is familiar with the cultivation of Cas-
sava, puts down the yield at seventy tons per
acre. At $7 per ton, which is a fair average
price, an acre of land will yield $490 for the
crop of roots alone. The seed from an acre of
cassava will readily sell for $40, thus giving
$530 as the gross receipts from an acre of cas-
sava.
[Divide these glowing results by two, and
the business will pay.-EDS. DISPATCH.]


A GRATEFUL WIDOWER.-The Perry (Ga.)
Home Journal says : Mr. T. J. Cater harvest-
ed his town crop of sweet potatoes last week,
an abundant yield of large, smooth tuber s.
Through the kindness of his heart he sent a
bushel to each of the widow ladies in town.
When we went .home that night we found that
Mr. Cater had left a bushel of very fine pota-
toes there, and our widow requests us to return
her sincere thanks to the kind donor, in which
we heartily join."
Seth Green, the pisciculturist, will arrive in
Florida some time this month for the purpose of
observing the shad fisheries, and will follow the
fish north until they appear in the waters of
New England.
The United States produces. thirty per cent.
of the grain and thirty per cent. of the meat of
the world.





5-6 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


New Publications.
"Harper's Monthly" for December is truly a
most attractive issue. The leading article isan
able paper on "The Columbia River," with a
great number of exquisitely beautiful illustra-
tions of mountain and river scenery. Then we
have a portrait of William Black, the popular
English novelist, with sketches of his study,
yacht, &c.; a poem, "Found Drowned," by
Dinah Muloch Craik; "The Great Sea-port of
Western France;" "Southern California,"
third paper; "Cameos of Colonial Carolina ;'"
"The Singular Vote of Aut Tilbox," by Sally
P. McLean, author of "Cape Cod Folks;"
"Storing Electricity;" the second part of "For
the Major," which opened so auspiciously in
the November number; "Shandon Bells," etc.,
etc. Price $4 per year--35 cents single num-
ber. (Ashmead Bros.)
"Winter Cities in a Summer Land," is the
title of a charming illustrated hand-book of
scenery and travel just issued by the Cincin-

Company. It very attractingly describes a
tour through Florida and the winter resorts of
the South, and will be found a pleasant and
useful compagnon de voyage to all who visit our
"sunny land." We return thanks to our friend
"L. R. T," for the copy before us.
The old "Prairie Farmer" has of late under-
gone a very striking metamorphosis, and now
comes to us as the "Illustrated People's Week-
ly and Prairie Farmer-a Journal for Every-
body." It is a very handsomely printed and
splendidly illustrated sheet of 16 pages-size
of Harper's Weekly-and well filled with ag-
ricultural and miscellaneous reading, at the low
price of $2 per year, in advance. Address
"The Prairie Farmer Publishing Company,"
Chicago, Ill.

"THE HOUSEHOLD" is the title of a new and
elegantly printed "story paper," just commenced
in Philadelphia. It contains sixteen pages,
finely illustrated, with a page of music, &c. ;
and purchasers of No. 1 obtain with it a very
beautiful picture, "The Mother's Pet," worth
Sfar more than the cost of the paper. It may
be had at the counter of Ashmead Bro's.

Fast Mail Service.
By reference to schedules, it will be seen that
the Savannah, Florida and Western Railway
continues the fast mail by immediate dispatch
from Savannah by fast train service direct to
Jacksonville, Live Oak, New Branford and
Albany, Ga. The fast mail train leaves Say-


annah at 11:10 a. m., passes Callahan 4:23 p.
m., arrives Jacksonville 5:00 p. m.; arrives
Live Oak via Waycross and Dupont at 6:45
p. m.; New Branford (Suwannee River) 8:30
p. m. ; arrives Albany, Ga., via Waycross and
Thomasville at 10:30 p. m.
As an illustration, of this annihi-
lation of space, the New York newspapers of
Monday are delivered in all of above named
places on Tuesday. We trust all the connec-
tions in Florida of this deservedly popular dis-
patch line will be enabled to take up this fast
mail schedule and continue it to all rail and
river points in the State.


Index for "The Dispatch."
MURRAY HILL,"
ORMOND, VOLUSIA COUNTY, FLA.,
November 13, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Di.patch:
Will you kindly inform me, as well as other
readers, if you are going to issue an index at
the end of volume 1 of THE DISPATCH ? If
not, I want to index mine, so would like to
know. We all think that we get more than our
money's worth in THE DISPATCH. I have
mine put up in a home-made binding for first
half of volume and keep the rest on file, and
find it very handy. I am, yours truly,
L. MORETON MURRAY.
REPLY.--We will have index and title page
for THE DISPATCH at end of volume and will
mail it to every subscriber. One is already
prepared as far as published.-EDs.
BiG YIELD.--The Economis-t says: "From
five bushels. of Scuppernong grapes, Father
Hugan, of this city, made 46 gallons of wine;
7 gallons from the pure juice, which he calls
No. 1 ; 22 gallons from the mass, putting in
'.Ou worun or sugur -Una Z Z gailuiu uiP w nt1
which he calls No. 2; and 17 gallons from the
dregs, adding 17 gallons of water and 50 cents
worth of sugar; this is No. 3. Besides this he
made 10 gallons of vinegar."-[Old Father Hu-
gan "stretched his blanket" a little too wide;
We should not like to be obliged to drink much
of the No. 2 and No. 3 "vintages"-to say noth-
ing of the vinegar. From three to five gallons
to the bushel of grapes, is about as much wine
as can reasonably be expected.-EDs.
HOME ADORNMENT.-Nature is active in
adorning her dominions; and man, to whom
this beauty is addressed, should feel and obey
the lesson. Let him, too, be industrious in
adorning his domain-in making his home, the
dwelling of his wife and children, not only con-
venient and comfortable, but pleasant. Let
him, as far as circumstances will permit, be in-
dustrious in surrounding it with pleasant
objects; in decorating it, within and without,
with things that tend to make it agreeable and
attractive. Let industry make home the abode
of neatness and order-a place which brings
satisfaction to every inmate, and which in ab-
sence draws back the heart by the fond associa-
tions of content.
WOULD LIKE TO COME !-A well-known
Chicago publisher writes one of the Editors of
THE DISPATCH, under date of Nov. 10 :
I would start for Florida to-morrow, if I
could sell my business, or arrange it so I could
do so. I dread the coming winter, for I am
very sensitive to cold or bad weather; but I
suppose I must stay and take it-though 1
don't like the prospect a bit."


SUGAR CANE IN ORANGE.-The Reporter
says: Sugar-cane grows luxuriantly in Orange
County, and it is a profitable crop to raise. Our
friend, W. H. Holden, has left a sample cane
in our office that was fifteen feet long, but we
had to cut it off five feet to make room for it.
It had twenty-seven joints, all well formed.
Florida sugar and syrup are superior to any
others made in the Southern States, owing, no
doubt, to our favorable climatic conditions.
-Let us do good, not to receive more good in
return, but as an evidence of gratitude for
what has already been bestowed. In a few
words, let it be "all for love, and nothing for
reward"-Jean Ingelow.


ITEMS FROM THE GULF.

Fertilizers-Fish--Oyster-Shell Lime-Cas-
sava, Etc.
The Levy Enterprise of 10th., has these
items :
Here at Cedar Key, or rather on an out-of-
the-way part of the island, should be established
a fertilizer manufactory, and the man with suf-
ficient enterprise, and a little capital, who goes
into the undertaking may make a fortune.
Here all about the town is the now worse than
waste material, poisoning the air we breathe,
and polluting the waters, which applied to its
appropriate use, would make Florida sand hills
blossom like the rose, and fill our markets with
the vegetable products so scarce and so much
needed.
Add to the compost heap the many barrels
of spoiled fish which are now expensively
buried, to get them out of the way, and the
practical economist sees still greater cause to
mourn.
Oyster shell lime is very much needed by the
agriculturist in the interior of Levy County,
and in spite of the uncounted millions of tons
xfxlG4,1i ly;"& fb T-ip f ty. t.hprp im none
prepared for market, and many tons per annum
are brought to this county from the Atlantic
coast, after the style of bringing coals to
Newcastle."
The markets of Cedar Key seem now to be
pretty well supplied with oranges from down
the coast-ripe enough to eat out of hand. We
put one on the scales the other day which
weighed a full pound. The best average lot
consisting of about 2,000 oranges, came from
the settlement of Hudson, in Hernando Coun-
ty, situated about midway between Bayport and
Anclote. Mr. Hudson presented us with some
samples, which proved of unusual sweetness,
and delicate flavor. One of these is a curiosity,
presenting the appearance as though one-fourth
of the orange had been tut out, and a quarter
of a larger fruit substituted, the suture being
well defined.
As the culture of cassava is one of the grow-
ing industries of Florida, we feel it a duty to
encourage it, and to let our neighbors know
what it will do in Levy.
We called on Mr. R. D. Simmons last Satur-
day morning, and he took us into his garden
and proposed to dig a cassava root for us. The
first one he struck was a monstrous root for one
year's growth. It measured five feet in length
and fifteen inches in circumference at the base,
and weighed twenty pounds. Mr. Simmons
also took up an arrow root that was fifteen
inches long and an inch in diameter.

Look Out for Cold I
One of the Northern weather-prophets pre-
dicts that a cold snap is again probable after
the 21st of the month. About 25th and 26th


heavy rain storms in southern and western-sec-
tions, with rain and snow falls in Northern
United States and Canada. The month will
close with an intensely cold dip and snow
storms through Canada and Northern and Mid-
dle, as well as Western, United States.

--Fortune turns faster than a mill wheel and
those who were yesterday at top may find
themselves at bottom to-day.-Don Quixote.
-A man whose reason is sound never is
without perception of truth, if only he has the
affection of understanding truth.- -Swedenborg.
-Be brief, for it is with words as with sun-
beams-the more they are condensed, the
deeper they burn.-Southey.
*





I.... TIE LORII A DISPATCH "


II


I









I



I























I


inches thiick, an d continue to repeat these lay-
ers in the above order, and in proportion to the
ian tity of each used to the ton, until the ma-
terial is consumed, Cover the whole mass
with stable manure, or scrapings from the lot,
one or two inches thick. Allow the heap to
a 6di this condition until a thorough fer-
~mwntatioi7 takes place, which-wiJl require from
three to six weeks, according to circumstances,
dependent upon proper degree of moisture and
the strength of materials used. When the cot-


T1-: *' '7 i rm i i Wind. 'g


-. __

i' a i..... 0..575 T58- S .O 7.7 0.00 E h 2'Clear.
n . 56 6S.Q 0.00 2 Clear.
13 ....... 6)!o t 0.00 SW 10 Clear.
,Tie -4,,.,. 1. 7'. 51jij0. ij 57.3 0.00 NW 5 Fair.
sWedn 30ay 15 1 30.1 67(44r 5.0 M71. 0.00 NW 4 Clear.
ST iurAdy 6. 50.31 74 157.3 72.01 0.00 N 5{Fair.
:' 7. ..:.,30';74 ij o.7J 70,7 ..M N i Fair.
,f"IHi 1PiAR*er 6A34,lwest 300.0
Highest temperature 76, lowest 44.
1(, N .- -- aeeir readingss reduebd to sea level.
f,4,. W.M.rJTH.Signal Obrerver U. 8. A.

,, ,npjposts.for Ctton and Corn.
i I Woe op from the.report of the Agricultu-
i1DeOartmet[ of Georgia the following ex-
lent formula fot'conmpokting cotton seed,
limapur.ad.suPei phoaphate:-: ".
If tWo s le .aure and cotton seed have.
e 4 pr9cted from wptq by qxposire to rain
pd sum, the following formula is recommended:
I Stable Manure............. ...... 650 pounds.
G reen Cotton 'Seed...... ....... 650
aperpiesphate......:. .. ... 700 "
Making .td :of..::.. ....-.......2,000 -pounds.
ni If the comappa, is inteindedfor use n soils
:vprtioularly deficient.ii potiash, the proportion
',of cotton seied may be reduced 50each and 100
Spbnds of Kainit used instead. The formula
WIould then be:
^tabf~3 Maiu.'. ...,... .. .... :. .. )0O pounds.
monS ed,'grkn..... ~'....... 6
erp ophi .... .............. 700 0 "

1 Making a ton 4f................2,000 pounds.
l heoee ingrrdients.im y be varied in propor-.
tionj to adapt the ~esaltinig composts to differ-
erent soils :r crops, bit either of the above will
Ibe 1otd to give satisfactory results on every
*-,ass of soils and oui all of ou-r cultivated crops.
wiketions fo6 (imipostiin.-The ingredients
may elixe ixed either by building up the hiap
byalterIate la eis of the ingredients, of they
..miy bthforoityhl y'lixed arid then thrown in-
16 a heap. Id either case water liould b'frely
usWd 6n th boarse 4iatertilsh wile compoatin'g.
"The foll6whg directions have been generally
foMlowdI:*y those Wh6i Hae isAd the; "om. ost
ith mn*o satisfactory results. Most farmers
prefer the phin'bf mixing the ingredients well
forb:raeiig'thhn ini thi hi'eap foi Termentsa
tioln.; Uhder ,this plan tihe mingling of the in-
/'rediienta is more tliorouth during the process
of fermentation, and hence its effects are prob-
ably maire thorough, though both plans have
Veggood reults.
Directions for .Coipfosting.-Spread under
lefter a layer of stable manure fqur inches
,thclo s- n'ishprinikle a portion of the phos-
phat,; next spread .a layer of ecottop seed three
inches Eick; wet these, thiQroughlv with water
a'd 'then, aidly more of the phosphate; next
spread another laver of stable manure three


diable injury-may be entered in large tracts,
representing' speculation and not settlement.
Still, some of the cash sales are bona fide pur-
chases, and the figures are interesting. During
the fiscal year ended June 30, 1882, the six
Southern States which contain Government
,land-.have the following shares in the home-
stead entries and cash sales of agricultural
lands:


Homestead
Entries.
- States. Acres,
Alabama........266,523
Arkansas............ 364,943
Florida............. 199,033
Louisiana.......... 116,703
Mississippi........ 158,488
Missouri..... 134,212
Total .............1,249,901


Agricult.
Sales.
Acres.
50,006
58,556
140,520
370,032
210,889
129,049
966,053


S M" TEOROLOGICAL RfPORT.
w|h ;"~ fo e '- OmIcBOF oOBSIbRVATION,
,..i4NALss.VIC1, U. S. A., jAdCKO0VILLU, FLA.
WeatJer for.weex ending November 17, 182.


ton seed are thoroughly killed, with a sharp
hoe or mattock, cut down vertically through the
layers; pulverize and shovel into a heap, where
the fermentation will be renewed, and the com-
post be still further improved. Let it lie two
weeks after cutting down; it will then be ready
fo f use.
The following plan of mixture gives equally
satisfactory results: Mix the cotton seed and
stable manure inu proper proportion, moisten
them with water, apply the proper proportion
of phosphate and mix thoroughly, shoveling
into a mass as prepared.
There is some advantage in this plan, from
the fact that the ingredients are thoroughly
commingled during the fermentation.
FOR COTTON.-Apply in the opening furrow
200 pounds, and with the planting seed 75 or
100 pounds, making in all 275 or 300 pounds
per acre. If it is desired to apply a larger quan-
tity, open furrows the desired distance, and
over them sow broadcast 400 pounds per acre ;
bed the land and then apply 100 pounds per
acre with the seed.
FOR CORN.-Apply in the hill, by the side
of the seed, one gill to the hill. An additional
application around the stalk, before the first
plowing, will largely increase the yield of grain.
Agricultural Progress of the South.
Additional, although indirect, evidence of
increasing agricultural industry in the South is
afforded by the sales or settlements of public
lands. The total area of the United States is
2,306,297,600 acres. The area of those States
and Territories where Government lands yet
unsold exist, is 1,814,788,922 acres. Of this
last enormous sum, 784,906,980 had been sur-
veyed up to June 30, 1881--leaving more than
a thousand million acres hot yet surveyed. Of
government land the total amount sold for
oabh, taken.up by homestead entries or scrips
or locations of the several legal varieties, dur-
ing the year ended June 30, 1881, was 10,128,-
175i acres, while the total for the year ended
June 30, 1882, has attained the unparalleled
magnitude of 15,599,848 acres. It is impossi-
-ble, says the New Orleans Picayune, to find
fault.with the Government on the score of want
of liberality;' for the aggregate sums realized
by the Government for that magnificent share
in its domain was only $8,351,091, or an aver-
age of less than fifty-three cents per acre. The
greater part of the cash came from cash sales
of 3,699,899 acres of agricultural lands for
$6,877,271. The homestead entries, 6,347,729
acres, brought only $614,149 cash in commis-
sions, and fees.
It is these homestead entries which mark ag-
ricultural progress. In most cases a homestead
pntry means a new farm, another farmer, and
knot her thrifty family in the neighborhood.
The sales of agricultural lands for cash are a
less valuable juindication, because they may
cover a mere design to strip wooded land of its
forest-which is a serious and almost irreme-


-If we could only follow the Irishman's ad-
vice we should be wiser and sadder, if not bet-
ter men. When drilling an awkward squad,
his patience thoroughly exhausted, he cried
out, "Do ye call that a pr's'nt arms? Hivens!
Just step out here, now, and take a look at
yerselves."


I


f


1


-nr - r .~a--- - -


The total amount of public land disposed of
in every way during the same year has been in
the same States as follows:
States. Acres.
Alabama................................ 516,514
Arkansas .......................... 402,077
F lorida........................... ........... 422,396
Louisiana.................................... 516,800
Mississippi ........................ 397,006
Missouri......................... ...... 297,124


Total..... ............... ......... 2,652,817
The figures show that the impetus of the
wonderful agricultural development of the
South indicated by the census of 1880 is not yet
exhausted. It is probable that the eleventh
census will show a steady growth during the
whole of the present decade, and before it is
taken the Government lands ifi the South will
probably all be in private hands.-Floridian.

A Sure Preventive for Chicken Cholera.
ZANESVILLE, OHIO.
Several experiments have been made dur-
ing the past five years by different parties for
the purpose of preventing the spread of chicken
cholera by inoculation or vaccination. We
have, during the past two years, vaccinated the
fowls in nineteen different yards where the
cholera was prevailing badly, and in each yard
we left some common fowls not vaccinated and
they all died. But of two thousand vaccinated
only eleven died, although they were in the'
same yard with those not vaccinated that were
all dying by scores. We have every reason to be-
lieve that this chicken vaccination will be as
effective in preventing cholera among fowls as
vaccination is in preventing small pox among
the human family. Vaccinate a hen and in
eight days her system will be thoroughly inoc-
ulated, then cut off her head and catch all the
blood in some vessel, then pour the blood out
on paper and let it dry ; a half drop of this
blood is sufficient to vaccinnate a fowl, and the
blood of one hen will vaccinate your whole
flock. Catch the fowls you wish to vaccinate
and with a pin or knife make a little scratch
on the leg (just enough to draw blood) then
moisten a little piece of the paper with the
dried blood on, and stick it on the chicken's
leg where you scratched it; then let the fowl
run and you need have no fear of chicken chol-
era. As the result of many experiments I have
now dried blood enough I would suppose to
vaccinate ten thousand fowls for which I have
no use as I donot sell patent medicines. If any
of your readers are enough interested in poul-
try to try this preventive, by writing to me I
will send free of charge enough dried blood to
start with. All I ask is that they send early
before the blood loses its strength, and report
the result of their experience to your many
readers.
W. H. Griffith, in Fla. Agriculturist.

-Absence from those we love is self from
self A deadly banishment.-Shakespeare.





-TQ THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


"Where shall I find a place clean enough to
kiss on your sweet, happy, dirty little face, my
pet?" while her fine associates clasped their
kid-gloved hand and said: "How shocking!"
It is only the discomforts of cleanliness this
article deals with. We are not in sympathy
with the man who could wear a clean shirt six
months, nor with the woman who whitewashed
the legs of her hens, nor with people who can
eat off of soiled napery, but a constant brush-
ing away of infinitesimal dust, of scrubbing
human strength and heart and hope into insen-
sate boards, is foolish beyond measure, for life
is worth too much to be frittered away in such
a fashion.


"Unco"-Cleanliness.
If any of our readers have ever had the
misfortune to be compelled to remain for any
length of time under the same roof with a
woman "prossessed of a neat devil," they can
fully understand the following from the Detroit
Post and Tribune:
There was a woman who had such a mania
for being clean that she scrubbed her floor
every day until she finally scrubbed through
into the cellar and was heard of no more, and
the writer of this recalls a mother who was the
direct cause of the death of an only and be-
loved child because she persisted in having his
room cleaned, before he had fully recovered
from an attack of diptheria. It is usually the
households who have the most need of comfort
who are afflicted with the cleaning mania.
The woman who makes the husband leave his
boots at the door so that he will not make
tracks on her clean floor, or compels her boy
to walk on stilts for the same reason, is a posi-
tive affliction. A writer on beauty in the
household says: "Wiser mothers leave their
households to a certain confusion while they
choose the better part and make themselves the
companions of their children the careful guar-
dians of their health, manners, minds and mor-
als." Some housekeepers are perpetually dust-
ing and sweeping. An old humorist called one
day at one of these houses. He was met as
usual by the wife, sweeping as if her life de-
pended on it. He looked at the heap of dust,
then at the woman, and his eyes twinkled as he
said: "Why, you must be the cleanest woman
in the world. My wife might sweep a week
and she would not get such a pile of dust as
that !" There are ladies who, in their own
houses, will move a book which a visitor has
been looking at and restore t to its former po-
sition, unconscious that their rudeness is a vio-
lation of the laws of hospitality. A nervous
man who was calling on a lady was astonished
and alarmed to see her spring from chair, run
half up the wall and catch a fly which was per-
ambulating there, "I spent the whole fore-
noon," she exclaimed, "in getting every fly out
of the house. That one must have come in
when you did !"
It is desirable to be kept in a chronic state
of dampness and soap with the constant injunc-
tion not to stop here or there, do this or that.
It would be preferable to sit down. in the dust
of ages in peace and comfort to tip-toeing
through life on newly washed floors. Cleanli-
ness is often an over-rated virtue when it mo-
nopolizes some of the best hours of life and
makes everybody uncomfortable. The little
Prince Imperial of France used to cry because
he was dressed up so fine he couldn't go out and
make mud pies with the little canaille in the
happy freedom of the streets. We recall a
young mother who, rich, wealthy and beauti-
fuil, picked up her rosy, romping child from
among his playmates, and holding him in her
arms, encased in rich silk, said laughingly,


special types, whether dumb or shaking, what-
ever may be its pathology, or nature, or origin,
is due as an existing evil here to decomposition
or exhalation and all the morbific and malefic
influences engendered about marshy or wet re-
gions and impure water beds. The best author-
ities are not sure, or agreed, on the question,
whether the disease is indigenous or imported,
or on the question why it is brought into activ-
ity at one time rather than another. They
generally concur in the opinion, on both sides
of the Atlantic, that it germinates or sprouts in
the human body from very minute spores, meas-
uring perhaps 3,000 to an inch. But how these
seeds are transported about, or what the condi-
tions of receptivity and susceptibility are under
which they are developed, nobody can yet tell.
There is evidence that sporadic cases occur in
dry, upland regions, but the disorder loves


THE RIGHT THING TO Do.-An example
worthy of imitation is thus recorded by the
Dawson (Ga.) Journal: "We presented a
small account of three dollars to a good citizen
in our county a few days ago, and he answered
that he had no money. Knowing him to be
perfectly good and reliable, while we very much
needed the money, we said nothing more about
it. A few minutes after we left the gentleman,
he said he got to thinking about the matter and
began to count up his little accounts around
town, and he felt like he was not doing right
to be holding his cotton in the warehouse when
he was owing money to men who needed it
probably worse than he did. He went straight-
way and sold a bale of cotton and paid up his
accounts.


ml


Lateness of Frost this Season.
The New York Herald, discussing season,
weather, '&c., says: "The progress of the
season, judged by the extension of the frost
belt southward, is remarkably slow. In Octo-
ber of last year "killing frosts" visited New
England as early as the 5th of the month, caus-
ing great destruction of the crops, and on the
6th extended to Virginia, North and South
Carolina and Tennessee, with very disastrous
effects to tobacco and fruit crops. During the
present month, except in the Northwest, no kill-
ing frosts have been reported, and those which
have occurred fell mostly after the 16th inst.,
north and west of the Ohio Valley. The only
very severe frosts so far reported this month
have been those of the 19th inst. in Wisconsin,
unless we go further north and into the West-
ern plateau regions. The exceptional immu-
nity which the tobacco and cotton growers have
enjoyed from frost this fall will no doubt ena-
ble them, as it will farmers generally, to make
the most of the growing season and considera-
bly enlarge their crop profits. The lateness of
the present season's frosts is already almost as
noteworthy as was that of the autumn of 1877,
when the Signal Service reported that no frost
occurred during October at Lynchburg; few
if any killing frosts in this State or Ohio, and
in some parts of New England the color of
autumn foliage was late in turning. This was
a very late autumn and was followed by a mild
winter; whereas the fall of 1876 carried its
killing frosts, with ice, as far south as Georgia
and Alabama by October 16th, and damaged
the tobacco crops in Virginia still earlier in
the same month, and was followed by a cold
winter. The first frosts of October, 1878, in
the cotton States were reported by the Signal
Service as early as the 19th, and the ensuing
winter was generally severe. In 1875, 1879
and 1880, the mean date at which autumnal
frosts injurious to vegetation reached the cotton
and tobacco districts of the South was October
19th. It will be seen from these data, there-
fore, that the country has so far escaped this
fall from the usual severe visitations of frost in
the Central, Eastern and Southern sections.
Although a delay of these visitations is not al-
ways followed by a mild winter, and early
heavy autumn frosts do not always indicate a
cold winter, the period of their first occurrence
is rightly held to be significant and of some
predictive value. Judging by this test we may
hope to escape a winter of intense rigor.

The March of Malaria.
The recent reports of the commissions and
scientific bodies, like the Board of Health, giv-
ing the results of careful and extended inves-
tigations, notably the papers of Dr. Chamber-
lain, of Hartford, and Dr. Adams, of Pitts-
field, though marked by the habitual caution
in generalization and inference which charac-
terizes the scientific mind, make it plain to
common sense that the fever, in its several


- -- ~---r~-c- ~------p-------arslL~-- ,, -----.-- ~-~ab.,n ------- ------ ------ ------.---- . i'


I


marshes, clings to artificial lakes or ponds,
riots by the banks of sunken streams and works
its burning and shivering damage most ma-
lignantly where the normal mutual relations
between soil, vegetable matter and stagnant or
moving water have been unsettled. Mention
is made of some compact rural populations
near foul mill ponds, where half the inhabi-
tants have been down at once. Speculation as
to causes, as might be expected, has been busy.
What causes of malaria exist now which were
non-existent, or in abeyance, so long prior to
this late day ? Not only is science shy of hasty
conclusions, but property, too, has its self-pre-
serving instincts, and the mill owners and man-
ufacturers are not unwilling to have a part, at
least, of the curse rest on other shoulders than
their own. What then arethe new conditions ?
Railroads and tobacco culture are two. The
railways are apt to open the surface on low
ground, and if there were enough of them it
might happen that an unwholesome- gas escap-
ing would affect the workmen, as it is said the
upturning of acres of old sod on building lots
affects the health of the people in the upper
part of the Island of New York. But there
are altogether too many railways where there
are no chills and too many chills where there
are no railways, to allow much plausibility to
this theory. It fails twice over. Much of the
same may be said of the tobacco fields. The
idea that the sickness comes of fertilizers used
for tobacco raising has even less support, for
that nuisance is of but a very brief annual con-
tinuance, and is far from being conterminous
with the malady. So far as the great forces of
nature are concerned, not much can be done in
the way of remedy. If, as there is some reason
to think, there is a constant shrinkage going on
in rivers, fountains, brooks and lakes, with a
diminished rainfall throughout this part of the
country, all we can do about that is to employ
every personal effort to remove or deodorize the
stench breeding and fever breeding matter
along the banks and to increase our forests by
planting or protection, as many thoughtful
land owners are now doing and as the late for-
estry convention in Montreal leads us to hope
may be done more and more. There are thous-
ands of citizens who, with only a moderate out-
lay, can stanch, on their own premises at least,
the offensive sources of pain and death-for,
though not regarded as ordinarily fatal, fever
and ague sometimes takes a congestive form or
otherwise overmasters the vital power, in spite
of the best treatment, and the patient dies.
Dwellers in bad climates study the laws of san-
itary safety and heed them. Out of door
night air can, to a great extent, be avoided.
Fires can be built evening and morning. The
human system can be kept free, vigorous and
protected by right living, temperance and flan-
nels. Some physiologists think a fine wire
gauze at open windows may keep out the spores.
A line of thick trees with underbrush has been
supposed to arrest them. There is plenty of
proof that good drainage counteracts this as it
does other kinds of sickness.-Boston Herald.





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 5-


The first appearance of cotton as an article
of commerce was a shipment of seven bales
from Charleston in 1757. In 1880-'81 the crop
was 6,600,000 bales.
A gallon of milk is said to have a food value
equal to two pounds of beef. But farmers at
the North sell milk for ten or twelve cents a
gallon, and buy beef at twenty-five and thirty
cents per pound.

Ashes should never be thrown upon manure
heaps nor mixed with any kind of manure, as
the caustic potash liberates the ammonia, which
is very difficult to save. Therefore, spread
ashes immediately upon the land, whether grass
or cultivated.
Many farmers injure their farm implements
more by exposure to the weather than by use
on the farm. An implement which with good
care would last twenty years will, when ex-
posed to the weather, become useless in five
years or even less. A farm cart which, with
good usage, would last almost a lifetime, will
IC,0 w.: r I4- w"hn 1" n ,rnospd to the sun.
THE ORANGE PROSPECT.-Our advices from
the Northern market in regard to oranges are
"that the orange crop is short in the European
countries as well as in the West Indies; that
the apple crop is short in the Northern States,
and that we may confidently look for better
prices this year than last." This report is en-
couraging, especially as it is thus far backed
up by actual returns for fruit forwarded, and
we hope the present short crop may bring nearly
the same amount of money that last year's
crop did. One thing, however, adds greatly to
the selling value of our fruit and vegetables,
and that is having neat and attractive shipping
packages, for it is a well-known fact that the
appearance of the boxes and the manner of
packing the fruit has almost as much to do
with its sale as the fruit itself. The eye needs
to be pleased as well as the taste in all produc-
tions that are not strictly indispensable. In "old
times," or at the start in orange and vegetable
growing it was next to impossible to produce
suitable boxes, as none were brought here and
none manufactured at home; but at the present
time there can be no such excuse to offer as the
supply of first-class box stuff is ample and
cheap, and the grower who attempts to ship his
fruit in bulk or home-made crates, makes a
mistake.-Putnam County Journal.




COMPOTE OF ORANGES.-Pare. the rind of
three oranges as thinly as possible, and set it on
one side; divide the fruit into halves, remove
the pithy cord which is in the centre, and cut


off the rind and pith in strips down to the quick.
leaving the halves of the oranges transparently
bare; dish them up in a high compote glass.
Throw the rind, cut off first of all, into four
ounces of sugar, boiled with a gill of water for
five minutes. Strain this syrup into a basin,
add a small glass of brandy, pour over the com-
pote and serve.
QUAIL ON ToAST.-Dry-pick them, singe
them with paper, cut off heads and legs at first
joint, draw, split down the back, soak in salt
and water for five or ten minutes, drain and
dry with a cloth, lard them with bacon or but-
ter, and rub salt over them, place on boiler and
turn after dipping two or three times into


melted butter; broil about twenty minutes.
Have ready as many slices of buttered toast as
there are birds, and serve a bird, breast up-
ward, on each slice.
CREAM OYSTERS.-Fifty shell oysters, one
quart of sweet cream, butter, salt and pepper
to taste. Put the cream and oysters in their
own liquor, and let them come to a boil; when
sufficiently cooked, skim; then take them out
the liquor and put into some dish to keep
warm. Put the cream and liquor together.
Season to taste and thicken with powdered
cracker. When thick, stir in the oysters.
STEAMED FIsH.-Place tail of fish in its
own mouth and secure it, lay on plate, pour
over it a half pint of vinegar seasoned with
pepper and salt; let stand an hour in the re-
frigerator, then pour off the vinegar, and put
in a steamer over boiling water; steam twenty
minutes, or longer if the fish is very large,
(when done the meat easily parts from the
bone); drain well and serve on a napkin gar-
nished with curled parsley.
TTHw TO PLTTCK POULTRY.-I have known
persons on market day to go out and kill twelve
or fifteen fowls and to bring them into a room
where there would be half a dozen women and
boys pulling a few feathers at a time between
their thumb and forefinger, to prevent tearing
them. Now for the benefit of such I will give
our plan: Hang the fowl by the feet by a
small cord; then with a small knife give one
cut across the upper jaw, opposite the corners
of the mouth. After the blood has stopped
running a stream, place the point of the knife
in the groove in the upper part of the mouth,
run the blade up into the back part of the
head, which will cause a twitching of the
muscles. Now is your time, for every feather
yields as if by magic, and there is no danger of
tearing the most tender chick. Before he at-
tempts to flap you can have him as bare as the
day he came out of the egg.-Journal of Horti-
culture.
SALTPETRE FOR GARBAGE WORMS.-A. B.
Howard, of Massachusetts, says: "A friend of
ours, who grows cabbages extensively for mar-
ket, has found that saltpetre dissolved at the
rate of one and a half to two ounces to a gallon
of water, and applied with a sprinkler, will
completely banish the European cabbage worm.
It has proved not only a sure cure for this nui-
sance, but a special fertilizer in stimulating an
increased growth of plant.
DENTIFRICE.-Honey mixed with pure pul-


verized charcoal is said to be excellent to
cleanse the teeth and make them white. Lime-
stone water is very good to be occasionally
used by those who have defective teeth or an
offensive breath.
What waste, what misery, what bankruptcy,
come from all this ambition to dazzle others
with the glare of apparent worldly success, we
need not describe. The mischievous results
show themselves in a thousand ways-in the
rank frauds committed by men who dare to be
dishQnest, but do not dare to seem poor; and
in the desperate dashes at fortune, in which the
pity is not so much for those who fail, as for the
hundreds of innocent families who are so often
involved in their ruin.-Samuel nSiles.


PINCHING BACK SQUASHEs.-The report of
the Ohio State Horticultural Society quotes an
experiment in pinching back the main shoots of
squashes and melons. One squash plant sent out
a single stem reaching over 40 feet, but did not
bear any fruit. Another was pinched back,
producing many side-shoots within eight feet,
and it bore sixteen squashes. A muskmelon
plant, kept thus within bounds, had twenty-
three melons. The narrator estimates the gain
by pinching to amount to 100 barrels on an
acre. The cases mentioned, if correctly re-
ported, were obviously extreme ones, but the
experiment is well worth repeating.
We must distinguish between felicity and
prosperity; for prosperity leads often to ambi-
tion, and ambition to disappointment.-Lan-
dor.



Florida Dispatch Line.
NEW YORK, November 13, 1882.
Receipts of oranges via Florida Dispatch
Line and Southern Express Co., week ending
11th inst., 5,200 packages. Florida fruit com-
ing mostly green, and selling from $3 to $5 per
box ; Jamaica oranges, from $6 to $7 per bar-
rel.
Respectfully, C. D. OWENS,
General Agent.
aecksonville Wholesale Prices.
Corrected weekly, by JONES & BOWEN, Wholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.
FRUITS-
SUGARS-Granulated...................................... 101
White Ex. C.............................
Golden C......................................... .... 81
Powdered............................................. 11
Cut Loaf............................................... 11
COFFEE, Rio-Fair.... .......... ...........
Good.......................................... 10
Choice.......................................... 11
Best...................... ................ .. 12
Java 0. ............................................... 18%
M ocha ................................................... 5
Peaberry.............................................. 18
M aracaibo........................................... 18
Any of above grades roasted to order
FLOUR-Snow Drop, best, patent....................... 8 00
Snow Drop, best, no patent............. 7 50
Oreole, 2d best....................................... 7 25
Pearl, 3d best........................................ 7 00
Orange Co., No. 1.................................. 6 50
MEATS-Bacon............................................... 15 to 15%
Hams (Merwin & Sons).................. 18
Shoulders............................................. 1t
HoMINY-Pearl, per bbl.............................. 5 25
M EAL-per bbl................................................... 5 25
LARD-Refined in pails.................................... 14.
BUTTER-Very best, kegs (on ice)................... 35 to40
CHEESE-Full cream.......................................... 15
Half cream....... ........... 13.
TOBACCo-Smoking-"the Boss" Durham Vs
anda 4s.................................... 32
"The Boss" Durham 1 lb pkge......... 30
"Sitting Bull" D. (genuine)-........ 50
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) s ........... 75
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) s ............ 49
Plug-"Shell Road" 4 plugs to lb., 30
lb boxes...................................... 55
"Florida Boys" 5 plugs to Ib., 30 lb
boxes...............................................
"Florida Girls"-Bright twist, 14 to
lb., 17 lb boxes.......................... 60
Cigars-"Long Branch"a very pop-
ular brand, per thousand......... 27 00
"Our X," choice cigar, easy smok'r 24 00
"Our XX," a very choice smoker.... 26 00
"Florida Boys," (we areState Agt,) 35 00
SOAP AND STARCH-Colgate's 8 oz., per boat.. 3 50
SPeerless, 8 oz., per box....................... 3 50
Starch, lump, per lb.............................. 6 c
HoPs, YEAST CAKES. BAKING POWDERS-


Hops, per lb................................... 15@22c
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz .......... 60c
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
doz. 1 b...................................... .... .... 2 25
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. 1 b. 2 25.
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. I lb..... 2 70
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. :4 lb...... 1 50
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOEs-Irish, per bbl., new.......................... 3@3 25
CHICKENS, each:............................. 20@40
EGGS-Per doz..................................................... 28@32
HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lb., first class 13
Country Dry Salted, per lb..................... 9@11
Butcher Dry Salted, per lb................... 9@10
Damaged Hides..................................... 6
Kip and Calf, 81bs. and under................ 10
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb......................... 35
Deer Skins Salted, per lb...... ............... 26@30
FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter....................................................... 150@ 4 00
Raccoon, each....... ...................... 5@15
Wild Cat, each................................. 10@20
FOX, each................................................ .. 5@15
BEESWAX-per lb................................................. 20
WOoL-Free from burs, per lb............................. 17@22
Burry, per lb..... ................................ 11@15
GOAT SKINS-Each per lb.................................. 10






;BO ..... TIrI FLO i DA D -1 SPA TC If. --


JACKSONVILLE, NOVEMBER 20, 1882.
D. Redmond, D.H., Elliott, W.H. Ashmead,
__ EDITORS.
Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.
RATES OF ADVE.RTISIING,
PAl) IXTN AD.VANqCE.T[
SQUARES. 1 TI.T A. 1 NO. 3 MO. 6 MO. 1 YEAR
One............1....0....... 50 6 50 .l0 00 S 1860
Two ................... 2 00 .5 00 10 00 18 34 00
Three..................... 700 1400 25 4600
Four.................... .00 9 00 .17 50 3000 58 00
Five .............. ... .4 50 1100 9 00 3500 65 00
Eight.... 8 00 15 0 850 00 100 00
Sixteen... ......... 16 00. 00 8000 150 00
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven wordA to 'line) 20. Cents
per line.

CIR CULA TION.
This paper has the largest circulation of any
paper (daily or weekly) published in Florida,
with a very large tcniat int in (Giorgia and the
Southern States; also has subscribers in every
State in the Union, with many in foreign coun-
tries. After October 23d, we shall issue weekly
from 8,000 to 10,000 copies, about 40,000 per
month. .
SPECIAL NOTICE.
Persons are warned against, paying subscrip-
tions to any one calling himself our Agent, as
we have no regular caauassing agent.

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA
FR UIT GR O WERS' ASSOCIA TION.

Special Club Rates with "The Dispatch."
We have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
following publications, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt of price, for ONE YEAA :
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH AND
American Agriculturist......... ...... .$2.00
Atlantic Monthly. Magazine.........:...... ..... 4.20
Country Gentleman .... ............ ....... 2.75
Detroit Free Press......:..: ...................... 2.50
Eclectic Magazine....................... ........... 4.20
Florida Agriculturist........ ......... ..... ..2.25
Florida W eekly.Union...... ............... ....... 2.25
Florida W eekly Times ................................ 1.50
Family Story Paper............................ .........-50
Fireside Companion........... ............ 3.35
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly......... ... 4.20
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4,20
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly.................. 3.40
Frank Leslie's Sunday Magazine........ ...... 3.40
Harper's Illustrated Weekly............ .......... 4.20
Harper's Illustrated Bazar......................... 4.20
Harper's Illustrated Young People................... 2.20
Harper's Monthly Magazine...................... 4.20
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine ..................... 3.40
Nebraska Farmer............... .,. ......... 2.00
North American Review............................ 5.20
New York Weekly Sun............................... 1.75
New York Weekly Herald........................ 1.75
New York Weekly Tribune...................... 2.50
New York Weekly Times ........:......:........... 1.75
New York Weekly World....................... 1.75
New York Ledger ......... ............... .......... 3.35
New York Weekly ................................. 3.35


Popular Science Ionthly...................,.... 5.20
Philadelphia Weekly Times.......................... 2.50
Southern Cultivator.................................... 2.00
Scientific American.................... .......... 3.75
Saturday Night..................... .................... 3.35
Savannah Weekly News........................... 2.50
The Century Monthly Magazine (Scribner's).... 4.20
W averly Magazine....... ........... ........ .... 5.20
The above are among the Very best publications"
Remittances should be sent by Check, Money Order,
or Registered Letter, addressed to
ASI1HMlEAD BROWS,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
NE W AD VERTISBEMEN'TS.
Music.-L. P. Bissell & Co., Cleveland, 0.
Real Estate for Sale.-W. N. Jackson, Esperahce, Fla.
Real Estate for Sale.-W. P. Couper, b. E. Lowell, W.
N. Jackson, Esperance, Fla.
Real Estate for Sale.-James E. Ingraham, Sanford,
Fla.
Real Estate for Sale.-W. W. Dewhurst, St. Augus-
tine Fla.
Telegraph Taught.-C. E. Jones & Bro., Cincinnati, 0.
Nurseries.-L. A. Hardee, Jacksonville Fla.
Guano.-C. D..Duancan, Jacksonyllle,. Fla. .


Splendid Citrus Fruits.
Rev. LYMAN PHELPS, of Sanford, sends us
from his own grove, "Lake Onora," and also
from the celebrated "Belair" grove, of Gen.
Sanford, a very fine and rare collection of cityrs
fruits, among which the following oranges, &c.,
are worthy of special mention : Maltese Oval,
Navel, Sweet Seville, Italian, Mandarin, Du
Roi, Canton Pomelo, Limonium Longifolium,
and other choice Lemons, etc., etc.
All these specimens, are fine, and some sur-
passingly so.. The Canton Pomelo strikingly
resembles, or is identical with the so-called
"Pink Shaddock." One of these specimens
measured twenty-one inches in circumference,
and had, somewhat the flavor of a ripe black-
berry. The oranges were not fully ripe, and
therefore not in fair testing condition, but
many were of very superior quality, and all
showed skillful culture and careful packing. Mr.
Phelps says the Pamelo "grew on sand as white
as ever seen in Florida," and that "the ground
has not been spoiled by muck--has simply had
Forester's Fertilizers."
In regard to varieties of the orange, &c.,
Mr. Phelps remarks: "I am sure there are
varieties of the orange we have not yet ob-
tained, that are superior to any we now have
in 'Florida.' You spok
about varieties, and the danger of having too
many. In time they will be weeded down to
only a few. None of the varieties have been
cultivated long enough for us to say positively
which are best adapted to our wants."
We return our best thanks to Mr. Phelps for
his thoughtful kindness, and hope to see some
of the fine and rare products of "Belair" and
"Lake Onora" at our coming State Fair.
Mr. S, H. BACON, of San Mateo, will also
please receive our thanks for a really splendid
specimen of the Navel orange, weighing
twenty-seven ounces. "Next ?"

Orange County Fair.
. The Orange County Fair Association holds
its Fifth Annual Fair at Sanford from the 21st
to the 24th of February next. We have re-
ceived the Fair Bulletin and Premium List,
and find the latter quite full and cominprehen-
sive. Among the fruits for which prizes are
offered, we notice the Pine-apple, Date, Ban-
ana, Avocado Pear, Sugar Apple, Custard Ap-
ple, Paw-paw, Sapodilla, Japan Persimmon,
etc., etc. The arrangements for the Fair are
evidently in the hands of men who understand


their business, and we wish the Association the
most. abundant success. The Corresponding
Secretary, D. L. WAY, Esq., has our thanks
for complimentary tickets.

WE call especial attention of our readers to
the advertisement of the Honey Moon Nurse-
ries, in this issue of THE DISPATCH. The pro-
prietor, Col. L. A. HIardee, is the Pioneer nur-
seryman of Florida, and has undoubtedly the
largest nursery in the South, comprising, as it
does, one hundred acres. He grows all the im-
portaIt varieties of the orange and other semi-
tropical fruit trees, plants, etc. As an old
friend of the publishers, we recommend him
to those desiring nu-rsery stock.


- -- i


ularly pointed as those of a Spangled Hamburg
or Sebright Bantam. But we have one very
superior young cockerel, carrying a pea-comb
as marked and distinct as a Light Brahma.
Now, we respectfully ask our Northern fan-
ciers how we are to classify these unique and
beautiful fowls? They are too large and fine
to go into even the "Improved American Domi-
nique" class, ,and seem to possess all the good
"points" of the Plymouth Rock, with the added
beauty of the rose-and-pea-combs. We will
gladly give all of them we can obtain a "local
habitation," if our brethren of the Poultry Press
will furnish "a name."
Small orange grove and house only $1,000.
A rare chance. Read W. W. Dewhurst's ad-
vertisement.


Plymouth Rocks-"Pea Combs" and "Rose
Combs."
In Stoddard's able and interesting work 9n
"Plymouth Rocks," (elsewhere. noticed), we
find the following suggestive passages-p. 25:
"The experiment of attaching a pea comb
instead of a single one has been, we believe,
tried in several instances with more or less suc-
cess, and quite recently a breeder advertised
Pea-combed Plymouth Rocks under the title
of 're-improved.' We have been unable, how-
ever, to obtain any reply to our inquiries as to
how the pea-comb was obtained, and whether it
is firmly fixed as a characteristic.
"Whatever the success or failure of the ex-
periment in this particular case, the desirability
of a race of pea-combed Plymouth Rocks is so
evident that we may expect, in a very few
years, a number of strains of the variety."
It will be seen, by reference to our paper of
last week, that the expectations of Mr. Stod-
dard have been fully realized. Mr. Seth
Rowley, Sr., of Mound City, Kansas, has suc-
ceeded, after experimenting several years, in
producing a breed of Rose-combed .Plymouth
Rocks, which were briefly described on. page
532, DISPATCH, November 13th, thus:
"We have Dominique fowls from the yard of
Col. Rowley, which are equal in size, form, uni-
formity of color, &c., to the very best Ply-
mouth Rocks-differing from these;only in
having double or-rose-combs, and a lighter cql-
ored plumage. Col. Rowley is an old and very
skillful breeder of fowls, and has produced
some of the finest we have ever seen."
We used the word "Dominique" in speaking
of the Rowley fowls, because we found the word
thus applied in Harker's Poultry Bulletin ;
but these Kansas Dominiques (?) are as far
superior in size, to the ordinary "Standard
American Dominiques" as these latter are to
the Hamburgs and Leghorns. Col. Rowley
sent us last fall, a rose-combed cock and two
hens of his improved breed,, and, in the same
cage, two Plymouth Rock hens of excellent
quality. The rose-combed cock, in fair order,
weighed ten pounds and eight otnces,(10lbs. 8oz.)
and the hens, each between seven and. eight
pounds-weights, we think, too great for profit.
The rose-combed fowls were superior in nearly
all desirable "points" to their companions, (the
Plymouth Rocks,) and their progeny has stis-
tained this superiority-the cocks, especially,
being far handsomer and finer than any of the
single-combed Plymouth Rocks we have ever
raised. Most of the young cocks (Rowley
strain) have high rose-combs, extending far
back from the crown, and as beautifully and reg-


wp


~IC~





ItHE FLORIDA DISPA TC IIr. .


Nansemond Potatoes for the North.
We have never succeeded in raising a satis-
factory crop of the Nansemond sweet potato in
Florida, but some of our neighbors, it appears,
have been more fortunate. The South Florida
Journal says: "Mr. J. W. Wellington has
been experimenting with the Nansemond sweet
potato, and has been so successful that he has a
large crop of them this year. After testing
their quality we do not hesitate in pronouncing
them the best potato in size, color and flavor
that comes to this market."
And John Simons, the well-known commis-
sion merchant, touching the glut of sweet pota-
toes in the Georgia markets, said to an Atlanta
Constitution reporter: "The trouble is they have
not planted the potatoes that will sell in the
Western markets. Our Georgia yam, while it is
the sweetest and best potato I know of, will not
ship well or sell well. What they want is the
Jersey potato, something like our Spanish po-
tato. It is white, (?) mealy and dry, resembling
the Irish potato in these points.. This potato is
a standard article in the Northwest and always
in demand. I have seen them sell at $5 to $7
a barrel in the Western cities.
Will it grow well in Georgia?"
"Yes. Commissioner Henderson has tried
it and so has Mark Johnson. It thrives well.
here and ships well, and sells high and steadi-
ly. It does not.produce as heavily as our
yams, but it ripens a month sooner, and thus
brings more money. In your article on pota-
toes some time since you warned the public
that the ordinary Georgia yam would not sell
well in the great cities. That is so. I have
tried it faithfully. This potato is what we
need."
"Savannah Guano Company."
A noticeable and very important feature in
the mode of putting their fertilizer before the
public, has been adopted by the Savannah
Guano Company," whose advertisement ap-
pears in present number. It will be observed
that each sack put upon the market bears the
tag of the Fertilizer Inspector appointed by the
State of Georgia-thus furnishing the customer
with some criterion of the contents and manu-
rial value. We commend to our Florida law-
makers this laudable attempt of a sister State,
to protect the interests of the agricultural com-
munity; and we suggest to our experimental
friends one trial, at least, of this guaranteed
fertilizer.
"Champion" of Florida.
The "North and South," one of the most
valued of our new exchanges, kindly says :


Florida has been fortunate in the possess-
ion of numerous champions, who have heralded
her resources to all parts of the world, but in
none has she found an abler one than in the
FLORIDA DISPATCH, published at Jacksonville
by Ashmead Bro's. THE DISPATCH is a hand-
some sixteen-page paper, published weekly, at
$1.00 a year."
The North and South" is a very neat
monthly, somewhat on the plan of the old
" Florida New- Yorker." It is devoted to Im-
migration, and the Agricultural, Manufacturing
and Industrial Resources of the South ;" and
is published at 191 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y., at
the very low price of 60 cents per year. Send
for a sample copy.


[ESTABLISHED 1866.]

E. ROBERTS & BRO., COMMISSION MERCHANT'.
FLORIDA FRUIT AND PRODUCE A SPECIALTY.
226 AND 228 NORTH DELAWARE AVENUE, PHILADELPHIA, PA.
OUR MOTTO: Quick Sales and Prompt Returns,
nov 13-tf We ask a trial. STENCIL PLATES FREE.


W 8aynlnan a un0R company, of ....ai
I....
Importers anzd. Ofaxufacturers of E-igh -rade 3eor-
tillzers, Offer for Sale lIeir
Golden Fruit Fertilizer,
A strictly first-class Manure prepared specially for Florida Oranges.

"'OT7C1 0 X ,7"T," for Florida Market Gardeners and Farmers, is highly anm-
moniated.
Also ENGLISH ACID PHOSPHATE for composting pure dissolved Bone. KAINIT,
COTTON SEED MEAL, pure BIRD GUANO,
MURIATE OF POTASH, &c.
Each sack bears the Inspection tag of the State of Georgia, which shows that it has passed
under the rigid inspection laws of that State, and is a guarantee that the Guano is what the
Analysis on the sack represents. No other brands in this State furnish such a reliable guar-
antee of their merits to the purchaser.
Send for Circular. 0- D. DIT"C,7"TC.&ITd ,
to may20-83 Jacksonville, Fla., General Agent for Florida.

ENLAR GEMENT.
On and after January 1st, 1883, this paper 10 l n
will be enlarged to 20 pages, printed on extra THE PIONEER NURSERY of FLORID)A.
superfine calendered book paper, and the yearly ONE HUNDRED ACRES IN STOCK.
subscription price raised from $1 to $2 per an- THE SWEET ORANGE A SPECIALT'Y.
num. Catalogue sent free on application. Address
This will enable the publishers to make im- to feb20,'83 L. A.HARDEE,
portant changes, increase the number of illustra. a
tions, insure a higher degree of typographical ex- AN $Soo HOUSE, 60 acres hammock and pii
and mae it s d o o p r of lk a f land, 300 orange trees in grove well
cellency, and make it second to no paper of like advanced, few bearing. Price $1,000. Rare chance for
character in the United States. new settler.
We shall still continue to take yearly subscript W. W. DEWHURST,
tions until January at one dollar. Save money St. Augustine, Fla.
and subscribe before that time. N. B.-Lettors will not be answered unless stamp is
All present subscribers will receive paper until enclosed. to feb20, 'W3
the expiration of their subscription. If you want to become a telegraph operator senudtwen-
- -- *ty-five cents to C. E. JONES & BRO., Cincinnati, Ohio, for
Oranges in Chicago. best illustrated instruction book. eow to July20-S:
Special Telegram to The Florida Dispatch:
CHICAGO, Nov. 18, 1882. Lands in Middle and South Florida,
Choice, well-packed Florida Oranges selling -ON THE-
at $5 to $5.50 per box. TRANSIT,
SHIGLEY & SMITH. FLORIDA SOUTHERN
PERSIMMON GROVE.-E. G. HILL, Esq., of and SOUTH FLORIDA
Lawtey, Fla., has two hundred Japan Persim- ___ RAIL ROADS.
mons in grove, and will soon be able to test the Lands tor Orange Groves,
market value of this fine new fruit. It will be ands fetor 'Tneruk Garden inu.
recollected that Mr. Hill is. the gentleman who -a o
sent us the wonderful cluster of seventeen Per-
simmons, a picture of which graced the first Fin-:e u l. ~.ig. Sites
page of THE DISPATCH of October 30. IN THE FLOURISHIING TOWN OF SANFORD.


JAPAN PERSIMMONs.-Captain R. R. Reid Sanford is rapidly Growing, and we have somr,
presented us with a Japan persimmon raised on VERY CHOICE LOTS on
his lot, the tree of which produced twenty-four the Market.
of as fine as ever grew. The persimmon is four Market.
Inclies In leng uili, six llice ILUn lr cuuAiii n Sanford has Churches, Schools, ilroads,
and three inches in diameter. A slight frost Sanr-sford has Churches, Schools, ailroaters,
matures them. The one on our desk is pretty W orks and all the advantages of an
much the shape of an egg, and is about the Works and all the advantages of an
color of a tangierine orange. It is quite a curi- :ES E _:ErT 0 0-'3Y-l l ".
osity. Verily, if Florida keeps on in develop- For full particulars, address
ing new varieties, there is no telling the end of JAMES E. INGRAHAM, Gen. Agt.,
her prosperity.-Palatka Herald. In regard Lands n Middle Sanord, Orange Co., Fla.
[All correct, Bro. Herald, except your state- JOHN E. LAMBETH, Local Agent,
ment about the frost. We have often had ripe nov2O-tf Gainesville, Fla.
Japan Persimmons the last of September or PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
early in October, long before the faintest breath VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
of Old JackPATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
of Old Jack is ever felt in this region.-EDs.] TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.







55 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
k -------------------------------------------------------- ---- - - ------------------------------------------


FLORIDA DISCOVERY.
N CAT A EVERY DRUGGIST IN THE STATE
WILL BE SUPPLIED.
It kills Ants, Roaches, Mice and Rats. Nothing ever
before offered has half the merit. Any Druggist In
Jacksonville will supply you.
CONE WILLIAMS,
Manufacturer and PRoprietor,
oct 30-tf [P. 0. Box 126.] JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

A. N. DOBBINS & BRO.,












Gm, Locsmilths ani tUc Cnlte r,

24 LAURA STREET,
JACKSON VIILLE - FLOQERIDA,
_unsmithing done in all its branches.
G IRON SAFE WORK.
Special rates on Stencil Cutting, by mail. Address,
to June 12 '83, (P. O. 0. ox m 33.)


6a


Ni



tt
U


to sept 1


to dec 30, '82.


Kieffer.Pear. Jap. Persimmon. LeConte Pear.
Cuttings and Trees FOR SALE. More
I5O)OOO trees in orchard than any five growers
of the LECONTE PEAR. Apply to head quarters.
W.W. W. THO1MPSONT, Prop'r.,
LeConte Nursery, Smithville, Ga.
SEND FOR CATALOGUE. oct 23-tf


BRADLEY'S ORANGE
We have prepared this Fertilizer
especially for the culture of the or-
ange tree, and from the results al-
ready obtained from its use on the
orange groves of Florida, we feel
justified in claiming that it cannot
be surpassed, if equalled, by any
other fertilizer.
It is composed of the purest and
highest grade materials, combined
in such proportions as to furnish all
the elements of plant-food in prop-
er quantities and in the best form
to promote a rapid and strong
growth of the wood and insure an
abundant yield of fine fruit.
A sufficient proportion of its -
phosphoric acid, being readily sol-
uble in cold water, is immediately
,available as food for the young
rootlets of the tree, while a consid-
erable portion, being present in the
form of pure ground bone, undis-
solved by acid, becomes entirely
soluble iii the soil only by the ac-
tion of the elements of nature in
due course of time. Thus this all
important food is not soon ex-
hausted by the tree, or washed into
the ground by heavy rains, but is
supplied in abundant quantities


TREE


FERTILIZER.
throughout the season.
The nitrogen and potash also are
furnished in the most nutritious
forms and approved proportions
for this crop.
After giving this Fertilizer a
thorough trial of three years on or-
ange trees in Florida, we intro-
duced it last season quite exten-
sively throughout the State, and
the results have even exceeded our
most sanguine expectations. We
have yet to hear of a single instance
where the mostsatisfactory returns
have not been derived.
We have nothing to say about the
fertilizers manufactured or sold by
other parties, as we believe, with an
established reputation of twenty-
two years in the manufacture of
high grade fertilizers, we can stand
upon our own footing, without call-
ing the attention of the public to
the record of any of our competi-
tors, or to the value of their manu-
factures as compared with that of
our own. Our fertilizers are all an-
alyzed, when manufactured, by
competent chemists, and none are
shipped to market until they are
known to be up to the standard.


Manufacturers of the Celebrated


the Standard Fertilizer for all Field and Garden Crops, and especially adapted to the wants of the
Cotton Crop.
MAIN OFFICE, 27 KILBY STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.
For further particulars and pamphlets giving testimonials from some of the best orange growers in the
State, address,
A. M. BECIK, General Agent for Florida,
to oct 9. '83. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


Wholesale Dealers in



Foreign and Domestic Fruits.


COMMISSION MERCHANTS FOR THE SALE OF


Florida Oranges and Lemons,


167 South Water St.,


CHICAGO, ILL.


---0-------

*CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED
WF-REFERENCES.-First National Bank, Jacksonville, Florida. Union National Bank, Chicago, Illinois.
sept 4, tf.


FRANK W. MUMBY.


JNO. N. C. STOCKTON.


RAYMOND D. KNIGHT.


MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,


1879.
F. W. MUMBY & CO.


-- SUCCESSORS TO -

IMPORTERS AND WH LESALE AND RETAIL


1870.
JNO. S. DRIGGS & CO.


Crockery, China, Glass and Earthenware.

We have the largest and most complete stock in the State. All the Latest Novelties in Majolica and Fancy
Goods, Vases, Motto Cups and Saucers,, etc. Decorated Tea, Dinner and Chamber Sets in a large Variety. Lamps
and Chandeliers, Fancy Vase Lamps in Majolica, Faience, Kito, Porcelain and other Wares. Wood and Willow,
Stone and Tinware. The American, Crown and Peerless Ice Cream Freezers, Water Coolers, Filters, etc.
SOLE STATE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED


Monitor Oil Stoves and Little Joker Oil


Cans.


THE BEST IN THE WORLD. Send for Price Lists.
The best and only absolutely safe Oil Stove in the World. It is Economical, Ornamental, Convenient, Dura-
ble, Compact and Cheap. Its fuel is Coal Oil. No Dust! No Ashes! No Smoke! No Trouble! Testimonials
from those using the Stoves given on application.
Fruit Jars and Jelly Tumblers Wine Bottles, Flasks, etc. Special inducements to the trade.
Merchants, Hotels, Boarding houses and Bars will find it greatly to their advantage to give us a trial. Send
for list of assorted packages.
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD.
MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
13 WEST BAY S I-'E;BTr. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to July 5, '83. (Mention this paper)


ml


-- ~I~ I ~I I ~ ~~- se I ~ F-


I







tH L.D.....N.


WHOLESALE GROCERS,

AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


DRY HOP YEAST CAKES,


60c. PER


DOZ.


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND

SNOW-DROP PATENT FLOUR.

First hi-dOs o Fliiest a allt37

Best Butter in Tubs at 30o to 3x Cents per Pound,

2: =0E'T '02T 10iE-.A


No. 38 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida. tofeb5, '83
tf

Ij.and .A..gentts, Lisand Buyers ancl. .jaand O'wners, PLYV
AND EVERYONE INTERESTED IN FLORIDA LANDS, The great d
secure the ag(
Can be supplied with of his stock,v
T1 0 "T7 3 S 2 -a I"P M. .A. V S made from United States Surveys-scale F (
two inches tO the mile-with topography complete, for every township in EAST and
SOUTH FLORIDA, delivered, or sent by mail, for 50 cents each. I am also ao
(Postage Stamps Taken.)
D 1 iscou n3t to Dea er s. AMERICWA
EX PLANATIOA1N CARD sent with every Map, showing vacant lands and where to apply for
them to purchase.
Special 14ap of Counties, Cities and towns made to order.
.A=rcl.itectural Designs a specialty. and on receip
address. No o
My long connection with the Florida Land and Improvement Company (DISSTON PUR- without some
CHASE) is a guarantee of satisfactory work. Correspondence solicited.
Address T. T. I..V= EI:M .i Civil Engineer and Draughtsman, to feb 12, '83
Ofice with Florida Land and Improvement Co., cor. Pine and For-yth-Sts.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA. oct 23tf

ESTABLISHED 1860.

L. aEOIRGE & CO.,


General Commission


Merchants,


95 SOUTH WATER STREET, CHICAGO.

FLORIDA ORANGES AND VEGETABLES A SPECIALTY.
ItBFERENCES:-National Bank of Illinois, First National Bank, Commercial Agencies, or any Wholesale
Grocer in CHICAGO.


to apl 8, '83.


G. L. LAWRENCE & CO.,


Stencils furnished by J. C. LANIER,
LEESBURG, FLORIDA.


COMMISSION MERCHANTS,


FOR THE SALE OF


Oranges and all Florida Produce,


234 WASHINGTON STREET, NEW YORK.


QUICI SALES, LHOENEST RETURNS and C.
PReOMrPT REBMITTANC0ES.


REFER BY PERMISSION TO
Hon. S. B. CONOVER, Tallahassse; D. GREENLEAF, Esq., Jacksonville;
to jan. 30, '83 p. MESSRS. GOULD & Co., Jacksonville.
F.-- -S. CONEA. H MANILLE


F. S. CONE, A. H. MANVILLE,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent.
IANVVI LE N UN-RSER
Lake George, Florida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate.


E. A. HILL,
Treasurer.


ORANGE AND LEMON TREES A SPECIALTY.
Catalogue for 1882-3, just out, free on application. to apr 17, '83


REMOVED.
I have removed my seed store to No. 22 East Bay st.
next door to post-office, where I have the largest and
most complete stock of pure and fresh Seeds in the State
S. L. TIBBITTS,
to Dec. 8, '82 Jacksonville, Fla.


THIE ARCHER NURSERIES
Grow a general assortment of FRUIT TREES, with
some Ornamental Trees, Shrubbery,
Vines, &c. Our stock of
ORANGE TREES
is good; both Sweet Seedlings and Budded sorts on both
sour and sweet stocks. Some 8,000
LECONTE AND OTHER PEAR TREES,
one and two-year-old-fine.
A large number of JAPAN PLUM TREES, with'a few
hundred of the famous
JAPANESE PERSIMMON
on native stocks, &c.
ORANGE and PEAR GROVES made to order and
cultivated by the year for non-residents,
SEIND FOR PRICE LIST to
TIPSYJY & CHKISTIJ5.


Archer, Alachua Co,, Florida.


[OUTIH ROCKS.
emand for these fowls have induced me to
ency of Mr. A. C. HAWKINS for the sale
which has no superior. I can sell
)W L.S OR ECGGS,
is enormous establishment, at his prices.
gent for the
N POULTRY YARD
-AND THE-
POULTRY WORt-D,
t of stamp I will send sample copy to any
ne should undertake to RAISE POULTRY
good POULTRY PAPER.
It. W. PARIAMORE,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


FARM MILLS

| 10,000 3 Wa

BuGemer to SaNs MILL. o.
curCINOiATI. 0,


to Jan 30, '83.

RANGE GROVES AND

LAND NEAR JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,
FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN.
Choice lots for Residence, Gardens, etc.
Groves built and cared for and improvements made for
non-residents, by J. S. BELL
Real Estate Agent and Notary Public
to nov 5, '83. Reed's Block, Bay-st., Jacksonville, Fa.

FOR SALE.
A COMPLETE SET of Surveying Instruments, con-
sisting of a Six-inch Vernier Compass, a Fine Tele-
scope, a Compound Ball-socket -Engineer's Chain 100
feet, oval links, No. 8 best Steel Wire; Galvanized Iron
Stakes, and Jacob Staff, Steel Point. As good an outfit
as can repurchased in any market. For a bargain, ap-
ply to W. G. PARSONS
with L. I. STEPHENA
to nov 21 '82. Jacksonville, Fla.


NO. 49.
N. O. & T. P. RY.
(Cincinnati Southern.)


PASSENGERS AND SHIPPERS FOR
THE NORTH AND WEST
will consult their interests, and secure all needed infor-
mation, by calling at
No. 49 Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.

L. R. TUTTLE,
to nov 30, '83. Resident Agent.
GET RICH selling our Rubber Stamps and Music.
o Samples free. L. P. Bissell & Co., Cleveland, O.
to may2-1'83


ACER'S


,
.


TH FORbADIPACA


553







t 4f 1t A f i Sk rt.A 5fY1ss A q- .c

SAVANNAH,.FLOItDK WESTERN RAILWAY Oceaf BS C iannah.

W-AYCJO HOTLY LNE. S DAY.
I ... EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMISHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL.
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE 1 #ECT; TW YORE. W. "
Philadelphia steamers for ovember are appoittded to sail as follows:
S. FROM PHILADELPHIA:
lO W ill e. .- ...OFI C ............................ad a e t........o........................................................................Saturday, November 25th.
FROM SAVANNAH:
Fast Mail f.D Jac 'l Ex. Daily. RAPIDAN...... .. .. i.. ..... .......... .4. ...... .... aturda ,th at 7:00 o'clock a. m.
Leave- e- JUN IATA ................................................................................................. Tuesday, Novem ber 14th, at 8:00 o'clock p. m .
Jacksonville at 930 a. Jack o vile at. 5 p J NIATA.................................................................................................Saturday, November 25th at 7:00 o'clock a. m .
Xii Ar.ve- .. 4t ..rivew.- o a *f .....efpm. S
Jacksonvl(f at.. 5: m Op m 1ackoIson 1 lp at.. 7:30 a 0 air
? ata. 4Ni r 1s a in he a -etakesii Askehagers
Waycross at...... 2:05 p m runswick at......5:34 ain WM. L. JAMES,
Live Oak at......6pt yt 1Meon fat.............7: am 444-tf Agent, I., Tj iL Ehlad liia ,. i- Agentsat Savaunah.
New Branford. 8:30 p n hmiasvfleat... :) a min
Savannah at...... 3:40 p m Albany at..........11:15 m
CiarlesltonitP..e l n rtlis tat..r8:0pm eaCa S ited h -
kTlio nvillet Ci nc-iIt Nv w t .ant s at... 9:M) a m ArWITe N v b rt,: p I *
Albany at...........10:30 pni Loniville at.... -- i
New Orleans at..10:00 p m Olicago at.J...... 700n mc I
Nashville at........ 7:00 p in St. Louis 1tit.... Ir T pm n Novembea m..J
ew York at...... Q:50 New York at.i n3:50 p i ic New Iron teal hips sail from Savannah on following .dates:
l Aws orkAi.... APt er, Friday, N ovem ber 3d. < ,7M J
Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars on this Train from CITY OF SAVANAH, Capt. Catharine. Sunday, November .5th, 2:00 p. inm.
Jacksonville to Cincinnati via Atlanta and Cincinnati CITY OF MACON, Capt Kempton, Tuesday, November 7th, 3:30 p. inm.
Passengerarrivig by this train for Palatkaand he CITY MA t. on Friday, No ber 17t, :00 a m.
Florida Southern Ridroad, make close connection with CITY (F AUGUSTA, Capt. Nickerson, Sunday, ^ovemner 19th, 1:0h p. m.i
steamer at the Railroad wharf. TALLAAS, Cat.Fiher, Tuesday, iiiber 212t,hr00 p.4aW .. ...
.....ei ai l hlt .a i oaan a f i ,. ... (ITT O ;4AV&NNAh. Capt. tttirit, Fiday.No4Otaber 24th, 0G^^4. C .... "-
S.gh.rcs-ba. C : CITY OF. ACQN Capt. Kmpton, Supday, Novenmber 2(th,7:00.a.' -n
CITY OF AUGUWA,Capt.Nickersotin/uesdky. November 28th, 8.:30 ap. .
Leave Jacksonvile at,........ ......... ................11:) p TAIhA A E, apit. fisher, Friday, Deeeniber lst. 11:00L in. .
Arrive Jacksonville at................................ ..11:5 p I Through Bis of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Arrive Savannah at...................................... ..a a n allway, and close connections wa4h,,the new ai elgts ?tm s .o. Fl rida.
ArriveCharleston t .............. ................... Freight received every ay frdm m.to p m.,at ,- .. .. ,.- ,
At ri ve Washington at,,.............................. 1:00 p mi Hi ONGE, eve. .G. SO.IREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
A A, Nqu Y' or t........................................ 9:30 p n Agent or Line, aud C. IF. of Ga. Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. .SOItEL
ArltVe Atlnf'a ait:................ ... 12:10 p .W. 1i. R. HEI.'r, Genehl A e ,F Bodway, N'e.Yori ...... -
Arrive Cincinnati at................. ......... ....... 7:00p nii H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent.. i-* -r NS,
Arrive Chicagp at.............. ..............................12-2 Getl Ag't S v'li, Florida & stern t y. Co, 31i1l3roadway. Y. Y.
Arrive St. Louis at...... ....... ....................... .. ..
Pullman Pal-ace Sleepi Ct oiar this Tra in for Say- g h-oc
PsVenger-takmg the/night expc.s cai get tito thie (Ec n ge g
sleeping cars at 9 o'clock p. in. -, *'tW- -* *
A new Restauirant has been opened at Waycross, and L 0 ?-
abklgdI .or passmn-. 'i r,' :
Se 3 fo A A Ib A uded fr t d approved varieties, and
ContORANGE si~b ith U a ew York, n C L IVElIf I on good healthy stocks.
Pi !e pe ti Also, JAPAN PERSIMMON pI TE: ,EA S awrl general line of Fruit Trees suitable to
tlc apg n wai]m(fo r Nei e Florida. Address,

..... "t .. ..0.r ..-."3 : , -fe t y z arl o iOh c


-2>8To 7 OlaLrk Street, 01.icag0,
Comnissin Merchant P Florid a Oranges


.N1Q149 '.: .....e FIIQI'ida..... .. ..
0 t n iSo en. R E CE.-HLibernian banking Association, (hieago.
S;.' ... : :. < /('6 i-ti d d 'dlieft1d. No. 1 packing only solicited, to dec 5 82





tion, The sten of i pany are appnte
8 .4 4 &. t, LJ)A, A. -- .....






-" .. '0 ,...., EE:Y 1VEDN AY AND FRDVSATI i

JA7S? mL>/ 8 T s swa;. M;t,^^oA *lA|01^In hl^W^ma ^


....... .. i EVER Y TUESDAY AND FRIDAY, ANITA, Capt. C. H. Brock.
-"*1 i : ,' aAOne of the above-named steamers will leave De Bary
tie. R. TUTTLE, as follows: Wharf, foot of Laura Street, daily except Sunday, at
to nov 30, '83. Resident Agent. Tuesday, Novemnber.7A3,1tp. Il p. t., forPALATKA SNFORI), ENT ERP ISE, and
tonov30,83. Reent Agent. Friday, Novemnber 10th, at 7 " all intermediate lhndings.
.riduay, Nve er 1tati7a.m. ROSA ICapt. J. L. Amazeen.
Tuesday, November 14th at, 9:30 a.m. GEO. BIRD, Capti. J. Mercier.
'l'i nels Friday, November 17th, at 11 a. Nm. Steamer ROSA leaves De Bary Wharf every Sunday
Friday, November 21t, atit 3 a. m. t p.., nd very Wednosda t m fortaldve-
Fria yNoves e *1t, at, 6:3a. :k *named landings.
Oece DTRE n TNE ,,T d N v P r 11h, at 1V ,at.o ,' "ISteamer GEO. M. BIRD leaves De Bary Wharf every
ONLY. DIRECT. LJNE. r st 1a. . Tuesday and Friday at 5 p. m. for same landings.
Tuesday, Decenber 5th, at 2 p. ni. Connects at Palatka with Florida Southern Railroad
Transhipnment and extra handling avoided. Car' Friday, December 8th, at 3:30 p.. for Gainesville and Ocala.
TuesunloadedatwharfinSav h.Frs passeeraday, December 12th, at :30~ Co.onncts at Astor with St. John's and Lake Eustis
comnmodations. Tuesday, Decenmber 19th, at O1:3. lroaid for Ft. Mason, Yalahm, Leesburg and all points
' 1 m~nhL4Fiaew Iroy eebeamsl i, eceber 1 at 3:30 1. i. on the Upper Ocklawaha.
foonellow .... eut.l yiDece;ner 2lhu$1HI Connects at Volusia with coaches fpr Qrmond and
Gate ollowi ht te l ~ iybeceimbr 29th, at 10a. m n ( Connects Sanford with South Florid8a Railroad for
S'iy 6 lhuay t Cabin Passage, $15.00; .fdotUi Ubthl; flu"; Ro"ttd :Longwo6d, Maitland, Apopka City, Altemonte, Orlando,
City of tolumbus, thursday, October oth, at 2:00 p. m.- Trip (Cabin), $25.00. The Company reserve the right of Kissimmee, and with steamers for Lake Jessup, Salt
(ate, ot CTl uryd<, T, cOceb er At'h, 79: a. m changing the sailing days. Lake and Rock Ledge and Indian River.
t. tyol iirs, etober 9Akt 1 For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida 1 Connects at Enterprise with coaches for Daytona and
Gate City, Thursday, October 26th, at :P p. Illew Snyrna.
City of Columbus, Thursday, November 2d, at 12:30 p. m. FRUIT AND VEGETABLE, :SHIPPE4IS Returning, Mail Steamers leave Enterprise every
FIRST-CLA-SM OAli* PAk4AGASA*M AS TO NEW this company has arranged a special schedule, thero.y norn t 7_. m..sd for ari al o rain
S, YORK. i. /i / : perab re t a te o priip Ste a . ir wihllave terse ry
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents, o y Ile S-3md VUJI f[y ru rorThur SuS aua. nb a i .
F. W. NICKERSON & CO., Savannah, Ga. I Steamer Rosa leaves Enterprise exery Friday at 5 p. m.
GWNeraL &Sevats, oston. By this route shippers are assurei ltl AlltRely go.o40 i4hli* ou bilsbf hladting given to all points.
'* .a g ; : it o GEO. V. HAINES wil receive careful handling and quickd ispatch. The steamers of this-line are all first-class in every
44-tf Agent S., F. and W. Ry., Agent Jacksonville Rates of freight by this route will be found in.another res ct.
_____ column. lor further information, apy at General Ticket
"- ..,G, en -e, B~a. : .Lana d t.e.,j 1e-e & Alden,
SSubscribefor THE FLORIDA DISPATC L I a 21rel3iid O it e f n boar & Alden.
$1per ear. A. L. H G Agent, W. B. WATSON, Manager.
Long Dock, Baltimore, Md. 30-ti C. B. FENWICK, Gen. Pass. Agent. bug. 7-tf.






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 5


I'


FROM
JACKSONVILLE AND
CALLAHAN JUNCTION
TO


.~r 'g
~ 0

~4Q., ~Q


Macon .................................. 35 & 70 $61 25 Madison, Ind........................ 7511 50 125 00
Augusta ................................ 401 80 70 00 Jeffersonville, Ind.................. 751 2 50 12500
Atlanta ..............................40 80 70 00 Evansville, Ind...... .......... 75 150 125 00
Oolumbus, Ga ........ ........... 40 80 70 00 Cairo, Ill....... ...... ......... 75 50 125 00
Montgomery, Ala ...................40 80 70 00 Indianapolis ....................... 80 1 60 00
Mobile........................[50 1 00 87 50 Terre Haute................. 80 1 60 I0 00
Ohattanooga, Tenn............... 50 1 00 87 50 Columbus, Ohio.....................80 60 130 00
New Orleans.......................... 60 1 20 105 00 St. Louis..........................85 714 00
Nashville, Tenn ....................60 1 20 105 00 Chicago.................................:&5 1 9 0 140 00
Memphis, Tehn............1..........60 1 20 105 00 Peoria, Ill........................... 85,1l 70 140 00
LIouisville, Ky......................7... 1 40 115 00Cleveland ................. 9011 80 150 00
Cincinnati, Ohio.....................70 401116 00 Toledo......... ........................ 90 1 80 150 00
Henderson, Ky...... ............701 40 115 00 Detroit............................. 90 00
Columbus, Ky.........................701 40 11500Miwaukee.........
HIickman, Ky.......................... 7011 40115 00 ,_
The dimensions of the Standard Box for Oranges are 12x12x27 inches, and the
weight Is estimated at 80 pounds.
The Standard Barrel is double the capacity of the Standard Box
Excess of capacity over the above will be liable to pro rata exc4 of cs.ar "
The Car-load is estimated at 20,000pounds or 250 Standard Bo.ret. xoess o f.hi.s
amount will be charged for pro rata. Car-load shipments must be to one destina-
tion and to olne cotisignee.
Prioy'mont of freight will not be required, bpt goo. 6rder and condition of
s8ipn&f. will be an absolute .equikement. It i.i blkaii.. aiderstood between the
shippers and the transportation companies that no responsibility shall attach for
loss or damage, however occasioned, unless it be from negligence, and that such loss
must attach solely to the company upon whose line-such negligence may be located.
The above points are the only points to which rates are gnarantoed, an'd.to
wivich Bills Lading will be issued. The Bills Lading will be ianed only bythe
Agents of this Companyat Jacksonville and Callahan Junction, guaranteeing ~alte
from those points only.
The charges advanced by this-Line in good faith to connections at those points
will not be subject to correction by this Line.
Unless otherwise instructed by the shippers, the original Bill Lading will be
mailed theconsigee at destination, and all claims for ovet charge or loss and damage
must be presented at. destination, accompanied by the original Bill Lading.
Shipments of single packages charged double rates.
In every case the full name and address of consignee must be given for' isertton
in Bill Lading and on the Way-bill. .


FRO SAVANNAH. T CI N.
FROM
_Per_ Box- Per Bbl. Per Box. '"Per Bbl.
Jacksonville........................................ .... 25 50 5 60
Landings on St. Johns River............... 35 70 40* 75
Stations on Florida Transit R. R ........ 4 75 50 80
Tampa and Manatee............................. 70 1 0575 1 10
Stations on the J. P. & M. R. ...... 40 75 56 85
In Connection with direct Steamers of the Boston and Savannah Steamship Co.
S From From From
From Ld'gs on Florida Tampa I From
!Jackson-! St. Johns Transit and IF. C. & W
ville. River. R. R. Manatee.



Boston.... .............. ......... .. 5-0 0 20 65 i 9 50 %'.
In Connection with Steamships direct from Savannah. 4
S From W From From
SFrom L'd'gs onl Florida Tampa From
Jackson- :St. Johnsi Transit and F. C.&W.,
ville. | River. R. Manatee.

__ " __-- i s I
Boston via New York...........73 1 45 83 $St65 I 88 1 5 1i .~i5S-,'1 1 -6
Philadelphia.............................. 50 100 1 60 120 65 1 20 9N) 150 (5 25
Baltimore.......... ................ 0 100 60 120 65 1 20 9 50 65 125
Providence via New York ........ 65 1 30 75 I 1.50 S2 1 50 1 07 I 0 0 1 55


IN CONNECTION WITH STEAMSHIPS OF M-. M.
FROM SAVANNAH VIA BALTIMORE.


T. CO.


From ..
From Landings From From I From
Jaekson- on Florida Tampa I F. C.&W.
ville. St. Johns Transit and
TO River. R. R. Manatee.,
TO .......j 6... -- i .
i4 1 51 C

Boston......................... ......... 55 1 3 70" 30 8 95 1, i 70 i61 5
Providence ............................. 55 1 1 65 130 70 1 05 1 (0, 70 1 35
WA ngton........................... 60 1 00 70 1 20 80 2 1 05 1 5J. 65 1 25
TIo make rats rom Siations on Peninsular Railroad south of Ocala add 5 cents
per box and 10 cents per barrel to rat~e from stations on Tranitt Railroad.
Stoamship connection from Savarrtlah for New York every Tuesday and Friday.
For Boston every Thurs For Philadelphia every Saturday. For Baltimore
ue vaima(Id Fi), 7
4 ado e th inh 1at 1om points tributary, to the above, add the rates for
transportation lines connecting to above rates.
Shipments via New York will be charged at the current rates from that point,
with cost of transfer added.
Single packages will be charged$1 each to Boston, New York, Philadelphia and
Baltimore. If shipped beyond, they will be charged in addition the single package
rates of connecting lines and boost of transfer. tk .
Stencils, shipping receipts and information furnished on application to any of
the agents of the Line.


ALL RAIL


Savannah, Florida and Western Railway Company,
FORMING WITH ITS CONNECTIONS THE ONLY FAST MAIL PASSENGER
ROUTE AND THROUGH FREIGHT DISPATCH LINE TO AND FROM
FLORIDA AND SOUTHERN AND SOUTHWESTERN GEORGIA.
'/"'*,*" r^ "" "*"" '" ---- ***/

I]REIGIDT DEPA.T1TMENT.
"% M6vfi n'of Freight ii. Through Cars,'thereby AVOIDING THE RISK OF
TRATsFETr to affd from al p)lints on the Florida Central and Western Railroad,
Florida Transit Railroad, St. Augustine, and all landings on the St. Johns and
Ocklawaha Rivers, Chattahoochee, Flint and Apalachicola Rivers, and Havana,
Key West, Tampa and Manatee.

Fruit and Vegetable Shipments Through in Ventilated Cars
NO DELAYS. PROMPT ADJUSTMENT OF CLAIMS..
Between Jacksonville and- Savannah daily. TRANSFER TO SHIPS' SIDE
AT SAVANNAH WITHOUT BREAKING BULK.
Rates always as LOW AS BY ANY OTHER LINE. Take out Bills Lading via
Sava nabh Florida and .etteirY Railway to insure ADVANTAGES OF THE ALL-
RAI ROUTE. .
D)hys of saIling sibloct to 'rln nge without previous notice. For further informa-
tion, if needed, apply Lo
H. YONGE, Agent of Line, and C. R. R. of Ga. Office New Pier 35 N River, N. Y.
Gen. W. L. JAMEAS, Agnt-, 25 South Third St., Philadelphia. A. L. HUGGINS,
Agent Merchants' and Miners' Line, Baltimore. WM. H. RING, Agent Boston and
Savannah Steamshrp Linel 18-.-Wharf, Boston. 0. G. PEARSON, Agent S., F. &
W. failwny, 219 Wnashingt6n St., Boston. C. D. OWENS, General Agent S., F. & W.
Railway, 315 Broadway, New York. J. B. ANDREWS, Agent S., F. & W. Railway,
48 GermanWSt., Baltimore. J. M. CLEMENT, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, Pier 41
South Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, or to either of the undersigned.
O. AMES, General Freight Agent, Jacksonville.
F. B. PAPY, General Freight Agent, Fernandina, Fla.
JAS. L. TAYLOR, General Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.
-D. H. ELLIOTT, General Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent S.. F. & W. Railway, Jacksonville, Fla.


THROUGH TABIP W ON OJANGES O9rLY.
-+0 T1'I LOIDA IMPATCH LINE, ALL-RAIL VIA ATLANTA OR MONTGOMERY,
____InT Em r 0 l' D O O v 0 B 1 st 1 a-a


FROM X
JACKSONVILLE AND | -4
CALLAHAN JUNCTION a l
TO C


I


- --


- "' I I I I I I --



*


-m




'I
'I
I

ii
Ii





5as THI PLORIDA DISPATCHf


TO PRINTERS AND BINTDERIS.

FOR SALE.
I Half Medium UniverWal Printiag
Press.................................... O0
1 Ruling Modgs .,h0i ... ..,.i,,...,.. ti*ad
Address A



GLEu M.o WAs N ( .iNTeA.
40 Iours from Ne oh f ; 18 kles f" .
Sst'%ilhah. '


tA


d from $3to $10 per acre" All 4infdsjrtHi ; $U
s,beftles, fruit, and stock, do welL 0t f Irn a
of debt, some lending money.
Lny number of acres, for colonizing or grazing, at $1 to
per acre; 40 acres, with house complete, for W0;
SY TXRMS. .
ome and see for youriself,a Te
o Jan 9, '83. Glentoret, Ware CountAr, Oa.


COLONEY, TALBOTT & CO.,

Real Estate Agents,

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
hav.lends Ui every county in the OranaBelt, atfro
StoU $i00 per acre. Orange gwves fro i t ipo to
government lands in every part of the Orange Belt.
Can guarantee all o o our property.
Strawberry Plants.
We have 20000 best varieties for sale low.
Orange Trees.
We have 300,000 trees, an ages, for sale,at ftro 10 oaets
to $t per tree, as to age.
COLONY, TALBOTT0 a CO.
Sep. l8, tf.



Commission Merchant,
SAD DKALZE ItN
Florida Oranges and Lemons,
74 WIWT BAY T wrBT.


N Y -Depot, MAXILD A Co., 07 andd .Park Place; Mag-
azinma. asking Hoewe, Way croes B. IWharf.
MANUrACTMivEB's AGBNT FOR
THE BAMWt8QBOX MATIR1T, 4OUPM. Itc.
Have a large quantity of Manilla Wrapping
tend in your o~ r 'an
ship pro"iTply whilq frtigh re light. Have ret
diiculty in getting it trnsported during the buly
season. [t ~w eh 25 88

0O,OOO CASiI
Can be invested to great advantage in the
ROCK LEDG~I-- HOMItE I01 4IVJi
of K5 aerStl 708 bearing tre in the beautiul had nmoed
R3K LEDGE HAMMIOCK on the great lUdian Rivet
wilh its ish, oysters, green tuttle and ducks. I will sell
thf grove for
TWO-THIRD@ ITS A-TV* T VALU1.
N ibers of visitors say it is the most beautiful and de-
si rble property in the itte.
Having pIrlied Jupitr Island', 100 miles soalth, I
proose to akepeeiulty of
C OCOANUTU, PINE-APPLES,
ani the more tender tropil fruits,
C.B. MAGRUDEI '
to feb 5' Bock LedIge, Florida.
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VE4qTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


.-:.. ^ ur.. "-.1, Ca




$ooN <, AA IAT. OIL




f',vared Painte.

Ws A, E O.-. I01 llt I O..







SAMu 1 .1 -. -


RANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
.esatds vlS Lnd Excha
and- .. i" >od wlti We and Proceeds promptly remitted.
New York; Merchants National B4nk, savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros O .t, Drexel,
Moan & Co., Jas. G. King's Soau,1utsze- BrB. New
York, and other prominent ] a==ut1iaqLferS '*f
aCredit.-. P-10tf

0. L. K E EjNXZ


MILLINERY,


FANCY, D SS GOODS.


NUOTIONS.


AND A FISE9 LUNif or

XIeD GLOVES.,
67 West Bay street, Corner Laura,
JACKg L,-.., - - -. LO DA.


1 N0 W0 0:Choice Cabbage Plants in fine condition for
1,UvU shipment. CABBAGE rMID, Or(ION EbED





SUITABLE FOR


Florida. 8end for circular to
WHITNEY, GOLD & HODGES,,
JACKSONVILLE,
June 2S-t-f Il~ O l0IT>A.,



SAil'O D, FLORtIA,

Agent in Orangeo oanty for
FLORIDA LAND ANIDIIPBOVIIENT WIFY,
BUYS AND BLlC
Or ag Grove and Ora L L i iM imi.
ALSO ORANGE TRIES.
EIXAIIES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
June 12.tf


W. H. PILLdOW'S


irtXIT AN MI k t'XA~3LE
I ,A JA&, .


COMMISRtN HOUE L








all kinds. Water Supply, Drainae, ewerage, Bridge









Roo* Etc, P.O. Box 784. Room *o. !2 to Block,




fltcoun "
VNrIENT TOly Free froA FroA l STEAM


whee on have the netUOT HE




. 'OYSTE,*R IS ;CP
All kids. W terS .uply, Drainage, Sewerage, Bridge'
of a P. n best chance to se earlyock,
Spreetf a E t'Feb. 7,f88














veefs, in P.Oew oxn. Address me witt stBmp,
at teHillsborough County, Florida T.
AI can sel yGrove or Orange Lands, in a healthy, beauti-
fulC country,
lBUy ,ree fro- Proprietors,
whee ron. have the finest






















DWELLINGS,
OYSTERS HO LS
SHRIMP,
CRAB,
GAME
of all d*scriptons, awl the best chance to raise early
vegetables, in a now country. Address me with stamp,
at Ancte H, fillsborough County, Florida.
I can sell you five acres, or five thousand acres, as yom
desire. 2 FM

THE SUWANNEE




EXLILAVILLE, F LOUBAI,











HOTELS


PUBLIC EDIFICES,
etc., at any point accessible by the several railroad and
steamboat lines. Possessing the advantage of manufac-
turing our own lumber, we are enabled to offer very lib-
eral inducements as to terms and quality of material.
Draughts, plans, estimates and information furnished
on application.
We have also made extensive additions to our Plan-
ing Mil and will continue, as heretofore to manufaeu-
1u Z maid khunp it eiu a full uli e Of ramihng ana inisn-
ing Lumber, Mouldings, Brackets, Lalusters, Pickets,
Laths, etc.
a, "th DREW & BUCKI,
July 17, i'8-t. Ellaville, Florida.

AT MANDARIN, FLORIDA.
20 FORTY-ACRE TRACTS only 12 miles from Jack-
sonville; extra good ladd, well located, between river
and JS^t..A,mi dH.R 1.U LR. Price, $10 per acre, WiH
sell on monthly payments of $12.0. These lands will hin-
erease in value, being located in an already prosperous
town, making a paying investment at small outlay.
Maps can be seen at No. 41 East Bay Street.
to nov 21, '82. GEO. 1. REYNOLDS.
Jacksonville, Fla.


w- ----- -Y


--.-. ------- ---,-- -i`. - I





THE FLORIDA DISPATCON 5 5
OWN"


VGtSET A&LE GROWERS
CAN MAkE MONEY BY USING *

FORRESTER'S CHEMICAL MANURES,
PREPARED ESPECIALLY FOR

Vegetables, Orange Trees
AND ALL
SEMKI TROPKOAL F R3 rTS,
BY --
CEO. B. FORRESTER, 169 Front St., New York.
-O--
THESE MANIMTIES ARE PREPARED FROM CONCENTRATED CHEMICALS; ARE FREF FROM ODOR;
Do not Breed Vermin or Insects in the Soil.
They have been used on FLORIDA LANDS for Years, and produce Wonderful Results.
For sale by

Sanford, Orange County, Florida.
M4iSend for circular. (to mar. 3, '83)p

JOHN O. MOORE & CO.,

FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,
"AND GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS
1.S WEST SIXTH STREET, CINCINNATI, OHIO.
REFERENCES: Commercial Agencies, or any Wholesale Grocer in CINCINNATI.
STENCILS FURNISHED BY T. 0. "LA.. -EP.,
to apl 8, '83. LEESBURG, FLORIDA.
SiIIT I & POT FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,
9 AND GEN'L COMMISSION MERCHANTS
NO. 41 SOUTH DELAWARE STREET,
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANNA.
REFERENCES:
INGRAM FLETCHER, of FLETCHER & SHARPE, Bankers, and Meridian National Bank.
A& Stencils Furnished on Application. jW
-ct-16,tf


DISSTON PURCHASE---4,000,000 ACRES!


THE FLORIDA

LAND AND IMPROVEMENT



Offer from October 1,1882, till May 1, 1883,

ALL THEIR LANDS

At Government Price of $1.25 per Acre
IN BLOCKS OF NOT LESS THAN 80 NOR MORE THAN 640 ACRES.
These lands include all varieties of upland and lowland, and are adapted to Oranges, Lemons, Limes, Pine-
Apples, Bananas, Sugar-Cane, Early Vegetables, etc., and are chiefly in the counties of
St.Johns, Volusia, Brevard, Orange, Sumter, Levy, Hernando, Hillsborough,


Polk, Manatee and Monroe.
The following are reserved and for sale at graded prices:
Gulf Coast Rteserve," 268,000 acres, M. R. MARKS, Agent, Anclote, Fla.
"Timber Reserve," 100,000 acres, comprising choice tracts of Pine and Cypress, chiefly in St. Johns and
Volusia Counties. Address
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT CO.,
to mar 24 '83 Jacksonville, Fla..
ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]
.J. A. BAR. ES & CO.

FRUIT AND PRODUCE

COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Souitlaer. .'lru.it aind. "Veg'etables a Specialty-.
3206 and 3"25 North Delaware Avenue, Philadelphia.
to Jan 6, '83


FINE POULTRY.

SEVEN BREEDING PENS OF THE FOLLOWING
BREEDS:
Two yards PLYMOUTH ROCKS, two yards each of
WHITE and BROWN LEGHORN,
and one yard of GEORGIA
WHITE GAME.
We are booking
orders now for EGGS, and
guarantee fifty per cent, better results
than from Eggs received from the North. Send for cir-
cular. R. W. PARRAMORE, Jacksonville, Fla.
W. C. BIRD, Monticello, Fla. toJanl5-'83

S. B. HUBBARD & CO.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in

llorwgrn, t0vos, D00rs, Sasl, Bll4s
PAINTS, OILS, PUMPS1 LEAD AND IRON PIPE,
-Sugar Mills, Rubber and Leather Belting,
Steam 4- Gas-Fitting, Plumbing d- Tinsmithing,
Agricultural Implements of all Kinds,
HAZARD'S POWDER,
BARBED FENCE WIRE.
AGENTS FOR S. L ALLEN & 00.'s GARDEN TOOLS.
49- Send for Price List and Catalogue, V&
to June 11 '83 ____
O SZ ALE.
Hickory Bluff, 46 acres, 18 acres Hammock, cleared and
enclosed with Picket fence. 200 thrifty young Orange
trees growing on the place. Bold bluff river front of over
a quarter of a mile and steamer channel close in short,
and over flve miles of water protection to the northwest, tVi-
ijng perfect security against frost. Nine miles below Jack-
sonville, and one mile from New Berlin. Can come to
city every morning on mail steamer and return in the
afternoon. A choice place for orange growing and truck
farming. Price, $2,500.
Also, two desirable city lots 53x209 feet, and one 70x156
feet covered with thrifty orange trees 6 years old, half
mile from business center. Good neighborhood (all
white). Price of first, $600each. Price ofsecond, a corner,
very handsome, $800. Apply to
J. H. NORTON,
No. 1 West Bay Street, JACKSONVILLB.
State that you saw this in THE DISPATCH.
July 3, tf

.Attetlozn 0 Poatry" :en..
DR. R. BACHMANN'S Vermin Hate; the only relia-
ble antidote to Vermin on Poultry of every description
now extant, viz: Lice on Fowls and Fleas on Dogs; all
other domestic animals are benefitted by its use. This
being an internal remedy to be given mixed with the
food, because all external remedies have been a tfilure.
It is put up in packages of FIFTY CENTS and ONr DOL-
LAR. Sold at Groceries and Seed Stores. The best of
reference given on application to the proprietor.
R. BACHMANN, M. D.,
Jacksonville, Florida.
Depot with PAINE BROS., 36 Bay Street.
aug.21 to feb. 21. '83.


to Jan 9, 83




The agent of the Royal Mail Line to the Nether-
lands," and of the "Florio Italian Line," in Jackson-
ville, offers his services to reliable parties in search oj
competent labor for their
Groves or Gardens,
to try to induce people from
Northern and Southern Europe
to come to Florida.
*i-Correspondence solicited.
C. II. VANDER LINDEN,
Care Florida Land and Imp't Co.,
sept 4, '82, tf. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


FOR SALE.
AN IMPROVED PLACE on the south side of Lake
Harris, in Sumter County, Fla., about a mile from Ya-
laha. It contains 225 acres of the finest, first-class high
hammock, about 50 acres cleared. There are two bold,
never-failing brooks -running through the place, from
which an unlimited supply of water can be had, mak-
ing the raising of vegetables a certainty. The place has
Smile lake front; the residence is a large, Southern
style house-six large rooms, store-room and kitchen at-
tached ; there are 500 old orange trees from 7 to 10 years
old, budded with choice varieties; also, 700 trees from 4
to 6 years old; lime and lemon trees in bearing. There
is on the place, probably, the finest guava grove in
South Florida. The estimated yield in 1881 was 500 bush-
els. This property is one of the most valuable and in-
viting tracts of land in this State. The quality of the
soil, besides growing orange trees, will make it, with the
advantages of Irrigation, and remarkable protection
from frost peculiarly profitable for vegetable growing.
It can be divided into 3 tracts sufficiently large for every
purpose. Daily communication at Yalaha by mail boat
connecting with St. Johns and Lake Eustis Railway.
Only the non-residence of the owner induces its sale.
Price, $15,000. Terms easy. Address
W. N. JACKSON,
to feb20-83 Esperance, Fla.


FOR SALE.

LANDS on the east side of Lake Harris, Sumter
county. We the undersigned offer the property de-
scribed below, situated at and around Esperance, at
great bargains. For further information apply or ad-
dress
W. P. COOPER,)
D. E. LOWELL, Espersnce, Fla.
W. N. JACKSON.)
(1.) 90 acres land at Esperance, mile lake front; first-
class willow-oak pine land; several fine building sites;
good elevation. Price $35 per acre. The above tract can
be bought in lots.
(2.) 80 aore, safte location, 30 acres hammock; fine
building site, 80 feet above the lake, with Y4 mile lake
front; 10 acres cleared -500 trees in grqve, part bearing.
Price $6,000. .
(3.) 46 acres, about20 acres hammock, full view of the
lake; good land. Price $700.
(4.) 40 acres fine, high Tand; view of the lake; one
mile from Esperance. Price WO.
(5.) 75 acres, 20 acres cleared and fenced; 600 trees in
grove; pine-apples, etc. Splendid location 4 mile
lake front; 2 miles from Esperance. There is on the
place a comfortable dwelling, with a sdfficiency of out-
houses. Price $6,000. Terms easy.
(6.) 40 acres good pine land, Y mile from Lake Harris ;
25 acres fenced; 17 acres set to orange, lemon and lime
trees. Lemons, limes, guavas, pine-apples, bananas,
grapes, &c., in bearing; comfortable house and out build-
ing. Terms to suit an actual settler. Price $3,000.
(7.) 120 acres good pine land, Y to 'A mile from Lake
Harris, in lots to suit purchasers, $20 per acre.
20 acres first-rate pine land, overlooking Lake Harris,
$825 per acre.
(8.) 15 acres on Lake Harris, with lake front, good
view of the lake; nice buildingsite; 3 acres of ham-
mock and two of pine cleared. Price $500.
(9.) 160 acres, I to 4 mile Trom Lake Harris, good
pine land, in lots to suit purchasers. Price $10 per acre.
(10.) 80 acres of land beautifully situated, with aecom-
manding view of the lake; 6 or 7 magnificent building
sites; 'Y mile lake front; 10 acres splendid hammock,
balance No. 1 pine land, Y mile from Esperance. Price
$20 per acre.
P. S.-Land will be divided if necessary. "
(11.) 80 acres land Y mile from the lake, No. 1 pine
land; handsome location; view of the lake; Y4 mile
from Esperance. Price $10 to 815 per acre in 5 or 10 acre
lots.
Groves will be set and cared for on above lots at reas-
onable rates. The party making the offer has had sev-
eral years' experience in the management of groyes.
to feb20-83


LOCAL AD VER TISEMAENTS.
FLORIDA BREEZES, by Mrs. Ellen Call Long, of
Florida will soon be published by ASHMEAD BROS.,
and will have a large sale. Advance orders solicited.
PLYMOUTH ROCKS AND BROWN LEGHORNS.-A few
los for sale. T. GRAHAM ASHMEAD,
to dec5-'82 Williamson, Wayne Co., N. Y.
FLORIDA ILLUSTRATED.-10,00( copies of which
:i ve just been issued by us, consists of 20 imperial size
'.lored views in a handsome cloth case, illustrating the
d ilferent sections of the State of Florida.
This is the handsomest work of the kind ever pub-
li.,hed on Florida. Price by mail, postage free, $1.00.
Every one interested in Florida should have a copy.
Address, ASHMEAD BROS.,
tf Jacksonville, Fla.
BLOOMFIELD'S ILLUSTRATED HISTORICAL
G JIDE OF ST. AUGUSTINE AND FLORIDA, with
map for tourists, invalids and immigrants. For sale
by all booksellers and newsdealers in the State, or sent
to any address for 50 cents by
MAX BLOOMFIELD,
to aprl5-'83 St. Augustine, Fla.
CHOICE ORANGE LANB In Hernando County, ly-
ing near surveys of railroads, can be bought at five dol-
hl rs per acre from W. B. CLARKSON, Jacksonville, Fla.
, end for descriptions. oct9-tf
LAW BLANKS.-A full line for Justices of the Peace,
Circuit Courts, etc. Deeds, Mortgages, etc, are printed
a id published by ASHMEAD BROS., Jacksonvil e, Fla.
W1 rite for a catalogue. tf
TO ADVERTISERS.-Large circulation: For the
n).xt tKo months THE FLORIDA DISPATCH will is-
-ue from 8,000 to 10,000 copies every week.; about 40,000
a month.
Merchants and others should take advantage of this
nad advertise liberally.
For advertising rates see editorial page. tf
ORANGE WRAPS.-Order your orange wraps from
ASHMEAD BROS., Jacksonville, Fla. For prices see
advertisement. tf


mailed on application.
SU BBE R ST AMPS.
Are manufactured right in our establishment, in the best manner, and at short notice.


CHRISTMAS GOODS
A SPECIALIVY,
CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR'S CARDS IN GREAT VARIETY.
We carry the largest stock in our line south of Baltimore.
AgW Orders by mail solicited and promptly attended to.
Anything we send out, if not satisfactory, we will take back and refund the money.



[Full count-480 sheets to the ream.]

10xIO-11x11--19 xl2
14 c. pr rm. 17 c. pr rm. 19 c. pr rm.
Address ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


__ _ __ _ ____ _____ICI__ _ __ _____~~I_ ~


3,000 BARRELS POTATOES.



OHI B lIIitlAN IAbRLY ROSI, 1FIB ISlD AND TABLli 'InU

To arrive during NOVEMBER and DECEMBER. Also general stock of SELECT SEEDS for Gardeners, and
SPECIAL FERTILIZERS for POTATOES AND CABBAGES.

FIFTY TONS TOBACCO STEMo8.
These stems are claitned by WESTERN GARDENERS to be a sure specific for the INSECTS that destroy Cab-
bage. Full stock
BONE MEAL, COTTON-SEE)D 3ME L, HULL ASH, ETO.
J. E. HART,
to .tan 6, '88 J ACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,

PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATION ERS
PRINTERS AND BINDERS,
ASND DEALERS IN
"0-S .A. T:D Y.ANTC" A.ZETIZ' .jE S.

BOO: B.R..
We have the most complete Book Bindery in the State; Can Rule, Number or Page and Perforate any job sent us.
Blanks and Blank Books manufactured to order for Railroads, Steamboats, Hotels,- Banks
and Corporations. The ruling of difficult jobs a speciality.
WE PUBLISH

TRE FLORIDA DISPATOI,
A 20-page Weekly Agricultural Journal, at only $1.00 per year,
Devoted to Southern Agriculture, Fruit Growing, Market Gardening, etc.
This paper has the largest circulation of any published in Florida. Specimen copies free. Write for a copy.


Itis generally conceded we do the Finest Job Printing in the State. We have all the modern machinery and all
new type. Can prirt the smallest Visiting Card to the largest size Poster.
Printing of Pamphlets a specialty. Prices on application.


FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, INVALIDS ORANGE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA, by
AND SETTLERS (Barbour, Profusely .Price- 0 A. MT. Garey, ENINGcloth).......................................Price 1 25
lustrated)..................................................-Price $1 50 A MANUAL of GARDENING in FLORIDA
FLORIDA: ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE (Whitner) ....................................................Price 50
AND HISTORY (Laner)............. ....Price 1 50 COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA ................Price 75
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paperPrice 10 COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-
FAIRBANKS' HISTORY OF FLORIDA.......Price 2 50 the best)............................................... .........Price 1 25
GUIDE TO JACKSONVILLE....... .......Price 25' NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF ST.
TOURISTS AND INVALIDS REFERENCE JOHN'S RIVER....................................Price 25
BOOK OF WINTER TRAVEL...................Price 75 McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST OF LAWS
SOUTH FLORIDA, THE ITALY OF AMER- OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep, postage extra)..Price $ 00
ICA ...................................................Price 25 INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SU-
DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition) PREME COURT OF FLORIDA..................Price 3 00
enlarged and improved..........................Price 50 NOTES FROM SUNLAND ON THE MAN-
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edi- ATEE RIVER, GULF COAST OF SOUTH
tion, enlarged and improved).............. Price 1 00 FLORIDA. Its Climate, Soil, and Pro-
ORANdE INSECTS-Illustrated (Ashmead,..Price 1 00 ductions, (By Samuel C. Upham) ...............Paper .25
HITOI~Y OF ST. AUGUSTINE-Dewhurst............ 1.25 FLORIDA AS A PERMANENT HOME .......Price .10
GUIDE TO ST. AUGUSTINE AND FLORIDA-Bloomfield.............................................................................. 50
Any of the above books hailed on receipt of price.

(Sent by mail,postage free, on receipt of price.)
In Book Form, Containing 12 Views Each.
Souvenir of Florida, (small size).......... ........ 25c I Souvenir of Jacksonville, (large size)..................... 50c
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small Souvenir of St. Augustine, (large size)..........,... 50c
size)........ ....................... ................... ...... 25c I Stereoscopic V iew s, per doz........................................... $1 00
:FJLO:ZI:D. :ZT-L "STT Aa-TEID -
10,000 copies of which have just been issued by us, consisting of twenty imperial size colored views in a hand-
some cloth case, illustrating the different sections of the State of Florida.
This is the handsomest work of the kind ever published in Florida. Price by mail, postage free, $1.00. Every one
interestedin Florida should have a copy.
WARRANTY DEEDS, per dozen........... Price 50 MORTGAGES, per dozen ..................Price 50

UIT-CLAIM DEEDS, per dozen ........... Price 50, NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, made toorder.Price $500
We publish a full line of Law Blanks for Lawyers, Justices of the Peace, Circuit Courts, etc. Price-list


_:I


I