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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00034
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: November 13, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00034
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

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eoted to the Agricultural, flanufacturing and Industrial Interests oaf Florida and the South.

Vol. 1.--No. 34. New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla. Price 5 cents.
Monday, November 13, 1882. $1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.

;itt W; 'g'p and so on. This rotation followed for a few year butchered his hogs direct from "the chufa
years, so weakens the Nut-Grass that cotton or patch" without giving them a grain of corn, and
Nut-Grass "-To e t. any other crop may be profitably planted for a never had better or firmer pork in his life. It
Nut-Grass --To Destroy. year or two. Then again the rotation can be has been the practice with us, however, to throw
We have battled with Nut-Grass for more pursued. them a little corn before converting them into
than a quarter of a century; and nearly always Here is what our correspondent says on the badon.
come out of the fight "second-best." But we subject: "In a lot thoroughly infested with low, I will show you what has been the yield
give, with some confidence, one more plan for Nut-Grass, cow-peas were planted after oats, this year: Having prepared the ground thor-
destroying it, from the Charleston Ne and to strug an existence in itsearly roughly, and manured in the drills three feet
destroying it, from the Charleston N ad fe, but eventually conquered, and in autumn apart with ground bone and cotton-seed meal,
Courier could not all be turned under by reason of its about the middle of April, I planted a little less
In a private letter from a friend in Berkely luxuriance. Land was again seeded to oats, than half an acre in chufas. The crop was
County be give us his experience in the ex- followed as before by cow-peas, which was again worked twice after that and then "laid by."
termination of Nut-Grass, or at least such a turned under. The next year cotton was plant- About the 1st of August finding a finegrowth
weakening as to make the land fit for cotton or ed and a very fine yield rewarded th labor." of tops, I moved them off, getting a ton of about
other crops, by a rotation of cow-peas and oats as nice hay as one would wish to look at. I
for a few years. This accords with our own The Chufa, or "Earth Almond." as nice hay and would wis h to look at. Ident
personal experience of its effects many years ago I am a little surprised that there is not a' relish. I am now about done gathering the chu-
by a similar rotation. Farmers of the coast more general cultivation of the chufa (O/pwrP." fas, and find I have 69 bushels, or equal to about
region of our State and Georgia know what a esculentus) for stock food. I have had a very large 450 bushels to the acre. The soil from which
pest the Nut-Grass is when it has taken posses- experience with it in the last eight or ten years, this crop was taken is a light, loose sandy loam
sion of a field. We have seen it growing luxu- and say without hesitation that I think it un- poor piney-woods landl made moderately
riantly enough in the middle country, but not equaled for the purpose, and believe it will go rich by the use of artificial manures, and I
with that vigor and virulency that it is capable farther, for the money and labor expended, in firmly believe that by increasing the amount


So0 lower down. the way of making pork, than any other food I of manure, one-half, the yield would have been
It is decidedly the worst enemy to good cul- know of, not even excepting corn. To illustrate more than doubled.
tivation, not excepting Bermuda grass or Means this, I will give you a few samples of my own Here we have on land that would be thought
grass with their spreading succulent roots. and some of my neighbors' tests, and am better ding wellto yield 25 or 30 bushels of corn to
These latter may be eradicated by frequent prepared to do so at this time, so far as I am oi ng w 2 0 bushels of n
ploughing and harrowing in dry, hot weather, concerned, from the fact that I have just gath- the acre, giving us 150 bushels of equally as
ut Nut-Gra.s defies all such treatment. The ered my crop and have made careful note of its rich) wandithoutritiousn hog food int( or five time hay.
tubers break off from their slender connecting progress from the sowing of the seed the dig- And then, besides, there still remains on the hay.
roots and are left in the ground, and the very ing of the tubers.
ploughing and softening of the land makes it I should say, however, by way of preface, ground for the hogs verynearly as much more,
more congenial to their vigorous growth. The that it is rather my purpose to give results than for it is next to impossible to gather much more
tubers often 'descend beyond the reach of ordi- to go into details as to the mode of cultivation, than half the crop.
nary ploughing, and are left intact. Plough- for fear that my contribution to your columns But it should be borne in mind, as intimated
ing also tends to scatter them over the parts of would otherwise exceed proper bounds. in the beginning, that the chufa is not a crop to
the field not yet infested, so that in a few years In previous years, it has been my practice, be gathered--this should be the hogs' business
the whole land becomes polluted. and that of my predecessor, to dig only what was --for the process is tedious and expensive, and
A rotation of, cow-peas and oats keeps the needful for seed the next season and then turn the curing of the seed and saving it until plant-
land in continual cultivation, and the Nut- the hogs in on the crop. Very little observa- ing time, is attended with more or less loss.
Grass is crushed out. Cow-peas, if manured, tion was necessary to discover that the porkers This experience is had in the lower South,
grow.rapidly and- soon shade the ground. The enjoyed the arrangement immensely and grew where the climate is mild and the summers
grass, vigorous as it is in its root, makes only a "as fat as they 'could wallow" without any re- long, but as between the spring and fall frosts,
slender stalk and leaves, and is thus effectually 'source to the corn-crib. My neighbors, some only five months are required for planting and
kept down by the more rampant growth above, of whom have been in the habit for many years manuring the crop. I see no reason why
In the fall, as soon as cow-peas are removed- back cf pursuing the same course, relate to me equally satisfactory results may not be obtained
or, better still, turned under for manure-the a similar experience. One of them, a gentleman as far north as you are, or even in New Eng-
oats are planted and take possession for the of intelligence, coupled with large experience land.--D. IW. Langdon, in, Colman's Rural
winter-to be followed in spring by cow-peas, in pork-making, states in addition that he one World.


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ST FLORID A 1) IS PA TC .


Experimental Farm and Garden in Florida.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch":
From my observations, I have reason to believe, that
Wheat can be successfully cultivated in the northern
portions of the State, and even as far south as Polk

remark, "The climate is too hot." The same statement
Was made with regard to Aiustralia. But an experi-
menter obtained varieties of wheat from warm and tem-
peirate climates, and found them adapted to the climate.
Asa consequence, this grain has become a staple crop in
Australia; and wherever exhibited, the grain has been
awarded a first prize. What was done in that distant
land can be accomplished in Florida.
During the English occupation in Florida, indigo was
extensively cultivated, and it proved a remunerative
crop. But with a change of flags it became one of the
lost arts. Owing to the high rental that has to be paid
for suitable land in India, the uncertainty of rains, and
the unwillingness of the natives to employ machinery in
the cultivation and preparation of Indigo, the culture is
to a great extent being abandoned. In this State, we
have the climate, soil and labor for its production, and
all that is required is to demonstrate the fact that it can
be successfully grown, and parties with ample capital
could-be induced to engage in its cultivation and prepa-
ration. It was a successful and profitable crop in the
past, and what has been done can be repeated. Private
individuals cannot be expected to experiment in this
culture, and the duty devolves upon those who own
large landed interests.
To illustrate the importance of experimentation in
new cultures, I shall refer to Jute: In India, in 182., the
value of this fibre produced, was 8:00. In 1872 the total
export amounted to 700),0I),000 pounds, worth in India,
$28,000,000. At that time 900,000) persons were wholly or
partially engaged in its production. This important
fibre is used in the manufacture of various materials.
The demand is annually increasing, and to meet it, a
Scotch company was formed to cultivate it in Egypt;
but owing to the character of the labor, and the preju-
dice existing against new industries, the etlort proved a
failure. Mr. DIss'rox imported from the East Indies,
several bags of the seed, and it was widely distributed
in the State. We recently examined a specimen of the
fibre grown near this city, from the Disston seed, and for
fineness, strength and glossiness of fibre, it excelled any
we have seen imported. In Florida we have the rains,
soil, climate and labor for its successful cultivation, and
all that is required to render it a staple product, is intel-
ligent and systematic experimentation, with the publi-
cation of actual results. It is essentially the poor man's
crop, for it will succeed on new land, and requires no
machinery forthe production of the fibre. With careful
culture, thie crop should yield from $'75 to $100 per acre ;
and within about four months from thie time of sowing
the seed, the fibre will be ready for market. To illus-
trate the adaptability of the crop to the State, I may re-
mark, that on my high and dry sandy soil, with a pure
white sand sub-soil, the plants have attained a growth
of seven feet. How absurd it is for the South to expend
at least $20,000,000 annually for bags and bagging to mar-
ket the cotton crop, when the fibre can be grown and
manufactured in this State. When drained, the rich
lands in the southern portion of the State, in connection
with thie summer rainfall, will produce large crops of
Jute, and it bids fair to become a profitable crop. But to
Secure its extensive cultivation, acts and figures should
be published, and an experimental farm would furnish
them.
Thie insect known as thie Phyloxera is destroying the
vineyards of the continent, and thus far nothing has
been found to arrest the destruction. \ e should take
advantage of the misfortunes of others and foster the ex-
tensive cultivation of thie Scuppernong grape and its
seminal varieties. This grape escapes the ravages of the
Lrysiphe (mildew) and the Phyloxcra. It will grow lux-
uriantly over a large portion of thie State, and its suc-
cessful culture does not require pruning or expenditure
for manures, and is remarkable for its productiveness.
I am aware that thie "must" of this grape contains an ex-
cess of tartaric acid, and many persons have condemned
thie wine made from it; and the question arises, is it
the fault of the grape or ithe manufacturer? I believe
the fault lies with the manufacturer. Owing to the ex-


cess of tartaric acid, wine makers add water ania sugar
to the must, and a mixture is produced called wine. It
is not generally known but for hundreds of years on
thie continent, wine makers have used a cheap and
harmless substance to remove the tartaric acia; and
when it is added to the must of the Scuppernong we
will produce an excellent and an unadulterated wine.
but successful wine-making in this State can only be
attained by the application of knowledge, and the adop-
tion of intelligent and systematic efforts to attain a
given end. If it could be demonstrated that a good and
marketable wine could be made from Scuppernong
grapes, millions of acres of the poor and elevated lands
of tihe State would be planted with vines, and our popu-
lation and wealth would be largely increased. To ac-
complish this desirable end, knowledge should be ap-
plied to wine-making and accurate results published.
A stranger visits Florida and seeks information regard-
ing Orange culture, and he will secure almost as many
diverse opinions as he consults persons, and in some in-
stances the inquirer retires in disgust. One preaches
high pine lands, another sings the praises of hammocks,
a land speculator, who owns thousands of acres, pub-
lishes to the world that land for orange groves will cost
$20 per acre, when State land can be purchased at $1.25
per acre, and U. S. land pre-empted. One advocates
budded trees, and another praises seedlings; one says
plant Homosassas and another insists that Indian
Iiver seedlings are the sine qua non.


_ ___


phlet before me, I find fifteen manures for fifteen differ- appeared at one of our docks a small schooner loaded
ent products referred to, and when examined, it will be with this fruit. Upon enquiry, I was informed that the
found that the vender merely rings changes on these grower utilized a piece of white sandy land between
substances-ammonia, phosphoric acid and potash. I Lake Worth and the Atlantic, and planted it with pines.
will ask, why all this clap-trap? The answer is simple He was ridiculed by his neighbors but the poor, white
-to capture the uninitiated. Superior mnuck exists in sand produced a crop of large and luscious fruit, which
immense quantities in this State, and it could be sue- rapidly sold in this market.
cessfully treated, experimented with and results pub- As an evidence of the necessity of experiment, and
listed. If our muck was thoroughly prepared, and the the adaptability of this State to fruit culture, I may
humic acid removed, and after seasoning, ammonia, state that within a few days I examined one cluster of
phosphoric acid and potash added in proper proportions Japanese Persimmons, numbering seventeen, and
artificial fertilizing would be excluded from the State. weighing seven pounds, and an individual fruit of the
At the experimental farm and garden intelligent experi- weight of one pound one ounce. This luscious fruit will
ments could be carried out and results made known, bear transportation, and as soon as known in the north
and a vastamount of money would be saved to the State, and west, it will command a large sale. The tree is a
that is at present paid to manufacturers for Jersey muck, great and early bearer, and will grow luxuriantly in
sand, ground bricks, &c. Muck of superior quality ex- even the poorest soils in the State.
ists in this State in exhaustless quantities, and it con- Experiments on the lower Indian River, Lake Worth,
tains humus which is an important element of plant and Chuckaluskee have demonstrated that Banana
growth ; pure superhosphate oi lime can be purchased, culture is successful, and more profitable than in the
potash is cheap, and sulphate of ammonia is worth but West Indies and South America. As soon as steamboat
six cents per pound. Why, I will ask, do our orange and railroad transportation is furnished, this fruit will
growers pay about $40 per ton for "Orange Tree Manure" be extensively cultivated in East and South Florida
containing but 88 pounds of ammonia, 55 pounds of and the transportation of it to the North and West. will
phosphoric acid, and 284 pounds of potash? the answer become an important item. The quality of Florida
is, to fill the pockets of manufacturers, pay for the pub- bananas is judged by the "horse bananas" grown in
location of pamphlets, lengthy advertisements in news- northern portions of the State; and I may remark that
papers and journals, and steamboat and schooner the most delicious samples of this fruit I have ever tasted
freights, and the commissions of agents. Let those who were produced at Lake Worth. At present, we have
purchase artificial manures, dig, and properly prepare but about three superior varieties in the State, and the
some muck, and add it to the substances referred to numerous kinds cultivated in South America and the
above, and ascertain the cost and results of the applica- East and West Indies should be imported and tested. If
tion of one ton to their crops. Such experiments could tihe new varieties proved superior to those at present


II


Among the miiultitude of counsellors, and the different be carried out in an experimental farm and garden and
opinions and theories expressed, the intending settler results published. Almost every stream in Florida con-
is induced to receive all the information obtained as a tains refuse fish, and their decomposition would result
delusion and a snare. If this State possessed an ex- in the formation of ammonia; every pint of ashes re-
perimental garden, seedling and budded trees could be moved from a stove or fire-place contains potash; and
planted side by side; all the different varieties could be by the addition of sulphuric acid to the bones wasted by
grown in the same grove; various modes of pruning every family, superphosphate of lime could be manufac-
could be tested; different manures and fertilizers and tured at home. It is a waste to send abroad for what
insecticides testecd&lnd different stocks experimented we can cheaply prepare at home. Almost every publi-
with. The best varieties from various countries could cation in Florida refers to the value of our muck, as a
be introduced, fruited, and If valuable, distributed. The fertilizer, and new-comers use it and poison their land
Curator could annually prepare and publish results for with humic acid. Our muck requires intelligent treat-
the benefit of the State. These could te issued in circu- ment, and the addition of a few simple substances to
lar form, data regarding tropical fruits, citrus culture produce manure equal to, if not superior to the artifl-
the results of experimentation in early vegetables ; and dial ones so extensively advertised and sold, and the
the seeker after facts could secure information. Coh- purchase of which impoveris es our farmers and vege-
cise statements and reliable facts and fiFures would ac- table-growers,
cormplish more tor the advancement o1 the State than There are annually sent out,by seedsmen a host of
the expensive pamphlets issued by the Bureau of Iam- new varieties of vegetable seeds, a very few superior to,
migration; for a man looks in vain for anything dell- and the many inferior to the old varieties. Truck grow-
nite in those publications-for as a rule they merely con- ers test them, and in a majority of Instances secure dim-
tain assertions and general statements, and in some appointment and loss. If an experimental garden ex-
cases unreliable information. If an experimental es- listed, new and old varieties could be grown side by side,
tablishmont existed, the Curator could annually pre- and the State benefited financially. In England, there
pare and publish results; and last, though not least, the is annually planted in the garden of the London Horti-
intending settler could -visit the garden, see for himself, cultural Society, all newly-introduced garden seeds, and
and in a few hours secure an amount of information re- cultivators have annual reports to guide them. In the
garding varieties, production, pruning and culture that past, truckers in Florida have made failures because
would require years to otherwise gain; and even the they were dependent on experiment, and these failures
old orange grower (unless he belonged to the genus will continue until an experimental garden is estab-
pachydernutta) could find new lights. The existence of lisheod, and practical results ascertained and published.
such a grove would improve the quality of our fruit in Although in its infancy, truck-growing in this State is
thie future, increase the annual yield and promote the doomed to assume great proportions. As evidence of
general welfare of orange growers. this, 1 need but state, that there was shipped in 1881, over
As regards pecuniary results, the experimental grove 500,00 crates of, vegetables. Such being the case, the
could be made self-sustaining, for the fruit could be business should be fostered, and every assistance ren-
marketed, and plants of newly introduced and valuable dered those who engage in the calling. Owing to her
varieties sold to nurserymen and others. The day is climatic advantages, none of the other States can com-
not far distant when oranges, like pears and apples, pete with Florida in early vegetable culture, and if the
will be marketed under distinct names, and a standard industry is aided it will tend to advance the material in-
grove should be established for purposes of comparisoif, terests of the State; and as new railroads are construct-
and where-varieties true to name could be secured for ed and transportation facilities increased, the markets
purposes of propagation. To illifstrate what can be ac- of a large portion of the Union will be supplied by Fkl.
complished in this direction, I shall merely refer to the ida. To illustrate the importance of experimenting, and
fact that the French Government found that there was the dissemination of knowledge, I may remark, that a
nothing definite known regarding the nomenclature of resident of Chuokaluskee fancied that he could grow
the vine; that one variety had many local names; that onions and compete with the productions of Bermuda.
several varieties were cultivated and sold under a simi- He carefully prepared his land and planted onions.
lar title. A collection was formed and about 1,400 va- They grew luxurianty, and when the crop was gathered
rieties were planted side by side. The result was the he was rewarded with a mass of tops, but few if any bulbs.
adoption of a correct nomenclature and the publication The next season he trampled and rendered his soil oom-
of an accurate description of each variety. From these pact, and the onions produced exceeded in size those
named vines nurserymen obtained cuttings for propa- grown in Bermuda. I am aware that this is a trilling
nation, and as a consequence, viti culture was placed on matter, but many such trifles occur annually in Flor-
a firm foundation. ida; and in the language of the old Scotch woman,
As a rule, Florida oranges are the best in the world ; "many a mickle makes a muckle." Ten years ago, an
but a few of the best varieties are worthy of the most ex- intelligent gentleman residing in one of the up-river
tended cultivation to the exclusion of the rest. At pres- counties, informed me that he had read much about the
est the yield is only about one-ninth of what is con- advantages of Florida muck and resolved upon using it.
sumed in the United States, and if the best varieties he placed it in furrows, covered it with soil and planted
were cultivated, foreign oranges would be excluded from beans, peas, &c. The seeds vegetated and plants flour-
our markets. Hence the importance of a correct nom- ished for a short time, when they died. He enquired the
enclature and the establishment of an experimental "reason why," and the answer was simple. 'The roots
grove, where varieties could be determined. At present, came in contact with the unprepared muck, and the
one variety is sold under several names, hence confu- plants were poisoned by humic acid an element con-
sion will result in the future. To illustrate the import- tained in the muck. And I will ask, how often has this
ance of introducing new varieties I shall cite but two occurred in this State, and if Florida has not been in-
cases in point: Some years since, iMr. Parsons, of Flush- Jured by statements published regarding the fertility
ing, L. I., introduced some orange trees and they were and use of muck? The muck of Florida is valuable, but
planted in his grove near Palatka. The labels were lost, requires preparation, and the proper methods of prepar-
and one gentleman obtained some buds from the trees. ing it should be published.
One tree fruited, and the product was submitted to the The Pine-apple sustains our position regarding the im-
Nomenclature Committee of the Florida Fruit Growers' portance of experimenting. Until recently the only
Association in March. The Committe maintained that variety in cultivation was the common one grown in
it was unripe, and had the fruit placed before them in the West Indies for exportation. Within a recent pe-
June, and the next year they tested it in August. The riod General Sanford introduced some superior varie-
Committee recommended its extended culture, and to- ties, and during the past season I examined and tested.
day we are in possession of an orange that can be mar- specimens of this noble fruit weighing eleven pounds-
keted in perfect condition from April to December, and specimens grown in this, the Garden State. The
when ordinary Florida oranges have fallen from the pine-apples of the West Indies are gathered before they
tree, or are as dry as sponges. The introduction of this are ripe, and even when eaten where grown they are of
variety prolongs the orange season through the entire inferior quality. The demand for this fruit in the mar-
year, and will materially add to the income of the State. kets of the United States is very great, and as soon as
several years since, General Van Valkenburgh and the demand can be supplied with Florida-grown pine-
Dr. Hall imported from Japan a variety of the Tange- apples the fruit of the West Indies will be excluded. In
rine, or Mandarin orange, which has been named "Sat- the southern portion of the State the common pines
suma." The fruit is large, sweet, juicy, early and seed- will produce from $300 to $500 per acre, and if the finer
less. The tree is dwarf in habit, the branches thornless varieties could be produced, and properly cultivated, the
and a remarkable early bearer. During the late severe yield per acre would be doubled. Gen. Santord and A. I.
winter, when the thermometer fell to 19, thie young trees Bidwell deserve the thanks of Floridians in this direction,
near Jacksonville and Fort George Island escaped un- they having imported many superior varieties. In Eng-
injured-in fact, did not lose a leaf. This introduction land,SouthAmerica and the East and West Indies many
will enable us to cultivate the orange successfully in all superior varieties are grown, and they should be intro-
portions of the State. If our ordinary varieties are hy- duced, tested and the best varieties disseminated. When
bridized with the Satsuma, a new race of oranges may fruit eaters of the North and West ascertain that such
be produced that will stand uninjured at all times in luscious and tender pine-apples can be obtained from
the northern portions of the State. Here we have an il- this State, the consumption will rapidly increase, and
lustration of the importance of new introductions and pine-apple culture will exceed, in pecuniary results or-
experiment. The orange crop of Florida is an import- ange growing. As this noble fruit cannot be successfully
ant one, and nothing should be neglected to perfect it. grown elsewhere in the United States, this State posses-
Like most of the Southern States, Florida is using ses a monopoly. Until the State became stocked with
large quantities of fertilizers, many of which are infe- the best varieties, the sale of plants from the experl-
rior. If an experimental farm and garden existed, the mental garden would bring in a handsome income. To
fertilizers could be tested and results published for the illustrate the adaptability of the State to pine-apple cul-
guidance of truck, fruit-growers and farmers. In a pam- ture, I need but remark, that a few months since there


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THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


under cultivation, a demand would arise for plants, and cultivation of a diversity of crops, and as a result, his
their introduction would prove a prove a prolltable in- chances are many and great.
vestment. As the capabilities and resources of Florida are so di-
Cobfee has been successfully grown as far north as versified and so little tested and known, we are of the
Manatee, and I cannot discover any reason why it can- opinion that it is the duty of the State, or large land
not be profitably produced in Southern Florida. As we owners to foster and encourage the introduction, culti-
proceed South towards the Equator, a higher altitude vation and dissemination of anything and everything
must be reached, so as to secure suitable climatic con- that is calculated to advance the pomological, horticul-
ditions, and it is not improbable that these conditions tural and agricultural resources of the State.
can be secured in this State independent of elevation. It is a costly improvidence to pay other States and
.When I visited the Island of Bermuda, some years countries for staples and productions which we can pro-
:since, I found coffee cultivated in the gardens at Hamil- duce and manufacture cheaper than they can be imi-
ton, and growing wild and fruiting freely near the Wal- ported. The greater the number of products which can
singham caves. be successfully grown in the State and the greater will
The Tea plant has been cultivated in this State, and be the number ol settlers, the greater will be the demand
found to grow as luxuriantly as in China. On the heavy for land, and the greater will be the exports which rail-
soils of Hernando and Leon Counties it should prove a roads and steamships will be called upon to transport
profitable crop, and each farmer should grow and pre- out of the State. Our transportation lines, business men,
pare enough for family use. land owners, and our State otlicials are interested, and
aMany years since, army officers planted Cocoanuts on they should lend a willing hand to aid in the develop-
the lower Indian liver and at Fort Meyers, and they ment of our American Italy. A diversity of cultures
have grown luxuriantly and fruited freely. Within a and employment, and an industrial independence of
few years this nut has been planted freely on some of other States and countries will most effectually promote
the Keys, and it can be successfully grown near the the welfare of our people. The greater the number of
coast on the southern portion of the Peninsula. As evi- crops produced, the greater will be the income, and the
deuce of this, I need but cite the fact that it grows luxu- more money will our citizens have to indulge in travel,
riantly as far north as Mandingo Key and Pine Island the luxuries of life, in education, and in everything*that
in Charlotte Harbor, and at Fort Meyers, on the Caloo- is calculated to refine and elevate a people.
sahatchee River. Several years since, Major Evans pre- If amn experimental farm and garden was established
sented me with a nut grown at Fort Meyers, and the at some suitable point, intending settlers, residents and
husk measured 3,1 inches in one circumference, and 37 visitors would visit it. If such a place existed where all
in the other. the tropical fruits could be collected, and where every
In the near future, Sugar will become the staple crop in vegetable, fruit and product adapted to the State could
Florida. It is not generally known, but we pay an im- be grown, not even neglecting Flora's brightest
port duty of about 3Y2 to 4A cents per pound on sugar, gems, thousands who annually visit Florida every win-
and the amount paid for this luxury and allied products ter would indulge in a trip to the farm and garden, and
since 1848 has exceeded by about $100,000,000 the it would become a second Mecca.
entire yield of the precious metals obtained during the Almost every article written about Florida, and al-
same period from the mines of the Western States and most every real estate advertisement, refers more espe-
Territories. The import duty will enable us to compete cially to orange culture, and that Florida offers an asy-
with Cuba; and as soon as slave labor is abolished in lunm to the invalid. I admit the importance and profits
the Faithful Isle, which will occur at an early day, of orange culture; but if another frost like that of 1836
Southern Florida will become the home of sugar cul- should visit theStite,good-bye to the income from orange
ture, sugar cane requiring a long season, a high ther- culture and the railroad freights for four years from the
mometric range and a heavy rainfall during the hot northern portions of the State. We have a climate that
months to render it a profitable crop. It is admitted is imminently adapted to the alleviation and cure of pul-
that the successful culture of sugar cane requires an an- monary diseases, and invalids should be welcomed and
nual mean temperature of not less than 75. The mean induced to enjoy our unrivalled climatic advantages;
of Baton Rouge is 6801'; of Havana, 759' ; and of Fort but we require something more than invalids to develop
Myers, 750. Thus we see that the annual mean of Ha- time latent resources of our State. What we require is the
vana, Cuba, only exceeds that of Southern Florida by bone and sinew of other lands, and to induce hard-fisted
less than one degree. A heavy rainfall during the warm working men to settle among us we must practically
months is a necessity for the thirsty cane, and its wants demonstrate that Florida is capable of producing some-
in this respect are supplied in South Florida. In Baton thing more than oranges, and make it, something more
Rouge, La., the summer rainfall is in round than a climatic resort for invalids and tourists. 'rofes-
numbers 19; in Havana, 14; and at Fort Meyers, 31 sional views regarding sanitarial change and tourist
inches. In Louisiana, the cane has to be planted an- travel, may be diverted to some other section. II per-
nually, and owing to early frosts, as a rule, it must be chance, these conditions should arise, we will discover
cut in October. 1 have been credibly informed that the when too late, that the varied resources of the State
cane in Louisiana does not average more than sixteen should be developed.
ripened joints, and it does not tassel. As the annual At present, immigrants, tourists and visitors cannot
growth is not attained, saccharine perfection is not form a just idea of the productions and resources oe the
reached. In Southern Florida the spring, fall and win- State, and they view the statements of immigration and
ter are comparatively dry, which favors the earlier real estate agents with suspicion; but if an experi-
growth of the cane and the ripening process. During mental farm and garden was established, at some suita-
the summer months, when the cane requires a large ble and accessible point, they could see growing and ex-
amount of moisture to insure its development, the rain- amine the various productions adapted to the State.
fall is 31 inches. Owing to the length of the season, the that would practically illustrate the great resources
absence of frost and the dry ana warm autumn, the and advantages of Florida. One such establishment
(cane attains full saccharine development. In Southern would do more to settle up the State than all the ad-
Florida, the cane does not require annual planting, as vertlsements that could be printed, and all the mnmii-
in Louisiana, but rattoons and produces from four to gration pamphlets that could be published; for such
seven crops from the same land. Instead of being cut in publications merely deal in general statements that have
October, as in Louisiana, the cane can remain standing but little weight with intending settlers, who require
until new canes are forming. Instead of an average of figures and facts, or actual demonstration.
sixteen joints, as in Louisiana, the cane of South Flor- The productions of the farm and garden, owing to
Ida will produce twice that number, and in some stout careful and thorough cultivation and fertilizing, would
canes we examined from Indian River, there existed probably be superior to those raised by residents, and
from 48 to 5b fully ripened joints. When the rich allu- would command a good price; and, articles sold could
vial lands of South Florida are drained (and they will be made to pay a part, if not all of the expenses of the
be by the Disston ComIpany), sugar lands superior to establishment, and at no distant day a margin of profit.
those of Louisiana will be available, and Florida will 1 shall be met with the enquiry, where are the ferniliz-
become the sugar producing State of the Union. We do ersto be obtained to produce luxuriant crops ? Muck of
not speak theoretically, for, independent of reliable data tne best quality is obtainable in endless quantities, and
obtained from responsible parties, we have examined it merely requires proper (r(iuimit 1 remove /ie hu'namic
thie cane and lands of South Florida. We are assured acid and the addition of a few substances to make it a
that that section will at an early day become the home perfect manure. If thie establishment was located at somei
of cane culture, but the day can be hastened if the Diss- suitable point a fishery could be established, market-
ton Company will experiment in cane culture and pub- able fish sold, and the refuse nsh converted into oil and
lish actual results, guano. At present the value or rish guano is over dou
iUntil recently, cotton and oranges were the main cul- per ton, and if the manufacture was conducted onailarge
tures to the neglect of other crops. But a few years scale, a portion of the product might be sold and a profit
since a few enterprising persons engaged in Strawberry realized. W ith regard to fish, I may remark, that in no
culture, and Florida berries can be lound in the North- portion of the world are fish as plentiful and as easily
ern markets in January, February and March. T'he cul- captured as in certain portions of Floriuma.
ture has already attained such proportions that one en- You will probably remark that, "the cost of establish-
terprising shipper has constructed a large number of re- lng an experimental farm and garden would be a serious
frigerator safes, in which berries can be kept for days affair." United states lanus could be purchased, and 1
and safely shipped to market. Even strawberry culti- feel assured that the Disston Company would donate a
vation is open to experiment, for there is grown in the sufficient quantity. The Agricultural Department ac
dry and hot climate of Chili a white strawberry of good W ashington would, no doubt, contribute, and by a sys-
quality, firm flesh and very large in size of berry, which tem of exchanges with Botanic wardens abroad, many
would appear to be peculiarly adapted to Florica. plan t and seeds could be received; and I feel assured


S O d that the citizens of our State would contribute. Through
Eveni the Olive finds its home in Flornida; and if this the influence oi our E english friends, specimens might be
tree was cultivated we would s(on become independent obtained irom the Kew Botanic Crenms. 'Througl thec
of the Mediterranean. Within four miles of where the Aminericn Consuls abroad, tropical andsemiou-topical
writer of this is seated, there is an olive tree that in 1881 climates could be made tributary. i the curator was
produced over 30 bushels of fruit. f it is found that one posmated could pull many strings, and ithin a limited
tree is productive, the experiment of more extended period, and t a siall outlay, ine could secure a collec-
cultivation is worthy of consideration ion athat would a stonis the uninitiated
As evidence of the tropical character of a portion of What is-required in our State, is a practical knowledge
Florida, I can state that the Mangoe, Avocado Pear, of the propagation and culture of products adapted to
Sapodilla, Sour sops, Guavas and other tropical fruits the climate; and if all experimental farm and garden
have been produced in the greatest perfection; and could be established, employes would acquire the neces-
from observations in this State and other lands, we feel sary knowledge and would be prepared to apply it, Ior
assured that all the luscious fruits of the tropics can be the benefit of themselves and emnpioyers. t ioraiy' o
grown in the "Land of Flowers." And when the lovers works appertaining to botany, agriculture, horticulture
of Pomona's choicest tit-bits, who reside in the North and agricultural chemistry could be provided ior the
and West, taste of the unequalled fruits of the tropics, benefit of employes, and at leisure times they could be-
Florida will reap a rich return. What has already been come grounded in the theoretical part of their calling.
accomplished by private enterprise in the introduction The curator might give weekly lectures on the theory
and cultivation of tropical fruits should act as an incen- and practice of horticulture and agricultural chemistry.
tive to large landed proprietors in developing the varied Thie advantages resulting from such a library would be
resources of the State. great, and would tend to advance the agricultural and
Independent of articles specially referred to, Arrow horticultural resources of the State. As an illustration,
Root, Castor Oil Beans, Cassava, and numerous other I may remark that, almost every writer on Florida has
things troni tropical and semi-tropical climes can be referred to "Florida muck;" and nineteen out of every
successfully produced in this favored land. The ques- twenty who have used it have been disappointed with
tion occurs to me, what fruit, vegetable, tubor, cereal or the results. They did not possess the book knowledge
fibre-producing plant is there that cannot be successful- to enable them to rid -it of its humic acid and thereby
ly and profitably grown in some portions of this favored render it fit for plant-food. In the N north and INs est tihe
land ? crops cultivated are but few, and a knowledge of their
In the North and 'West, cultivators of the soil are con- culture is easily acquired, but the crops adapted to Flor-
fined to a few crops, and if these fail, owing to frost or a ida are so varied, and their cultures so different from
dry or wetseason, tmhe condition of thle treasury is any- those of the North, that practical training would prove
thing but satisfactory. But in Florida the climate and advantageous, if not almost a necessity to success.
seasons are favorable. The farmer can engage in time You will probably ridicule some of my apparently


Utopian views, but I assure you that they are based on
observation and the experience of other lands. For a
man to become successful in any occupation he should
be educated and posted with regard to everything apper-
taining to such calling. We have much of practical ex-
perience, and however valuable it may be, it has gener-
ally been received as a sequence of much bungling and
many failures. What will apply in the learned profes-
sions will apply to agriculture and horticulture. What
I will ask, would become of the lame, sick and halt, it
physicians depended entirely on practical experience ?
What would become of our civil engineers if they relied
entirely on practical experience and ignored figures and
the theory of these and their calling ? Where would
our lawyers be if they depended on practical experience,
and failed to familiarize themselves with the principles'
of law as laid down by Blackstone? I will admit that
practical and experienced agriculturists and horticultu-
rists 'succeed without theoretical knowledge; but I
maintain that they would be more successful if they
were thoroughly versed in the theory and practice of ag-
riculture and horticulture, and at least in the elements
of agricultural chemistry. Old fogies, the Rip Van Win-
kles of even to-day, can be found, who ridicule "book
learning," butit is nevertheless valuable, and more espe-
cially in a State like this, where the productions are so
varied.
If an experimental farm and garden was established;
annual reports could be prepared and published regard-
ing vegetable, agricultural and pomological introduc-
tions, the yield per acre, market prices obtained, best
varieties to cultivate, and other facts. The various news-
papers and agricultural journals of the State would only
e too happy to publish such reports. The data so ob-
tained would be reliable and would be received as such.
I will ask, why has Kansas made such strides in set-
tlement and advancement ? Simply because those who
had lands to sell clubbed together, appointed a Land
Commissioner, and formed a traveling exhibit of the
productions of the State, and sent out such collection to
the various State fairs. If such a course was adopted by
the State of Florida, and her varied productions exhib-
ited at agricultural fairs in the Northern and Western
states, attention would be directed to the State and
rapid settlement and development would result. Casts
could be made of perishable articles, or they could be
preserved in alcohol. With a slight effort and a moder-
ate expenditure, a Florida exhibit could be collected and
prepared that would astonish the residents of other
States, and would convince the most skeptical that the
productions of Florida excel in number and market
value those of all the other States combined.
Those having large landed interests in the State are
especially interested in the establishment of an experi-
mental farm and garden. At present there are many
millions of acres in the market begging for purchasers ;
and if the Okeechobee Drainage Company and the Coast-
wise Canal Company succeed in their enlorts the quan-
tity will be greatly increased. Then again, there are the
railroad lands to be sold. To effect the sale of this vast
body of land and to settle up and develop the resources
of the State, systematic efforts should be made to prove
that the State is worthy of notice; that it will produce
more than oranges; that all the crops of the Northern,
Western and Southern States can be successfully grown
in Florida, and many others that cannot be produced
elsewhere. But to establish these facts, cultural experi-
mients are a necessity. in connection with the publica-
tion and wide circulation of actual facts and figures.
Statements and assertions will not satisfy the masses,
and something more definite should be published.
We conceive it to be to the interest of those who own
large tracts of land in this State to establish at some suit-
able point al farm and garden like the one indicated; or
else lor the Trustees ol the Agricultural College Fund to
found a College and an Agricultural farm and garden ;
and we feel assured that the Legislature, as well as the
Disston and Reed syndicates, would lend a helping hand.
One of the first things would be to appoint a president
and a curator. In the commencement a nucleus could
be established and the garden and farm practical-
ly started, and year by year additions could be made,
and within a limited period a college could be estab-
lished and the farm and garden in productive operation.
Instead of sending our children abroad to obtain an
education, they could be educated in our own State; and
apprentices and laborers could be instructed in the theo-
retical and practical details of horticulture and agricul-
ture, and properly qualified to till their own planta-
tions or those of others. To prove that the residents of
other States take more interest in the advancement of
Florida than do Floridians, I need but remark that I
have in my possession a letter from an old and valued
friend, who oiers to donate to the Florida Agricultural
College, when it is established, a Museum of Natural
History, worth 50,000.
The question arises, shall we have an Experimental
Farnm and Garden and an Agricultural College, and de-
velop the varied resources oi our State, or shall we "grub
along" guided by the old fogy doctrine of practical ex-
perience, and raise cotton and corn and live on "hog and
niominy ?"'


There is a bright future for Florida, and advantage
should be taken of every resource to develop her vast
resources. We should not confine ourselves to practical
experience, and depend upon the publication of asser-
tions and statements.
In the above hastily penned pages I have set the ball
in motion, and trust that others will discuss the subject
pro and con. 1 may be in error as regards my views,
but I am at least honest in expressing them.
c. J. K.
JACKSoON VILLE, October 30th, 1882.

Women and Dress.
It is possible, (as the Cincinnati Commercial observes,)
for a woman of good taste, to make herself not only pre-
sentable, but attractive in calico at five cents a yard. It
is the art of knowing how to dress, rather than the cost-
liness of the material used in dressing, that tells. There
is a vulgar notion abroad that a woman is not dressed
unless she is loaded down with the costliest of fabrics
and jewels to correspond, yet we have seen women in
the plainest of dresses so admirably corresponding to
their complexion And figure, that they outshine the
more elaborately dressed women in a society gathering.
What is needed is good taste in the selection and make-
up of the material, and even then we are inclined to
adopt Dr. Johnson's idea that thIe woman whose con-
versation is so charming as to make one forget how she
is dressed, is the best dressed woman in the assembly,
where a display of fine clothes is thought to be the chief
point of interest.


-0 -P I - L mw-* mmm q.__p







533 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Taxing Young Orange Groves.
P. M. OLIVER, in the Gainesville Advocate,
gives us these sensible, pertinent and just ideas
on the matter of taxing young orange groves
Is it right, or just, that parties investing
their money in land and young orange groves,
with eight to twelve years' hard work and care-
ful cultivating before a dollar clear can be re-
alized, to be compelled to pay taxes according
to the value an Assessor may think a young
grove is worth ? I contend that such a law is
unjust. This plan is simply imposing a tax on
a man's prospects.
Supposing that a man has $1,000 and invests
it all in land, trees and labor, and he is comn-
pelled to pay tax on the supposed value of this
prospect for a grove-and after his last dollar
is exhausted in improving and preparing this
future prospect, about the time his trees are be-
ginning to bear, there should come a freeze and
kill out all and leave him worse than nothing
but his land? All of his money, labor and the
best energies of his life in them gone. This
would be a sad picture, indeed. I think that
land on which a young grove is planted should
be taxed according to the value of the land
alone. Then a special income tax might be
placed on the fruit as it matures, or the money
realized therefrom, from year to year. Never
tax a man on his prospects. What country
would enforce laws to tax a man on the pros-
pect of a cotton, corn, or wheat crop, before the
farmer has realized money from it ? To do this
would be to tax a man's chances or expecta-
tions. Who can foresee the ravages of the
caterpillar on cotton, or grasshopper on wheat
crops ? The same reasoning holds well with the
chances of a young orange grove being killed
by freezes. Who knows when such damages
and losses are to occur ? In the case of des-
tructive freezes to a young grove the result is
much more damaging ; for in this instance, not
like one year's work on cotton or wheat is lost,
but part (and a good part) of a man's life time
of labor and money is lost; and he, in his old
age, has nothing to fall back on. Any one
with a knowledge of orange growing must know
that each and every year a young grove is being
worked is an annual expense and no income.
Then, in all justice, let the government wait, as
the owner of a young grove does, until there is
an income before imposing a tax on his mere
prospects.
I have heard it surg.ested by some, that a
young grove should be taxed after a certain
term of years. This would not work well, be-
cause some groves are more valuable and on
better land; hence they come into profitable
bearing sooner.
Tax orange groves only on the income, let
the money be much or little; and should the
grove be killed down, then let the taxes stop,
and then tax only the land. Others reasoning


on this subject, say that a man should be taxed
in proportion to what the young grove might
sell for. In this instance, let the State wait
until said grove is sold for the money, and then
tax the fortunate seller's money, as is the case
with all other money owned. A young grove
is not money until it is sold; or the fruit there-
from is made and sold. No insurance can be
had against caterpillar on cotton, grasshoppers
on wheat, or freezes on orange groves; hence
they are mere games of chance, and unlike
other investments and enterprises. I repeat that
a man's chances and prospects should not be
taxed.

DON'T WASTE THE "BnRUH."-Some men
burn all their brush from the trimmings of or-
chards, lawn trees and shrubs. Brush cut up
fine and put beneath shrubs and trees will add


rapidly to their growth as it rots. We put No Patent on Bee Hives.
some thickly beneath a few trees on a poor san- W. S. HAur, the well-known agriculturist of
dy soil a few years ago, says one, and although New Smyrna, Fla., writes us:
they had nearly stopped in their growth, as Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
soon as this brush began to decay they started I have received a circular from a Mr. Z. G.
out fresh and have grown as fast as other trees Hege, agent for the Diehl Bee Hive, with the
on the same kind of soil have done under hope expressed in an accompanying letter that I
which we spread at the sae time a moderate may be induced to purchase the right of the
hih we spre at the s tie a moderate State of Florida. He has struck the wrong
coating of staple manure. It is much better to man this time ; and that my less-posted brother
utilize brush in this way than to burn it. Vine- bee-keepers may not be led to purchase worth-
growers in Europe have long thus used the less patent rights, or be frightened into paying
cuttings of their grape vines to mulch and fer- a royalty on any that they may have in use, I
til th will state that there is no valid patent on any of
ti iz .cin. the best hives in use, or any part or fixture
thereof.
7OrJ' .f3 ~0 Y.4 Any money paid to Mr. Hege, or any other
man, for a patent right on bee hives, is worse
Indian River- Booming." than wasted. I know whereof I speak, and if
Edito.s of The 'lori,,, Jp, .h.: Mr. Hege thinks that I have wronged him, he
Mr. Editor-1 have re -entiy come from Tennessee to knows where to find me. I will say that I have
this Indian River country. I have made a tour of the
river to Jupiter Inlet, and lind it to be one of the most never met the man, and do not know but that
beautiful sheets of water I ever bl.ohO, a onli,~ in he is honest in his claims as far as he knows.
millions ofr tish; oyster bars by the acre, and some of the Yours, respectfully,
old citizens realize from four to seven hundred dollars V. S. HART.
for their winter's work catching g'.en t.rtl. As I hear i
it talked, oranges, lemons and limes are considered the Peaches in Florida'.
most profitable crops to raise; then pine-apples loom up 1882.
into the hundreds of dollars per. acre- annual income. BIRMINGHAM, ALA., 1882.
Some claim to have realized as much as w,4li, SO0, and Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
even at the rate of $1,2010 an acre. Bananas yield from
600 to 1,000 bunches, with from 50 to 200 pods to the Dear Sirs-I am desirous of coming to Flor-
bunch, and pay 2I.0; to $400 an acre; then comnies onions,
tomatoes, beans, egg plants and other vegetables esti- ida for the purpose of raising fruit and vegeta-
mated at from 50 to $,00 an acre roit. sugar (1ae is blues, and want to know of you what part of
one of the staple crops of this country, and will payro
from $75 to $100 net profit per acre. One man cain sup- the State is surest for peaches. Could you re-
port a family on five acres, with his vegetables, and at commend Archer or Bronson ? Please reply.
the same time bring on his grove. Some tell me here commend Archer reply.
that one single acre will yield a larger net profit than a, Very much oblige. Yours
one hundred acre farm in the interior part of the State j rY rs
in corn or cotton, aye than our Tennessee farms. I am VV E. T.
referred to Mr. Harris, who bought a. wild sour grove on
Orange Lake, and in three years had a bearing grove; REPLY.-Our friend LIPSEY had fine Peen-
also to Major Norris, at Spring Garden, who improved
a wild grove to great profit. I would like to know the To peaches at Archer last April, and sold some
proper season of the year for underbrushing and clear-
ing the forest growth from among the orange trees; what of them in Philadelphia at marvelous prices--
disposition to make of it; when to top the trees; when vnty-fe cents each! We believe the Peen-
to bud and how to cultivate, &c. The whole mdus op-c hbe
erandi of those who have been so successful, and, Mr. To, the Honey, and some native seedlings su-
Editor, as you are the people's friend, and supposed to te ome su-
be thoroughly posted in the true merits of Florida, I ceed in all the dry uplands of Florida, espec-
ask your advice.
Major Magruder has 186 acres of land in what is known ally where there is clay not far from the sur-
here as Turnbull swamp; low, rich, marl land, with a
large, sour orange grove upon it, and within two and a face. We mail our correspondent THE Dis-
half miles of the Hspartslnan Hotel, on the Hillsboroughi
River. He offers me an undivided one-half interest for PATCH of October 9th, containing an ex-
$2,50,), if I will obligate to procure hands and develop
(he property, he paying one-half the expense and allow- cellent article on this subject.--EDS.
ing me wages for superintending., le proposes to'devel-
op the orange grove, raise bananas, sugar cane and veg- i
tables, for all of which these lands are claimed to be Fine Poultry-High Prices.
well adapted. Please tell me what, you would think of
such an investment, as to poosp.ls of success, price, &c. Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Merritt's Island is attract in attention now as the fa-
vored spot -for growing pine-apples. Messrs. Black, I notice a recent article in your excellent
White, Hescock, BoISPATC on the high price of Plymouth
others, claim fabulous results, variously estimated from RcISPAId, othe e hign price Ot teymouth
$-00 tol.1.a!r an acre income. The demand for plants Rock and other "fancy" fowls at the North.
was not half filled this season, although there were sev- r n f
eral boats running to Key Largo all summer. S. That there is a good reason for this, a "Poultry
Rydes, of Itockledge, has some 65,000 set; Knight Breeder in Dixie Farmner, thus attempts to
Brothers 50,000, Col. Gibson 30,000, on St. Sebastian ; Ma-
gruder on Jupiter Island, Rawson, Cofron, Baker, En- show : Yours, D. W. P.
sey, Schuyler, Moss, and others, setting every plant they "This business in the South is yet in its in-
can get, and orders for thousands unfilled.
The orange crop of Indian River is not large, but fruit fat cy. It is possible, and, I think, almost cer-
large and fine. Delightful weather, perfect health and .
a happy, contented people. Yours, tain, that it will ere long assume large propor-
c.w. J. tons. Northern poultrymen are all pretty
REPLY.-Our correspondent certainly pre- well posted. They take poultry journals, and
sents a very rosy view of matters and things on space is given to poultry matters in their agri-
Indian River: but while we do not doubt the cultural journals. I am glad to see the Dixie


statements he rehearses, or that most of his Farm'er fully abreast with the times in this res-
pect. The questions, What are useful and
"facts are true," some little allowance must be practical ? What are the elements of success
made for the natural and pardonable partiality in the business of poultry raising, feeding and
of the residents and land-owners of that fattening? we set down for the consideration of
favored region in regard to their own special your readers a few items:
locality. Any of the old settlers will give him Having determined what breeds you will try,
be sure to get pure thoroughbred, and well
all necessary information respecting the proper marked and developed stock to begin with.
time and mode of clearing land, planting or- There is much difference is this respect with
ange trees, etc., etc. ; but that business proposal chickens as with horses or cattle.
to which he alludes is a matter touching which The best breeders of stock and poultry sac-
we could ot form ay opinion without rifice two-thirds of their raising to common
we could not form any opinion without goinguses, after paying high prices and looking care-
"over the whole ground" and examining all fully after strains and pedigrees. You may ex-
the bearings and details.-EDS. pect to pay high prices. The man from whom
,PERSONS ORDERIT GOO)S .FROM AD you purchase has paid more for a single cock
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS- and hen than he asks you for a trio. To buy
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO- cheap is the first mistake of the beginner, and
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT. years of care are necessary to mend matters,


--~ I- a II~-- --- ~I- --~ I ~- ~---s -rm ~-~IPi~-r -n ~a~ II---------- ----- -------Y-~~-r~a I~IIC- I I __






T 11E F LORIDA 1) S PATC II C


and often it is found necessary to close out and
begin over again. Let no parsimonious and
mistaken idea of economy mislead you.
To raise fine poultry, full sized, well marked
with beauty, health and utility, you must have
good stock to start with. A mistake here is
fatal."


(t' sr4-
Sheep vs. Guano.
VALDOSTA, GrA., October 4, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
I have been a constant and interested reader
of THE DISPATCH for about two years, and
have been much pleased with its general make-
up. We, of South Georgia, while not engaged
in orange culture, are much interested in the
success of our neighbors across the line, not only
in orange, culture, but in fruit and vegetable-
growing generally, and as fertilizers are in-
dispensable in successful planting, I ask for a
little space to pay my respects to the sheep as
competitor of the guano gentry of our country.
It is well known that ordinary scrub sheep will
pay a dividend on the capital invested, from 50
to 100 per cent. in wool, and increase. If this is
so, where can you find a better investment;
Now, as the raiser of manure, the sheep is a
much greater success. There is no animal of
equal size that is half as valuable in this respect ?
and to those why have had the good fortune to
have a sheep-fold on their premises, it is unnec-
essary to speak; but to those who wish a good
manure that costs absolutely nothing, and is
superior, pound for pound, to the general com-
mercial fertilizers that are being palmed off at
three cents per pound, I would say, get a flock
of sheep and pen them every night, and my
word for it, after you have done it for three
months you will not have to be advised to pen
them. They get very gentle, and in a very short
while, you will only have to shut the gate, as
they will come home and pen themselves.
As sheep are kept for wool only in this coun-
try, it is all-important that the scrub stock be
transformed into a Merino or some other breed
noted for wool, as rapidly as possible, which can
be done without any trouble, by getting pure
bucks. I would recommend the Merino, as I
have tried them, and there will be no trouble to
double your clip of wool and have just as hardy
sheep. Respectfully, J. A. DASHER.

DATES IN KEY WEST.-A late Key qf the
Gulf says: "At the auction room of Messrs.
COLEMAN & BARTLUM, a few mornings since,
we found some dozen or more clusters of ripe
Dates, from the grove of Mr. PITCHER. Each
cluster weighed not less than from fifty to sev-
enty pounds. They were scarlet-colored and
delicious."

MANDARIN JUTE.-The St. Augustine Press


tells us that Mr. George Reynolds, who has. a
farm near Mandarin, sent a sample of jute,
which he raised on his farm at that place, to a
leading rope and twine manufacturer of Phila-
delphia, who pronounced it the finest they have
ever seen. This is truly encouraging to farm-
ers and others throughout the State, and we
trust to see many other productions raised with
profit which are native to the soil and climate
of our State. It is not only the orange and
lemon which Florida will in the future produce
to perfection, but other productions which oc-
cupy, at present, aA permanent position in the
principal standard staples manufactured and
used in the United States.


Cotton and Meat.
The following timely counsel from the Yazoo
(Miss.) Herald, is well suited to other southern
latitudes:
Planters should prepare to sow oats, rye and
barley for winter pasturage.
It takes two pounds of cotton to buy one
pound of bacon ; and this state of things will
exist so long as our planters have their smoke-
houses in the west. Poverty, hunger andl
want are in store for such a people.
When the wives and children of the planters
of Mississippi cry to them for bread, and their
farms are taken from them under the hands of
the sheriff's hammer, they may then possibly
change their mode of farming and raise what
they eat at home. Twenty cents a pound for
meat and ten cents for cotton will in a very
short'time beggar any people in the world.
Planters raise your meat at home another
year, and thus keep want from your door. The
day may come that your wife and children will
come to you for bread, and there is no bread in
the house, if you persist in neglecting hog rais-
ing and thereby be forced to pay 20 cents a
pound for meat; we say the day may come.
Meat is now per pound, cash. How long will the planters
own the land they live upon at these prices,
when cotton is only selling at ten cents ? We
think that three or four years will completely
wipe them up. In view of these facts, will
they not be induced, and see it largely to their
interests, to raise their meat at home ? Poverty
and hard living only await the farmer who
pursues the opposite course, and continues to
have his smoke-house in the west.
THE HONEST ENGLISH FARMER !--We are
informed by an English contemporary that at
a great northern British seaport the largest
customers of the oleomargarine importers are
farmers of the surrounding country. They take
it home with them in casks, work it up into
"rolls" or "shapes" and retail it in the market
as the genuine product of the Brilish dairy. As
the difference between the pure "butterine"
and fresh butter is from sixpence to a shilling
a pound, the profits are large.

BURIEI) F(O,:,STs.-Geological examination
of the delta of the Mis;issippi now shows that
for a distance of about three hundred miles
there are buried forests of large trees, one over
the other, with interstices of sand. Ten dis-
tinct forest growths of this description have
been observed, which, it is believed, must have
succeeded each other. Of these trees, known
as bald cypress, some have been found over
twenty-five feet in diameter, and one contained
5,700 rings; in some instances too, huge trees


have grown over the stumps of others equally
large. From these facts geologists have as-
sumed the antiquity of each forest growth at
10,000 years, or 100,000 for all.
ENCOURAGING MANUFACTURES.--A Maitland
(Fla.) correspondent says : "Will you please
encourage manufacture, such as would pay in
this country, give direction to build water pow-
ers, tell how much a creek will give of horse
power ; how much a saw, gin, grist-mill, small
circular saw, turning-lath, &c., will need ?" We
shall be happy to meet the wishes of our corre-
spondent, and throw our columns wide open for
the replies of Engineers, Machinists, Practical
Saw-Mill and Lumbermen, &c. We are not
fully up to the tecnichs of the arts to which he
alludes and we must refer the matter to more
accomplished "experts."-EDS.


METEOROLOGICAL REPORT
Weather for week ending November 10, 1882.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION, )
SIGNAL SERVICE, U. S. A., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Therin.m wind. -

4p ;j----
DATE. z


Saturday .1....... 29.97 04157 60.0 86.0 0.00 N i15 Cloudy.
Sunday 5....... 30.0 63 56 58.0 81.7 0.00 N 6iFair.
Monday 6........ 30.11 66 533 58.3 75.3 0.00 NE 4 Clear.
Tuesday 7........ 30.2170 56 60.0 78.3 0.00 NE 31Clear.
Wednesday 8.. 3-Y.26069'a53 60.7 176.3 0.00 NE 41Clear.
Thursday 9 .. 3024i73i55i 63.3 76.7 0.00 NE lIClear.
Friday 10 ........ 30.23761571 65.3 77.0 0.00 NE liClear.
Highest barometer 30.30, lowest 29.93.
Highest temperature 76, lowest 53.
NoTre.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Observer U. S. A.

PHYLLOXERA IN THE GRAPE.--We learn
fro m foreign journals that Prof. Balbiani, who
11 as been trustedd by the French Minister of
Agriculture with the pr sccutions of experi-
ments directed toward theexteimination of the
g rape phylloxera, has returned a report to the
Government detailing in brief his investiga-
tions relative to the destruction of the winter
eggs of the insect. M. Balbiani finds, as the
result of carefully conducted experiments, that
the readiest and the most thorough means for
accomplishing this end is the method of "paint-
ing" the most affected portions of the plant
with a mixture of coal tar and heavy oil, in
the proportion of nine parts of the former to
one of the latter. This mixture possesses a
much greater penetrating power than the mix-
ture of simple water and heavy oil, recommen-
ded by Boiteau and Lafitte, whose efforts were
principally confined to the superficial layers of
the bark, and which consequently left the more
deeply-seated eggs untouched. The prepara-
tion of coal tar and heavy oil, on the other
hand, penetrates completely through the bark
to the wood, as is proved by the black stains
left in its track. The only precaution necessary
i n the use of this toxic mixture is to prevent
its access to the young shoots, which are as in-
variably destroyed by it as the leaves and other
green parts of the plant."

Oranges and Cotton.
James A. Harris, of Citra, writes the Flor-
ida Union, of 7th November: "The prospect
fbra very large orange crop in this section is
good. I am now getting off a car load a day,
an d after ten days will get off eight or nine
car loads a week. There will be about four


car loads shipped from this station daily after
about ten days. The cotton crop is very
short."

FARM ACCoUNTs.-The real practical value
there is in keeping farm accounts consists in
this: When a farmer keeps such an account
in his operations, he is able, by annually cast-
ing up his balances, to see just what crop and
what line of his farm operations have paid him
best. If any line of cropping in a series of
years is thus shown not to be so profitable as
some other crop, these definite data enable him
to correct his mistakes and determine on some
new line of procedure. The most of business
men who fail find on a revision of their trans-
actions, too loosely kept, that in reality they
had failed months, and sometimes years, before
the fact was revealed to them.


- --------------F--------






53 2 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


C--' G
Poultry Notes.

CATARRH.-"This disease consists of a cold in
the head, and is often attended by a watery
discharge from the eyes and nostrils. It does
not always lead to roup. It is apt, however,
to extend itself to the air tubes, and then we
call it bronchitis. This effect may be known
by the coughing of the fowl. Keep fowls thus
affected in moderately warm quarters and feed
entirely with warm food. Should the fowl act
feverish, a few drops of tincture of aconite in
warm water will benefit. Be sure that the
catarrh is not a case of roup. The symptoms
are much the same as those attending roup,
and catarrh is often mistaken for that more
serious disease. As we said above, as soon as
discovered the fowl should be taken to a dry,
warm room, fed on soft, warm food ; eight drops
of tincture of aconite is advisable, mixed in a
pint of water. If they do not recover in a few
days, and especially if the discharge at the
beak becomes of a putrid character, consider
that they have the group, and give the German
roup pills, by all odds the best remedy for that
disease that we know of."-Poultry World.
Catarrh is sometimes troublesome in Florida,
during cold, rainy spells in the fall and winter.
A noted breeder at the North advises us to "give
them ginger in their food, when affected with
this disease." We seldom have seen cases of
roup, unless the catarrh is neglected ; but we
will copy what the Poultry World says of it:
"Roup has been described fully, by us, many
times in years past, and we are almost tired
with answering this simple question, What is
Roup ? But we reply once more, That roup is
variously understood in various sections, to be
the result of poor care for the ordinary needs
of domestic fowls; or it manifests itself among
the flocks where they are unduly exposed to
wet tenements or filthy runs; it will break out
when bad food is given to the birds; or it comes
from allowing them access to filthy barn-yards
and rotten muck heaps, where they sip the pu-
trid water they thus obtain, instead of the pure,
fresh drink they require daily. It is also com-
municated from roupy fowls which are allowed
to run with healthy ones. Its distinguishing
symptom is an ill-smelling discharge at the
beak, with generally a swollen head.
"If poultry-keepers will give their birds
proper attention as to feed, shelter and cleanli-
ness, and keep handy a box or two of the Ger-
man Roup Pills, to be had from this office
(which have proved so remarkably efficacious
in treating fowls affected with incipient roup),
they may at trifling expense, stave off this dis-
ease, or restore their afflicted fowl-stock with
great certainty. This is the best advice we can
give-and the above hints as to What Roup is,
we submit as the result of personal experience
for years, in managing domestic poultry."


[The German Roup Pills may be obtained
from H. H. STODDARD, Poultry World office,
Hartford, Conn., at 50 cents per box.]

ROOF FOR POULTRY-HOUSE.-A corre-
spondent of HARKER'S Poultry Bulletin de-
scribes a cheap water-proof roof for a poul-
try-house. He says:
"I should like to have the readers of the Bul-
letin know how a cheap and tight roof for their
hen-houses can be made. Have built two that
stood the test for six years. The roof consists
of boards, batting and paint. Good boards
of an inch thick, planed both sides, and not
matched, should be procured, then make a
groove i of an inch from the edge of each
board, i of an inch wide and I of an inch deep.


Cover the grooves with a thin batting 3 inches
wide. (1 boards split in two are about right.)
"The water will run off through the grooves
before getting to the joint between the boards.
If good boards are selected and kept well paint-
ed, your roof will never leak, and it will cost
much less than shingles. My houses are 8 by
12, painted white, with pink roof, and are easily,
moved."
POULTRY BOOKS.-Mr. H. H. STODDARD,
of Hartford, Conn., writing in Poultry World,
says
"The series of popular cheap books on special
topics connected with the poultry business has
proved a great success, some of them having
reached several editions. The nine of the se-
ries which we sell at 25 cents each are
"Light Brahinas," "White Leghorns," "Brown
Leghorns," "Plymouth Rocks," "How to Feed
Fowls," "HIow to Win Poultry Prizes," "Poul-
try Architecture," "Raising Poultry on a Large
Scale," and "How to Cure Fowl Diseases."
Any five of these, if all are ordered at the same
time, $1.
[Address H. H. Stoddard, as above.]
ROSE-COMBED AMERICAN DOMINIQUTES.--
The Poultry Bulletin says :
"The finest American Dominiques in Amer-
ica are said to be bred at Mound City, Kansas,
by SETH ROWLEY, Sr."
[rWe can vouch for the truth of this state-
ment. We have Dominiqmu, fowls from the
yard of Col. Rowley, which are equal in size,
form, uniformity of color, &c., to the very best
Plymouth Rocks-differing from these only in
having double or rose-combs, and a lighter col-
ored plumage. Col. Rowley is an old and very
skillful breeder of fowls, and has produced some
of the finest we have ever seen.-EDs.]

Hinson vs. Lee, on Florida.
FRANK J. HINsoN, of Altoona, Orange Co.,
Florida, writes the Florida Union, under date
of October 31:"
Seeing a most unpi'ovoked and unnecessary
slanderous, false statement published by one J.
E. Lee (evidently intended for Richard Lee.-
EDS.), against the fair name and possibilities
of our Florida, and also reading in your valu-
able paper (a most welcome visitor to my house
and family), a request to your subscribers to
send their experience here, to you, permit me
to say, not with any egotism, but in simple jus-
tice to the land I love, that I came to this place
nine years ago with a delicate wife and a girl
baby, $114 in cash and a shot gun, which I
traded for a yoke of oxen, took a homestead
and went to work. For a year or two the only
comfort I had was the smiles of my wife and
the prattle of the baby. Still my trees kept
growing, day and night, and Sunday too. I
saved my money, kept improving my proper-


ty, and to-day I can sell out my interest in
Florida for $30,000, but I would not take $50,-
000; and I have in ten years, unaided and
alone, made it every cent. I refer you to Mes-
srs. E. H. Craw, N. J. Trowell, Hon. M. L.
Bryant and Mr. J. T. Wofford, and many
other well-known and reliable citizens near
here, who came here comparatively poor men,
but who have since made, if not fortunes, cer-
tainly comfortable competencies. I take the
liberty to refer you to Messrs. S. B. Hubbard
& Co., of your city, and to J. I. Griffin & Co.,
and Wightman & Christopher, who are among
the staunchest business men in the South, and
will join me in refuting Mr. Lee's false state-
ments.
The great essentials of happine- arc :some-
thing to do, to love and to hope fti.i


The Song of the "One."
There are ninety and nine that live and die
In want and hunger and cold,
That one may revel in luxury,
And be lapped in its silken fold;
And the ninety and nine in their hovels bare,
The one in a palace, with riches rare.
They toil in the fields, the ninety and nine,
For the fruits of our mother earth;
They dig and delve in the dusky mine,
And bring her hidden treasures forth;
And the wealth released by their sturdy blows
To the hands of the one forever flows.*
From the sweat of their brows the desert blooms,
And the forest before them falls;
Their labor has builded humble homes,
And cities with lofty halls;
And the one owns city, and homes and lands,
And the ninety and nine have empty hands.

Pork and Beef in Chicago.
"In hog packing," says the Chicago Tribune,
"we have apparently nearly reached our high-
est point. Places like Kansas City are starting
ahead at a rapid pace and taking control of
the territory that distance puts just beyond our
grasp. But the business of supplying the East
with fresh beef will more than keep up our
rate of growth. The demand for the commo-
dity is unlimited. In London, American beef
has won its way to popular favor by the side of
the beef of England, and in the eastern cities
the sale of it is apparently limited only by the
supply. In Washington one-third of all the
beef sold last week was Western beef. Prices
have fallen rapidly, in some cases thirty-three
per cent., but they always yield a profit to the
Western shipper. A grand future is opening
before Chicago. The East, with its rings and
middlemen; the West and Southwest, with in-
ferior capital, labor and markets for refuse,
cannot hope for any successful rivalry with it.
Chicago will become a focal point toward which
all the bellowing cattle of the plains will be
driven to be killed for the benefit of all man-
kind."
The same paper, speaking of the new trade
which has sprung up in slaughtered beeves, re-
marks:
"Three short years of experimenting have
shown that beef killed here can be shipped
East and sold with a profit at lower prices in
Boston, New York and Philadelphia than Wes-
tern beef shipped alive and butchered there.
Ten millions of Chicago capital will soon be
embarked in this enterprise. Washington,
Baltimore and New York have already been
invaded, and the local meat dealers routed.
Chicago can undersell them for several reas-
ons. Eastern meat must pass through the
hands of ring after ring of middlemen. Chi-
cago goes over the heads of these middlemen.
Its packer sells direct to the Eastern consum-
ers. He sells for cash, and can undersell the
home butcher, who sells on credit. Chicago
has acquired in its packing industries an equip-
ment of slaughter houses and refrigerators and
other conveniences the like of which is not
known at the East. It has labor educated to


the work. There have grown up around our
monster packing houses a group of associated
industries which buy at high prices all that is
refuse to the packer. In Chicago the packer
gets $1.50 cents more for the offal, one to two
cents a pound more for the hides, four to five
cents a pound more for the tallow than the
Eastern butcher can sell them for."

POTATO MEERS CHAUMS.-It seems that a
new use has been discovered for the Irish po-
tato. It can be converted into a substance re-
sembling celluloid by peeling them and, after
soaking in water impregnated with eight parts
of sulphuric acid, drying and pressing between
sheets of blotting paper. In France pipes are
made of this substance, scarcely distinguishable
from meerschaum. By subjecting the mass to
8 great pressure, billiard balls can be made of it
rivaling ivory in har]less.


- Mon omit Is am WA







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


The Farmer Feedeth All.
My lord rides through his palace gate,
My lady sweeps along in state,
The sage thinks long on many a thing,
And the maiden muses on marrying;
The minstrel harpeth merrily,
The sailor plows the foaming sea;
But fall to each whatever befall,
The farmer he must feed them all.
Smith hanmmereth cheerily the sword,
Priest preacheth pure and holy world.
Dame Alice worketh embroidery well;
Clerk Richard tales of love can tell;
The tap-wife sells her foaming beer,
Dan Fisher fishes in the mere,
And courtiers ruffle, strut and shine,
While pages bring the Gascon wine,
But fall to each whatever befall,
The farmer he must feed them all.
Man builds his castle far and high,
Whatever river runneth by;
Great cities rise in every land,
Great churches show the builder's hand;
Great arches, monuments and towers,
Fair palaces and pleasing bowers.
Great work is done, be it here and there,
And well man worketh everywhere;
But Work or rest, whatever befall,
The farmer he must feed them all.
-*Chas. G. Lclaid..




Oranges, Guavas, &c.
A correspondent of the Bainbridge (Ga.)
Democrat, writes from Orlando, Orange Coun-
ty, Fla., October 17th :
I intended going west from Savannah, but
changed my mind and came south, by way of
Jacksonville. I spent one day there, then went
to Sanford, by steamer Rosa, of the DeBary
Line. The trip up the St. Johns was very
pleasant indeed. We left Jacksonville at six
o'clock p. m., and arrived at Sanford the next
evening at six. The steamer made close con-
nections with the South Florida Railroad, not
allowing me any time in Sanford. I reached
this town October 5th, and am very much
leased. I was very much surprised in the
hands of South Florida. The- la*k along the
St. Johns appear to be good hammock lands.
I find but two objections to Orlando-the
weather is exceedingly hot-It is warmer here
now than it was in Decatur in July and Aug-
ust. With that exception, Orlando is a perfect
little paradise. Fruits of all kind, from the
lemon, lime and citron, to the guava. The
guava is very much like the maypop. About
the only difference is that the guava grows on
a tree.
Orlando is situated on the South Florida
Railroad, twenty-one miles south of Sanford,
and is surrounded by orange groves of im-
mense size--the most beautiful sight I ever be-
held. The oranges are just beginning to color
a little. The groves extend as far as the eye
can reach in every direction, from the centre
of the town. I am told by responsible parties
that twelve months ago the population of Or-
lando did not exceed three hundred, and at
the present time it is estimated at about fifteen


hundred or two thousand, and there are daily
arrivals of from six to a dozen, mostly North-
erners. There is every evidence of thrift and
wealth. There are two large churches, the
pews of which are crowded every Sunday; and
the social advantages are as good as any town
I know of. There are already three hotels in
the place, and Capt. T. W. Shine is finishing
off one of the finest hotels in the State. There
are nine new store houses going up, which,
when finished, will make quite a large town.
There are about fifty mechanics at work here
all the time, and there is such a clatter of ham-
mers and saws that you can scarcely hear any-
thing else. Politics are running pretty high
here. The political tendency of this place is
Republican. I have not been out in the coun-
try yet, but expect to go about sixty-five miles
south of here on a hunting expedition to-mor-
row, and hope that at the next writing I will


be able to write so'wnthing that wil! intr'-.st ti-he
readers of the Dnmi'crft.
In conclusion, I will say to those troubled
with their lungs to come to South Florida. I
have derived great benefit in that respect since
my arrival.
Cultivating the Onion.
"The Onion," says the Baltimore Sun,, "is an
article of huge consumption, not only in this
country, but of large export. It stands to-day
one of the staple productions of the agricultu-
ral world, and counts in dollars for the amount
of land occupied, one of the heaviest crops-
varying from one hundred to six hundred or
more bushels per acre, according to the skill of
the cultivator and the freedom of the crop
from casualty.
Of the several varieties cultivated, the white
silver-skin and the large red are mostly pre-
ferred, the former on account of their being
more handsome and mild, and the latter on ac-
count of their greater productiveness and pun-
gency, and are both thought to retain their
firmness through the winter better, perhaps,
than any other.
For field culture, the ground should not only
be good, but well plowed and thoroughly pul-
verized, but before being harrowed have heavy
dressing of well-rotted manure, which should
be harrowed in until the surface is in as fine
tilth as possible, and the seed then drilled in
rows two and a half feet apart. As soon as
well up the young plants should be thinned
out by careful hands, so that they will stand
about three inches apart in the row, and im-
mediately thereafter receive a careful hoeing,
and the space between the rows cleaned out
with the cultivator or double shovel plow--
those operations to be repeated twice after-
wards in intervals of ten or twelve days. The
labor of thinning them out and weeding them
is very important, and should only be entrusted
to careful hands, for although some pretend to
say that it can be done just as well by children,
we have never yet seen children, boys or girls,
who could or would perform the work prop-
erly.
The cost of raising an acre of onions varies
considerably in different localities-the price of
manuring, labor, and the character of the land
having much to do with the result-and there-
fore no stated estimate can be formed, though
it is safe to say it would not amount to one-
third the value of the product.

Japan Persimmons.
The Boston Tr-aveller of October 21st says :
"The Japanese Persimmon (variety Mikal.o)
exhibited by E. H. Hart, Federal Point, Fla.
It is a delicious fruit, as your reporter, doth
know. It is very rare, even in Florida. The
fruit resembles the tomato." (!)
And the South Florida J<,unhul/ adds: "In
this vicinity, among others, Mr. J. O. Taber
has been very successful with this fruit budded
upon the wild persimmon."


BEARING BuDS.--The Southt Florida Jour-
nal says: "The Isis is now, :iftt, being thor-
oughly repaired, on the river making two trips
a week regularly. She carried about 100 boxes
of oranges down the river last week, about for-
ty of them were from Dr. Foster's three-year-
old budded trees.
ANOTHER BIG ONE !-HOMER BROOKS has
presented us with a naval orange which meas-
ares exactly one foot each way in circumfer-
ence, and weighs fifteen ounces. We thought
Homer was "fooling" us with a grape fruit
when we first laid eyes upon the monster.- Or-
aJn y County R'po't r.'
PESlONS ORDE I:< Go(I)DS FROM AD-
VERTiSFs APPEARfNG IN THE DIS-
PATCH WTLL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYIlG THE]M TO THAT EFFECT.


The Farmer as a Commercial Man.
The farmer was originally a tiller of the soil
only, and he was allowed a bare living. It was
of trifling consequence to him whether the sur-
plus on the land he cultivated was sold for much
or little. That surplus belonged to the owner
of the land. The conditions are all changed
now, especially in this country, and the farmer
is in a certain commercial sense like the manu-
facturer. He must study the law of supply
and demand. He must study a good deal of
political economy. If he has an y surplus to
sell he must keep himself posted as to the best
market. The manufacturer is forced to avail
himself of the most approved machinery and of
all the conditions which will enable him to sell
at a profit whatever he makes. It is this con-
dition in business that has caused the wide sup-
port which manufacturers give to reliable pub-
lications in their behalf. The farmer's condi-
tion has been also greatly improved by the num-
ous agricultural publications in this country.

A GRAND MARECHAL NIEL ROSE !-The
Journal of Horiticultur), (Eng.) has the follow-
ing : "There is growing at the New Gardens,
Whitby, a Marechal Niel rose tree which is ex-
citing considerable interest from florists and
horticulturists, as well as frem the general pub-
lic. It was planted about eighteen years ago,
and the present extremity of its growth hori-
zontally is no less than 102 feet, being 48 feet
to the left and 54 feet to the right of the parent
stem, respectively. The average depth of the
tree is between six and seven feet. Last year
2,500 roses were plucked from it, but this sea-
son no less than 3,500 were counted by the pro-
prietor of the gardens, Mr. H. K. Williamson.
It is said to be the largest and most prolific tree
of the kind in the United Kingdom."
BACON AND COTTON.-The Memphis Ava-
lanche says: "If bacon that used to sell here
in the South from five to eight cents per pound
is now worth from fourteen to seventeen cents,
would it not seem poor policy to raise cotton to
buy bacon with ? Our Southern farmer should
aim to make cotton a surplus crop-i. e., a
crop netting a clear profit over and above the
cost of running his farm and supporting his
family. The farmers who raise plenty of corn
and live stock, which are the natural farm ac-
companiments of plenty of corn, will never be
seriously injured when the cotton crop proves
a failure, and we all know what a mighty un-
certain weed, in point of compensation for out-
lay, is this much-pampered cotton crop. Bread
and meat and then cotton should be the South-
ern farmer's motto."
LEACHED AND UNLEACHED ASHES.-The crops most
benefited by unleached ashes, besides grass and all
fruit crops, are potatoes, root crops, and Indian corn,
and to these crops it may be applied in the hill or drill
at planting, or dropped by hand near and upon the
plants soon after they come up. There is some danger of
injury to the seed unless the distribution is very even,
i c,,- the surface application is usually preferred.
Ashes work down in the soil. Rains wash down their
most valuable c'nstituents, and on their way they act


favorably upon the soil, and come In contact with the
roots of the plants. They should, therefore, always be
appie-d upon or near the surface of the soil. 'With
leached ashes the case is different. T'he most soluble
parts have already been washed out. They still con-
tain, however, a notable and very variable quantity of
pot ash, which soon makes its presence known, and as
reached ashes are usually applied much more liberally
than unleashed, the response of crops is prompt and
satisfactory; they may be economically used for the
same crops. Upon grass they are spread as a top-dress-
ing as evenly as possible at the rate of 50 to 100 bushels
to the acre-less upon light soils than upon heavy. Un-
leached ashes are applied to grass and clover in about
half the above quantities, namely, 25 or 30 bushels per
acre upon sandy or light, loamy lands, and 50 bushelsor
more upon heavier soils.-American Agriculturist for
iNovem ber.
GUAVA JELLY.-Capt. Terry has discovered
a new way of making first-class guava jelly.
By mere manipulation he tints from pale am-
bher to deep red, and produces his results from
the syrup in ten minutes. His jelly has, by
competent judges, been pronounced the best
ever made.-Suinterville Timj';s.


J1I1I~CJI*Di~lDI


,CL-- ---- -- ---~-'-I'- -. ~~-,'-~_~',` --~---- ~_~:---------------------- _---- --V;;Pp~i~L;I;L-~;;;;~L~~LI~, I----I-I~ ~-LIII _ __ 11 111


I







3 THE PLO RTIDA DISPATCH.


'ThOe f4rida iZ$S dlh.


Scientific American...................................... 3.75
Saturday Night........ .. ................. 3.35
Savannah Weekly News....... ............ 2.50
The Century Monthly Magazine (Scribner's).... 4.20
Waverly Magazine..... .......... ......5.20
The above are among the very best publications-
Remittances should be sent by Check, Money Order,
or Registered Letter, addressed to
ASH1IM:EAD BO',LA.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


NEW AD VERTISEMENTS.
Plymouth Rock Fowls.-R. W. Parramore, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Commission Merchants.-E. Roberts & Bro., Philadel-
phia.
Potatoes.-J. E. Hart, Jacksonville, Fla.
Cabbage Plants.-C. B. Rogers, Philadelphia.

ORANGE WRAPS.-Order your orange wraps from
ASHMEAD BROS., Jacksonville, Fla. For prices see
advertisement, tf


JACKSONVILLE, NOVEMBER 13, 1882.

D. Redmond, 'D. H. Elliott, W. H. Ashmead,
EDITORS.
Subscription $1.00 per annum,n in advance.
RATES OF ADVERTISING,
PAID IN ADVANCE.
SQYAltIES. 1 TIME.I 1 MO. 3 MO. | MO. 1 YEAR
One................... $ 00 2 50 $ 5 50 $1000 $ 18 50
Two..................... 2 00 5 00 1000 .18 00 34 00
Three ..................... 300 700 14 00 25 00 46 00
Four............... 400 900 17 50 3000 58 00
Five.:... ................. 450 1100 1900 3500 6500
Eight..................... 8 00 1650 30 00 50 00 100 00
Sixteen........ ....16 30 30 00 50 00 8000 150:00
Tent lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words'to line) 20 cents
per line.

CIR CULA TION.
This paper has the largest circulation of any
paper (daily of weekly) published in Florida,
with a very large circulation in Georgia and the
Southern States; also has subscribers in every
State in the Union, with many in foreign coun-
tries. After October 23d, we shall issue weekly
from 8,000 to 10,000 copies, about 40,000 per
month. '
SPECIAL NOTICE.
Persons are warned against paying subscrip-
tions to any. one calling himself our Agent, as
we have no regular canvassing agent.

OFFICIAL OR GAN OF THE FLORIDA
FRUIT GR 0 WERS' ASSO CIA TION.

Special Club Rates with "The Dispatch."
We have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
* following publications, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt of price, for ONE YEAR :
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH AND
American Agriculturist,.............. ......... .$2.00
Atlantic M lithly. Magazine..................... 420
Country Gentleman................................. 2.75
Detroit Free Press.................................. 2.50
Eclectic M agazine....................................... 4.20
Florida Agriculturist.......................... ......... 2.25
Florida W weekly Union................................... 2.25
Florida W eekly Times ................................. 1.50
Family Story Paper.................................... 3.50
Fireside Companion...................................... 3.35
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly.................. 4.20
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4.20
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly...................... 3.40
Frank Leslie's Sunday Magazine.................. 3.40
Harper's Illustrated Weekly.......................... 4.20
Harper's Illustrated Bazar ............................ 4.20
Harper's Illustrated YoungPeople.................. 2.20
Harper's Monthly Magazine...................... .20
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine................... 3.40
N ebraska Farm er......................................... 2.00
North American Review.... ............. 5.20
New York Weekly Sun........................... 1.75
New York Weekly Herald........................... 1.75
1ew York Weekly Tribune......................... 2.50
New York Weekly Times.............................. 1.75
New York Weekly World............. .............. 1.75
New York Ledger .................................. 3.35
New York Weekly ................................. 3.35
Popular Science Monthly............................ 5.20
Philadelphia Weekly Times.......................... 2.50
Southern Cultivator.. ................................... 2.00


HOMES IN SUNNY FLORIDA.

Four Million Acres to Choose From.

Too much cannot be said of the benefits de-
rived to Florida from the big land sale of
4,000,000 acres to Hamilton Disston, of Phila-
delphia.
He and his company, "The Florida Land
and Improvement Company," have started the
"boom," which every day is increasing in vol-
ume and which is destined to raise Florida
among the foremost States of the Republic. At
present, no State can show more activity. The
"boom" is felt from the Gulf to the Atlantic
and from the Keys to Georgia. Na-
ture has done more for Florida than.any of
her sister States. She has the finest climate in
the world; cooling and refreshing breezes con-
tinually chase each other from the Gulf to the
Atlantic, and from the Atlantic to the Gulf;!
her fruits-tfie orange, lime, lemon, fig, guava,
cocoanut, etc., are unexcelled in any clime,
and her natural water communications are uin-
equaled, nearly all her waters being navigable.
These natural advantages, together with. in-
ternal improvements now going on in the State,
from one end to the other, will rapidly develop
her resources, increase the value of her lands
and make her a crowning jewel in the Repub-
lic's diadem of States.
In all directions railroads are being built;
steamboats are plying navigable streams; ca-
nals are being dug to connect navigable waters
and drain rich bottom lands for the cultivation,
of sugar cane, rice, hemp, etc.
The lands to be thus reclaimed by the At-
lantic and Gulf Coast Canal and Okeechobee
Land Company will be among the best and
richest, and are speciallyadapted to the cultiva-
tion of these standard products.
It is gratifying to us to hear that unusually
rapid progress has been made in cutting their
proposed canal, and that it is expec-
ted to be completed by February, 1883.
When this is accomplished, ample transporta-
tion facilities from this section of the Gulf
coast will afford easy access to the North and
Atlantic sea ports, and the early settlement and
development of this El Dorado willthen be as-
sured. Steamers can then ply from Key West
via Punta Rassa, Caloosahatchee River, Lake
Okeechobee and Kissimmee River to Kissim-
mee City, in Orange County, there connecting


Florida Pecan Nuts. ,
We have in: Florida thousands, of acres, of
low-lying, moist hammock and rich strips of
land on the margin of creeks, rivers, lakes -ind
ponds, admirably suited to the growth of ithe
Pecan tree; and the owners of such lands illl
find it greatly to their interest to plant these.
trees in all suitable localities. Like mos other'
fruits, the Pecan has run into varieties by *ciil-
tivation, and there is a very wide differencee be
tween the common wild pecan of the Texas
and Arkansas "bottoms," and" the improved
sorts raised on the Mississippi River coastst"
and perhaps elsewhere. Some of these last are
twice as large as the former, with a shell so
thin that they can easily be cracked in the
hand, and "meat" of a very sweet and fine
flavor. We do not know the "Arnow" Pecan,
of St. Mary's, 'Ga., so highly praised by our
friend Col Hardee, of "Honeymoon," but we
are indebted to Hon. A. M. Reed, of "Mulber-
ry Grove," (a few miles up the St. John's
River), for samples of two very superior varie-
ties of the Pecan, successfully grown on his
place. One of these is supposed to be the
"Arnow," and the success of Judge Reed in


I


----


ifimlmbw*


I


in a few years these lands will be among the
most valuable in Florida.
The Florida Land and Improvement Com-
pany, in order to induce immigration and en-
hance the value of their lands, from improve-
ments made by actual settlei-s, are doing a far
sighted thing in offering, till May, 1883, all
their lands at the Government price of only
$1.25 per acre in blocks of not less than 80 nor
more than 640 acres. This liberal offer affords
a splendid opportunity for obtaining, at an in-
significant price, choice and desirable land
adapted to the cultivation of all ,inds of trop-
ical and semi-tropical products. \
The lands offered so cheaply are among the
finest in the State, as Mr. Disston(iad iis choice,
and employed competent persons to select, sur-
vey and choose. No better can be found any-
where.
To men of smallmeians, whio really desire to
make a home in "Sunny Florida" and capital-
ists who want to niake a ";f investment,
no better opportdhity presents itself for grati-
fying your desires. This chance may never dc-
cur again, "There is a tide in the affairs of
men, which, when taken at its flood, leads on
to fortune." Let this be your tide.
People from every State in the Union are
now coming to Florida, and she is being rapid
ly settled by intelligent and refined people.
From the Western aifd Northwestern States,
from the East and all parts of the South, they
come-as immigrants, invalids, tourists, set-
tlers, investors, etc. We advise all those 'to btiy
who can, as we feel assured they will realize.
sor ethi ng.handsome from the investment .. :
Many of *se lands, too, at the present mo-
ment, are worth from five to ten times the price
at which they are offered, and an intelli-
gent and discerning person, by procuring de-
scriptive pamphlets and maps from the Florida
Land and Improvement Company, at Jackson-
ville, Fla., can easily select them.
W. H.A.


-- ~----e~-----------------


..._ . .


for Jacksonville via South Florida Railroad to
Sanford and St. John's River.
When consummated, this most southern
district of the United States will be opened up
to travel and settlement. It has, too, special
attractions and advantages which East Florida
does not possess. The cocoanut, the royal and
date palm, the mango, custard apple, tamarind
and sappodilla flourish equally with the orange,
lemon, lime, pine-apple and banana. Game,
fish and oysters are in abundance, and thous-
ands of acres are especially rich and adapted
to sugar culture. Planters from Louisiana,
Cuba and Jamaica are already investing, and
Florida will soon help to supply this staple pro-
duct.
Those who intend investing should lose no
time in selecting and buying, for undoubtedly







------ --~-----I --`-U -- --ITHEY~~ FL R D DiSPA T31~CH. 53$---C--III---Y--P--~ - --- --


TAKING YOUNG ORANGE GRovEs.-The in-
justice and absurdity of taxing young orange
trees before they come into bearing is well set
forth in the article of P. M. Oliver, printed
elsewhere in this issue. Instead of fostering
one of the State's most important industries,
the present law almost prohibits the planting
of young groves. Let us wipe it from the
statute books at the coming session of the Leg-
islature.
SOUTHERN FURNITURE.-The Chattanooga
Tradesman says that the South made no furni-
ture worth mentioning for several years after
the war. The output for 1882 is estimated by
a shrewd observer at not less than $3,000,000
in value. This section will soon carry the war
in cheap furniture into the North and make it
very lively, too.


__


producing, large quantities of this fine and pro-
fitable nut should encourage others all over the
State to "stick in" a Pecan tree here and there,
in moist, rich places, if not to plant regular
groves.
We do not intend to encourage either care-
lessness or neglect in culture, when we speak of
"sticking in a tree here and there." .We had
in mind the advice of the old minn of Sir
Walter Scott, who counselled Jack to be "aye
sticking in a tree, which would grow while he
was sleeping." But we desire very strongly to
inculcate the maxim that to insure satisfactory
growth and productiveness, while the owner is
either sleeping or waking, the tree should at all
times receive proper care and culture.

Guava Jelly.
Mr. A. J. iPHAiRES, of Yalaha, has our thanks
for a tuin$ler ft 'homrne-nimae" Guava Jelly,
clear as amber and of a delicious flavor. This
is one of the finest jellies in the world, meets
with a ready sale, and returns large profits. A
few years ago all the Guava Jelly used in Flor-
ida and the United States, was imported from
the West Indies, Jamaica and elsewhere in the
tropics. Now, Florida is raising the fruit in
abundance, and several manufacturers in the
State are making. a superior article, building up
a fine trade and rapidly driving the imported
jelly from our doors. May sUccess attend all
such enterprises.

A Mammoth Rose Bush.
Mr. J. C. Greeley has, on his beautiful place
in ]o(.lyn a suburb of Jacksoiville, an?"Is-
abe tpfuni' rbse bush, which stairs six feet
high and measures thirty-three Wt in circum-
ference. It has just put on a beautiful growth
and is covered with buds and roses.
Why don't our people plant roses and flow-
ers ? With a little care and attention, in Flor-
ida, all could have flowers the year round.
What are the fact, however ?
With a few worthy examples, which demon-
strates untold possibilities, and how easily flow-
ers grow and flourish in this clime, the gardens
surrounding the residences in Jacksonville and
elsewhere in Florida are a disgrace to any in-
telligent and refined community.
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH would like to see
this remedied.
It is well worth a trip to Mr. Greeley's to
see his large rose bush and beautiful grounds,
and we trust those visiting him will profit by
his example.


II


i


-- I I II -_ __ _I LI- I~- I F I --II~


I


[ES TABLISHED 1866.] i

E, ROBERTS & BRO, COMMISsiON MERCHANTS.
FLORIDA FRUIT AND PRODUCE A SPECIALTY.
226 AND 228 NORTH DELAWARE AVENUE, PHILADELPHIA, PA. '
OURt MOTTO : Quick Sales and Prompt tetuarns,
nov 13-tf We ask a trial. 'STENCY ....ATS hE .'-|

English Peas--Culture, Varieties, &c. "Honey Prqmiqj
PUTNAM COUNTY, FLA., Nov. 3, 1882. In eply to inquiries of Il. W. ,e give
Editors of The Florida Dispatch: the splecial'honey premium offered a -r Flor-
Will the English Pea do well if planted on ida Fair, in Feru-arty; Thi"preiii'.mias in-
old lands, and how much fertilizer should be advertently united from the i r list:
put per acre, to make it profitable? For the 'est display 6 o .fy !'in nl .rt-
Yours respectfully, mentsrof production and c nre ...................20 0,
1For the tiemu^ es' exhibit of Hloney .Coplb,1 o)t l,.S.h:ui
D. WILLIAMS. 10 pounds....................... ............... 10 (X
There must be t.wo or more ixmiibits in (onIl.)l)tion.
REPLY.-Several years ago the Rural New :-- .;-- T
Yorker made an elaborate test of a great num- .,
ber of English Peas, using four hviidred pounds -
of superphosphate to the acre, and also a light Florida Dispatch Line. '
dropping of hen manure and muck. The soil, NEW YORK, November 6, 1882:.
a clay loam, was well prepared by spading and Receipts of oranges via Florida Dispatch
raking, and the peas were planted two inches Line and Southern Express Co., week ending:
deep two inches apart, in drills three 4th inst., 2,700 packages. Good oranges in de-
mand at top prices: Florida4, fro?44 to 8$'
feet apart. Were we cultivating sandy soils, per box; Jaiaicas, from $9 to $12 p barre .
we should omit the hen manure and use a Respectfully, C. D.jOlENs,
large proportion of composted muck, bone dust' general gent.
and ashes. All were planted by hand. The ,Jacksonvie who J o1esa P r .es, .
yield of all the varieties, under such treatment, b' weekt,by JOA V ,
: *. LRetCil Groers, Je.'son.'ill', P '.
was very abundant and satisfactory; but the FRUITS-
SU ARs- G ranulate( .................:..... ... ............ I
experimenter, in all cases, gave the preference WhiEx. .......................
to the wrinkled over the smooth peas, summing Powdre................................
S? 'uCnt Loaf........................................
up the m atter as follows: :E, o- ai....... ............................
o o .........................................
HMWhat is gained either to the market or home glic'........ . .... :.. !.
gardener by raising varieties of peas thit- ro iJaa 0.!. .................
five feet high, wheii other kinds growing from ca .................. .35
two to three feet high will yield more peas of Maracibo ........ ..
as good a quality Conmpare, for example, the o aboe gradrop, bes roasted to od. ....
old and fhivorite Cham-pion of England with Snow Drop, best, no patent......*... ..- 7 50)
Oreole, 2d best....... ...... 7 25
Carter's Stratagem. Pearl, 3d best...........................::;::: 7 00
"Why should we sow smooth peas;which are Orange Co., No. I........................... 6 50
S.r.K.,MTS-.-Baeon........................................... 15
always of inferior quality, when varieties of HaimS (Merwin & Sons).................... 18
wrinkled peas may be sown, which are of HomiN 'ouy-Pear ebbl........................... .
the first quality, and ill yield just as MEAL- er bb............................................. 5 25
11?" j LARD- eflned in pails......'... .......... .. ... 14
well BUTTER-Very best, kegs (on ice)......... .
Carter's Stratagem gave the greatest number EESE--F cream. ...................
and weight of seeds to a pod, as well as the TonAcco-Smoking-"the Bos Durham s
aml l is praedp4 x- "The Boss" Durham 1 b pk~o......... 30
largest, pod, and is highly praised by the ex- "sitting Bull" D. (genuine). ..... 50
periientre.-E s. "Sitting B ll' (gen e) s.......... .. 75
....^ "Sitting Bull" (ge ilne)1 rb pkge.. 45
FLORIDA EXPERIMENTAL GARDEN.-We Plug-"Shell Road" 4 plhgstoIb*, 30
lb boxes................... ..........:...... ;. 55
print in present issue of THE DISPATCH the "'Florida Boys '5 plugs.to lb., 30,
b o x es ..............-......'.......;........ .... 36
conclusion of Dr. KENWORTHY'S able and ex- "Florida Girls"--Bright twists 14i !'
haustive argument in favor of an Experiment- cigars- "Loig Branim 'a very pop- .
a G d f or F riu la r b rt.TdD p etth o uaabd .,u.... .27 00
al Garden ior Florida. The Doctor probably "Our X," choice cigtr, easy smok'r, 24 00


Z


e is s tile w u a s .". Our XX," a very choice smok-er... 26 00
understands the wonderful capacities and re- "Florida Boys," (we are StateAgt,) ;500
S. . OAP AND STARCH-Colgalte's S oZ., per O ...' 3 50
sources of our State as well as any man living, Peerlegs, 8 oz., per box.... ............. 350
Starch, lum p, per I .,..-.-. ..,i ................ 6!/ c
and he has set these forth so lucidly and for- Hops, YEAS A BAIG POWDERS-- .
I-lops, per lb..... .......................15@22c
cibly that little more need or can be said. Let I Agers Fresh Yeast Cakes, Fer doz .. .00
us now have ACTION. The want of such a gar- Grant's 3-Dime Baking owder, per 2 2
doz. Ilb ................................................ 2 2.5
den is so obvious and pressing that its incep- own Tal BakingPowder, per doz.I 22 705
tion, at least, must soon be an accomplished Royal Baking Powder, per doz. lb...... 150
fact. Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high,
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl., new....... ................. 3 3 25
Southern Agricultural Fairs. icH K s, each..................................40..
EGGS-Per doz ... 232
FLORIDA STATE FAIR opens at Jacksonville, HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per i:., ;st class 13
Country Dry S~1ted, per lb.......;.............. 9@11
on Tuesday, February 13, and continues four Butcher Dry Salted, per b............................ 9@10
days. Send for Premium List to Major A. J. Damaged Hides............. .............
Kip and Calf, Sibs. and under ................ 10
RUSSELL, of this city. SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, pa hlb...................... 35
Deer Skins Salted, per lb ................. 26@30
The following Fairs will be held in other F s -Otter,each, (Summer no value)Win- @30
Southern States at the tim e m mentioned: ter........................................................ 00 ,
Raccoon, each............................'....
Montgomery, Alabama, (State,) November Wild Cat, each....................................... 0@20
13, five days. Fox, each............................................... 5 i5
1 five days. oBEESWAx-per lb........................................... 20
Columbia, South Carolina, (State,) Novem- WooL-Free from burs, per lb............................. 17@22
er 14, six days. G Burry, per ................................. ..... 1@15
ber 14, six days. GOAT SKINS-Each per lb .......................... 10


THE'FL RIA DSPA CH


E5.3_.-







36 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


a



4'
II

h*


to sept 10 '83
m a a 2A


Kieffer Pear. Jap. Persimmon. LeConte Pear.
I3Oooo Cuttings and Trees FOR SALE. More
o*5ft trees in orchard than any five growers
of the LECONTE PEAR. Apply to head quarters.
W. W TH-OMJPSONT, Proper.,
LeConte Nursery, Smithville, Ga.
SEND FOi. CATALOGUE. oct 23-tf


U
N
N

U

S
U


FLOIRIDA DISCOVERY.
C T A "} EVERY DRUGGIST IN THE STATE
WILL BE SUPPLIED.
It kills Ants, Roaches, Mice and Rats. Nothing ever
""before offered has half the merit. Any Druggist in
Jacksonville will supply you.
CONE WILLIAMS,
Manufacturer and Proprietor,
oct 30-tf [P. 0. Box 126.] JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

A. N. DOBBINS & BRO.,











G(nn, Loc mils n 4Mglncll CRWtmr,
24 LAURA STREET,
JACK. SON VILI.,,E - FLOIRD.TA,
unsmithing done in all its branches.
U IRON SAFE WORK.
Special rates on Stencil Cutting, by mail. Address,
to june 12'83, (P. 0. Blox 833.)


TREE


BRADLEY'S ORANGE
We have preparedithis Fertilizer
especially for the culture of the or-
ange tree, and from the results al-
ready obtained from its use on the
orange groves of Florida, we feel
justified in claiming that it cannot
be surpassed, if equalled, by any
other fertilizer,
It is composed of the purest and
highest grade materials, combined
in such proportions as to furnish all
the elements of plant-food in prop-
er quantities and in the best form
to promote a rapid and strong
growth of the wood and insure an
abundant yield of fine fruit.
A sufficient proportion of its
phosphoric acid, being readily sol-
uble in cold water, is immediately
available as food for the young
rootlets of the tree, while a consid-
erable portion, being present in the
form of pure ground bone, undis-
solved by acid, becomes entirely
soluble in the soil only by the ac-
tion of the elements of nature in
due course of time. Thus this all
important food is not soon ex-
hausted by the tree, or washed into
the ground by heavy rains, but is
supplied in abundant quantities
M ~ Ai a i Kim


Manufacturers of the Celebrated


the Standard Fertilizer for all Field and Garden Crops, and especially adapted to the wants of the
Cotton Crop.
MAIN OFFICE, 27 KILBY STREET, .BOSTON, MASSACHTUSETTS.
For further particulars and pamphlets giving testimonials from some of the best orange growers in the
State, address,


to oct 9, '83.


A. M. BECK, General Agent for Florida,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.

KIGLET SUEXTIL
JCXA3Pjjai~iii X 3S.59JH& &-*U


Wholesale Dealers in



Foreign and Domestic Fruits.


COMMISSION MERCHANTS FOR THE SALE OF

Florida Oranges and Lemons,


167 South Water St.,


CHICAGO, ILL.


CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED
SAi-REFERENCES.-First National Bank, Jacksonville, Florida. Union National Bank, Chicago, Illinois.
sept 4, tf.

FRANK W. MUMBY. JNO. N. C. STOCKTON. RAYMOND D. KNIGHT.

MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,


187i9.
F. W. MUMBY & CO.


UCCESSORS TO -

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE AND RETAIL


1870.
JNO. S. DRIGGS & CO.


Crockery, China, Glass and Earthenware.

We have the largest and most complete stock in the State. All the Latest Novelties in Majolica and Fancy
Goods, Vases, Motto Cups and Saucers, etc. Decorated Tea, Dinner and Chamber Sets in a large Variety. Lamps
and Chandeliers, Fancy Vase Lamps in Majolica, Faience, Kito, Porcelain and other Wares. Wood and Willow,
Stone and Tinware. The American, Crown and Peerless Ice Cream Freezers, Water Coolers, Filters, etc.
SOLE STATE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED

Monitor Oil Stoves and Little Joker Oil Cans.
THE BEST IN THE WORLI). Send for Price Lists.
The best ;i;nd only absolutely safe Oil Stove in the World. It is Economical, Ornamental, Convenient, Dura-
ble, Compact and Cheap. Its fuel is Coal Oil. No Dust! No Ashes! No Smoke! No Trouble! Testimonials
from those using the Stoves given on application.
Fruit Jars and Jelly Tumblers, Wine Bottles, Flasks, etc. Special inducements to the trade.
Merchants, Hotels, Boarding Houses and Bars will find it greatly to their advantage to give us a trial. Send
for list of assorted packages.
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD.
MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
13 WESrT BLAY STREET. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to July 5, '83, (Mntion this paper)


-~----CIC


I -, --- -- ---~


trengtn and durability. We also make the best ana
cheapest All UImAutomatic ofr Self-Opening ate, also
ftapest a4 eatestAt All Iron Fence. For Prices and
Particulars ask Hardware Dealers or address the Manu-
Mention this paper. il.ntfe, ]ad.
to dec 30, '82.




FERTILIZER.
throughout the season.
The nitrogen and potash also are
furnished in the most nutritious
forms and approved proportions
for this crop.
After giving this Fertilizer a
thorough trial of three years on or-
ange trees in Florida, we intro-
duced it last season quite exten-
sively throughout the State, and
the results have even exceeded otr
most sanguine expectations. We
have yet to hear of a single instance
where the most satisfactory returns
have not, been derived.
We have nothing to say about the
fertilizers manufactured or sold by
other parties, aa we believe, with an
established reputation of twenty-
two years' in the manufacture of
high grade fertilizers, 'we can stand
upon our own footing, without call-
ing the attention of the- public to
the record of any of our competi-
tors, or to the value of their manu-
factures as compared with that of
our own. Our fertilizers are all an-
alyzed, when manufactured, by
competent chemists, and none are
shipped to market until they are
known to be up to, tfi standard,


.


.I







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


WHOLESALE GROCERS

AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


60c. PER


DOZ.


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND

SNOW-DROP PATENT FLOUR.

irst I-rancls oz 0Finest laality3

Best Butter in Tubs at 30 to 3x Cents per Pound,

S OT O:E'.-.


No. 38 West Bay Street,
tf


J. J. T EVE ES,


S- Jacksonville, Florida.


CIVIL ENGINEER AND
DRAUGHTSMAN.


Office with Florida Land and Improvement Co., cor. Pine and Forsyth-86t.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.

Twnunhin Qi~On made from United States Surveys-scale two inches to the mile-with
IUV IIJJ IIIJIJ topography complete, for every township in EAST and SOUTH FLOR-
IDA, delivered, or sent by mail, for 50 cents each. Discount to Dealers.
gOniO l M of Counties, Cities and towns DESIGNS a specialty.

My long connection with the Florida Land and Improvement Company (DISSTON PUR-
CHASE) is a guarantee of satisfactory work.
Correspondence solicited. oct 23tf

ESTABLISHED 1566.

11I. GEORGE & CO.,

General Co om i mission Merchants,
95 SOUTH WATER STREET, CHICAGO.

FLORIDA ORANGES AND VEGETABLES A SPECIALTY.
BEFE.RENCES:-National Bank of Illinois, First National Bank, Commercial Agencies, or any Wholesale
Grocer in CHICAGO.


to apl 8, '83.


G. L. LAWRENCE & CO.,


Stencils furnished by J. C. LANIER,
LEESBURG, FLORIDA.


COMMISSION MERCHANTS,


FOR THE SALE OF


Oranges and all Florida Produce,


234 WASHINGTON STREET, NEW YORK.


QUICIOK SALES, HONEST IETUR PROMPT IEMITTANCES.


REFER BY PERMISSION TO
Hon. S. B. CONOVER, Tallahassse; D. GREENLEAF, ESQ., Jacksonville;
to jan. 30, '83 p. MESSRS. GOULD & Co., Jacksonville.


F. S. CONtE, MA. H. MANVILLE, E. A. HILL,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer.

IMA NVILTLE NURSERIES,
-aim- -og F'mia


-L-aL e (eorge, Florida.
kFULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate,


ORANGE AND LEMON TREES A SPECIALTY.
Catalogue for 1882-3, inst out, free on application, to a
to a


pr 17, '83


AGER'S


COCOANUTS, PINE-APPLES,
and the more tender tropical fruits.
C. B. MAGRUDER.
fo feb 5' Rock Ledge, Florida.


THE ARCHER NURSERIES
Grow a general assortment of FRUIT TREES, with
some Ornamental Trees, Shrubbery,
Vines, &c. Our stock of
ORANGE TREES
is good; both Sweet Seedlings and Budded sorts on both
sour and sweet stocks. Some 8,000
LECONTE AND OTHER PEAR TREES,
one and two-year-old-fine.
A large number of JAPAN PLUM TREES, with:a few
hundred of the famous
JAPANESE PERSIMMON
on native stocks, &c.
ORANGE and PEAR GROVES made to order and
cultivated by the year fr on-residents.
SND FOR PRICE LIST to
ZI.PSefY & CIHRISTIE,
to feb 5, '83 Archer, Alachua Co., Florida.


.3


DRY HOP


537


--- ~ 5- _- L__ _- I I- --


~I~_ __ -- -- --- --- __


i


YEAST CAKES,


JOIN
J. MI. STrIGER'S COLONY,
GLEIMORE, WARE COUNTY, GA.
40 Hours from New York City; 108 Miles from
Savannah.
Here we can plant and gather some crops every month
in the year; good water plenty of grass in the woods for
sheep, cattle and hogs all the year round; very profita-
ble to the owner. Farms of 40 acres each at $1 to $3 per
acre; lumber, $1 per 100 feet, delivered at the depot;
shingles, $4per 1,000; will build a house with 4 rooms, 6
panel doors, 6 windows, cement flue for chimney, well
dug and curbed, for $150, on easy terms. Labor of all
kinds needed at fair wages; board at Mrs. Bainbridge's
from $15 to $20 per month.
We need farmers, truckers, stock and fruit-growers.
One bushel crate of vegetables delivered in New York
City for 50 cents; per barrel, $1, and with quick dispatch.
A number of Northern and Western families now here
are doing well; no stones, no underbrush, no winter,cli-
mate delightful and perfectly healthy all the year round.
Land is not cleared, but near the depot; some cleared
land from $3 to $10 per acre. All kinds of grain, vegeta-
bles, berries, fruit, and stock, do well. Our farmers are
out of debt, some lending money.
Any number of acres, for colonizing or grazing, at $1 to
$3 per acre; 40 acres, with house complete, for $250;
EASY TERMS.
Come and see for yourself, or address
J. M. STIGER,
to jan 9, '83. Glenmore, Ware County, Ga.
NOTICE.
U S. LAND OFFICE,
GAINESVILLE, FLA., October 18, 1882.
COMPLAINT having been entered at this office by
George V. Burbridge against Michael Bowes for
abandoning his Homestead Entry No. 2126, dated Octo-
ber 2, 1875, upon the Lot 8, Section 21, and Lot 1, Section
28, Township 2 south, Range 29 east, in Duval County,
Florida, with a view to the cancellation of said entry;
the said parties are hereby summoned to appear at this
office on the 21st day of November, 1882, at 10 o'clock a.
m., to respond and furnish testimony concerning said
alleged abandonment.
L. A. BARNES Register.
oct 23 to nov 13, '82. JOHN F. ROLLINS, Receiver.


R ICH'D H. MARKS'
ORANGI GOINTffY LAN AGENOY,

SANFORD, FLORIDA,
Agent in Orange County for
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT OMIP'Y,
BUYS AND SELLS
Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission.
ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
june 12-tf __ ____
REMOVED.
I have removed my seed store to No. 22 East Bay st.,
next door to post-office, where I have the largest and
most complete stock of pure and fresh Seeds in the State.
S. L. TIBBITTS,
to Dec. 3, '82 Jacksonville, Fla.

$20,000 CASH
Can be invested to great advantage in the
ROCK LEDGE HOME GROVE
of 15 acres, 700 bearing trees in the beautiful and noted
ROCK LEDGE HAMMOCK on the great Indian River
with its fish, oysters, green turtle and ducks. I will sell
the grove for
TWO-THIRDS ITS ACTUAL VALUE.
Numbers of visitors say it is the most beauliful and de-
sirable property in the State.
Having purchased Jupiter Island, 100 miles south, I
propose to make a specialty of


go


11R


womow




(


38 TOHE FLOR DA DISPATCH1-


NO. 49.

C. N. 0. & T. P. RY.
( ('o,,,.;,,,/;i Sod/vthrr .)



PASSEN-4ERS AND SHIPPERS FOR
THE NORTH AND WEST

will consult their interests, and secure all needed infor-
mation, by calling at

NTo. 4.9 a By Ttrect,
JACKSONVILLE, -" FLORIDA.


to nov 30, '83.


L. R. TUTTLE,
Resident Agent.


Bosio Ran savannah stoomShID C,
ONLY DIRECT LINE.
Transhipment and extra handling avoided. Cars
unloaded at wharf in Savannah. First-class passenger ac-
comnhmodations.
The magnificent new Iron Steamships sail from Bos-
ton every 'Thursday at 3 o'clock, and from Savannah as
follows:
Gate City, Thursday, September 28th, at 7:30 a. m.
City of Columbus, Thursday, October 5th, at 2:00 p. m.
Gate City, Thursday, October 12th, at 7:00 a. m.
City of Columbus, Thursday, October 19th, at 12 m.
Gate City, Thursday, October 26th, at 6:00 p. m.
City of Columbus, Thursday, November 2d, at 12:30 p. m.
FIRST-CLASS CABIN PASSAGE SAME AS TO NEW
YORK.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
F. W. NICKERSON & CO., Savannah, Ga.
General Agents, Boston.
4,GEO. V. HAINES,
41-tf Agent S., F. and W. Ry., Agent Jacksonville.

Subscribe for THEFLORIDA DISPATCH
$1 per year.


SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA
WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, AUGUST 19th, 1882, Pas-
senger Trains will run over the Waycross Short Line
as follows;
as owsFast Mail. Jack'lle Ex.
Daily. Daily. i
Leave Jacksonville at................. 9:00 a. m. 6:10 p. m.
Arrive Jacksonville at................ 6:15 p. m. 7:30 a. m.
L eave Callahan at.......................... 9:45 a. m 7:05,p. in.
Arrive Waycross at...................... 11:5 a. m. 9:2) p. m.
Arrive Jesup at............................... 1:32 p.m. 1:40 p. m.
Arrive Brunswick at..................... 3:35 a. m.
Arrive Savannah at............... 3:35 p. m. 2:30 a. m.
Arrive Charleston at......................9:lO p. m. 8:45 a. m.
Arrive Augusta at......................... 5:20 a.m. i 1:30 p. m.
Arrive Macon at............................. 7:00 a. inm.
Arrive Atlanta at........................ 12:50 p. m.
Arrive Louisville at...... ............. 8:00 a. m.
Arrive Cincinnati at..... 7:00 a. m.
Arrive Washington at...................9:30 p. m 7:40 a.m.
Arrive BaltimOre at.....................25 p. inm. 9:30 a. hi.
Arrive New York PR. R............. 6:15 a. inm. 3:50 p. inm.
Arrive St. Louis t.. ................... 7:00 p inm.
Arrive Chicago at.................. 7:00 p. inm,
TIME. Iti; m.
To Savannah ........... ............................................... 6 40
To N ew Y ork ............................................................ 45 -15
To W ashington............................................ ............ 36 30
T o C hieago .. .................................. ................ 49 00
To St. Louis..:...... ................................................... 49 00
THROUGH SLEEPERS:
Jacksonville to Cincinnati.
Jacksonville to Charleston.
Jacksonville to Chicago.
Beginning with Monday, October 16th, trains over the
LIVE OAK AND ROWLAND BLUFF BAILROAID
Will run daily, (except Sanday), as follows :
Leave Live Oak...... ............... ........... ........ 2:30 p. m .
Arrive atN ew Branford................................. ... 4:00 p. m .
Leave New Branford....................... 8:55 a. m.
A rrive at Live Oak...............................................10:30 a. m .
Connecting at Charleston with through Pullman
Sleepers for Washington.
The Restaurant Car attached to the train between Sa-
vannah and Charleston, affords supper to passengers
bound North, and breaklhst to those coming South.
Only one change ofemars to New York.
Passengers going to the West and Northwest take the
evening train.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callalman.
Passengers arriving on train at 7:30 a. mi., make close
connection for.Palatka and line of the Florida Southern
Railroad by taking the mall boatSylvan Glen.
Passengers from lnie of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. n. and arriving at Savannah at 2:35 a. in., or train
at JacksonVille, leaving at 9 a. min. and arriving at Sa-
vannah at 3:40 p. m.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
SConnedting at, Charleston with steamers for 'New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
s4iip connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay-strbet, and at Depot
Ticket Office. GEO. W. HAINES, Agent.
JAS. L. TAYLOR, Gen'l T. and P. Ag't. [*]


IREFEiENCE.- Hibernialn Banking Association, Chicago.
Correspondence solicited. No. 1 packing only solicited.


to dec 5 82


BALTIMORE EXPRESS UA .
e0-rh t' ine,
MERCHANTS AND MINERS TRANS- TAnhats9 ILo
PORTATION COMPANY. CARRYING THE U. S. MAIL.
SAVANNAH, GA., September 12, 1882.
The steamships of this company are appointed to ELEGANT SIDE-WHEEL STEAMERS.
sail from BALTIMORE forI SAVANNAH
EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY Y
AT 3 P.M., FREDERICK DE BARY, Capt. Leo. Vogel.
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE, 11. B. PLANT, Cat. J. W. Fitzgerald.
EVERY TUESDAY AND FRIDAY, ANITA, Capt. C. leave. Brock.
One of the above-named steamers will leave De Bary
as follows: Wharf, foot of Laura Street, daily except Sunday, at 3
Friday, November 3, at 12:30 p. m. p. ., for PALATKA, SANFORD, ENTERPRISE, and
Tuesday, November 7th, at 3 p. mi. all intermediate landings.
Friday, November 10th, at 7 a. m. ROSA, Capt. J. L. Amazeen.
Tuesday, November 14th, at 9:30 a. m. GEO. M. BIRD, Capt. G. J. Mercier.
Friday, Novembner 17th, at 11 a. m. Steamer ROSA leaves De Bary Wharf every Sunday
Tuesday, November 21st, at 3 p. m. at 1 p. m., and every Wednesday at 5 p. m. for above-
Friday, November 24th, at 6:30 a. m. named landings.
Tuesday, November 28th, at 9 a. m. Steamer GEO. M. BIRD leaves De Bary Wharf every
Friday, December 1st, at 11 a. i. Tuesday and Friday at 5 p. m. for same landings.
Tuesday, December 8th, at 2 p. m. Connects at Palatka with Florida Southern Railroad
Friday, December 8th, at 3:30 p. m. for Gainesville and Ocala.
Tuesday, December 12th, at 8:30 a.m. Connects at Astor with St. John's and Lake Eustis
Friday, December 15th, at 10 a. m. Railroad for Ft. Mason, Yalaha, Leesburg and all points
Tuesday, December 19th, at 1:30 p. m. on the Upper Ocklawaha.
Friday, December 22d, at 3:30 p. m. Connects at Volusia with coaches for Ormond and
Tuesday, December 26th, at 8:30 a: inm. Daytona.
Friday, December 29th, at 10 a. m. Connects at Sanford with South Florida Railroad for
Cabin Passage, $15.00; Second Cabin, $12.50; Round Longwood, Maitland, Apopka City, Altemonte, Orlando,
Trip (Cabin), $25.00. The Company reserve the right of Kissimmee, and with steamers for Lake Jessup, Salt
changing the sailing days. Lake and Rock Ledge and Indian River.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida Connects at Enterprise with coaches for Daytona and
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS Returning, Mail Steamers leave Enterprise every
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby morning at 7 a. m. and Sanford on arrival of train.
perishable freight is transported to the principal Steamer Geo. M. Bird will leave Enterprise every
points 1th the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from Thursday and Sunday at 5 a. m.
Baltimore. Steamer Rosa leaves Enterprise exery Friday at 5 p. inm.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods 6-Through bills of lading given to all points.
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch. The steamers of this line are all first-class in every
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another : respect.
column i For further information, apply at General Ticket
JAS.I R WEST & CO. Agents, iOffice, corner Bay and Laura Streets, Leve & Alden,
114 Bay-St., Savannah, Ga. corner Bay and Ocean Streets, or on board.
A. L. HUGGINS, Agent, W 3B. WATSON, Manager.
Long Dock, Baltimore, Md. 30-tf i C. B. FENWICK, Gen. Pass. Agent. Aug. 7-tf.


0


v


~


I __ __ _ __ _


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

-Savannopi anmd Philadelphia.
A STEAMSHIP FP THIS LINE SAILS FROM EAHTI PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers for November are appointed to sail as follows :
FROM PHILADELPHIA :
JUN ITATA ....... ..................................... ................. ........................................... Thursday, Novem ber 9th.
JU N IATA ...... '.'.'.'.. "...e 1 h............... .................................................... Saturday, N ovem ber 18th
C ITY O F NIA CO N ...................................................................................................................... Saturday, N ovem ber 25th.
FROM SAVANNAH:
RAPIDAN ........................................................Saturday, November llth, at 7:00 o'clock a. inm.
JU NIATA ..................................................................................................Tuesday, N ovem ber 14th, at 8:00 o'clock p. inm .
JUNIATA... ..................................... ...............Saturday, November 25th, at 7:00 o'clock a. nim.
CITY O A( .................................. ..Saturday, Dece r 2d, at 11:30 o'clock a. m.
Subject to ehanige without notice.
WM. HIUNTE & SO a r


0


WM L. JAMESWM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.

Ocean Steamship Company.


SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.
SAVANNAH, November, 1882.
The lMtnilieeAit New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
TALLAHASSEE, Capt. Fish er Friday, November 3d, 12:30 p. m. .
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Capt. Catharine, Sunday, November 5th, 2:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Capt Kempton, Tuesday, November 7th, 3:30 p. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Capt. NicKerson, Friday, November 10th, 6:00 a. m.
TALLAHASSEE Capt. -Fsher, Sumnday, November 12th, 7.00 a. in. ,
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Capt Catharine, Tuesday, November 14th, &30 a.. m.
CITY OF MACON, Capt. Kempton, Friday, November 17th, 11:00 a. .
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Capt. Nickerson, Sunday, November 19th, 1:00 p. m.
TALLAHASSE, Capt. Fisher, Tuesday, November 21st, 3:00 p. i n.
CITY OF SAVANNAH. Capt. Catharine, F'riday.November 24th, 6:00 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Capt. Kempton, Sunday, November 26th,7:00a. inm.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Capt. Nickerson, Tuesday, November 28th, 8:30 a. Il.
TALLAHASSEE, Capt. Fisher, Friday, December Ist, 11:00 a. m.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. ItR.
H. YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agentof Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. I. IRHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'I lSoliciting Agent. '. D OWENS,
12-2 CHISTIAN en oliciting Gen'l Ag't Sav'h, Florida Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. Y.


GEORGETOWN NURSERIES.
--0-
RAN AND LEMON Budded from tried and approved varieties, and
ORANGE AND LEMON TREE on good healthy stocks.
Also, JAPAN PERSIMMONS, LECONTE PEARS, GRAPES, and at general line of Fruit Trees suitable to
Florida. Address,
a i s 4 E r to -., orida.
to Nov. 6 p.-

JAMES S. TAYLOR,

Tco. 7 ClaiK Street, oh.icda fO,


Commission Merchant h Florida Oranges


ow


-1





.j)


THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


K


FROM 0 C ) FROM 0
JACKSONVILLE AND | JACKSONVILLE AND
CALLAHAN JUNCTION CALLAHAN JUNCTION i m ;
TO TO W l) ( T
Macon ........................... 35 70 61 25 Madison, Ind........ ................. 75 1 50 125 00
Augusta ..................................40i 80 70 00 Jeffersonville, Ind................. 75 1 50 125 00
Atlanta...................40 80j 70 00 Evansville, Ind................. 751 50 125 00
Columbus, Ga ......... ....... 40| 80 70 00 Cairo, Ill.................................751 50 125 00
Montgomery, Ala ..........40 80 70 00 Indianapolis ...........................81 60 1 30 00
Mobile............. ..........50100 87 50Terre Haute............................. 801 60113000
Chattanooga, Tenn............'50 1 00 87 50 Columbus, Ohio.....................0 1 601130 00
New Orleans.......... .... 0 1 2010500St. Lous... ..................1... 7014000
Nashville, Tenun... ... 1 20 105 00 Chago..........12 00.......................... 85 1 70 140 00
Memphis, Tenn....................60 1 20 105 Peoria, Ill............................... 85 1 70 14000
Louisville, Ky......................70 1 40 115 $1, Cleveland .............................. 1 80 150 00
Cincinnati, Ohio.....................j70 1 40 115 00' Toledo............ ........ 90 1 80 150 00
Henderson, Ky ........ ....... 70 40115 00 Detroit.............. ............... 9 1 80 150 00
Columbus, Ky.........................70 1 40 115 00 Miiwaukee .............................90 1 80 150 00
Hickman, Ky........8..... ..... 70'1 40 115 00'
The dimensions of theStandard Box for Oranges are 12x12x inches, and the
weight is estimated at 80 pounds.
The Standard Barrel is double the capacity of the Standard Box.
Excess of capacity over the above will ho liable to pro rata excess of charges.
The Car-load is estimated at 20,000 pounds, or 250 Standard Boxes. Excess of this
amount will be charged for pro rata. Car-load shipments must be to one destina-
tion and to one consignee.
Prepayment of freight will not be required, but good order and condition of
shipments will be an absolute requirement. It is clearly understood between the
shippers and the transportation companies that no responsibility shall attach for
loss or damage, however occasioned, unless it be from negligence, and that such loss
must attach solely to the company upon whose line such negligence may be located.
The above points are the only points to which rates are guaranteed, and to
which Bills Lading will be issued. The Bills Lading will be issued only by the
Agents of this Company at Jacksonville and Callahan Junction, guaranteeing rates
from those points only.
The charges advanced by this Line in good faith to connections at those points
will net be subject to correction by this Line.
Unless otherwise instructed by the shippers, the original Bill Lading will be
mailed the consigee at destination, and all claimafor overcharge or loss and damage
must be presented at destination, accompanied by the original Bill Lading.
Shipments of single packages charged double rates.
In every case the full name and address of consignee must be given for insertion
in Bill Lading and on the Way-bill. T L e ised nl
FRON 1_TO SAVANNAH. TO CHARLESTON.
FROx~M. ----- -- __ __,_
FRO_ li Per Box. Per Bbl. Per Box. Per Bbl.
Jacksonville ............... ........0 Pin5 3
Landings on St. Johns River............. 35 70 40 75
Stations on Florida Transit R. R.... ... 45 75 I 50 80
Tampa and Manatee..........I........ 70 1 05 75 1 10
Stations on the J. P. & M. R. R........... I 40 75 t 56 85
-In connection with direct Steamers of the Boston and Savannah Steamship Co.
From From From I
From Ldgs on Florida Tampa Fromn
SJackso n- St. Johns Transit a, nd F. 0. & W
yl vile. River. R. R. Manatee.


Boston e... ............ ...... .- .. 501$1 00 1 20 65 j120 90 1$150! 65 $1 25
S In Connection with Steamnships direct from Savannah.
S LFrom From~ From
SFrom Ld'gs on i Florida Tampa From

SJackson- St. Johns Transit and F.C. &W.
ville. River. I R. R. Manatee.
TO-_____ __ ,_ _| _ _


Boston via New York..... . 73 $1 43 838$1 65 88 $1 65 $1113 $1 15 888$1 65
PB n...hiladelphia- a --| 1 .- 1 -. 1 -.
al ha.... ..............50 1 00 60 1 20 65 1 20 90 1 50 65 1 25
Baltimore ... ................. 10 10
ProvidenceoviaNowYonith.....5010 te s0 dirt2 121 a190a1n50 65 125
65110 fro1 2 11407:-1 s,- 0 80 1 35


IN CONNECTION WITH STEAMSHIPS OF M. & M. T. CO.
FROM SAVANNAH VIA BALTIMORE.


TO


U-0 ...4....IT- -
Boston......... ............ .............. 55 1 6 70 81 3 80 95 8 1 0 70 81 35
Providence ................................. 5 1 10 5 1 30 70 1 30 5 1 0 70 1 36
Washington .............................. 60 1 0l 70 1 2 80 1 20 I 05 1 65 1 25
To make rates from Stations on Peninsular Railroad south of Ocala add 5 cents
per box and 10 cents per barrel to rates from stations on Transit Railroad.
Steamship connection from Savannah for New York every Tuesday and Friday.
For Boston every Thursday. For Philadelphia every Saturday. For Baltimore
Tuesday and Friday.
To make through rates from points tributary to the above, add the rates for
transportation lines connecting to above rates.
Shipments via New York will be charged at the current rates from that point,
With cost of transfer added.
Single packages will be charged $1 each to Boston, New York, Philadelphia and
Baltimore. If shipped beyond, they will be 'charged in addition the single package
rates of connecting lines and cost of transfer.
Stencils, shipping receipts and information furnished on application to any of
the agents of the Line.

ALTL RAIL

Savannah, Florida and Western Railway Company,
FORMING WITH ITS CONNECTIONS THE ONLY FAST MAIL PASSENGER
ROUTE AND THROUGH FREIGHT DISPATCH LINE TO AND FROM
FLORIDA AND SOUTHERN AND SOUTHWESTERN GEORGIA.


FREIGHT DEPARTME NT.
Movement of Freight in Through Cars, thereby AVOIDING THE RISK OF
TRANSFER to and from all points on the Florida Central and Western Railroad,
Florida Transit Railroad, St. Augustine, and all landings on the St. Johns and
Ocklawaha Rivers, Chattahoochee, Flint and Apalachicola Rivers, and Havana,
Key West, Tampa and Manatee.

Fruit and Vegetable Shipments Through in Ventilated Cars
NO DELAYS. PROMPT ADJUSTMENT OF CLAIMS.
Between Jacksonville and Savannah daily. TRANSFER TO SHIPS' SIDE
AT SAVANNAH WITHOUT BREAKING BULK.
Rates always as LOW AS BY ANY OTHER LINE. Take out Bills Lading via
Savannah, Florida and Western Railway to insure ADVANTAGES OF THE XLL-
RAIL ROUTE.
Days of sailing subject to change without previous notice. For further informa-
tion, if needed, apply to
H. YONGE, Agent of Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N River, N. Y.
Gen. W. L. JAMES, Agent, 25 South Third St., Philadelphia. A. L. HUGGINS,
Agent Merchants' and Miners' Line, Baltimore. WM. H. RING, Agent Boston and
Savannah Steamship Line, 18- Wharf, Boston. 0. G. PEARSON, Agent S., F. &
W. Railway, 219 Washington St., Boston. C. D. OWENS, General Agent S., F. & W.
Railway, 315 Broadway, New York. J. B. ANDREWS, Agent S., F. & W. Railway,
43 German St., Baltimore. J. M. CLEMENT, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, Pier 41
South Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, or to either of the undersigned.
W. 0. AMES, General Freight Agent, Jacksonville.
F. B. PAPY, General Freight Agent, Fernandina, Fla.
JAS. L. TAYLOR, General Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.
D. H. ELLIOTT, General Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, Jacksonville, Fla.


539


- I -I-


I


-v


_


Z


THROUGH TARIFF ON ORANGES ONLY.
VIA THE FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE, ALL-RAIL VIA ATLANTA OR MONTGOMERY,
"r 0T EF Er'T OCTOBE IMM 1st, m1.82.








5--0 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH


COLONEY, TALBOTT & CO.,

Real Estate Agents,

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Have lands in every county in the Orange Belt, at from
$3 to $100 per acre. Orange groves from $1000 to $100,000.
Government lands in every part of the Orange Belt.
Can guarantee all of our property.
Strawberry Plants.
We have 200,000 best varieties for sale low.
Orange Trees.
We have 300,000 trees, all ages, for sale, at from 10 cents
to $2 per tree, as to age.

COLONEY, TALBOTT & CO.
Sep. 18, tf.
D. G. AMBLER. -T. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as
AMBLER'S BANK.
TRANSACTS A G GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptl ly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf


EIGHT HARDY GARDEN PLANTS by rMail,
A^APXA -a postpaid, 'f0 $1.00 viz: Ampelopsis
veitchii, lovely miniature climber- Hydrangea Panicu-
lata )Granditiora, white; Passon Vine, blue flowered;
Chyrsanthemum Spotless, white; Hydrangea Otaska,
pink flowered; Ake bia Quinata, chocolate colored climb-
or; Phlox White Lady, flowers white; Crape Myrtle,
pink flowered. Premtinu with every order. Address,
ROB'T J. HALLIDA Y, BALTIMORE, MD).


FLOWERSn t 8 l"e"itijl Plants for House
l'A m S^ CULTURE, bym"aiil, postpaid, for
ONE DOLLAR. Daphne Odora, very fragrant, light
pink; Camellia Japonica, double white; Camellia Ja-
ponica, double red; Smilax, beautiful climber; Croton,
foliage variegated; Cape Jasmine, flowers white; Olea
Fragrans, sweet olive Bouvardia Alfred Neuner, double
white. Pr'mianmo with c ry./ order. Address,
Robert .J. HlallidaUy, Bialtimtore, Md.



R i -Eifyht Winter "wer-ft('i'ti Bos,'s for
ROS ES$I. $1,00, by 'Tuil, pt pa(id.-Bon Silene,
carmine; Queen's Searlet, crimson; Niphetos, white
Perle des Jardins, yellow; General Jac( uiininot,brilliant
crimson ; Marechel Neil, golden yellow ; Marie Van
Houtte, canary yellow; Catherine Mermet, rosy pink.
lPremiums with every order.
Address, Jtob't ,T. Inivlidrty, Baltimore, Md.
to nov 1, '82,



LANDS FOR SALE
SUITABLE FOR

In lots to suit, in the town of Satsuma, Putnam County,
Florida. Send for circular to
WHITNEY, GOLD & HODGES,
JACKSONVILLE,
june 26-tf IFT4OI IIA.


E. EE...1,T,

Commission Merchant,
AND DEALER IN
Florida Oranges and Lemons,
74 WEST BAY STREET.
N. Y. Depot, MAXFIELD & CO., 67 andt 9 Park Place; Mag-
azine and Packing House, Waycross R. R.Wharf.
MANUFACTURER'S AGENT FORE

THE BANGOR BOX MATERIAL, HOOPS, Etc.
Have a large quantity of Manilla Wrapping
Papers, at Lowest Market rates.
Send in your orders for BOX MATERIAL. Can
ship promptly while freights are light. Have great
difficulty in getting it transported during the busy
seaOson. [to March 25 '8'3


"ET..A :.E .'Y-S. "WT':7E3TS":E:"O:EP,
DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,
GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.

GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMIOE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emery ]Papers, &e.
AGENT FOR
PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3O00, FIRE TEST.
Johnson's Prepared iKalsomine. Wads-
worth, M3artinez and Longman('s
Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
to mar25,'83 JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Only $1.00 a Year!

-TH E-


Florigda Wokly T mos,


LARGE 32


COLUMN PAPER.


THE WEEKLY TIMES contains the choicest things
from the previous six issues of the DAILY TIMES,
which is universally conceded to be one.of the newsiest,
liveliest, brightest,most readable and most enterprising
newspapers in the South. Its State news is fresh and
full; it comprises Telegraphic Dispatches from all parts
of the world up to the hour of going to press; and its
comments upon current events are pointed and in-
structive.
Special attention is given to all matters pertaining to
the Farm and Household ; and its Market and Weather
Reports are invaluable to Merchants, Planters and
Fruit-growers.
In all the qualities of a newspaper for the family cir-
cle and the business man, the FLORIDA WEEKLY
TIMES is the cheapest and best ever osfcrd to the Florida
pubTERMS (STRYlic. IN ADVANCE):
TERMS (STRICTLY IN ADVANCE) :


W. Ju. rPLLO"WS

STRAWBERRY 8lHIPPH{I AGENCY
-AND--
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE
REPACKING AND
COMMISSION HOUSE,
Has closed till NOVEMBER. Present address,
may 12, '83. l1oohester, N. Y.


ST. MARK'S8 HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.

OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
to April 23, '83

ELLIS & McCLTURE,


ArchlteCts au efvil ERwO Prs,

Plans, Specillcations and Estimates for Buildings of
all kinds. Water Supply, Drain age, Sewerage, Bridges'
Roots, Etc. P. 0. Box 784. Room No. 12 Palmetto Block,
Bay Street. to Feb. 7, 83

IF TO"r W WT
An Orange Grove or Orange Lands, in a healthy, beauti-
ful country,

Entirely Free f'romn I'rost,

where you have the finest

FISHING,
OYSTERS,
SHRIMP,
CRAB,
GAME
of all descriptions, and the best chance to raise early
vegetables, in a new country. Address me with stamp,
at Anclote, Hillsborough County, Florida.
I can sell you five acres, or five thousand acres, as you
desire.
to aug 20, '83 M. JR. MARIKS.
THE SUWANNEE


One year, 4;l.o. Six months, 50 cent.s. One month on l AM AW & PLANING MILS,
trial 10 cents. Specimen copies free to any address.


PREMIUMS:
To each subscriber remitting $1.50, the WEEKLY
TIMES will be sent for one year, together with a copy of
Rev. T. W. Moore's Treatise and Handbook of Orange
Culture, the )rice of which is one dollar. To each sub-
scriber remnitting $2.00, the WEEKLY TIMES will be
sent one year with a copy of Barbour's Illustrated and
Descriptive Work on Florida, the price of which is $1.50.
To any one sending us tewn yearly subscribers we will
send an extra copy for a year.
PR t.iLnitltaiies should be made by draft or Post-Of.
fice order, or in a registered letter. Address
"FLORIDA TIMES,"
octl6-tf Jacksonville, Fla.

O. L. KEENE,

MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,

Laces, MWorsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF


6r7 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to feb 20, '83

TO -PuINTlER AND BIN DEI3.

FOR SALE.
1 Half Medium Universal Printing
Press ..... ....................$300.00
1 Ruling Machine..... ............. 125.00
Address ASHMEAD BROS.,
Jacksonville, Fla.


ELLA VILI-IBE, FLORIDA,

DREW & BUCKI, Proprietors.
0-
We respectfully announce to our friends and the pub-
lic generally, that, having secured the services of com-
petent Draughtsmen, Architects and Mechanics, we are
prepared to estimate on and contract for the building of
DWELLINGS,

COTTAGES,

FACTORIES,

HOTELS

PUBLIC EDIFICES,
etc., at any point accessible by the several railroad and
stantiloat lines. Possessing the advantage of manufac-
turing our own lumber, we are enabled to offer very lib-
eral inducements as to terms and quality of material.
Draughts, plans, estimates and information furnished
on application.
We have also made extensive additions to our Plan-
ing Mill, and will continue, as heretofore, to manufacu-
ture and keep in stock a full line of Framing and Finish-
ing Lumber, Mouldings, Brackets, Balusters, Pickets,
Laths, etc.

July 17, '82-tf. Ellaville, Florida.

AT MANDARIN, FLORIDA.
20 FORTY-ACRE TRACTS only 12 miles from Jack-
sonville; extra good land, well located, between river
and J., St. A. and H. R. R. R. Price, $10 per acre. Will
sell on monthly payments of $12.50. These lands will in-
crease in value, being located in an already prosperous
town, making a paying investment at small outlay.
Maps can be seen at No. 41 East Bay Street.
to nov 21, '82. GEO. R. REYNOLDS.
Jacksonville, Fla.


094ftolk


1 Popp I rrr*rrrr~a - -- ;------


i






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH H 4


CAN MAKE MONEY BY USING

FlORRESTER'S CHEMICAL MANURES,
PREPARED ESPECIALLY FOR.

Vegetables, Orange Trees
AND ALL
SEEMI- TROPKiAL.L FRUJITB
S "- BY -

CEO. B. FORRESTER, 169 Front St., New York.
-0
-o,---
THESE MANURES ARE PREPARED FROM CONCENTRATED CHEMICALS; ARE FREE FROM ODOR;
Do not Breed Vermin or Insects in the Soil.
They have been used on FLORIDA LANDS for Years, and produce Wonderfil Results.
For sale by

f4anfortd, Orang'e County, Florida.


*S-Send for circular.


(to mar. 3, '8 )p


JON 9 0. MOORE & CO.,

FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,
&AND GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS &
188 WEST SIXTH STREET, CINCINNATI, OHIO'
REFERENCES: Commercial Agencies, or any Wholesale Grocer in CINCINNATI.
STENCILS FURNISHED BY T. 0. .Lj4lsT'EEIS,
to apl 8, '83. LEESBURCG, FLORID)A.
MITI & POTT, FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,
TAND GEN'L COMMISSION MERCHANTS
NO. 41 SOUTH I)ELAWAtI.E STREET,
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANNA.
REFERENCES:
INGRAM FLETCHER, of FLETCHER & SHARPE, Bankers, and Meridiaii National Bank.
A Stencils Furnished on Application. AV
oct-16,tf

DISSTON PURCH ASEE---4,000,000 AC R ES!


THE FLORIDA


LAND AND IMPROVEMENT
COMPANY

Offer from October 1, 1882, till May 1, 1883,

ALL THEIR LANDS


At Government Price of


$1.25 per


Acre


IN BLOCKS OF NOT LESS THAN 80 NOR MORE THAN 640 ACRES.
These lands include all varieties of upland and lowland, and are adapted to Oranges, Lemons, Limes, Pine-
Apples, Bananas, Sugar-Cane, Early Vegetables, etc., and are chiefly in the counties of
St.Johns, Volusia, Brevard, Orange, Sumter, Levy, Hernando, Hillsborough,
Polk, Manatee and Monroe'.
The following are reserved and for sale at graded prices:
"Gulf Coast Reserve," 2(8,000 acres, M. R. MARKS, Agent, Anclote, Fla.
"Timber Reserve," 100,000 acres, comprising choice tracts of Pine and Cypress, chiefly in St. Johns snd
Volusia Counties. Address
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT CO.,
to mar 24 '83 ___acksonville, Fl .
ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]

J. A. BARNESB & CO.,

FRUIT AND PRODUCE

COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
So tlern. 'rumit anzid. -Vegetables a Specialty-
32O and 302 North Delaware Avenue, Philadelphia.
to jan 6, '83


FINE POULTRY.

SEVEN BREEDING PENS OF THE FOLLOWING
BREEDS:
Two ytrds PLYMOUTH ROCKHS, two yards each of
WHITE and BROWN LEGHORN,
mal one yard of GEORGIA
WHITE GAME.
We are booking
orders now for EGGS, and
guarantee fifty per cent. better results
than from Eggs received from the North. Send fer cir-
cular. ItR. W. PARRAMO!E, Jacksonville, Fla.
W. C. BIRD, Monticdllo, Fla. tojanl5-'83

S. B. HUBBARD & CO.,
JACIKSONVILLE, FLA.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in

lHaruwr, Stovos, Boorn, sah,Bu
PAINTS, OILS, PUMPS, LEAD AND IRON PIPE.
Sugar Mills, Rubber and Leather Belting,
Steam, 4- (his-Fitting, Pluombing y- Tinsmrithing,
Agricultural Implements of all Kinds,
HAZARD'S POWDER,
BARBED FENCE WIRE.
AGENTS FOR S. L. ALLEN & 00.'S GARDEN TOOLS.
A,)- Send for Price List and Catalogue, 6i
to june 11 '83

Hickory Bluff, 46 acres, 18 acres Hammock, cleared and
enclosed with Picket fence. 200 thriify young Orcrwge
Irees growing on the place. Bold blutf river front of over
a quarter of a mile, and steamer channel clo.e in shore,
and over five miles of u'ar proteeian t to the fwrthwest giv-
iag perfect setrimy against frost. Nine miles below Jack-
sonville, and one mile from New Berlin. Can conic to
city every morning on mail steamer and return in the
afternoon. A choice place for orange growing and truck
farming. Price, 82,500.
Also, two desirable city lots 53x2009 feet, and one 70x156
feet covered with thrifty orange trees 6 years old, half
mile from business center. Good neighborhood (all
white). Price of first, $O00 each. Price ofsecond, a corner,
very handsome, $800. Apply to
J. H. N4OIRTO N,
No. 1 West Bay Street, JACKSONVILLE.
State that you stiw this In THi DISPATCH.
July 3, tf
.A.ttentioni Poultry- aezX..
DR. R. BACHMANN'S Vermin Hate; the only relia-
ble antidote to Vermin on Poultry of every description
now extant, viz: Lice on Fowls and Fleas on Dogs; alt
other domestic animals are benefitted by its use. 'Thil
being an internal remedy to be given mixed with the
food, because all external remedies have been a failure.
It is put up in packages of FIFTY CENTS and ONE DOL-
LAR. Sold at Groceries and Seed Stores. The best of
reference given on application to thr poprietor.
R. BACI{MANN, M. D.,
Jackaonville, Florida.
Depot with PAINE BROS., :36 Bay Street.
aug. 21 to feb. 21. '83.





rhe i- G .en: _luus _ted _,.


to Jan 9, 83




The agent of the "Royal Mail Line to the Nether-
lands," and of the "Florio Italian Line," in Jackson-
ville, offers his services to reliable parties in search oj
competent labor for their

proves or Gardens,
to try to induce people from
Northern and southern Europe
to come to Florida.
4WCorrespondence solicited.
C. II. VANDER LINDEN,
Care Florida Land and Imp't Co.,
sept 4, '82, tf. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


_ ---54






iG THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


y LOCAL ADVTERTISRMENTS.
FLORIDA BREEZES, by Mrs. Ellen Call Long, of
Florida, will soon be published by ASHMEAD BROS.,
arid'Will have a large sale. Advance orders solicited.
PLYMiOUTHi ROCKS AND BnOWN LEGHORNS.-A few
trios for sale. T. GRAHAM ASHMEAD,
to dec5-'82 Williamson, Wayne Co., N. Y.
FLORIDA ILLUSTRATED.-10,000 copies of which
have just been issued by us, consists oft20 imperial size
colored views in a handsome cloth case, illustrating the
different sections of the State of Florida.
This is the handsomest work of the kind ever pub-
lished on Florida. Price ,by mail, postage free, 8l.40.
Every one interested in, Florida should have a copy.
Address, ASH ME.\ A BROS.,
If 'Jacksonville, Fla.
B uOMFIELD'S LI LITRATEI)D HISTORICAL
GUIDE OF' ST. AUGUrSTINE AND FLORIDA, With
map, ftr tourists, invalids a*nd immigrants. For sale
by all booksellers and newsdealers in the State, or sent
to ai padres fo 50 nt by
II i y l JN. 4 EIlUDtMFIEIJ)..
tvii'.AJ 5 n / ^J_. St. .: Autgustin Fla.
CHOICE ORQBANQE LAN.)1Sin Ilernando County, ly-
ing isei sitrvveysof ratlrdaascai be -bbu~ht at five dol-
lars per acre from W. B. CLARKSON, Jacksonville, Fla.
Send for descriptions.. .. .,. oct9-tf


r ri e or n catalogue. tr"
TO AD.1EI.rRTIERS.-I e circulation: Far the
next twp months THE FLORIDA DISPATCH will is-
stc fOh 8,)000tlo,4,000) copies every -week ;, about, 40,000
a month.
Merchants.and ;others should take advantage of this
and advertise liberally.
For advrtsing rates ee editoriall page. tf

THE ueen %South

FARM MILLS
For Stock Feed or Meal for
Family use.
10,000 Z1Tr T"PS0 :
Write for Pamphlet.
Ampson Gaunt M'fg Co
Successors to STRAUD MILL Co.
CINCINNATI. 0.
to jan 30, '83.

OANGE GROVES AND

.IAND NEAR JACKSONVILLE, FLA,
FOR 6ALE AT A. :BARGAIN-.,
S-Choice lots for Residence, Gardens, etc..
Groves built and cared for and improvements made for
non-residents, by J. S. BELL,
Real Estate Agent and Notary Public,
to nov 5, '83 Reed' Block, Bayst., Jacksonville, Fla.


FOR SALE. .
A COMPLETE SET of Surveying Instruments, con-
sisti~gof- a .Six-inch Vernier Compass, a Fine Tele-
tWel],"- Compound" Ball-socket: Engir air's Chain, 100
feet, oval links, No. 8 best Steel Wire; <(a'iVnized Iron
Stakes, and Jacob Staff, Steel Point. 'As good an outfit
scann bepurchased in any market. For a bargain, ap-
pply to W. G. PARSONS,
with L. I. STEPHENS,
'to nov 21 '82, Jacksonville, Fla.
; Established 1840.
THE CELEBRATED
"BRADFORD"
PORTABLE MILL.
CORN, WHEAT & FEED,
FLOUR MILL MACHINERY.
Send for descriptive Circu-

I




The grca't dmand for the$e fowls have induced me to
securest a~mEay ofi Mr- A. 0, GIAWKINS for the sale
of his stock, which has no superior. I can sell


FOWLS ORi EGGS,
direct from hi. 6d1o6rmons establishment, at his prices.
I am also agent foi tlihe
AME3 ICAN POULTRY YARD
-AND THE-
"A T.POUTLTRY WOBLD,
and ,on receipt of stamp I will send sample copy to any
address. No one should undertake to RAISE POULTRY
without some good POULTRY PAPER.

to feb 12, '83 JACKSONVILLE, RDIDA.


Piaant Pla t nb Plan b Pl
1,000 000 Choice Cabbage Plants in fine condition for
shipment. 'CABBAGE SEED, ONION SEED
of all Varieties. Ndw Crop.-
AWSEND FOR NFW CATALOGUE.
C. B. ROGERS, Secdsman,
to dee 12, '92 No. ]3 Mirkrt-,it., PlITADELPIHIA,


3,000 B A R R E LS PO T ATD S .



S-I99lm i EAN ARLY ROSEH, FORS EHD t T1N R i

To arrive during NOVERIER and1 DECEMTBER. Also general stock of SFLECT SEEDS for GOaners. and
E I F .PEC'IAFt .FERTIs.IZERS-for POTATOES, A M. DA f l| J
AF l f
FIFTY TONS TOBACCO STEMS.
These st.l0s asra claimed by WESTERN GARDENERS tQ bo a sure specific f(q the rNSII Cab-
bage.i1 Ftl 1Ie AjC~ !I
BONE 4 MEAL, COTTON-SEED MEAL, HULL ASH, ETC.

to jan 6, .J VlL


-ASHMEAD BROTHELS$, .G
"1 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,

PUBI-SHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS
PRINTERS AND BINDERS,

AND DEALERS IN



SWe ha ve .114- most cornplete Book Bindery in the State. Can Rule, Nunmber lAge and PerFornte ani |oe seit s.
BIlnil: -and Blank Books manufactured to order for Railroads, Steamboats, Hotels, Banks
and Corporations. The ruling of difficult jobs a speciality.
WE PUBLISH
TIxE LE.XOD3 A D0SPTAO ,
A 20-page Weekly Agricultural Journal, at only $1.00 per year, '
'Devoted to Southern Agriculture, Fruit Growing, Market Gardening, etc.
This paper has the largest circulation of any published in Florida. Specimen copies free. Write for a copy.


It is generally conceded we do the Finest Job Printing in the State. We have all the modern machinery and all
new type. Can print the smallest Visiting Card to the largest Wsize Pott.
Printing of Pamphlets a specialty. Prices on application..

IIST OF 0",00S OQT PLO ZID&.
FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, INVALIDS ORANGE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA, by
AND SETTLERS (Barbour, Profusely II- A. T. Garey, (cloth).......................................rice 1 25
lustrated) ......... ............. ............Price $1 50 A MANUAL of QGRDENING in FLORIDA
FLORIDA: ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE (Whitner)..... ................................Price 50
AND HISTORY (Lanier)..............................Price 1 50 COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA .........................Price 75
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paper Price 10 COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-
FAIRBANKS' HISTORY OF FLORIDA........Price 2 50 the best)................................................ ..... rie 125
GUIDE TO JACKSONVILLE.......... ........ Price 25 NEW AND ACCURATE .. P OF P T.-*
TOURISTS AND INVALIDS REFERENCE JOHN'S RIVER................ ...........Prite 125
BOOK OF WINTER TRAVEL..............Price 75 McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST OF LAWS
SOUTH FLORIDA, THE ITALY OF AMER- OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep, postage extra)..Price 6 00
ICA.................................................................Price 25 INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SU-
DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition) PREME COURT OF FLORIDA................Price 3 00
enlarged and improved............. ...... ............Price 50 NOTES FROM SUNLAND ON THE MAN-
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edi- ATEE RIVER, GULF CAST OF SOUTH
tign, enlarged and improved)...................... Price 1 00 FLORIDA. Its Climate, Soil, and Pro-
ORANG( INSECTS.-Jllun.rated (Ashmiuead.Price 1 00 ductiQns, (By Samuel C. UT plminL....... jper 25
% .. FLORIDA AS A, PERMANENT- H0 ...... ice
Any of the above books mailed on receipt of price. ..

(Sent by 7 (ai!,po.it?/l,/ free, on receipt of price.)
In Book FIorm, Containing 1' Views Eaeh.
Souvenji, r of F.lori' n, small ike).. ................................. 25c Souvenir of ackl 6n}ille, large elc).,. ... .... .... 50c
Scene's andl Characters Of the Sunny South, (small Souvenir of St. Augustine, (large iz. ............ 50c
size)... ........... 25c Stereoscopic Views, per doz......... ............ $1 00
I=-. O.:pA ILLT.TS T'=AI D.
10,000 copies of which have just been issued by us, consisting of twenty imperial size colored views in a hand-
some cloth case, illustrating the different sections of the State of Floridas
This is the handsomest work of the kind ever published in Florida. Price by mail, pbs4aige rej.c0, / Eve'ryose
interested in Florida should have a copy.

WARRANTY DEEDS, per dozen......................Price 50 j MORTGAGES, per dozen....................................Price 50
QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS, per dozen...................Price 50 | NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, made to o.rder.Price $5 00
We publish a full line of Law Bniiks for Law.yers, Justices of the Peace, Circuit Courts, etc. Price-list
mailed on application.


UBBER STA M IPS.
Are manufactured right in our establishment, in the best manner, and at short notice.


C H R ISTMAS GOODS
A ISiECIATY,
CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR'S CARDS IN GREAT VARIETY.
We carry the, rg,tt stock in our line south of Baltimore.
-A Orders by il solicited andt.prompily attended to.
A ,yt.,/itinfg we se d out, if not satisfactory, ,, t,'lPI'/ Ak,- ,(,-ck A,,

tFull count-480 sheets to the ream. f '.
......1 x1.... 1 1x1
!, ... . [F[ull


Address


14 c. pr rm. 17 c. pr rm. 19 c. pr rm:.
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
'21 WEST B \Y STRiEET, JACKSCNVILLE, FLORIDA


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