Title: Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00033
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: NF00000068
Volume ID: VID00033
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
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Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

Full Text


31.: THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


The Palm lWow 2,-Phoenix.
FEDERAL POIT, FLA., Oct. 28th, 1882.
The genus Phoenix, widely distributed over
the warmer portions of the eastern hemisphere,-
includes some of the most useful and elegant of
the family of Palms.' Pre-eminent among therA
stands P. dacfylifera, the 'Date, perhaps the most
famous and valuable tree on ;tlh face of. the
earth. Around it.cluster innumerable associa-
tions-sacred, historical, romantic, poetical-
furnishing ample material, if collected and em-
bellished by. the pen of genius, inspired withen-
thusiasm,' for one of the most delightful of vol-
umes. The mention of it calls up the entry of
our Saviour into Jerusalem, and the multitude
strewing his pathway with palm branches,
which acquired therefrom. a sacred significance.
It suggests the plain of Jericho, where the pro-
fusion of these trees won the admiration of the
conquering Romans, who caused medals to bA
struck, bearing the legend "Judcea.Capta," and
representing a lonely female sitting. under a
palm. We think of the Moorish civilization in
Spain, when we read of the Caliph Abd el Rha-
man planting with his own hand in a garden at
Cordova, a young palm brought from' his dis-
tant home in Syria, and composing .a poem in
honor of the event. We picture in our minds
the historic Nile, dotted with palms; and the
medieval splendor of the cities of Mesopotamia,
so graphically described in the Arabian Nights,
and try to measure the thrill of delight felt by
the traveler on the desert, when before his
weary eyes the verdure of the oasis breaks the
line of the horizon. In the middle ages the
wandering religious devotees, who had visited
the Holy Land, and bore about with them a
palm branch in token thereof, were called
Palmers.
The Date is of immense economic value to
those dwelling along the south and east shores
of the Mediterranean. An Arab on being told
that there were none in England, could not
conceive how people managed to live in that
country. Its fruit, both fresh and dried, forms
an important article of food, and from it are
prepared wine, spirits, vinegar, honey and
sugar. Oil is extracted from the .seeds, which
are afterwards fed to cattle. The trunk affords
excellent timber; the' bud, a delicious vegeta-
ble, and the leaves, together with the coarse
fiber surrounding their bases, are manufac-
tured into baskets, mats, bagging, cordage, and
many other useful .articles, while the saf>, by
evaporation, yields sugar; by distillation, ar-
rack, and by fermentation, Wine.


Its original home is supposed to be along th'e
shores of the Persian Gulf. It thrives best be-
tween the parallels of 200 and 350, requiring a
certain measure of cold weather to flourish and
bear in the greatest perfection. Generally,
north of this, it perishes from the inclemency
of the winter, and in the equatorial regions be-
comes dwarfed or unfruitful. A hot and dry
climate i'mrnost congenial, and as the' saying is,;
it should have its feet in the water and its head'
in the fire, which shows its adaptation to irri-
ted soils." Alon the northern shore of- the
(ecliterranean, 1R i occuayioiuiiy rUu Ia III IncI-
tered spots, producing a scanty crbp' of inferior
fruit. One exception to this, however, occurs'
in the arid districts surrounding Elche and Or-
ihuela, in Spain, where irrigation is practiced,
and where the peculiar climatic conditions pre-


ferred by the Date are found. Here, according
to Dr. Bennett, who visited the place, the Date
trees appear in orchards, in groves, in thick-
ets, of fifty and a hundred or more acres, from
ten to a hundred feet high, exactly like the
palms in India. These Dates are the large, fa-
rinaceous species, not the soft,, sweet kind, en-
crusted with sugar; and in .the districts from
Carthagina to Alicante owing to the intense
heat of the summer, and to the dryness of the
winter climate, they ripen their fruit." These
peculiar conditions do not- exist in Florida,
where it is as yet to be proved whether the Date
can be successfully cultivated for fruit. True,
Dates have, ripened here and there, between
Cumberland Island and Key West, but the
quality is said to be far inferior to those brought
from up the Straits."
The male and female flowers grow on separ-
ate trees, and more careful attention to the fer-1
tilization of these flowers, and to the introduc-
tion of the earliest and finest varieties, may
give better results.. In the east this fertiliza-
tion has to be, strictly. attended to, or there
would be little or no .crop,,but the wild varie-
ties are said to take care of themselves. Re-
cently, a tree .was found in Algeria, bearing
seedless fruit of extra:fine quality,which ripened
some weeks sooner than usual.. Offsets from
this tree were carried to France for. propaga-
tion and experiment. It Asiatic Turkey, the
offsets which form around the base of .the trunk
are planted, and come into bearing ini four or
five years, By this method one has the advan-
tage of selecting plants from fertile trees, where-
as when seed is planted,: a large proportion
prove males and consequently. barren. In
Florida, blossoms begin to appear at the age of.
ten to twenty years. Three of. my young trees
have bloomed, unfortunately all staminate. I
have never heard of offsets being successfully
planted in Florida. Probably, a fair trial has
not been made, as they should be of good size,
and carefully watered till roots .form.
The growth of young seedlings in Florida is
vexatioul'y tedious for a :few years, till the stemin
develops, after which they shoot rapidly; aloft.
I have a plant twelve years old, and eighteen
feet high, which has made about four feet of
trunk during the past two years. A little north
of the wharf at Mandarin, on the St. John's
River, may, be seen some fine specimens of Date
palms, clearly visible *from steamers at the
landing, lifting their waving plumes above the
roofs of the adjacent houses. The light colored
varieties appear to ripen more evenly in Flori-
da, and to be of better flavor than the small
black Dates, and seeds taken from the dried
fruit of the stores readily germinate.
But even if in Florida, the cultivation of the
Date for fruit should prove uncertain and un-
profitable, it is still worthy of attention fir pur-
poses of decoration. The majestic sweep of its
branches is rendered doubly striking and pictu-
resque, by the intermingling i wit and contrast
to the rounded forms of broad-leafed vegeta-


tion. When artificially illuminated at night,
the play of light among its latticed foliage, pro-
duces an effect really startling in weird magni-
ficence. Planted in the open border, it forms a
convenient natural trellis, which, festooned with
climbing vines in full bloom, presents a unique
and brilliant appearance. At IBordighera, on
the Genoese Riviera, it is' cultivated for the
sake of its leaves, which are artificially bleached
and sent to Rome and even -IHolUand, to be
used in dressing churches on'-Palm Sunday. In
Florida, the leaves will probably, for many
years, possess a commercial value, and be in de-
mand for similar purposes.
planted in India, for wine, sugar and spirits,
which are made from the sap', drAwn off through-
an incision into the bud belo6W the crown. It
is 'well worthy a trial on a small scale in Flori-
da, since if the experiment should prove suc-


cessful, it might give rise to a profitable branch
of industry. -Trees are fit for tapping at the
age of five years ; produce sugar to the value of
fifty cents or a dollar, each, annually, and con-
tinue productive for many years. Little or no
cultivation is necessary-a few-crops of castor
beans being usually raised .among them while
small, and a plantation once established be-
comes an unfailing source of revenue. .The
leaves are thicker, longer, firmer, and more
gracefully arched than those of the P. dactyli-
fera, and its constitution is hardier as against
frost; hence it is preferable for ornament, but
the fruit is very inferior and scarcely edible.
In this latitude I have found the P. dactylifera,
sylvestris, and canariensis, perfectly hardy. The
latter is a smaller growing variety, with very
dark green shining foliage, but the leaves 'of
the two former are of a dull, glaucous hue.
Mention is made of Date trees on the Canary
Islands, by a! Roman :writer. P. reclinata,
from the Cape of Good Hope, is another strong
growing, handsome variety, and probably
hardy, but most of the.plants, sold under that
name are spurious. Its seeds are used by the
natives as a substitute for coffee,
The greatest number of varieties of Phoenix,
are to be found in India, some of which possess
such elegance of shape and vigor of constitu-
tion, as render them especial favorites for con-
servatory culture. They are generally of
dwarf habit and nearly stemless, and in many
parts exist in such abundance as to form the
characteristic scrub growth, like the saw pal-
metto, (Sabal serrulata,) in' Florida. The
greater part of these low-growing Indian spe-
cies are too tender to bear any frost, otherwise
they could be used with pretty effect in our
gardens. A few specimens of the most grace-
ful of them all,. P. rupicola, from the southern
slopes of the Himalayas, are, however, well
Worth planting. They can hardly be matched
in elegance, and the low stem is easily covered
with earth, so. that if -the foliage be winter
killed, it will be speedily renewed in spring.
E. B1. HART.
Grafting the Grape.
ST. JoHN's Co., FLA., Oct. 26, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I have some strong roots of the native wild
"Bullace," or "Muscadine," growing near my
house, and I would like to graft these with a
few of the finer varieties, such as 'Black Ham-
burg, Delaware, Muscat of Alexandria, and
Malaga.. Can I do this successfully? If so,
when and how ? Please reply and oblige
Yours truly,
CON5TiNT READER.
REPLY.--We have no well authenticated ac-
counts of the finer varieties of grape,
especially the European Vitis" vinifera,
being successfully grafted and brought to bear-
ing on the wild roots of the Southern "Bul-
lace," V. rotundifolia. Have any of our read-


ers tried this experiment ? If so, we shall be
glad to hear from them. There is, in Grape
Culture," by J. Fiske Allen, a very wonderful,
indeed almost incredible account of the success
of a gentleman who lived near Quincy, Fla.,
many years ago, in' grafting the Muscat of
Alexandria, and other fine grapes, into native
roots, but whether 7. lalrusca, 'V vulpina or
V. rotundifolia, we .do .not remember. This
gentleman, a certain Hon. Mr. Symmes, stated
that, as the result of such grafting, he produced

We have_ always felt disposed to drop a 'few
pounds from those marveloVn bunches, and to
take the whole story cum grano-though the
work of J. Fiske Allen was considered one of


------
II i i ~ "1 T -T~- T -I-- ~ --LI :








THE FLORIDA DISSPATICH .:l


the standard'authorities, twenty-five or thirty
years ago. -.
'But as regards the matter and manner of
grafting the grape, we find a report of Chas.
H. Larrabee, of Crafton, Cal., in the River-
side Pre&s and Horticulturist. Mr. Larrabee
says ..
I report the result of an experiment in
grafting made by myself this year. I have
about three acres of Mission vines about twelve
years od., and as they adjoin my raisin vine-
yard. I think-to. graft them with Museats next
spring.
I selected a healthy vine, and removing the
earth to the depth of three inches, cut it off,
a41 with a sharp i-inch bit bored three holes
in the.crown of the vine 11 inches deep. On
just touched with its edge the inner bark of the'
stock, one was i inch inside the bark and the
third 'one s .i.ch from the bark. The
soions, wer ,short-joikted, seti, the lower
end cut off square, the outer bark removed,
and selected a 'to size so as to fit snugly, in the
h6les. 'A bud of tbe scion wk fput at the top'
ofthe stock, arid two b~ds above. Now as t6
result The scion nearestt ihe baik has made a-
finet growth, the: branches being three feet in,
length; the union is perfect, and the supply of
rd0ts is good. The wounded top of stock was
well covered with grafting wax. ..
The scion i iich injde .male feeble growth,
and the one 4 inch did not start, at all.
It might be well for others to continue these-
exprimnents as it is difficult to su-cceed with
cle g grpftings il0on old v1in .
Japan Persimmons at Archer, Fla.
CcHIgEB, FLA., November, 1882.
,Editors of The Fforida Di ch:



30th of the fine cluster.set t yot; and whft'lis so beantP.
fully shown in the Illustration, I send you today a
specimen of ours taken from an imported tree now
Four feet high, and which matured 23 specimens' such as
the sample sent :
I have been closely., watching this newly imported
fruit, and am satisfied.it 'i 'destined to prove .fo much
value as a fruit for homeeonlfuhmption uiaj .for distant,
market. Two of its characteristics are early bearing
and great productiveness. Qilte' a number of our
I young .newly set trees put ot triqit, some shed all the.
fruit off, while others retail them. In the nursery rows
we-have now two trees grafted at: the ground last' Feb
Sarury, with fruit on; one tree not .wo feet high, with
high, twih seven half grown, both same age. know-
for the good of the trees, they should not be allowed to.
bet frit so youfig, but for the novelty- of :the thigAn&
to learnts qlabits, I.could not: mI7 .up courage tq.
take the ruit off:.'. YoursVery truly. .
__ *;.'<. *f.W*iB.bIPSEY

I Analysis of rerilizerS. ''-'
Prof. J. F. Eitosl, Analytical cemist, thus discdses
so6iie poiinhts contiected with tlet reil Value o-fOdmnmer-
clalfertilizers. Weiquote the Indiana Farmer; ':
"Jt really seems t. me that something .apuld.b dae
1 to guard against imosftlion in the purchase otf fertili-,
Szers, Ir there are few things less findetod thanthe aeo
tion of' fertilizer, by he averae farmei.,,4)ftentnltea
he uses gn artificial mlnure, when the prDw' woultl d
more: .dective' serviced/ Again, I in asny, distance
analysis o the so 1emostrates the fct thai mnyof
the elieArith of pant food 'ie d nts itin th& soii i
needig awakening,and thpi too, -aveiy.ama
lay, i act nothing, as compared to the cost of boe-
dust etc., which n hh instan ds only ants inn a lteu
chanical mmnper, being of little more practical v~h p
Sthanso much sand. Finally the farmers 'shoulU know


precisely what their soil needs, and precisely-whvbt they-
shou.d apply to supply this deficiency. Of what .use, I
Swbild like to ask, are all' eabalistic charaCters wisd idet
eig wo.Q48 so OftepL.een on fertilizer sacks T I, am, fee
to confess that I do not see liow they act as alnyguid 'r"
to the. ftrtililing V"alue of the contents. The. farmer'
needs, in the language of the United States, information,
as to hbow much the use of a given amount pef acre *ill:
increase his eropxa Fk his can be done in three .Nvpd ?
any one knows that be this 50, 20 or 1 per cent., all the
rest merely acts mechanically, and so would "aund '6r'
S smatl seed"' T ..8 4
., .. .,
S"Thankstto.thee good-influence of agricultural papers,
Ith .farmers, as at whole, are susceptible toless 'cheating
that ever before, but 'to fight dbwean evil like that 61f
dishoeseea manufacturers if fertftizses will require time,,'
patience and money. In this respect I consider the law,
governing the style of fertilizers easy to be evaded. The
law should give the consumer the right to an analysis ,
and provide means to accomplish the same, by firnish-
ing facilities by which each sack may be examined be-"
for payingfor it."
A Cscago correspondent of the Louisville Cburier-
JournaTrwrites: "It doesn't matter how many Southern
winter resorts are built-they will hereafter all be filled
with Northern people." The proprietors of watering
Spaces and hotels should take the hint .., .....


MORE' ABOUT .MR. RICHARD LEE, THE
SLANDERER OF FLORIDA.

.His Character and Reputation.
In last week's issue we published such an ably-writ-
ten and thorough refutation of the slanderous 'article
published in the New York Sun of the 16th inst., headed
"The Land of Flowers," and signed Richard Lee; from
,the pen of our worthy citizen, Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, that
we deem anything further on the subject suPieriluous.
Moreover, further investigations into the character of
Mr. Richard Lee, show him to be worthless -and thor-
oughly unreliable, as the following "testimonials" from
prominent citizens of Waldo amply testify :
'WALDO, FLA., October 25th, 1382.'
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
In response to your inquiry concerning a certain'
"Richard Lee," who signs a communication inthe 'New
York aSun, we, the undersigned, believe that he Is the
person who dishonored this community with. hs. pres-
ence for about three years, and from our experience, he
seemed to be on the "'dead beat" order-promlishig muCht
and paying only when compelled to. Respectfully..
S NED B. PFAREL,L .
JOE M. PkRiM.iT' .
Richard LeeI who lived In the vicilitty of Waldod
through hiSr family'obtained about $90 worth of goodN
from me,,which were never paid for.. .*-, .* ;
., ... T.M. CA, xTES.
I believe this correct. ; RA',,l.ON.
The within' I know to be correct. : -
J J.' T. -F' asrG SoN,,
While in business under the firm,' of Ferguson Bros.,
for a small amount of s1,60, dunned him at last three
times before it was paid. D. L. FERGUSON.
I was express agent at this place during one Richard
Lee's residence in this vicinity, and am satisfied he
'gave' me: ind the express more trouble for. the: small
amount of- ptronage,he gave us than all the. balance of
th.e, community.. T. A. PECK.
I never met with a more disagreeable and discourteous
man in business than Richard Lee. I wag postmaster at
the time he resided here, and I was generally 'conceded.
by the public to be very courteous and obliging ,in the
discharge of my duties, but with all my best efforts to
please Mr. Lee and family, I have never received any-
thing from them but the meanest abuse. .
.... .,- R.. CAMPBELL, Late P. M
. .Now .' R. Agt, T,.R. R.
I knQw the above to be correct; that Mi. Richard Lee'
made arialyfal'se ad ihalici6ius idpoiwts to the' ex1tess'
and p ,ta'authbrtties, and always eameeoIt second -iest
an4 with idivule- ,.' w EDWAN O*R J0 , .
.-ieh ard Lee, wA a nelor of mine, and I ave ca-
fuf Yriad dtfib 66o-0d, aiNdhfmdrst it'tllry. ,4 .. V"If
ifhave-,carefully read the Above, ani be.4yastatt,
mentos to be c6rrct, and know subscribers to be business
men, and our best citizens. "N. C. PiTIT.
I believe his absence better than his presence in any
community. I know the subscribers and believe they
have made truthful statements regarding this humbug-
ging "Lee." ' "
(Signed) Gxo. C. RIXFORD.
We are also, reliably informed that Mr. Lee wrote
a series of "highly colored".articles on Florida, praising
up the soil, climate, productions, &c., which vere pub-
lished:in the& Weekly Union in 1878, or thereabouts. This,
is not all.' In order to dispose of some worthless Hands
he started a big land scheme and gave the property the.
high-sounding, aristocratic title of "Lee Park." This he
tried to-dispose of in lots at an advance of five or six.
hundred' .per cent. profit. Thus we have' shown Mr.,
Ridhard Lee to be not only a slanderer and vilfler of
our Sithte, a D. B: In every sense of the word, but ntnost
worthless, unsortpultous 'and contemptible character.-'


Oranges-Gathering, Packing and Shipping
S'VERNOR," the Lake George Correspondent of the Pa.
latka Journal, says .
,We aminow shipping the regularT orp of oranges,
ind between now and the slet of December will see
heavy shipments from this point. Our crops, are large,
and four-tiths of the oranges will cinO'un'der the head
ef "fancy," and by the 'wayspeakrig of shipping and
parking oranges, there is great diversity af opinion as.
regard the same. Your, iedqral PoiIt correspondent
4ays actual experience oh their" part proves the sweat-
ing 'itoeefss'wrorig, and says it hastens dAecay. Our ex-
nerience in this section is otherwise My own expe-


lience is, that the trouble and failure on the part of
many is caused by carelessness in picking anid handling
the fruit. Unless one has thoroughly trusty' men to
pitk the fruit, they had much better do it, themselves,
And as to sweating the orange, there is only one proper
way and that is by racks, built of slats, about an inch
apt/, alloWing the. frAit 'to lay two to three oranges
deepo-not pile them in heaps on the floor In this man-
ner the airwill have full circulation, and if the fruit is
picked and handled properly there will be no reason
todblimplain on the part of the consignor or conlsgnde.
The main trouble is too much haste and not enoughg .
etntiow paid .to packing neatly, A consignee likes his
fruit to come to him in first-class mtarfner, not'jiiibliesd
1ia dOr the sake of'getting -them in the market -fdit';
there is no profit inthat, Neatnesas.all thef ia neces-;
sary, and to prove it to onself, follow your own dfo-,,
tates wien buyingn. In picking o gages!ht in'tiishould
Pe particularly instructed not to touch therathumb to'
the orange when cutting it from the Att.i, as.the pres-
sure of, te same will cause a defect that will in e the
frpit 'by the' time it reaches the 'Iarket. 'The knife
sHould at all: times be kept very sharp. We packin box-
es 12x12-x27 inches; wrap up all, our oranges andi ine the
' boxes, with white paper it costs a litt-le more, but it
takes the eye and brings better prices. 'Our shipments
go to Chicago to Higley & Smith, who have made con-
clusive arrangements to get them through within six-
days, and not to cost over sixty cents per box per car
_z .


METEOROLOGICAL REPORT.
Weather for week ending November 3,1882.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION,
SIGNAL SERVICES U. S. A., JACKSONVILLE, FLA1.
Therm. ir Wind.
'. * L=, *| --- -.- .:





Saturday 28....1217960 69.7 76.3 0.00 E 2 Pair.
Sunday 29....... 80.06181168 72.7 80.7 0.00 E 1 Fair.
Monday 30.0.... 05&81!67 73.0 79.0 0.00 NE :!3 Clear.
TIuesday 81..... 1 30.07[81 66 72.0 89.3 0.00 NE 5 Olear.
AWednesday 1.. 380.12.!8068 70.3 96.7 1.85 ., .E Fair .
^hu8ay'2..... 30. 1374665 6901 89.7 0.24- BE. 5 Cloudy.;
Friday 3.......... 30.0869 59 63.0 89.0 0:501 N 14 Cloudy.
Highest barometer 80.17, lowest 0.02. .
Highest temperature 81, lowest50, .
SNoTB.-&Barometer.readings reduced tp sea level..
*. ... J., W. SMITH, Signal ObPrver U. S. A..

e "King Cotton" iNot Deade
The Levy Aer r.te,.qf OBronsn, :Fl., very,, nsiuly
says: "There -has much been said about the little profit'
J'lither l .raisrig cotV6fi at the; present low figures fort
the staple; .which, no doubt, tQ a great extent is; true.;
but we believe with a little system-a little, more care
and labor to prepare the land before planting, that when
the :cotton comes to be gathered, the planter willfin
much better results with :but very little,labor. We have
a case to the point:
Mr. B. B. BARCO, thisweek, sent usan average stalk
ot cotton I'rQm the patch of Mr. M. J. MIXON, wifth the
result up to this time: '
Two years ago the land had been cow-penned;; last
year it was a vegetable garden,,and t4is year planted in
long cotton. Mr. Mixqn has already gathered and'sold
a thousand pounds to' t'h' are; andj judging from the'
Vimopened bolls of thb plant' sentius,, if frost ,oies not,
Cath them he will hmke, five thousand, pounds more*
But calculating on what is already saved: One thousand
pounds to the acre t'stix cents per pound iA $60per acre
lure, with a certainty of more; which is considered
rEfltableinap1dX6 Wn,apy ?ouAtry. The lunfpie ip,
If your land l, poor and hungry-f-ed it.. .
N Bit.'-TI4b' ocr p Was raised on the "Sanrrd Hills o1f
BironsoniP. 'f tet fiatt woods.or. haminecksi can beat.
ltih w ,o'W b ha ppy ti .ma a a.C n ...It,,

THE following Table, showing the quantity o1 seed.'
required for a given number of Plants, number of Hills,
or length of Drill, may be of use to our friends, the gar-'
deners and "truck" raisers:
Apparags,.......................... to 60ft. ofdrill.
Beet...... ........................I oz. to 50 ft. of drill.
BeansDwarf..................... qt to. 100 ft. of drill.
Beans Poe.............. ..... ... t. tO 150 hills.
Carot.. .. ................ .. ........1 oz. to 150 ft. of drill.
Cuumber ...................;...... oz. to 0 h*lll.
Corn ,..... ...... .. ..... .. .....1 q to 200 hills..
Dandelion.... .......... ...........1 oz. to ft, of drill.
Endive.,.................................... J oz. to 150 ft.' f drill.
Leek ....... ... ............. ........ ........ bz. td 10 'ft drill.
Melon, Water.............. ..'..:.l ozto. 30 hill .
:Melon, .Mu .... ........................... oz.,to 60 hills.
Okra ...................... ............. ............ oz. to 40 ft. of drill.
nion.................. ....... ........ ......1 oz. to 100 ft. of drill.
nitanSets, small...........................1 qt. to 40 ft. o drill.
Parsley ....... .......... .......... ....... oz. to 150 ft. of drill.
,Parsn p ...... .......... ..... ..........1 oz. to 200 ft. of drill
Peas.. ....,....'........ ................... 1 qt. to6 100 ft. of drill
lum pkir .......l...o........................loz. to 40 hills. .
E IRadlsli. .d.....,' ....................... ..... o.z. to 100 ft. of drill.
Salsify ................... ........1 oz. to 70 ft of drill.
Spinach....... .' ............. o. to 100 ft. of drill.
quash, Early ................................... oz. to 50hills .
'quash, Marr.w......................- oz, to 16 hills.
....r.... ......;............,...,.0.lz.'to 150 it. of drill.
Cablfag g........... ...'.1' Oz. to'2000 plants. -
]au! lowfir. .:.:.;.. ......;.... .... ,.......l Oz. to:2000 plants.
Cleru ....'.-. ... .:.....'...1i'oz. to 3000 plants.
g 'la t......., ..^.... .......... .... oz. to 1000 plants.
Letuce.. .........1 oz, to 3000 plants.
Pepper.... ............. ..... ...foz. to 1000 plants.
Toiaato....................- os. oz. 1500 plants.


SORANGOE PICKINg TIME.- As the orange picking sea-
son' draws near, the subject of packing the fruit for mar-
ket sl-nattually. discuase&,by the growers. It has been
and is now advocated by many that the fruit should be.
]picked frind then subjected to a sweating process before
packing, but with us no process is attempted, as, actual
expeitence'ha-proven that the sweating propes -simply,
hastens decay. The keeping qualities of an orange are
limited, and the sooner the fruit can reach as market
after it is picked from the trees the better, 'They mnust
never be picked when damp, either by rain or dew, and
tif grioter will be very careful that 'hisTrult is dry when
pled in. tathe boxes.' Much loss. hasbeen incurred by
careless handling whilq ptiug.an by placing'them in
l4arg piles afterwards; as In that ease the fruit that lays
'at te bottom of there pile' is 'sure to boe' nioe or less
ortished by the weight' of that abovq it, pubjecting the
grower-to the annoyance pf receiving a report from his
donsignee stating that "part of your frdit arrived in bid
order. The crop 111 be lighlt'this year, but of excellent
quality, and too 'much' care cannot be taken in its har-
Vest.-Pcalatka Jaur.oo t. ,

P OTASH FOB POTArTOS:.-We have, frequently, advised
the use of potash for potatoi6 :. It should be applied be-
fore planting' arid thoroughly mixed' with the soil be-
cause, according to V. T. MAGERSTEIN, the tubers re-
quire potapspm most In the early stage of their growth
and a later application of the potash manures has but
little influence on the increase of reserve matter.


~


I I






5e THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Experimental Farm and Garden in Florida.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
I noticed in a recent issue of a New York journal, en-
titled the Orange Grove, an editorial on the import-
ance of establishing an "Experimental Farm
in Florida." The writer recommends that it be
placed under the "control of the Agricultural Depart-
ment at Washington," and requests Mr. Disston to do-
nate 1,500 acres of land; and the editor will "undertake
to obtain the necessary appropriation for establishing
the farm and school-say of $25,000 the first year, and
probably $15,000 the second year." In discussing this-
subject, the editor says:
"The immediate establishment of an experimental
farm in Florida is a national necessity. It should be lo-
cated there for the reason that Florida presents far
more advantages in respect to climate, soil, productions,
ready improvements and accessibility than any other
State or Territory. While the proposed institution
might and should embrace some of the less expensive
features of an agricultural school, the grand central idea
of the plan should be a practical experimental farm or
plantation as an adjunct to and under control of the Ag-
ricultural Department at Washington. Some of the ob-
jects to be accomplished should be the propagation and
fullest development of every available production now
known in the State, together with every northern and
even foreign product that by possibility might be accli-
mated there. To foster and bring forward to greater
perfection the recently discovered products of that won-
derful State would alone be a marvelous achievement;
yet we have scarcely entered on the threshold of her
possibilities. The great objects to be thus accomplished
are nowisesectional, but strictly nationtional, and therefore
this thing should very properly be an appendage of the
National Department."
However important an Experimental Farm may be to
our State, if placed under the control of the Washington
authorities itswould prove a failure, and possibly an in-
jury to the State. It would become a point for the free
distribution of useless flower and vegetable seed, and a
political machine for the distribution of official pap-
the officers to be changed to suit the political necessities
of "the party," or of a Congressional candidate. Then
again, unless each variety of plant, fruit, vegetable and
cereal was properly cultivated, and grown to the great-
est perfection, the State would be injured; for in the
language of Mrs. Partington, "comparisons would be
odorous."
An Experimental Farm and Garden should be estab-
lished by the.Trustees of the Agricultural College Fund,
in connection with a college, and aided by the State, or
else by the syndicates who have so largely invested in
our lands.
In my wanderings in this and many other lands, I
have devoted considerable time to the study of the veg-
etable productions of the places visited, hence my views
are based on something more than theory and hearsay.
Florida is comparatively A new country, and as yet
many of its resources are undeveloped. Many new set-
tlers have been badly advised, and have commenced the
cultivation of the soil without the necessary knoWl-
edge, and as a result, have made failures. One failure
will do the State more irijury than one hundred succes-
ses will benefit it. Failures are taken advantage of by
those who are inimical to the State, and are widely pub-
lished, but successes, like good deeds, are seldom
heard of.
The majority of those who settle in this State engage
in orange culture to the neglect of other crops; and as
mixed husbandry is the secret of success in any coun-
try, it should be encouraged by the State, or those who
have large landed lMerests at stake. That far-seeing
writer, Charles Vignoles, whose work on Florida was
published in 1823, says:
"It is doubtful whether a happier man will be found
than a respectable independent planter, who fixed in a
salubrious spot in Florida, finds on his farm every lux-
ury that is so dearly purchased by the citizens of a
crowded city; his sugar, tea, fruit, preserves, animal
and vegetable food will be the produce of his own fields


or farm yard; the rivers supply the most delicious shell
and scale fish; the wild fowl are excellent and numer-
ous; his vineyard, olive and orange groves will Offer
their unstinted products; his orchards and his garden
supply all to tempt and gratify the appetite; except for
a few articles of wearing apparel which, if necessary,
could be supplied at home, he will be wholly independ-
ent of the world, while he will send out his cargoes of
superfluous productions to supply the.wants of his less
fortunate fellow-citizens in more northern climes. Such
will be at a future day the situation bf the-Florida plan-
ter, who by a judicious arrangement of his capital and in-
dustry, shall turn the silent forests into smiling fields
and flourishing plantations."
I admit the great importance of orange culture and
the superiority of the oranges grown in this State, and
however great may be the demand for the luscious gold-
en apples of Florida, the day will arrive when the mar-
ket will be supplied, and other resources of the State
should be developed. The climate, soil and productions
of this State are so varied,important and lucrative, that
we should adopt some systematic effort by which it can
be practically, definitely and satisfactorily ascertained;
what can be successfully and profitably cultivated; the
best methods of producing same; the net yield per acre,
and the adoption of some mode by which accurate in-
formation can be disseminated in this and other States.
For health and diversity of products, Florida cannot be


equaled by any State in the Union, and its
climate is all any reasonable man can ask.
Intending settlers visit Florida, and the only reliable
information obtainable is the number of orange trees to
be planted on an acre; and theoretically, how many or-
anges will be borne by the trees at the expiration of five
or ten years. Unfortunately for the State, some blatant
mouthed individuals have exaggerated the productive-
ness of orange trees, and as a consequence, the State has
been injured. What is required is to definitely ascertain
the product of, say fifty groves, in various portions of
the State, and the publication of facts-not mere asser-
tions. All do not wish to engage in orange growing, and
definite and reliable information should be collected, col-
lated and published for the benefit of those who wish
to engage in other cultures. No State can be densely
populated and prosperous that depends on one crop
alone, and it will pay those who have large landed in-
terests to encourage in every possible manner a diversity
of productions, and through the medium of an experi-
mental farm and garden practically illustrate what can
be accomplished.
Successful and extensive orange culture is merely a
development of about fifteen years, and practical ex-
periment has determined that Florida possess the cli-
mate par excellence for the production of oranges; and
it has been established beyond doubt that for size, juic-
ness and flavor, the oranges of this State cannot be
equaled by those of any orange, producing region. If
experiment has accomplished so much for the orange,
may we not reasonably expect a similar result as re-
gards other productions ?
Other States are climatically limited to the production
of a few crops, but in Florida we can successfully pro-
duce the crops of the other States, and many that alone
can be grown in this. Yet to determine the capabilities
of the State, and what can be successfully produced, the
intending settler must wander over a large extent of
country, and even then he may fail to secure reliable
facts and figures to guide him. The question arises, what
product of the earth is there that cannot be produced in
some portion of the State ? Actual experiment has de-
termined that we can successfully grow maize, the cere-
als, potatoes, (Irish and sweet,) oranges, lemons, limes,
grapes, all the vegetables and roots, bananas, tobacco,
ramie, jute, indigo, cotton, (long and short staple,) tam-,
arinds, olives, pears, peaches, nectarines, melons, straw-
berries, cocoanuts, tea, coffee, pine-apples sapodillas,
Avocado pears, sugar-cane, rice, &c. But when the in-
tending settler asks for information regarding the culti-
vation, the yield and profit per acre of any given pro-
duct, definite information is not forthcoming. When he
Onquires-where he can see the productions of the .State
cultivated, he is Informed that he must visit this section
and that, and devote weeks to the investigation. What
is required is to concentrate all the cultures in a suita-
ble locality where intending settlers and visitors could
observe for themselves, and where accurate and reliable
information could be secured.
The question arises, would such a farm and garden
pay? In our humble opinion, it would. NeW things
could be introduced, tested, and if valuable, propagated,
and sold. *The productions of the garden in the way of
vegetables would pay for their cultivation. Oranges
and other fruits could 1e marketed. If deemed advisa-
ble. the ornamental couldb>e added to the useful, the gar-
den rendered attractive, and a taste cultivated for the
beautiful and the State made more attractive. How
Often do residents hear the remark, 'Florida Is called the
Land of Flowers, but where are the flowers." We have
the soil and climate to produce floral gems in the great-
est profusion, but strange to say, the taste Is lacking to
ornament our homes, and our negligence falsifies the
appellation commonly awarded the State. In Tallahas-
see much attention is paid to floral ornamentation, and
in this respect the City is very attractive. On the con-
trary, the city of Jacksonville-the objective point of the
State-contains butfew if any private gardens worthy
of the name. The first duty of our citizens should be to
beautify their homes, and thereby elevate and refine
themselves, and asa eosiequenoe render the State more


attractive to visitors and settlers.
But we should look further than to the culture of the
articlespreviously referred to, mixed husbandry being
necessary to the success of a State. This State can never
become agriculturally prosperous and productive, until
a full supply-of animal manures are obtainable, and to-
obtain these important substances stock must be kept
and fed. The stock at present kept in this State is truly
a "laughing stock." Improved breeds of cattle, hogs
and sheep should be introduced-breeds that will pay
for care and the production of artificial food. To feed
stock we must have succulent grasses as well as-root
crops. Our native grasses are few and innutritious, and
those of the North and West will not succeed in this cli-
mate. In many tropical as well as semi-tropical coun-
tries, succulent grasses exist and they should be intro-
duced, tested, and if desirable, disseminated. It has al-
ready been practically determined that Bermuda and
St. Augustine grasses will make permanent pastures,
and that excellent hay and fodder can be made from
oats and Guinea grass, and from corn anl teosinte.
Through our Consuls, and by the medium of exchanges


with the curators of Botanic Gardens in the English
colonies, roots and seeds of grasses could be secured and
experimented with. As introduced, they could be plan t-
ed side by side; their valuedetermined, and useful spe-
cies propagated and disseminated. You will probably
say that this is chimerical, but in reply, I can assure.
you that useful grasses could be readily propatated and
distributed. In the Island of Jamaica, as I have been
informed by a correspondent, the native grasses are not
adapted to stock, and that they have made pastures by
planting Bermuda and St. Augustine grasses; ana ob-
tain a supply of hay from the Guinea grass. This lat-
ter grass is extensively grown in Bermuda for cut food
and hay. As an illustration, I will direct your attention
to a grass known as Timothy. A few stalks were found,
the seed was saved and planted, and in a limited period
widely disseminated. It soon became a staple gtass of
the North and West, and has materially contributed to
the agricultural advancement of those sections. My ob-
servations and experiments have forced me to the con-
clusion, that we can without difficulty provide broad
acres of pastures, and a sufficiency of root crops; and
uhen that end is attained, we can keep and fatten cattle
and raise mutton sheep.
Actual experiment has established the fact, that up-
land rice culture is a success in Florida and very profit-
able. In the East Indies forty-two varietiess are culti-
vated, and one of the number thrives on sand- hills and
mountains. If these varieties were introduced and test-
ed, it Is possible that one of the number might prove
more productive and better adapted to the climate than
the variety under cultivation. In the past it was sup-
posed that successful rice culture required reclaimed,
and at times overflowed lands ; but a series of experi-
ments in this State have demonstrated that irrigation
and even marshy lands are not necessary for the pro-
duction of large crops of rice. The average product of
the wheat crop of the United States is about eleven bush-
els per acre, and from a number of returns I have re-
ceived from cultivators, I find that upland rice in this
State yields from twenty-five to seventy-five bushels per
acre, or an average of about forty-five bushels. In the
hull seed is worth about $1 per bushel, and as the yield is
about four times as great as wheat, and as tt is easily
and cheaply-cultivated, it is very profitable and the crop
for the poor man. C. J.K.
(To be continued.)

Notes From Sunland.
BRAIDENTOWN, MARATEE Co., FLA. '
October 22, 1882. J
-Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
As a number of your readers have written
articles describing their localities, I do not
know but it will be in order for me to say some-
thing concerning the Manatee region, or Sun-
land, as it has been called. Unfortunately for
us, we are not located in "the exact centre of
the orange bblt," nor are we below the "frost
line," as so many fortunate localities are in
Florida. So far as a "frost line" is concerned,
the whole thing is a myth, gotten up for the
benefit of uninformed people at the North.
There can no more be a "frost line" than a
hurricane line, or a snow line, or a line of per-
petuallygood neighbrs, and I suppose if the
truth were known there is not a locality in
Florida that is always exempt from frost.
Even Key West and the northern West In-
dies occasionally get a visit from the King of
Winter ; but, of course, such visits are of very
rare occurrence. Here at Manatee and Braid-
entown, four degrees north of tg1 Tropic of
Cancer, we are practically exempt from dama-


going frosts, and have a delightful climate,
which has all the benefits of the tropics, and
very few of its drawbacks. The great arm
and elbow of Tampa Bay on the north, and
nearer still, Terraceta Bay and.the Manatee
River, form a natural water protection that de-
stroys the chilling effects of the cold north
winds that sweep down in winter across the
continent.
I wish I could say that this locality was a
natural paradise, that the richest and most gor-
geous vegetation grew here spontaneously ; that
there were no disadvantages in this part of
the country; that the soil was boundlessly rich,
and that the owners thereof would never tell
lies about it to uninitiated strangers; but truth
compels me to draw a much more moderate
picture. Not that I claim to be naturally
more truthful than the common run of folks,


I -- -







T F DISPATCH.. 5L


but that I think it good policy sometimes to be
honest,. and rather understate .thIn overstate
the facts. I know it is common for residents
here in Florida, who are anxious to have their
localities settled up witfi enterprising people,to
paint a bright picture in their letters and pub-
licatins, bhut I have seen the miserable disap-
pointed look,and heard the curses loud and deep
of those who had been led to believe that Flor-
ida wAs a Garden of Eden, and who, when they
saw for themselves, found it fall. so fart short of
'the glowing descriptions. Such disappointed
people return home thoroughly disgusted, often
without even. stopping to look around; they
.cannot find language sufficiently strong to abuse
Florida with, and so deter many from, coining
down here. But to my description : Much of
our soil is light, though we have plenty of pine
and hammock land, some of the latter of which
is abnost inexhaustibly rich. The orange-thei
fruit of fruits of Florida-grows here to perfec-
tion, and probably is just as fine in quality,
and as productive as it is on- the Indian River,
or many other celebrated localities in the State.
All the tropical fruits so far as tried, the Guava,
Sapodilla, Alligator Pear, Mammee A ple, Pay-
Paw, Sugar Apple, Custard Apple, Mango, td-
coanut and Coffee, flourish here, and many of
them are ii full bearing. At -Fgartyville
iMadam JULIA ATzERO :raised the fmest cof-
fee grown in the United States, and she has a
aumiber of trees now growing and bearing. Thr
Banana in our hammocks and bay heads grows
magnificently and bears enormous erops. Here
the Sugar-eane blossoms and forms sead, an in-
dication of how ciomptel y tropicall our climate.
is. The Lime afd dLmon JQ expellenily, and.
the culture -of the Pine-apple is becoming quite
an important industry here. Fish, oysters and-
clams abound in the' Manatee River and ad.
joining waters in unlimited' ,aant. -ei and tur-
tle are abundaut and fite in the asoa. e-
ple frown the lorth, ad the li *i br
Louthei-n fteg,'aretpfilcy coming in andi set-
tling up the country, aMd hew buildings are
constantly going up all around'us. One of the
industries that la beginning to assme large pro-
portions here is the. raisig aad shipping of veg-.
etables in winter and eirly aprimg,f(aneg which
the Tomato takes a prominent place. There its
plenty of land for sale in this vicinity, and to,
listen to the description lby ,its owners, one
would believe it was all of he finest quality
and for sale at very low prices.
With this brief account of the ManateA re-
gion, I invite those who think of making F'Ior-
ida their future home, to come and see, not
with too brilliant expectations, but prepared.
for some draw kacks and ,inconvegiw n ,oe-a
sary to a new country. Repectfully, .
CHAs. F: SIMPso .

"Lying About lorida." -
"REX," a correspondent of the Fort .ade
2Messnre, says "STTOP TRAT !"- "


"8to6p What ? Stop writing lyiin lettIabadt'
FloridK to lbr active immnigants, ahd-for the
Northern press. This is doing us tinre hariMi
than is generally supposed, and should, b'Adis-,
couriged by every one who is in any tgreein-.
terested in the 'development of our suniy'an.d!.
'The liars mayhe divided into two classes, the
Tourist and the Resident. ...
THEE TOURIT.
In speaking of the tourist, I do not include
iavalids, but those who come to Florida to "do.
tke .State" simply for the faun of the thing..
About the middle of OctpIer he packs his trap.p
and strikes a bee line' for Jacksoville; where
he remains for a day or tW* asking an huknded'
questions from. every native he meets ; his next
move is to take a steamer for some port onAthe
Upper Stt John's. Stopping here a few 4ays to


shoot "gators" he rushes back to Jacksonville,
he has now seen iuall, and must write it up, for
his city or county paper. He knows nothing
about it, having had no opportunities to learn,
hence he very naturally inclines to one extreme
or the other and pictures Florida to be the
greatest country on earth, or not fit for white
men to live in; there is no half-way ground,
with him it is the noblest work of GOD, or an
invention of the enemy.
It is .not generally known that the character
of the country depend entirely upon the con-
dition of his stomach at the time of writing,
nevertheless such is the fact, if that organ is
"well filled with Volusia County game, and St.
John's River fish, he is careless and happy, and
the beautiful, balmy Land of Flowers is lauded
to the sky, on the other 'hand if his stomach
shouldbe empty, he is pig-headed anrid cross and
othe desert, swampy Land of, Flowers is con-
temptuously consigned to the gentleman in
black:. Intentionally or unintentionally, it is
all the same, he lies. But as long 'as he has
plenty of "Uncle Sam's" promises to pay we do0
iot complain, for while he is here our livery
stable men have a soft thing, hotels and lunch
houses do a driving business, for your tourist is
no epicure, he has a capacious maw and greed-
ily devours everything edible wJhich he can get
his paws on; he is iot much at prayer-meet-
ings, or assisting African missions by dropping
large ooias in the church contribution box, but
when it eomes to eating and lying it will be a
cold day when he gets left.
THE RESIDENT.
This individual Is by a long odds worse than
.the tourist, for the latter may sometimes be led
astray by the rose-colored account with which
he is stuffed by' the natives, while nothing can
be Smid in defence of the. former unless it be,
that he overdraws the thing in ord.r to induce
imgeip .uimmaalgration Induced 1i this
eer profitable. Jiidgingfrom letter
whilr Ihave read, -written by residents and ap-
pearing from time to .time in the Northern
press, a stranger would be led to believe South
Florida is one of the greatest corn-producing
regions in the Union; this is all wrong atnd
should stop at' once. When a gentleman writes
to you, from his Northern home,. asking for in-
formation, aboutt .Florida, don't tell him that
peas planted here will bear on the end of every
vine a two-bushel gourd full of shelled corn, but
come right out with the truth and frankly on-
tihat this is'but a poor agricultural country
as compared to the North and West. By judi-
eious management a man can grow all the corn
and -oats required to feed his horses from one
season to another, while the yield of sweet'po-
tatoes, peas sad garden vegetables will be rich
enough to satisfy the most fastidious person liv-
ing. Now, when it comes to fruitgrowing, say
all you like, you can hardly overdraw it, and
underr this banner our ultimate success is as-
sured. Take the orange for instance, every
full-grown tree is one hundred dollars; it will


pay an annual interest of from 20 to 30 per cent.
on thatv'amount, and- tihefit t Oe yeaste after it
reaches its full bearing capacity, it will, more
than repa the cost of growing t. Is, this not
enough? Would you try to make Florida what
.itis hbt and never will be? It is quite good
6gb as it is. Let It alone as OD' tirade it.-
f -e eitrns fhndily we 'have our strongest
point. "'Stick to your- eolbrs' aud stop lying.
In 8a- an old eatoi amongk the -rural
people'is never to eat fruit out of dors with-
out planting the seed. The roads 'i-hli.ed
with reer, whose fruit is free' to all. An :id
proverb sa-s : "The- man has not lived ip
vain who plants a tree in the right place..
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VEfiT1E BS APPEARING iN' TTHE DIS-
PATCOH. WILL CONFER A FAVOR -BY NO-
TP!YINGOTHEM TOY THAT. EFFECT.


Farming in Rhyme.
I'm sure I am not far wrong to call the times alarming,
,Which fact alond will justify a short essay on farming;
The subject's full of interest, in any way we view it-
Success or failure much depends on the manner we pur-
sue it.
Experience, if nothing else, teaches us one thing,
That cotton now, if it ever was, is no longer 1ing";
Butcorn and hogs ren and hogs re instead-twill be aappy day
When every farmer in the land acknowledges their
sway.
Raising cotton, nothing else, and buying our supplies
From the farmers 'way up North is anything but 'wise;
And such a course, if still pursued, can lead us bunt one
Sway, .
And that is to poverty and ultimate decay.
Then to my brothers everywhere, this advice I give:
When you settle at your home, first prepare to live;
Build ample shed-room for your stock, to shelter them
* from rain;
Build ample barns to store away your surplus hay and
grain;
Plant ample fields of yellow corn, sow barley, wheat and
rye,,
And never let us hear again that a hog "must root or
die." hog "must root or
Curtail your now vast cotton fields, divide them into
lots
Of ten or twenty acres each, improve thewornout spots,
Prepare youp land quite thoroughly ;-when you plow,
plow deep, .
And stock your farm with cattle, horses, mules and
sheep.
Sow grasses in abundance, and set your land in clover-
And when you have a hog to die, just let him die all
over. -
If you like, raise cotton, I think it very well
To have a surplus bale or two, to take to town and sell;
But be sure 'tis surplus, no extra hands required, e
No orders drawn on merchants to pay for hands you've
hired.
In such case 'tis very Well to have a few such bales,.
For then you simply pocket the proceeds of these sales.
This money'S yours, and wlth it do just as you please-
Buy corn to feed your surplus stock, or simply take your
ease, b
Or, better still, invest in stock, as has been done before,
Start within your neighborhood a co-operative store.
And if I'm not mistaken, 'twill pay you in the end
Good interest on your money and a handsome dividend.
These simple hints, my brothers, if practiced, I am sure,
Will shield us from our enemies, and thus we may en-
dure
The universal onslaught of enemies around us,
Whose poisoned darts and arrows literally surround us.
In short, my brothers, make yrour home home in every
sense,
Where one can live in princely style at a very small ex-
pense.
Seek not for princely- wealth and power, but leave to
your descendants
The greatest of all earthly boons, simple independence.
I've mentioned stock 9f all kinds-barley, wheat and
Those essetials of the farm, which no one cankeny.
Btt of a wessenUtla iywu'll le a appY
By all means let the faimAer have 4t ue l loving wife;
And when yon hi%'e her, croww ir-16-etb her- have her
sway, *' -
As queen o'er all the household let her have her way.
Chickens, eggs, and butter, waffles, battercakes,
And numerous other dainties the careful housewife
m akes, .... ....
Will reward your confidence; you'll think your;wife the
best-
That no man living neathh the sun is half so truly blest.
And, finally,. ay brothers, I must admonish you,
It matters poq what others do-to .yourself be true.
Scan pub il que.tions closely-be careful whom you
choose, :-
And force yali public servants to represent your views-
For just as sure s all eftct must hav ascertain cause,
You cannfdt eto pspr unless ou have good laws.
.-'* .---'. A. Fctci, s GdiOGazette.

Southern. Rallways.
According to the New Orleans Times-Demo-
orat, the amount of rail actually laid south of
Virginia, Kentucky and Missouri is as follows
for the nineteen months ended Akugust 1, 1882:
Miles for19 Total com-
months. pleted.
A labam a.......................................... 67 1871
A rkansas.....:.......:....... ................. 422 1318"
Florida.. 35.... .... 31 881
G eorgia ................................... .... 2 6
Louisiana ..........:....................... 303..... 3 .1 1026
M issis ippi.................... ..... .......... 81 12
North Carolina..-.....:................ 224 173
South Carolina......................1e..e.. 1. l..152


Tennessee............ ......................... 207 2kl 2073<
Texas. ...... ........ .. ..... . 01.,... 6
Total....... ..... ....... ..... ....... 5 20,65
The capital for the construction of Southern
railways is in great .part furnished by investors
it the Northein Statea or drawn from Europe.
The Soith, while-getting the benefits of the vast
expeaditure. necessary for putting 5,000 mile
of railroad in shape to lay down the iron upon
it, will At feet the drain rieeulting fidm tied-up
capital. The effect of cheapened transportation
in adding value to the whole agricultural pro-
duct of the regions traversed by new lines of
railway will give a wonderful impetus to the
development of manufacturing industries in the
next ten years. Push the farmer ahead and he
will pull everybody el-se after him,.


9


___.. ---- --- --- ---- I


I


I q -


THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


5.7






518 'THE FLORIDA DISPATCH..
.. ' 1 -* *. . ^ :- ',


|w $lorzida gispaichk
JACKSONVILLE, NOVEMBER 6, 1882.
D. Redmold, D. H. Elliott, W. H. Ashmead,
EDITORS.
Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.


RAT ES OF .T ADV-ERTISING,
PAID IN ADVANCE.


SQUARES. 1 TIME. 1 MO. 3 MO.j 6 MO. 1 YEAR
One...................... $ 1 00 $250 $550 $10 00 $ 18 50
Two ............ ......... 2 00 500 1000 18 00 3400
Three ..................... 3:00 7 00 1400 25 00 46 00
Four...................... 4 00 900 17 50 3000 58 00
Five......................... 4 50 11 00 1900 35 00 65 00
Eight...................... 8 00 1650 30 00 50 00 10000
Sixteen................. 16 00 3 0 500 80 00 15000
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words to line) 20 cents
per line.
CIRCULATION.
This paper has the largest circulation of any
paper (daily or weekly) published in Florida,
with a very large circulation in Georgia and the
Southern States.; also has subscribers in every
State in the Union, with many in foreign coun-
tries. After October 23d, we shall issue weekly
from 8,000 to 10,000 copies, about 40,000 per
month.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
Persons are warned against paying subscrip-
tions to any one calling himself our Agent, as
we have no regular canvassing agent.

OFFICIAL OR GAN OF THE FL ORIDA
FRUIT GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.

Special Club Rates with "The Dispatch."
.We' have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
followingepublications, which will be mailed promptly
upon. receipt of price, for ONE'YEARI:
'THE PLORIDA.DISPATCH 4AND .
American Agriculturist ............ ......... $200
Atlantic Monthly Magazine....... ..... 4.00
Country Gentleman... .................... 2.75
Detroit Free Press.... ....... 2.35
Eclectic Magazine....... .. 4..00
Florida Agriculturist.... ............... ... 2.25
Florida Weekly Union.......... ..... ........ 2.25
Florida Weekly Times .............................. 1.50
Family Story Paper....................................... 3.35
Fireside Companion............................... 3.35
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly........... 4.00.
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4.00
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly.................. 3.15
Frank Leslie's Sunday XMagazine.,............... 3.15
Harper's Illustrated Weekly......................... 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Bazar........................... 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Young People................. 2.00
Harper's Monthly Magazine...................... 4.00
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine................. 3.15
Nebraska Farmer...... ................ 2.00
North American Review.,.............................. 5.00
New York Weekly Sun.............................. 1.75
New York Weekly Herald........................... 1.75
New York Weekly Tribune........................ 2.50
New York Weekly Times ........................... 1.75
New York Weekly World...:....... ........ 1.75
New York Ledger .................................. 3.35
New York Weekly ...................................... 3.35
Popular Science Monthly. ..................5.00
Philadelphia Weekly Times... .......2.50
Southern Cultivator.................:.............. 2.00
Scientific American .................................... 3.75
Saturday Night....... .................. .35
Savannah Weekly News............................... 2.50
The Century Monthly Magazine (Scribner's).... 4.00
Waverly Magazine................................... 5.00
The above are among the very best publications"
Remittances should be sent bX Check, Money Order,
or IRegistered Letter, address to
ASHMEAD BRO'S,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


N2iEW AD VER TISEMENTS.
Archer Nurseries.-Lipsey & Christie, Archer, Fla.
Plymouth Rock Fowls.-T. Graham Ashmead, Wil-
liamson, N. Y.
Commission Merchant.-James S. Taylor, Chicago.
Land for Sale.-C. B. Magruder Rockledge, Fla.
Orange Groves for sale.-J. S. Bell, Jacksonville, Fla.
Books, Stationery, Printing and Binding.-Ashmead
Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
Prof. A. H. Curtis, Jacksonville Fla., desires a large
specimen of orange wood, and will pay a fair price for it.


Orange Seedling Slocks, Prices, &o.
PUTNAM Co., FLA., October 24, 1882.
Editors' of The Florida Dispatch.:
I notice in your paper, an advertisement of
the Senior Editor for sweet or sour. orange
seedlings. As I am comparatively a "new-
comer," I would like to know how to raise such
seedling stocks in large. quantities, and -also,
what the probable demand for them will be,
and what they are worth: per thousand. Please
reply, and oblige, M. W.
REPLY.-To raise brange seedlings in large
quantities, you must have a piece of' well-pre-
pared land, as free from stumps, roots, &c., as
possible. This ground should be well manured,
plowed deeply, harrowed fine, and laid off in
straight rows three feet apart. The seed,`
dropped in these rows two inches apart or six


orchard, not in the nursery," and; we axe there-
fore in favor pf transplanting orange,trees into
the grove while .young, and opposed ;to disturb-
ing or removing. large trees under nearly allt
circumstances.
As to the price ofnursery seedling stocks of
one o0 two years old, pqr thousand, we can only
say, that they should not .cost any more than
apple,'peav or peach stocks 'of the same age and
size. Of course the law of supply and demand
will, in a great insure, regulate this matter;
but if our calculationsas to the number of stocks
which can be raised upon an acre are correct,
we should say that from $5 to $10 per thousand'
would fully remunerate the grower. At the low-


I,


Fine Sheep and Hogs for Florida.
We are glad to see an interest awakening in
Florida for fine stock of all kinds. It speaks
well for the future. Green Cove Springs will
soon have a fine flock of Southdown sheep,
brought from the north by Mr. H. O. Smith.
We predict they will prove a success, as Florida"
is well adapted to sheep, raising.
At Daytona, if rumor proves true, the razor-
back hog will soon give place to some fine pure
bred hogs from the north.

New Publications.
"Preliminary Report on Scale Insects of the
Orange, with Remedies and their Apphcation."
By H. G. HUBBARD., Athor's Edition; price
25 cents.
The author, Prof. H. G. Hubbard, as Special
Agent of the United States Agricultural Dd-
partment, has been stAtioned at Crescent City,
Florida, during the, years 18W1,and. 1882,,in-
vestigating scale' -insects and experimenting
with remedies for their-destruction, and in the
above contribution he incorporates some of his
most valuable discoveries.
It is a well-written, 23-page octavo pamph let
issued from the Government Printing Office at.
Washington, D. C., and 'bears unristaikable
evidence of the painstaking industry' of the
author. .
The pages from one to eight are devoted to.
the characterization of the 'dilferent'species of
scale insects-number of bitood, tn6nmies, &c
and the balance are devoted' to descr.iig hi
experiments with dedrenthredip.a djthe .
tion of numerous insecticides.', This is the mmt
valuable part of the work, and what orange*
growers really want.
We have carefully read the work through'
and find it a well-written epitome of the more im*
portant of Mr. Hubbard's investigations and ex-
periments, and consider it a most valuable con-
tribution to the literature of scale insects. .
This little brochure. is invauable itQ any one
owning an orange grove,6r who contemplates
starting one, .
For sale by ASI EAD BRdCSI
"DESCRIPTIVE C4TALiOGUE OF LECONTE
NURSERIES," Smithville, Georgia, ..W. W
THOMPsoN, proprietor, a neatly-printed, 32-mo.
pamphlet, with descriptions 'of fruit trees
suitable for Georgia anid Floidi a; among which
we noticed the LeConte Pear, Jaipan Persim-
mons, peaches, &c. Send for a copy.. .


to the running foot, will, if all groW,' produce'
eighty-seven thoiuand one hunidied and twenty
(87,120) plants.to the acre; or, making a very
liberal allowance for the failure of the 'seed to
germinate, sayfifty or sixty thousand. The ceul1
tivation of these seedlings, except a little hand-
work. when the plants are very young, may be
most. entirely done by a horse or mule, run-
ning between the rows, back. and forth, with an-"
expanding cultivator or horse-hoe, and the :ia,
bot of keeping the crop clean can be no hoi6re
than 'it would be for an equal space imi cori or,
cotton. It must be understood that the,,speds
of the orangevintended for planting should never
bcbhie dry., The soonerthey are' planted af-
der leaving 'the fruit! the better but, f itis
necessary to keep the. for a, few day efofe
planting, drop them into a vessel ol? fresh War
ter,,or pack them' carefully in layer 'of' daAmp'
sand .: ; ' I' . .
bW, cmrinnot sat. what i4ie demand'r fsorQ '.
seedlin.gr ay be in tl future 'but,, s ,pre
are still,-hundreds .qf thousands f acres of
good orange 'lAnds iu' Florida uncledred ran
unplanted, weo dnot Jiazard anything. in say-
ing that,, for some years, least, the' demani
of nuserymen. for budding, stockss, and: of, oth r.
for seedling tnees of three.-orfour:yeaw s old,l
wilt justify those who have: proper LfabilitiWini'
raising siur' stocks, 'eveni in large' qualtities.'
Stockspfor, n4rseryime, iswell, grpoVn and 'ian-.
died, should 4ie of. gool budding size. at- two
years. old9;t ba-seedlings (not budded) intended '
-for' ntrnkplritiag into' gVe; may bee 'yeiat or
to' -i4d6, Thesea.te should' 'be litft&' rom
the seed-rows when one, or two years, old, transd
planted into better soil, and given a distance
of a !foot 'or eighteen inches apart in the row,
in order to'develop a spreading ead aid a stout,
"stocky" trunk or stem.
We.do not, at this advanced stage of orange.
culture, advise the planting 6f seedling trees in
grove, where: choice budded sorts'' can 'readily"
be obtained,; but as many people piefr i~R'd
will have seedlings, and as .maiy .others cannot
obtain budded trees, we throw out this, hint
about transplanting and giving large seedlings
more rob'm; fb6 the benefit of those 4vlio desire
to raise them., In regard to' transplanting, it
is scarcely necessary to say, that the oftener a
young tree is skilfully: trt pl; the more
abundantly are its roots developed, an4d the
more easily successful its final removal ,fror-
nursery to grove or orchlrd, Still, qur experi-
ence teaches us th truth qf the, French maxim
that a "tree should make'its growth. in the'







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 519:


est 'rate. mentioned ($5 per M.) and 50,000
plants to the acre, the one-year-old stocks would
be worth $250, and the two-year-old at $10 per
M., $500; .and if we could be sure of a large
demand for such stocks during the next few
years, we should have no hesitation in prepar-
ing and planting as, few acres at once ---EDs.

"HOMOsASSA" AND "NONPAREIL."-Our
neighbor, Mr. CHERRY, of Point La Vista,
will accept our thanks for well-ripened speci-
mens of the two very superior premium, or-
anges named above.

A Big Supply.of Fruit.
MEssRS. GIBSON & ROCKWELI the poptllar Fruit and
Produce Commission Merchants, have just received the
largest consiginIment of fruit ever received by any one
honse in Jacksonville. For the past. t,wq abreelarge'
schooners have been unloading at their a., tb o they
have been busy selling and shipping ever since. They
are also doti Allarge busiAess as orange shippers.
The Editofw ,nd Publishers rettern thanks for a large-
bunch of choice bananas.

Root Pruning the Orange.
A correspondent in St. John's County, Fla., writes:
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
"I have an orange grove of about fourteen acres, most
of the trees being seedlings of from eight' to ten years
old. From the beginning I have given these trees good
culture and plenty of manure, Their vigorous growth
and healthy appearance is quite remarkable, but as yet
they show no signs of bearing. A friend, in looking'
through my grove the other day, said: 'You have stim-
ulated and over-fed your trees. They have made too
much wood. If you Vwant to throw them into- bearing,
you should root-prune them.' Do you think this diagno-
sis of my trees correct ? If so, when and how should I
root-prune theinm ? Please tell me what you think of
it." :
REPLY.-Over-feeding the orange tree'ls not4a very
wide-spread weakness among growers, yet we know of
several instances in which it has beeg, done, and the
bearing period retarded. We have no reliable data in
regard to the effect, beneficial or otherwise, of root-
pruningh but, reason from analogy, we do not see
wh2iy rt)trft*,ia.ot be atm uec sf0_y .ra" a *ed
oia iWon eL*on lnylther frkit teeU j 6tSAcde
root-pruning the apple and the pear, especially in gar-
den or "high culture," has long been common in France,
Belgium, England, and other European countries, and
to some extent on this side of the Atlantic. We read,
not long since, in the London Garden, some 'remarks on
recent experiments of this kind, the gist of which was,
that a vigohoqs apple trade, eight or ten years old, which-
had scarcely made any fruit buds, has done best when
about half the roots were cut (with a very sharp spade),
in one season, and half three years later, by going half
way around on opposite'sides in one year'*and finishing
at the next pruning, working two feet underneath to
sever downward roots. It has always answered well also
to cut from such trees all the larger and longer roots
about two and a half feet from the stem, leaving the
smaller and weaker ones longer, and going half way
around, asalready stated. The operation was repeated
three or four years later by extending the cut circle a
foot or two further away from the tree. By this opera-
tion unproductive fruit trees become thickly studded
with fruit spurs, and afterwards bear profusely. This
shortening of the roots ha. been continued in these ex-
periments for twenty- yeaes with much suiecess, the cir.
cle of roots remaining greatly circumscribed. The best
time for the work has been found to be in the latter part
of August and beginning of September, when growth
has nearly ceased and while the leaves are yet on the
trees, causing greater increase of bloom buds the follow-
ing.year thai wYhen performed after the leaves had
fal tep. cor .' p- e n' de f e, e -r:"' it -
SbouftTfour correspondent desifetO expfrilifeit with a"


few of his yet barren and unproductive orange trees, we
would suggest that the experiment be made during the
present or next month. The mode of performing the
operation is sufficiently indicated above. Let him try a
few trees only, to begin with, and carefully watch the
effect. At the same time, let him withhold all manure
from-the main grove for a year or two, and merely give
his trees enough shallow culture to keep down the grass
and weeds during the growing season. He can thus de-
termine whether it is better to keep up his system of
high culture, followed by root-pruning, or lessen the
supply of food and thus check the tendency to over-
growth and the undue preponderance of wood.-EDs.
CANE AND SUGAR.-A correspondent of the New Or-
leans Times-Democrat estimates that 200 acres of cane,
yielding twenty tons of cane with 56 per cent, of juice,
having a saccharine strength of 15 per cent. per acre, will
give 33,000 pounds of sugar worth five cents a pound,
and 297,00 pounds molasses worth two aind one-half cents
a pound--the whole crop bringing $25,575. This is $127
an acre; and a fair paying business.


SIR PHILIP CLARK

Buys 60,000 Acres of Land From the Diss-
ton Company.
Sir Philip Cla-k, Lord Houghton, of London, England,-
brother-in-law of the Duke of Argyle, arrived in the
city last Sunday afternoon, and so quiet were his move-
ments that it was not known until-he had left. He has
purchased sixty thousand acres of the Disston lands,
and Intends going extensively into sugar culture in
South Florida.
He stopped with friends while here, and left for Kis-
simminee City last Satur(daly afternoon.
Lord Houghtbn is largely interested in sugar -culture
in Jamaica, and seems to think that Florida is a better
field of operations in that business than the tropical
island. If his prognostications prove correct it is.prob-
able that he will invest at least a million dollars in the
sugar business in Florida. He will return to the city in
a week or two.-Florida Times.

Big Oranges.
Putnam Cou.ty comes to the front with some "brag"
oranges, The Palatka Journal says that Mr. S. H. BA-
CON, of San Matfo, brought a large specimen to the office
'a- fe# day- since. It was 17 inches around the largest
way, /1, inches i"n circumference around the centre, and
weight 26 ounces! "If our frieiAds up North will recol-
lect tha'tan ordinary orange weightAidoi't 1 610 ounces,
they will better realize what a 'whopper' this one is. It
,is of the Navel variety, welL shaped and perfect in all
respects. But this is not all; Mr Bacon assures us there
are thirty or forty moxe such huge fellows on the tree,
all Uloihg finely. There are also 100 to 150 more oranges
on the tree of smaller size, but none less, as he estimates
it, than 15 to 16 ounces. The tree is a six-year-old bud
and is healthy and growing finely. So far we hold the
'belt.' Let us hear what other sections of the State have
to say for. themselves." -
Japan Persimmons..
Mr. W. B. Lipsey, of Archer, and Mr. F. Warner, of
Fairbanks, send us fine specimens of Japan Persimmons
raised by them at their respective places. They are of
a different variety from those noticed in last week's is-
,stue; smaller ifn size and not so fine in quality, but, how-
ever, good, fair s4pecm'fens of this promising fruit.
Thanks!' gentlemen.
Mr. Lipsey sends with his a good, practical article on
the subject, which we publish.
Judging from specimens of this delectable fruit sent
us. Florida 1hs, we think demonstrated that she cm
'pric cJap t i ns1 ai np so

The specimen sent us by Mr. Fitz-Hugh, grown by
him on his place at Picolata, weighed seventeen
ounces, and is larger than some illustrations we have of
those grown in Japan. We allowed it to get thorough-
ly ripe before eating, and find it not unlike a delicate
jelly. In our estimation, there are but few fruits that
excel it in flavor.
It is certainly a coming fruit, and a profitable one,
and we advise its general culture.
Trees can be -obtained from -the following reliable.
nurserymen .. . BidwellI,. Jacksonvilld; Manville'
Nurseries, Lake George; Lipsey & Christie, Archer;
Aaron Warr, Georgetown, Fla.; also from W. W.
Thompson, Smithville, Ga.
1RISH POTATOES.-When the Early Rose was a new
and expensive variety, a correspondent of the American
Cultivator says he was advised, in order toget the largest
yield from the seed, to cut u',n and leave but one eye to a
piece, and drop one piece in each hill, The advice was
followed, and that crop has never been excelled in size
Of. tuber or in weight Irom the same, number of hills.
t.ers have testified to thq same truCh, Iut still persist
in using more seed than is needful. His rule now is, two
eyes to each hill, hills not over fifteen inches apart, and
he does not see any reason to change the practice. The
advantage of light seedling is two-fold-it is a matter of
economy and there will be a higher average in size of


tuber than if two much s ed is used.

S: orrSa Dispathr Ei I
NEW YORK, October 28, 1882.
Receipts of oranges per Florida Dispatch
Line pnd Southern Express Co., week ending
to-day, 1,650 boxes Florida oranges, selling
from $4.00 to $5.50 per box. Jamaica oranges
selling from $9.00 to $10.09 per bbl -
Respectfully, C. D. OWENS,
S General Agent.
LOCAL ADVERTISEMT ENTS.

FLORIDA BREEZES, by Mrs. Ellen Call Long, of
Florida will soon be published by ASHMEAD BROS.,
and will have a large sale. Advance orders solicited.
PLYMOUTH ROCKS AND BROWN LEGHORNS.-A few
trios for sale. T. GRAHAM ASHMEAD
--to dec5-'82 Williamson, Wayne Co., N. Y.
ASPARAGUS PLANTS for sale; 2 and 3 years old. Syv-
enty-five cents per 100, $5 per 1,000. Packed for ship-
ment. J. W. WHITNEY.
oct23-tf Jacksonville, Fla.


FOR SALE.-800 to 1,)0 LECONTE PEAR TREES
from four to seven feet high. Address,
JAS. B. GAMBLE,
to nov7-p T.allahassee, Fla.
FLORIDA ILLUSTRATED.-10,000 copies of which
have just been issued by us, consists of 20 imperial size
colored views in a handsome cloth case, illustrating the
different sections of the State of Florida.
This is the handsomest work of the kind ever pub-
lished on Florida. Price by 11uail, postage free, $1.00.
Every one interested in Florida should have a copy.
Address, ASHMEAD BROS.,
tf Jacksonville, Fla.
TOBACCO STEMS.-Just received and for' sale, 50
TONS TOBACCO STEMS, for fertilizing and keeping in-
sects off orange trees, caobages, &c., &c. Send for pri-
ces. J. E. HART;
octl6-tf Jacksonville, Fla.
BLOOMFIELD'S ILLUSTRATED HISTORICAL
GUIDE OF ST. AUGUSTINE AND FLORIDA, with
map, for tourists, invalids and immigrants. For sale
by all booksellers and newsdealers in the Stgte, or :sent
to any address for 50 cents by M
t* MAXBLOOMFIELD,
to aprl5-'83 St. Augustine, Fla.
CHOICE ORANGE LANDb in Hernando County, ly-
ing near surveys of railroads, can be bought at five dol-
lars per acre from W. B. CLARKSON, Jacksdiiville, Fla.
Send for descriptions, oct9-tf
LAW BLANKS.-A'full flie for Justices of the Peace,'
Circuit Courts, etc. .Deeds, Mortgages, etc., are printed
and published by ASHMEAD BROS., Jacksonville, Fla.,
Write for a catalogue. J tf
TO ADVERTISERS.-Larg 'circulation: .For the
next two months THE FLORIDA DISPATCH Will is-.
sue from 8,000 td 10,000 copies every week; about 40,000
a month.
Merchants and others should takq advaptage of this
and;advertise liberally.
For advertising rates see editorial page.., -. f
ORANGE WRAPS.-Order your orange wraps from-
ASHMEAD BROS., Jacksonville, Fla. For prices see
advertisement. 'f"

$O0,00 COASHi
Can be invested to great advantage in the'
ROCK LEDGE IIOlME GROVE
of 15 acres, 7C0 bearing trees in the beautiful and noted
ROCK LEDGE HAMMOCK on the great Indian River,
with its fish, oysters, greeii turtle and ducks. I will sell
the grove for
TWO-THIRDS ITS ACTUAL VALUE.
Numbers of Visitors say it is the most beauliful aud de-
sirable property i, the State:
Having pi rchasgd Jupitet Island, 100 miles south, I
propose to make a specialty of
a. -*.... COCOANITS, PINEAPPLES,
arid the more tender tropical fruits. .
SC.B. MAGRUDER.
fo feb 5' Rock Ledge, Florida.


Queen TE South

FARM MILLS
For Stock Feed or Meal for
Family ume.
1.0,000 X T
Write for Pamphlet,
Simnpson Gault M'fg 0Co.
SucOcessors to BTRAUB MILL Co.
CINCINNATI, 0.
to jan 30, '83.

RANGE GROVES AND

LAND' NEAR JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,
FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN.
Choice lots for Residence, Gardens, etc.
Groves built and cared for and improvements made for
non-residents, by J. S. BELL,
Real Estate Agent and Notary Public,,
to nov 5, '83. Reed's Block, Bay-st, Jacksonville, Fla.

THlE ALRCIIEIU 1NJURSEitIES
Grow a general assortment of FRUIT TREES, with
some Ornamental Trees, Shrubbery,
Vines, &c. Our stock of
ORANGE TREES


is good; both Sweet Seedlings and Budded sorts on both
sour and sweet stocks. Some 8,000
LECONTE AND OTHER PEAR TREES4
one and two-year-old-fine.
A large number of JAPAN PLUM TREES, with-a few
hundred of the famous
JAPANESE PERSIMMON
on native stocks, &c.
QRANGE and PEAR GROVES made to order and
cultivated by the year for non-residents,
SEND FOR PRICE LIST to
L, IPSEY & CHRISTIE,
.to feb 5, '83 Archer, Alachuh Co., Florida.

FOR SALE.

A COMPLETE SET of Surveying Instruments, con-
sisting: of a Six-inch Vernier Compass, a Fine Tele-
scope, a Compound Ball-socket; Engineer's Chaih 100
feet, oval links, No.8 best Steel Wire; Galvanized Iron
Stakes, and Jacob Staff, Steel Point. As good an outfit
as can bepurchased in any market. For a bargain, ap-
ply to W. G. PARSONS'
with L. I. STEPHENS
lo nov 21 '82. Jacksonville, Fla..






0 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Make the Boys Handy.
Without doubt, says the Husbandman, there
is a tendency among boys on the farm to leave
the business that at best offers but slow profits.
This is a speculative age. Young men are
seized by a mania for riches speedily acquired.
The "sober second thought" does not influence
them, for unfortunately it comes-if at all-too
late. Speaking on that subject, the New Or-
leans Times-Democrat says:
Between forty and fifty years ago there ex-
isted among American boys a much greater
capacity for "turning their hands" to any prac-
tical matter than is found among them to-day.
The boy of that period did "chores" about the
house. He was familiar with the stable. Even
in town or village he could, milk the cows haxr-
ness the horse, or mend a broken picket. He
learned early something of the use of the tools
in the barn, and probably spoiled more or less
good lumber. A little older he learned a trade,
or he went to sea. There was not so much
"style" as now, but more practicality. More
boys could handle the axe, chop wood, and use
the bucksaw. A great many American boys
now can do none of these things. Everything
is done for them. They are above grooming
horses, milking cows or mending pickets. A
trade is despised. They grow up, white-hand-
ed, well dressed, conversant with the polish and
veneer of society, but often useless in practical
matters. Many of them cannot drive a nail nor
tie a square knot. If the harness breaks in an
out-of-the-way piece of road they are helpless.
They cannot with axe or hatchet cut down a
tree or point a stake, For the most trifling bit
of carpentry they must send for a mechanic.
They are incapable of cooking the simplest
meal. They cannot plant a potato or corn patch.
They are useful where ? At a desk in a bank-
ing house or a lawyer's office. They are en-
tirely "professional." They are always dressed
up to the prevailing style, and own no overalls
or working clothes.
The faculty of "turning one's hand" to any-
thing is a very useful one. Not so much for the
attainment of perfection in any particular kind
of occupation as for the cultivation and adapt-
ability, to circumstances and condition. One
may on a wreck knock a raft together and give
himself a chance for escape. Another waits for
help and perishes. One man out of the relics
of failure builds immediately some support
which shall give him a foothold, while the other
sits idly down, waits, does nothing and starves.

A PROSPEROU YOUNG COLORED MAN.-
We met a young c ored farmer one day this
week who is prosper ng, and who the colored
youth of the county m ht well take as a pat-
tern. He saved enoun from his last year's
wages to buy him a mu at the beginning of
this year, paying all but $ 0 cash down. He
rented some land and went \ work with a will.


and this is the result of his lIors: From 16
acres he has gathered 295 bush s of corn, 125
of which will supply him another ear and the
balance he will sell. From 22 ac% of cotton
he expects to get six bales. Besid this, he
has raised more than enough meat t' do him
next year. The sales from his cotton will pay
his rent, the balance due on his mule and a
small store account, which he was obliged to
contract, and leave a balance in his hands of
over $150. This is a splendid showing for the
first year's farming, and the young man says
his success is due to the fact that he kept away
from town as much as possible, and drank no
whiskey. This speaks volumes for him, and
we wish him continued and increased success.
-Madison (Fla.) Recorder.


BRADLEY'S ORANGE TREE
We have prepared this Fertilizer
especially for the culture of the or-
ange tree, and from the results al-
ready obtained from its use on the
orange groves of Florida, we feel
ustiied In claiming that It cannot
e surpassed, if equalled, by any
other fertilizer.
It iW composed of the purest and
highest grade materials, combined
in such proportions as to furnish all
the elements of plant-food in prop-
er quantities and in the best form
to promote a rapid and strong
growth of the wood and insure an
abundant yield of fine fruit.
A sufficient proportion of its
phosphoric acid, being readily sol-
uble in cold water is immediately
available as food for the young
rootlets of the tree, while a consid-
erable portion, being present in the
form of pure ground bone, undis-
solved by acid, becomes entirely
soluble in the soil only by the ac-
tion of the elements of nature in
due' course of time. Thus this all
important food is not soon ex-
hausted by the tree, or washed into
thsjgrQnj p b:yJ alfadftV


FERTILIZER.
throughout the season.
The nitrogen and potash also are
furnished in the most, nutritious
forms and approved proportions
for this crop.
After giving this Fertilizer a
thorough trial of three years on or-
ange trees in Florida, we intro-
duced it last season quite exten-
sively throughout the State, and
the results have even exceeded our
most sanguine expectations. We
have yet to hear of a single instance
where the most satisfactory returns
have not been derived.
We have nothing to say about the
fertilizers manufactured or sold by
other parties, as we believe, with an
established reputation of twenty-
two years in. the manufacture of
high grade fertilizers, we can stand
upon our own footing, without call-
ing the attention of the public to
the record of any of our competi-
tors, or to the value of their manu-
factures as compared with, that of
our own. Our fertilizers are all an-
alyzed, when manufactured, by
competent chemists, and none are


Manufacturers of the Celebrated

" "Eradclle-y*'s 1lHos lp ate,"
the Standard Fertilizer for all Field and Garden Crops, and especially adapted to the wants of the
Cotton Crop.
MAIN OFFICE, 27 KILBTY STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.
For further particulars and pamphlets giving testimonials from some of the best orange growers in the
State, address,


to oct 9, '83.


A.. 1. BECK, General Agent for Florida,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


Wholesale Dealers in


Foreign nand Do m. es tic Fr units.


COMMISSION MERCHANTS FOR THE SALE OF'


Florida Oranges and ]Lemons,


167 South Water St.,


CHICAGO, ILL.


---* ^-----0-o---*----

*PCORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED
4a-REFERENCES.-First National ]ank, Jacksonville, ilorida. Unidn Nationfl Bank, Chicago, Illinois.
sept 4, tf.


FRANK W. MUMBY. JNO. N. C. STOCKTON. RAYMOND D. KNIGHT.

M U M BY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,


1879.
F. W.. MUMBY & CO.


S--"- SUCCESSORS TO'

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE AND RETAIL


1870.
JNlO. S. DEIGOS a CO.


Crockery, China, Glass and Earthenware.

We have the largest and most complete stock in the State. All the Latest Novelties in Majolica and Fancy
Goods, Vases, Motto Cups anid Saucers, etc Decorated Tea, Dinner and Chamber Sets a largeVariety. amps
and Chandeliers, Fancy Vase Lamps in MiJolica Faience, Kito, Porcelain and other Wares. Wood and Willow,
Stone and Tinware. The American, Crown and Peerless Ice Cream Freezers, Water Coolers, Filters, etc.
SOLE STATE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED

Monitor Oil Stoves and Little Joker Oil Cans.
THE BEST IN THE WORLD. Send for Price Lists.
The best and only absolutely safe Oil Stove in the World. It is Economical, Ornamental, Convenient, Dura-
ble, Compact and Cheap. Its fuel is Coal Oil. No Dust! No Ashes! No Smoke! No Trouble! Testimonials
from those using the Stoves given on application.
Fruit Jars and Jelly Tumblers Wine Bottles, Flasks, etc. Special inducements to the trade.
Merchants, Hotels, Boarding Houses and Bars will find it greatly to their advantage to give us a trial. Send
for list of assorted packages.
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD.
MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
18 WEST BAY STREET. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to July 5, '83. (Mention thi paper)


-------.


- I







1.


WHOLESALE GROCERS,

AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


AGER'S DRY HOP YEAST


CAKES,


60c. PER DOZ.


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND

SNOW-DROP PATENT FLOUR.

First ZE lsin.dzs 01i Pizzest Q1ULslitty

Best Butter in Tubs at 30 to 3x Cents per Pound,

-i=:a1'rEz'0T O1*T I0ME.-*a
No. 7 WVest Bay Street; Jacksonville, Florida.
tf

j. J. TREVERIES, CIVIL ENGINEER AND
DRAUGHTSMAN.
Office with Florida Land and Improvement Co., cor. Pine and Forsyth-Sts.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.

.T10o MOn made from United States Surveys-scale two inches to the mile-with
Towllli JJUh topography complete, for every township in EAST and SOUTH FLOR-
IDA, delivered, or sent by mail, for 50 cents each. Discount to Dealers.

8 lil n of Counties, Cities and towns DESIGNS a specialty.
made to order. -Afmhto al]
My long connection with the Florida Land and Improvement Company (DISSTON PUR-
CHASE) is a guarantee of satisfactory work.
Correspondence solicited. oct 23tf

ESTABLISH iD 1J6o.

m. GEOME & CO.,9

General Com m mission M merchants,
95 SOUTH WATER STREET, CHICAGO.

FLORIDA ORANGES AND VEGETABLES A SPECIALTY.
R EFERRENCES:-National Bank of Illinois, First National Bank, Commercial Agencies, or any Wholesale
Grocer in CHICAGO.
Stencils furnished by J. C. LANIER,
to apl 8, '83. LEESBURG, FLORIDA.


G. L. LAWRENCE & CO.,


COMMISSION MERCHANTS,


FOR THE SALE OF


Oranges and all Florida Produce,


234 WASHINGTON STREET, NEW YORK.

QUICKi SALES, HONEST RETURNS and
PROOM:PT REMITTANCES.


REFER BY PERMISSION TO
Hon. S. B. CONQVER, Tallahassse; D. GREENLEAF, ESQ., Jacksonville;
to jan. 30, '83 p. MESSRS. GOULD & Co., Jacksonville.

F. "S. CON}, A. H. MANVILL, RE. A. HILL,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Sdperintendent. Treasurer.

MANNVILLE N ITRSERIEs,
Lake George, Florida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate.

ORANGE AND LEMON TREES A SPECIALTY.
Catalogue for 1882-3,jnst out, free on application. to apr 17, '83


STRAWBERRy PLANTS FOR SALE.
Crescent Seedling.
These plants are very thrifty and perfectly hardy,
even in the climate and soil of Florida, a merit
which will be duly appreciated by growers the pres-
ent season.
Exceedingly productive, berries always large and
of good quality and fine appearance. Its firmness
and shipping qualities are beyond question.
In ripening it is the earliest of the early, three
weeks in advance of the Nunan or Wilson.
It is undoubtedly the plant needed for the success-
ful growing of strawberries in Florida.
Price $5 per 1,000. Special rates on orders. over
5,000.
Pot-grown plants for garden cultivation per dozen
50 cents, 100 $2, 1,000 $15. Orders for these should
be sent two weeks in advance of shipment.
All orders must be accompanied by the cash to re-
ceive attention. P. E. JoHssoN & Sos,
to nov8 Jacksonville, Fla.

JOIN
J. M. TIGER'S COLONY,
GLE MORE, WARE COUNTY, GA.
40 Hours from New York City; 108 Miles from
Savannah.
Here we can plant and gather some crops every month
in the year; good water, plenty of grass in the woods for
sheep, cattle and hogs all the year round 4 very profita-
ble to the owner. Farms of 40 acres each at $1 to $3 per
acre; lumber, $1 per 100 feet, delivered at the depot;
shingles, $4per 1,000; will build a house with 4 rooms, 6
panel doors, 6 windows, cement flue for chimney, well
dug and curbed, for $150, on easy terms. Labor of all
kinds needed at fair wages; board at Mrs. Bainbridge's
from $15 to $20 per month.
We need farmers, truckers, stock and fruit-growers.
One bushel crate of vegetables delivered in New York
City for 50 cents; per barrel, $1, and with quick dispatch.
A number,of Northern and Western families now here
are doing well; no stones, no underbrush, no winter,cli-
mate delightful and perfectly healthy all the year round.
Land is not cleared, but near the depot; some cleared
land from $3 to $10 per acre. All kinds of grain, vegeta-

bles, berries, fruit, and stock, do well. Our farmers are
out of debt, some lending money.
Any number of acres, for colonizing or grazing, at $1 to
$3 per acre; 40 acres, with house complete, for $250;
EASY TERMS.
Come and see for yourself, or address
J. M. STIGER,
to Jan 9. '81. Glenmore. Ware County, Ga.


NOTICE.
U. S. LAND OFFICE, 1
GAINESVILLE, FLA., October 13, 1882.J
COMPLAINT having been entered at this office by
George V. Burbridge against Michael Bowes for
abandoning his Homestead Entry No. 2126, dated Octo-
ber 2, 1875, upon the Lot 8, Section 21, and Lot 1, Section
28, Township 2 south, Range 29 east, in Duval County,
Florida, with a view to the cancellation of said entry;
the said parties are hereby summoned to appear at this
office on the 21st day of November, 1882, at 1O o'clock a.
m., to respond and furnish testimony concerning said
alleged abandonment.
L. A. BARNE8, Register.
oct 23 to nov 13, '82. JOHN F. ROLLINS, Receiver.
R ICH'D H. MARKS'


ORANGE ODNffT LAND AGENCY,
SANNFORD, FLOLRIDA,
Agent in Orange County for
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMP'Y,
BUY.8 AND SELLS
Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission.
ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
june 12-tf
REMOVED.
I have removed my seed store to No. 22 East Bay st.,
next door to post-office, where I have -the largest and
most complete stock of pure and fresh Seeds in the State.


to Dec. 3, '82


S. L. TIBBITTS,
Jacksonville, Fla.


STRAWBERRY PLANT FOR ALE.

Several thousand Nunan Variety. Price $4 per 1,000,
packed and shipped in good condition. Money must
accompany each order.
Address, MIRS. A. B3EATBT'Y,
to Nov. 6. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


MOMEW


c
-- r r , ,
:.*..


'ULM


THEFLRD DIPTH


5221







522 THE-FLORIDA DISPATCH


I


C. N. O. &


T. P. RY.


(Cincinati Southern.)_



PASSENGERS AND SHIPPERS FOR
THE NORTH AND WEST: "'

will consult their interests, and secure all needed infor-
mation, by calling at

1No. 49 BDay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORi)A.


to nov 30, '83.


L. R. TUTTLE,,
'Resident Agent.


Bostio ill n a i ila a to. 1 Co .
ONLY DIRECT LINE.
Transhipment and extra handling avoided. Cars
unloaded at wharf in Savannah. First-class passenger ac-
coinnodations.
The magnificent new Iron Steamships sail from Bos-
ton every Thursday at 3 o'clock, and from Savannah as
fol lows:
Gate City, Thursday, September 28th, at 7:30 a. m.
City of Columbus, Thursday,- October 5th, at 2:00 p. m.
Gate City, Thursday, October 12th, at 7:00 a. m.,
City of Columbus, Thursday, October 19th, at 12 m.
Gate City, Tlursday, October 26th, at 6:00. p. m .
City of Colrimbus, Thursday, November 2 att30 p.'m:
FIRST-CLASS CABIN PASSAGE SAMEAS 45 O NEW
YORK.
'RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
F. W. NICKERSON & CO., Savannah, Ga.
General Agents, Boston.
GEO. V. HAINES,
44-tf Agent S., F. and W. Ry., Agent Jacksonville,

Subscribe for THE FLORIDA DISPATCH
$1 per year.


SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA
WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, AUGUST 19th, 1882, Pas-
senger Trains will run over the Waycrogs Short Line
as follows;
Fast Mail. .Tack'lle Ex.
Daily. Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at.............. 9:00 a. m. 6:10 p. m.
Arrive Jacksonville at................ 6:15 p. m. 7:30 a. m.
Leave Callahan at................... 9:45 a. m, 7:05 p. m.
Arrive Waycross at...... ............11:45 a. m. 9:20 p. m.
Arrive Jesup at................1:32 p. m. 1:40 p. m.
Arrive Brunswick at ......3:35 a. m.
Arrive Savannah at............. 3:35 p. m. 2:30 a. m.
Arrive Charleston at............... 9:10 p. m. 8:45 a. m.
Arrive Augusta at.............5:20 a. nm. 1:30 p. m.
Arrive Macon at............................. 7:00 a.
Arrive Atlanta at.......................... 12:50 p. m.
Arrive Louisville at..... 8:00 a. m.,
Arrive Cincinnati at...................... 7:00 a. m:
Arrive Washington at..........9:30 p. m. 7:40 a. m.
Arrive Baltimore at...... ......12:25 p. m. 9:30 a. m.
Arrive New York P. R. R............. 6:45 a. m. 3:50 p. m.
Arrive St. Louis at.............. ...7:00 p .
Arrive Chicago at........................ 7:00 p. m,
TIME. H. M.
To Savannah....................... ............................... 6 40
To New York........ ..............,........................ 45 .45
To Washington .......................................................... 36 30
To Chicago.......................................... .................. 49 00
To St. Louis.... ............................ .... ......... .49 00
THROUGH SLEEPERS:
Jacksonville to Cincinnati.
Jacksonville to Charleston.
Jacksonville to Chicago.
Beginning with Monday, October 16th, trains over the
LIVE OAK AND ROWLAND BLUFF BAILROAD
will run daily, (except Sanday), as follows:
Leave Live Oak................ 2:30 p. m.
Arrive at New Branford........ ..... 4:00 p. m.
Leave New Branford.... .....................8:55 a. m.
Arrive at Live Oak.......... ...............................10:30 a. m .
Connecting at Charleston with through Pullman
Sleepers for Washington.
The Restaurant Car attached to the train between Sa-
vannah and Charleston, affords supper to passengers
bound North, and breakfast to those coming South.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to the West and Northwest take the
evening train.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take -the
train at Callahan.
Passengers arriving on train at 7:30 a. m., make close
connection for Palatka and line of the Florida Southern
Railroad by taking the mail boat Sylvan Glen.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. n. and arriving at Savannah at 2:35 a. mn, or train
at, Jacksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vannah at 3:40 p. m.
Con necting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston, wlth steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay-street, and at Depot
Ticket Office. GEO. W. HAINES, Agent.
JAS. L. TAYLOR, Gen'l T. and P. Ag't. [*]


NO. 49.


GEORGETOWNI NURSERIES.
-------
SORANGE AND LE I M T I Budded from tried and approved varieties, and
ORANGE AND L I T .FE 91 good laltihy stocks.
Also, JAPAN PERSIMMONS, LECONTE PEARS, GRAPES, and a general line of Fruit Trees suitable to
Florida. Address, d. .-

to N v. 6 p., .-. .-- .t -
QV-.
4J ME S.TA Lr,


JAMES 8. TAYLOR,

Cm isi7 o relk-Satreet, Oiaagoe


Commission MerchantbK Florida Oranges


REFERENCE.-Hibernian Banking Assoclftionj Chicago.
Correspondence solicited. No. 1 packing only solicited.


BALTIMORt E XPItEA

MERCHANTS AND MINERS TRANS-
PORTATION COMPANY. -
SAVANNAH, GA., September 12,1882.
The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail from BALTIMORE ,r SAVANNAH. .
EVERY A TV*J- E T ANJt A t ID DAY,
AT 38P. M., "
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE,
EVERY TUESDAY AND FRIDAY,
as follows:
Friday, November 3d, at 12:30 p. m.
Tuesday, November 7th, at 3 p. m.
Friday, November 10th, at 7 a. m.
Tuesday, November 14th, at, 9:30 a. m.
.Friday, November 17th, at 11 a. m. ... ;-
Tuesday November 21st, at 3.'p. n
"Friday, November 24th, at 6:30 a. nM. -
Tuesday, November 28th, at 9 a. m.
Friday, December 1st, at 11 a. m.
Tuesday, December 5th, at 2 p.m. n.
Friday, December 8th, at 3:30:p. iV.'
Tuesday, December 12th, at8:30 a. m,
Friday, December 15th, at 10 a.,m.
Tuesday, December 19th, at 1:40 p. m.
Friday, December 22d, at 3:30 p.'min.:
Tuesday, December 26th,. at 8:30 a: m.
Friday, December 29th, at 10 ih. '
Cabin Passage, $15.00; Second Cabin, $12.50; Round
Trip (Cabin), $25.00. The Company reserve the right of
changing the sailing days.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and FloridAd
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this cpaIny has arranged a 'spcial.sehedule, thereby
perislhible ftreight is trausported co the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by railfrom
,Baltim ore. .* o, -"
By this route shippers are assured, that their goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
column. "i - 1 Ba O- -av Ga.-
SBPy...-W t&aO. Aagents,G
114 Bay-St., Savannah, Ga.


A. L. liUGlGINS, Agent,
Long Dock, Baltimore, Md.


30-tf


to dec 5 82


IMlerchants' LIne,
CARRYING THE U. S. MAIL.

ELEGANT SIDE-WHEEL STEAMEI
O f. .. ;ii -
FREDERICK DE BARY, Capt. Leo. Vogel.
H. B. PLANT, Capt. J. W. Fitzgerald.
ANITA, Capt. C. H. Brock.
One of the above-named steamers will leave De Bary
Wharf, foot of Laura Strebt, 'daily except Sunday, at 3
p. i., for PALATKA, SANFORD, ENTERPRISE, and
all intermediate landings.
ROSA Capt. J. L. Amazeen. -
GRO. M. BIRD, Capt. pl. J. Mercier.
'Steamer ROSA leaves De Bar3ty Wharf every Sunday
at 1 p. m., and every Wednesday at 5 p. m. for above-
named landings.
Steamer GEO. M. BIRD leaves De Bary Wharf every
Tuesday and Friday at 5 p. m. for same landings.
Connects at Palatka with .Florida Southern Railroad
for Gainesville and Ocala.
Connects at Astor with St. John's and Lake Eustis
Railroad for Ft. Mason, Yalaha, Leesburg anrd all points
on the Upper Ocklawaha.
Connects at Volusia with coaches for Ormond and
Daytonao. : .. .
Connects at Sanford with South Florida Railroad for
Longwood, Maitland, Apopka City, Altemonte, Orlando
Kisslmmee, and with steamers for Lake Jessup, Sali
Lake and Rock Ledge and Indian River.
Connects at Enterprise with coaches ,for Daytona and
New Smyrna.
Returning, Mail Steamers leave EiFierprise every
morningg at 7 am.,In and Sanford on arriAl of in. .
k Steamer Geo.' M. -Bird -will l~hve EhterprTe" eV'fy
Thursday and Sunday at 5'a. m.
...Steamer'RosaTe aveA Enterprise exery Friday at 5 p. m.
4#-Through bills ofladaing given to all points.. .
The steamers'of this line are all first-class in every
rs tlr infAixi6 a1,, ii)it;GeiA l Ticket
Offc; O orTer'Bay "and "LauraI Streets, Leve & Alden,
corner Bay-and Ocean Streets, or on board.
W. B. WATSON, Manager.
C. B. FENWICK, Gen. Pass. Agent. Aug. 7-tf.


Ocean St.eam. si Copany Q Yanah.

------o:-------
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.

EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be reoeirpd for pssge by the Compapyy Ships tmNew York. Tickets sold by all Age.sa .ew 'lclia:.Phjl-
adelphia at SAME-P CE as DIRE TO NE O YORK! .
Philadelphia steamers for November are appointed to sail as follows :
JUNIATA, Saturday, November 4th, at 12:00 o'clock m.
RAPIDAN, Saturday, November 11th, at 7:00 O'clock a, m. .
JUNIATA, Saturday, November 18th, at 11:00 o'clock a. m.
RAPIDAN, Saturday, November 25th, at 7:00 o'clock a. m.
eJ oATASat.rday,i D mber 2d, gt 1*0 o'4oc&% m. o
:S ngt6ectio i ng w i thfe u t n o tice -' .- ;.- ,' : .. .
Ao-The "Rapidan takes no passengers.
WM. L. JAMES, WM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. .. -, :yAgents at Savannah.

Ocpa P n Steamship C9p ppny.


SAVAN NAH AND: WYQ0 R K.
SAVANNAH, November, 1882.
T. Magmlcent ew r eam ps sail from Savannah on following plates :
TALLAHASE,'CatfFi1, Friday, Novemb r 3d, 12:30 p. MI.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Capt. Catharine, Sunday, November 5th, 2:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Capt Kempton, Tuesday, November 7th, 3:30 p. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Capt. Nicserson, Friday, November 10th, 6:00 a. m.
TALLAHAS$EE. apt Fisher,'Sunday, Novem j 7a. T
CITY O SAYVANNAH, 1apt Catharine, Tuesdar'onm I ll 8:3i. ,
CITY OF MACON, :Ct..RKempton, Friday, Novemnber 17t.h, It:a.. .
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Capt. Nickerson, Sunday, November J9th, 1:00 p. m.
TALLAHASSE,,Capt. Fisher, Tuesday, November 21st, 3:00 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH. Capt. Catharine, Friday.N6vember 24th, 6:00 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Capt, Kemipton, Sunday, November 26th,7:00a, min
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Capt. Nickerson, Tuesday, November 28th,-8:30 a. m.
TALLAHASSEE, Capt. Fisher, Friday, December 1st, 11:00 a. m.
Through Bills of Lading and ,Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & .Western.
Railway, and close cohnectfonis with the new and elegant steamers to Florida. . .
Freight received every day firomn 7a. m. to 6 p.m., at Pier35, N. R. -
H. YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savaknflah, Aa.
Agent of Line,and C. .R. ofGa., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. BHETT, General AgeInt, 317 Broad wy, New York. .. -.
H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Sbliciting Agent. ', ; .. )WRS,
12-2m '1 (en'LAg't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry. Co, 815 B-ia W ay.


--


.- .- 1. l. .v.. . . I- ...


-- 1` --





/ ,./



SOUTH


THIIBoUtG TARIFF ON ORANGES ONLY.
VIA THE FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE, ALL-RAIL VI ATLANTA OR MONTGOMERY,
r'M^ iq .';.=" O:m0- .. at:o=, o3E t, I.eS .'


JACKSONVILLE AND 0 JACKSONVILLE AND P ,
CALLAHAN JUNCTION 1 4 CALLAHAN JUNCTION $ & S -
S; TO : : 4.: 4 dTOPA .
Macon .....57061 25: MadisonInd........ ............ 751 50 125 00
Augusta ............./....::............,. i40 80 70 00 Jeffersonville, Ind................. i7511 501125 00
Atlanta ............................. 40 80 70 00 Evansville, Ind................. 75 1 50 125 00
Columbus, Ga ...................... 40 80 70 00 Cairo, Ill....................... .......... 75!1 501125 00
Montgomery, Ala .................. 40 80 70 00 Indianapolis ........................ 80 1 60 130 00
Mobile........................... .............. 501 00 8750 Terre Haute..........................".. 801 600 13000
Chattanooga, Tenn............... 1 00 87 50 ColuOnbus, Ohio............... 801 60130 00
New Orleans.................0.. 60 105 00 St. Louis ........................... 85 70 140 00
Nashvilll TWenl ......... ........ 60 1 20 105 00 Chicago................................. 8511 70 140 00
Mempi s. Tenn................. 601 20 105 00 Peoria, Ill..................................... 5 1 70140 00
LoOlsvine, Ky.......... ....70 1 40 115 Cleveland ................................ 90 1 80 150 00
Cincinnati, Ohio..................... 70 1 40 11500 Toledo................................... 901 80 150 00
Heuderson,Ky........................ 70 1 40 115 00 Detroit................................... 90 1 80; 150 00
Columbu, Ky........................ 70 40 115 Milwaukee ......... ........ ..... 90 1 8050 00
Hickman, Ky.......................... 70 1 40 115 00,
The dimensions'of the Standard Box for Oranges are 12xl2127 inches, and the
weight Is estimated at 80 pounds. '
ThB Standard Barrel fadouble the capacity of the Standard Box.
Excess of capacity over the above will be liable to pro rata excess of charges.
The Car-load is estimated at 20,000 pounds, or 250 Standard Boxes. Excess of this
amount will be charged for pro rata. Car-load shipments must be to one dpvtina-
tion and to one consignee.
-; Pr0paymont 6f freight'Will not$ be riquijredi butigtod order and condition of
sltiln~etas will be an absolute requtremnent. It is clearly understood between the
s4lppensiand tbe transportation companies that no responsibility shall attach for
loss or damage, however occasioned, unless it be from negligence, and that such loss
must attach solely to the company upon whose line such negligence may be located.
S The above points are the only points to which rates are guaranteed, and to
which Bills Lading will be issued. The 1ills Lading will be issued only by the
Agents of this Company at Jacksonville, and Callaaan Junction, guaranteeing rates
from tt'tiBeoints only.
The charges advanced by this Line in good faith to connections at those points
will net be subject to correction by this Line.
Unless otherwise instructed by the shippers, the original Bill Lading will be.
mailed the consigee at destination, and all claims for overcharge or loss and damage
must be presented at destination, accompanied by the original Bill Lading.
SShipments of single packages charged-double rates.,
In.every case the full name and address of consignee must be given for insertion
in Bill Lading and on the Way-bill. -, .


FROM


Jacksonville.......... *......................... .. ..
Landings on St. Johns River................
Stations on Florida Transit. jR, .,......
Tampa and Manatee.......................
Stations on the J. P. & M. R. R...........


TO: SAYA ANNAH.- TO CHARLESTON.
P,er Box. Per Bbl. Per Box. leer Bbl.
25 $50 35 60
35 70 40 75
45 75 50 -$0
70 1 05 75 1 10
40 75 1 56 85


In Connection with direct Steamers of the Boston and Savannah Steamship .Co.
I From From From
From Ld'gs on Florida Tampa From
Jackson- St. Johns Transit and F.C.& W
ville. River. R. R. Manatee.
R.R.. ..

Bos
;4----- $q_0_; a 16 45 S 1-4

Boston....... ............. ........ 1.$100 0 0 $120 65 $0 90 -$150 65 $1 25
In Connection with Steamships direct fr-om Savannah.
SFrom From From
From iL'd'gs on Florida Tampa From
Jackson- St. Johns Transit I Td F. C.&&W.
ville. River. R R. Manatee.



Boston.via New York....... 73 $1 45 83 $1 65 88 $1 65 $113 1 15 88 $1 65
Ne York.............. ....... ....o.. l 50 100 60 1 12 65 120o 90-150 651 25
Philadelphia...........................50 00 5 0 1 20 65 1 20 901 50 65 1 25
Baltimore....................... .. 50 1 00- 60 1 20 65 1 20 90 1 50 65 1-25
Providence via New York ........ 65 1 30j 75 1 501 82 1 50 1 07 1 80 80 1 55


IN CONNECTION WITH STEAMSHIPS OF M. & M.
FROM SAVANNAH VIA BALTIMORE.


T. CO.


From
From Landings From From From
Jackgon- on Florida Tampa F. C. & W.
Sville. St. Johns Transit and
River. R. R. Manatee.
TO..



Boston................................... 55 $1t 10 65 $1 30 7 80 95 1 70 $1 35
Providence ........................ 55[ 1 10 65 1 30' 70 1 301 95 1 60 7) 1 35
Washington............................... 60 100 70 1 20! 80 1 20 1 0.5 1 50 65 125


To make rates from Stations on Peninsular Railroad south of Ocala add 5 cents
per box and 10 cents per barrel to rates from stations on Transit Railroad.
Steamship connection from Savannah for New York every Tuesday and Friday.
For Boston every Thursday. For Philadelphia every Saturday. For Baltimore
Tuesday and Friday.
To make through rates from points tributary to the above, add the rates for
transportation lines connecting to above rates.
Shipments via New York will be charged at the current rates from that point,
with cost of transfer added.
Single packages will be charged $1 each to Boston, New York, Philadelphia and
Baltimore. If shipped beyond, they will be charged in addition the single package
rates of connecting lines and cost of transfer.
Stencils, shipping receipts and information furnished on application to any- of
the agents of the Line.

ALL BAIL

Savannah, Florida an Western RSilway company,
FORMING WTITI CTONNECNCON.:THE ONLY FAST MAIL PASSENGER
ROUTE AND THROUGH .FREIGHT DISPATCH LINE TO AND FROM
FLORIDA AND SOUTHIERt AND SOfaITWESTERN GEORGIA.


,FRBEIGI-T D).PAR1T-l.ENT.
Movement of Freight in Through Cars, thereby AVOIDING THE RISK OF
TRANSFER to and from all points on the Florida Central and Western Railroad,
Florida Transit Railroad, St. Augustine, and all landings on the St. Johns and
Ocklawaha Rivers, Chattahoochee, Flint and, Apalachicola Rivers, and Havana,
Key West, Tampa and Manatee.

fruit and Vegetable Shipments Through in Ventilated Cars
NO DELAYS. PROMPT ADJUSTMENT OF CLAIMS.
Between Jacksonville and Saannah daily.v TRANSFER TO SHIPS' SIDE
AT SAVANNAH WITHOUT BREAKING BULK.
Rtes always as LQW AS BY ANY OTHER LINE. Take 6ut Bills Lading via
Savannah Florida and Western Railway to insure ADVANTAGES OF THE ALL-
RAIL ROUTE.
Days of sailing subject to change without previous notice. For further informa-
tion, if needed, apply to
H. YONGE, Agent of Line, and C.R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N River, N. Y.
Gen. W. L. JAMES, Agent, 25 South' Third St., Philadelphia. A. L. HUGGINS,
Agent Merchants' and Miners' Line, Baltimore. WM. H. RING Agent Boston and
Savannah Steamship Line, 18- Wharf, Boston. O0. G. PEARS6N, Agent S., F. &
W. Railway, 219 Washington St., Boston. C. D. OWENS, General Ageint S., F. & VW.
Railway, 315 Broadway, New York. J. B. ANDREWS, Agent S., F. & W, Railway;
43 German St., Baltimore. J, -1. cLEMENT, .Agent S., & W. Railway, .Pier 41
South Delaware Avei, Philtdelphia, or to either of the undersigned.
W. O. AMES, General Freight Agent, Jacksonville.
F. B. PAPY, General Freight Agent, Fernandina, Fla.
JAS. L. TAYLOR, General Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.
p. H. ELLIOTT, General Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, a4cksqnyille, Fla.


r I I I


THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.







B -4i _THE FLORID A DISPATCH

COLONEY, TALBOTT & CO., "--I. S. 3ES"." "9T'EIS EOFLF1E H H, v

Real Estate Agents DEALER IN
nts, PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES1 Uk T B
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. BRUSHES
Have lands in every county ln the Orange Belt, at from GLUES, BRUSHES,,
$3 to $100 per acre. Orange groves from 81000 to $100,000. COMMISSIOWUSE,
Government lands in every part of the Orange Belt. WTndow, Picture and Carriage Glass.
Can guarantee all of our property. .. Has closed till NOVMBE. Prent ess
Strawberry Plants. GOLD AND METAL LEAF. a g
We have 200,000 best varieties for sale low. BRO7E, OOPPIRAS, ALUM, PlTCl0 STONE, KEROBN, TT E L, A
Or-ange Trees. Saud and Emery Rapers, A k. .- ACKjO t. --DA.
We have 300,000 trees, all ages, for sale, at from 10 cents AGENT OR' 7" .
to $2 per tree, as to age. PRAT T'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
e.COLONEY, TALBOTT & O 0o t T .T CONVENIENT TOPOSTFICE ALL STEAM-
| Sp l8,tLBO & 'CO 3000, .PI A ERS ON ST. JOHN.RIVER.
A Johnson's Prepared Ialsomine. WIad8s-
D. G. AMBLER. T. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON. worth, MartineZ and Lo gan 0 P WO T HE
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON Prepared Paints. A .
,-3T 3 WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE O[L to 'Apti. Z_____"
Oldest Established Bank in East Florida. FOn ORANGE TREES.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and No. 40 West Bay St., Stgn of Big Barrel, E & .Y047U E,
Generally Known as to mar25,'8` JACKSONVILLE, FLA. i
AMBLER'S BANK. ... .:.._ t f1. -1llQH1.
RANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS. Only $1.0( Year!
Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS. Plans Specifications and Estimates for Buildings of
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted. HT H.E-7 all kids. Water. ly, Dn ind sater Brige o
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank, Roos, Etc.. P.. Hx metto k,
New York; Merchants -National Bank, Savannah, Ga. Bay Street. ', to Feb. 7, 83
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel, l t oI b '
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bdnkers i uaing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf ,,
LARGE 32 COLUMN PAPER. An Orange Grove orOrange Lands, in a healthy, beauti-
Sful country,
EI1HTIARDY GARDJENyP.LANTSby MJail,
e h post paid, for $1.00, viz: Amelopsis Entirely Free from Frot,
Veitchii, lovely miniature climber, hydrangea Panicu-y Y a lM-y0eIO rot
lata)Grandiflora, white; Passon Vine' blue flowered;
Chyrsanthemum Spotless, white; Hydrangea Otaska, where yu hae t finet
pink flowered; Akebia Quinata, chocolate.colored climb- T EK whdre yiu haie tue fnest
er; Phlox White Lady, flowers white-; Crape Myrtle, THE WEEKLY TIMES contains the choicest thing P.
pink flowered, Premiums ithevery order. Addr from the previous six issues of the DAILY TIME, FISHING -
vRO^T J-. -MA.L.LIDAY BALThfOR, MD. which is universally conceded to be one of the newsiest,
OB H A, liveliest, brghtest,ost readable and mostenterrisin OY1TERS,
newspapers in the South. Its State news is fresh and TT
full; it comprises Telegraphic Dispatches from.all parts CRI ,
of the world up to the hour of going to press; and its CRAB
F LOW E-'RS 8Beamuto Plants for roukE "comments upon current events are pointed and in- GA E
jrA s^X .w jr. .CuiVuBE,bykai1, postpaidfor structive. --.. : = ,, .brAME
ONE DOLLAR. Daphne Odors, very fragrant, light Special attention is given to all matters pertaining to
pink; Camellia Japonica, double white; Caleleia Ja- the Farm and Household-; and its Market and Weather of all deaeriptions, and the best chance to raise early
ponica, double red; Smilax,.beautiful climber; Croton Reports are invaluable to Merchants, Planters and vegetables, in a new eounitry. Address me with stinp,
foliage variegated- Cape Jasmine, flowers white; Olea Fruit-growers at Anclote, Hillsborotigh County, Florida.
Fragrans, sweet olive Bouvardia Alfred Neuner, double In.all the qualities of a newspaper for the family oir- I can sell yo fqve apres, or five thousand acres, as you
white. Premium with every order. Address, cle and the business man, the FLORIDA WEEKLY desire.
Robert J. Halliday, Baltimore, Md. TIMES is the cheapest and best ever offered to the Florida to aug 20, '88 M .. t 1.MALtJKS.
public.
_THE SUTWANNEE
..........-~ --TERMS (STRICTLY IN ADVANCE):
RO SO E Eight Winter iFlowerisng Roses for One year, $100. Six months,50 cents. One month on
J.'^ ^- ~$1,00, by mail, post paid.-Bon Silene, trial 10 cents. Specimen copiesfree to any address.
carmine; Queen's Scarlet crimson; Niphetos, white; .. : E r .1 .. "
Perle des Jardins, yellow; General Jacquiminot,brilliant P REMIU.,:I:: ,. ..' ,. '-- .
crimson; Marechel Neil, golden yellow; Marie Van To each subscriber remitting $1.50,' the WEEKLY ' EI AVItLlE, Fl ORIDA ,
Houtte, canary yellow; Catherine Meriet, rosy pink. TIMES will be sent for one year, tether with a copy of
oAddress, 1ob't Ha. l day, Baltimore, Md. Culture, the price of which is one dollar. To each ub- U ,
to nov16, '82, scriber remitting $2.00, the WEEKLY TIMES will be
,sent one year with a copy of Barbour's Illtstrated.and ------.-.,
___ ____ Descriptive Work on Forida the price ofwhi $ We.respet0ly oue tot frie anthe pub- -
To any one sending us tea yearly subscribers we will Werespeotfily auaonhee toons fridndn hepub-
N A T1 AT sefld an extra copy or a year. lie generally, that, havinrig secured the services of com-
JLAlND S FOR L2XjJ a %-Remittances should be liade by draft or Post-Of- petent Draughtemen, Arohitects andti Mechanics, we are
S--flee order, or in a registered letter. Address prepared to estimate ont asa contract for the building of
SUITABLE FOR "FLORIDA TIES" -


O A -SO ES, octl6-tf JacksonviflleIla. DWlLINGS,
In lots to suit, in the'tow h3tatsuma, Putnn County, O. KEENE' COTTAGES,
Florida. Sqnd for circular to .
WHITNEY, GOLD & ODES, MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS FACTORIES,/
JACK.SONVILLE,'D + ,r'..tDS*
june 26-tf uFLO -IT.A. NOTIONS,. HOTELS
L:0 AMaces A Worstes, PUBLIC EDIFICES;
etc., at any point accessible by the several railroad and
S steamboat lines. Possessing the advantage of manufac-
Commission merc ant AND A FINE LINE OF turning our own lumber, we are enabled to offer very lib-
AND DEALER IN r GV Draughts, plans, estimates and information furnished
on application.
Florida Oranges and Lemons, 67 W ave also made extensive additions to our Plan-
67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura, ing Mill, and will continue as heretofore, to manufaau-
74 WEt T BAY STREET. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA. ture and keep in stock a full line of Framing nd Finsh-
B ETJC IE i -FO Ing Lumber, Mouldings, Brackets, Baludters, Pickets,
to _ 20_, 183._ Laths, etc.
N. Y. Depot, MAXFIELD & Co., 67 and 60 Park Place; Mag- to fe 2 '3 __ i W
azineand Packing House, Waycross R. R.Wharf. _.
A RTO PRITERA A N"D II ~T)iERU July 17; '8-tf. llaville, Florida.
MANUFACTURER'S AGENT FOR
THE BANGOR BOX MATERIAL, HOOPS, Etc. FOR SALE. AT MANDARIN, FLORIDA.
1 Half Medium Universal Printing a0 FORTY-ACRE TJACTS only 12 miles from Jack-
Have a large quantity of Manilla Wrapping sonville; extra geod4-a welt lo-atl, -between rive
Papers, at Lowest Market rates. .. t...." and J., St. A. a.nd ,. 8.P'.Oper are. WIll
sell On monthly. paye rts of $12.50.. Thesolar Wilt In-
Send in your orders for BOX MATERIAL. Can 1 Ruling Machine.................. 125.00 crease in value, being located in an already prosperous
ship promptly while freights are light. Have great town, making a paying investment at small outlay.
difficulty in getting it transported during the busy Address ASHMEAD BROS., Maps can be seen at No. 41 East Bay Street.
season. [to March 25 83 Jasonillea. to nov 21, '82. GEO. R. REYNOLDS.






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH 52


VEGET ALEM GROW ERS
CAN MAKE MONEY BY USING

.-FORRESTER'S CHEMICAL MANURE
PREPARED ESPECIALLY FOR

Vegetables, Orange Trees
AND ALL
SwMIX TROPXC A&.L FRUxTS,
BY -
CEO. B. FORRESTER, 169 Front St., New York


-0------(
THESE MANURES ARE PREPARED FROM OONOENTRATED CHEMICALS; ARE FREE FROM ODOR;
Do not Breed Vermin or Insects in the Soil.
They have been used on FLORIDA LANDS for Years, and produce Wonderful Results.
For sale by

Sanford, orange County, Florida.
4-'Send for circular. (to mar. 3, '83)p_ a __

JOHN O. HMOORE e CO.,

FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,
|AND GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS
198 WEST SIXTH STREET, CINCINNATI, OHIO.
REFERENCES: Commercial Agencies, or any Wholesale Grocer in CINCINNATI.
STENCILS FURNISHED BY T. C. jLA.%Tr'IE!E,
to apl 8, '83. LEESBURG, FLORIDA.,
sIIT[T POTT FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,
S IT PO T 9 AND GEN'L COMMISSION MERCHANTS
NO. 41 SOUTH DELAWAhE STREET,
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANNA.
REFERENCES:
INGRAM FLETCHER, of FLETCHER & SHARPE, Bankers, and Meridian National Bank.
*i Stencils TiFurnished on Application. M
oct-16,tf ____

DISSTON PURCHASE---4,O00,000 ACRES!


THE FLORIDA

LAND AND. IMPROVEMENT
COMPANY

Offer from October 1, 1882, till May 1, 1883,

ALL THEIR LANDS


At Government Price of


$1.25 per


Acre


IN BLOCKS OF NOT LESS THAN 80 NOR MORE THAN 640 ACRES.
These lands include all varieties oq upland and lowland, and are adapted to Oranges, Lemons, Limes, Pine-
Apples, Bananas, Sugar-Cane, Early vegetables, etc., and are chiefly in the counties of
St.Johns, Volusia, Brevard, Orange, Sumter, Levy, Hernando, Hillsborough,
Polk, Manatee and Monroe.
The following are reserved and for sale at graded prices:
"Gulf Coast Reserve," 268.000 acres, M. R. MARKS, Agent, Anclote, Fla.
"Timber Reserve," 100,000 acres, comprising choice tracts of Pine and Cypress, chiefly in St. Johns and
Volusia Counties. Address
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT CO.,
to mar 24 '83 Jacksonville, Fla.
ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]

J. A. BARNES & CO.,

FRUIT AND PRODUCE

COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Soutl~ern ruit an. CI "Tegetables a Specialty.
32O and 3Sa North Delaware Avenue, Philadelphia.
to jan 6, '83


FINE POULTRY.

SEVEN BREEDING PENS OF THE FOLLOWING
BREEDS:
Two yards PLYMOUTH ROCKS, two yards each of
WHITE and BROWN LEGHORN,
and one yard of GEORGIA
WHITE GAME.
We are booking
orders now for EGGS, and
guarantee fifty per cent. better results
I than from Eggs received from the North. Send for cir-
i cular. H. W. PARRAMORE, Jacksonville, Fla.
. C. BIRD, Monticello, Fla. tojanl5-'83


S. B. HUBBARD & CO.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,
Wholesale-and Retail Dealers in

, 81oes, oors, Bl
PAINTS, OILS, PUMPS, LEAD AND IRON PIPE.
Sugar Mills, Rubber and Leather Belting,
Steam 4 Gas-Fitting, Plumbing 4 Tinsmithing,
Agricultural Implements of all Kinds,
HAZARD'S POWDER,
BARBED FENCE WIRE.
AGENTS FOR S. L. ALLEN & 00.'S GARDEN TOOLS.
jW- Send for Price List and Catalogue, -4
to June 11 '83 ________
F :O l SA."T' 0
Hickory Bluff, 46 acres, 18 acres Hammock, cleared and
enclosed with Picket fence. 200 thrifty young Orange
trees growing on the place. Bold bluff riverfront of over
a quarter of a mile, and steamer chwnel close in shore,
and over five miles of water protection to the northwest giv-
ing perfect security againstfrost. Nine miles below Jck-
sonville, and one mile from New Berlin. Can come to
city every morning on mail steamer and return in the
afternoon. A choice place for orange growing and truck
farming. Price, 82,500.
Also, two desirable city lots 53x209 feet, and one 70x156
feet covered with thrifty orange trees 0 years old, half
mile from business center. Good neighborhood (all
white). Price of first, $600each. Price ofsecond, a corner,
very handsome, $800. Apply to

No. 1 West Bay Street, JACKSONVILLE.
State that you saw this in THE DISPATCH.
July 3, tf


DR. R. BACHMANN'S Vermin Hate; the only relia-
ble antidote to Vermin on Poultry of every description
now extant, viz: Lice on Fowls. and Fleas on Dogs, all
other domestic animals are benefitted by its use. This
being an internal remedy to be given mixed with the
food, because all external remedies have been a failure.
It is put up in packages of FIFTY CENTS and ONE DOL-
LAR. Sold at Groceries and Seed Stores. The best of
reference given on application to the proprietor.
R. BACHMANN, M. D.,
Jacksonville, Florida.
Depot with PAINE BROS., 36 Bay Street.
aug. 21 to feb. 21. '83.






us !.tI hou
No. 1114 et teet, Pliladeli
(to Jan 9, '83)


The agent of the "Royal Mail Line to the Nether-
lands," and of the "Florio Italian Line," in Jackson-
ville, offers his services to reliable parties in search oj
competent labor for their
Groves or Gardens,
to try to induce people from
Northern and Southern Euxiope
to come to Florida.
*&Correspondence solicited.
C. II. VANOEU LINDEN,
Care Florida Land and Imp't Co.,
sept 4, '82, tf. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


i -- -- -- -----_- I





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


FLORIDA. DISCOVERY.
NECAT'. EVERY DRUOGIST IN: THE STATE
WILL BE SUPPLIED.
It kills Ants, Roaches, Mice and Rats. Nothing ever
before offered has half the merit. Any Druggist in
Jacksonville will supply you.
CONE WILLIAMS,
-"Manufacturer and Proprietor,
oct 30-tf [P. 0. Box,126,] JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

A. N. DOBBINS & BRO.,


S 24,LABA .STREET,
.T.LCIK:SONyVII.ALE. I FL'RIDA,
uinsmithing done in all its branches.
.. IRON SAFE WORK.
Special rates on Stencil Cutting, by mail. Address,
,to 2 4 ., (p ... .3 )\ .


U"."-


N4


.1

N

K

U
S


to sept 10 '83


aFoan


Mletion thispaper. g.lamond, Ind.
to dec 30, '82.


KiefterPeak. Jap. Pefilimm6n: LeCotftoeParl.
I a 50 a0 Cuttings and Trees FOR SALE.,.More
u^ ^ trees in orchard than any five growers
of the LECONTE PEAR. Apply to hea, quarters.
WV, W. TIQHOMPSON, 1Prop'r.,
LeConte Nursery, Smith1ville, Ga.
SBND FOR CA~ALOGUE., 'o 2 'tf


C H-O CE CAB BAEG E -E D!
CHOICE BERMUDA ONION SEED !!
S .s .

6e ew Stbtk .of Sect'Seeds or rt
TILe Cabbea Seed. C ro f 'p2 is 1l1 o0t a co plete
fa~ii-vir^'yirb is ;g .. ;-- see lofgt 1^5r
eacli, of suobh. seleot vraVieties as azre asu SaC 0ss 8 n1.our
oli .nate. I : .anre a stool=k of cabbaue Pertilizers,
3. e 2 .. e ,;.
to jan6,3_ 1 ___8 -

ASHMEAD BROTHERS.
21 WEST BAY STREET, JA.9N F *- o(
PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS
.. PRINTERS, AND- INDERS,
AND DEALERS'IN
STO=S "ANTD PANCY .AlTII^ ..S.. -
S.A
We yave the .nos, com alete Bopk Bindery in the State. Can Rule, Number _r.Page and Perfor t apn ob sept us.
1n* lns ald 'apl .B4ok hanufa0tud order for Railgod, o boas, otl a
/ dbrpbration. I ie riling of difficult jobs'a ecity.

R. z '.LEPUPB. SH
6' A 2.-pae ekly Agricultural Journal, at only $1.00 per year, .
Devoted to Southern:iAgricnlture, Fruit, Growing, Market Gardening, etc. '
This paper hs :t e largest circulation of any published in, Florida.. Specimen copies free. Write for a copy.

.- P Z. M' . a ,..
Itis generally conceded we do the iist Jb ring n etat h all no e
S new type. dan pfnitthe sritallest Visiting Card to the largest size Poster.
SPinting of pfph.lts. specialty. Price on. appljiatiVA. .
LIST OF 3=0 OOS ONT 0PLO.IDA.-
FLQjP AQJ rO IST ,4 I JQS ORANGE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA, by
lustrated)..... ................ .............. .................Price $1 50 A MAi UAX L of ( 9ia ENING in FIlOR .ADA '
FLORIDA: ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE (Whitner)......................................................Price 50
AND HtSTOY (Lnr....8... 8...r...50 COTQN'SMAP ..........Price 75
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA-(Edwards); paperPrice 10 COLTON'S MAP O1 FLORIDA (Setional- : .
FAIRBANKS' HISTORY OF FLORIDA........Price 2 50 the best)....................................e...................Prfce 1 25
GUIDE TO JACKSONVILLE..........................Price 25 NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF ST.
TOURISTS ANIN*VALIA ytiE&"ECE JOHNS RfVER.. ....................... ...........Pride "25
BOOK OF WINTER" VEL ...... ....Pric1 75 McCLELIAAN S NEWSDIG FTF AS
SOUTH FLORIDA, THE IAY0< iA R- O1F FLORI-DA (8voaheep, postage extra)..Prie 6 00
ICA.........................................Price 25 INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SU-
DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition) PREME COURT OF FLORIDA..................Price 3 00
enlarged and improved..................Price 50 NOTES FROM SUNLAND ON THE MAN-
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE ule' edl- AkTEE RIY. SU'L F COAST OF SOUTH
tion, enlarged and improved) ;,.... L.. ....fRced. I 00 "'LOR A.: ts k Climate, Soil, and Pro-
ORANGE INSECTS-Illustrated (Ashmead,..Price 1 00 ductions, (By Samuel C. Upham)...............Paper .25
A- yn- L ORIDA S Ai PeANENT p c .. 0
4'-. x ai- -
(Sen(ly w. poaitace~frree, on receipt qf price.)
In Boolk Fonin, Dittb1iilting iiViews Each.
Souvenir of Florida, (small size).... .............. 25c | Souvenir of Jacksonville, (large size)..........:.............. 50c
Scenes and Characteps of.thei,'ininn 'uth. jalal l souvenir of St, Autitine large ize)c...... .
size)' .....[. .......... .....Z... ...t6.tereor. .. . .... 00
.T.. A II.JL.TV ST .4.TED.-
10,000 copies'of which ha jis bsfb. iIued Dy us~ eonsisltng .f twenty i peri- iize colored views in a hand-
some cloth case, illustrating the tfse ehtsdctt6ns of tle Stat of Florida. -
This is the handsomest work of the kind ever published in Florida. Price by mail, postage free, $1.00. Every one
et in Flo' wouldd e a ( g" ' ..p " ,

WARRAN, Y. DEE1), per do .n .......:.......Price 60 MORTGAGES, pe" dozen..:.........,;..... .,........Price 50
QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS, per dozen.....................Price 50 | NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, made to order.Price $5 00
We publish a fall line of Law B11tatk for' Lawyers, Justices of the ,Peace, Circuieit Aleures,etc. Price-list
mailed on application. '


x itT lER 'STA 11 P .
Are manufactured right-In our establishm'ent,.in the, best manner, and at short notice


.CHRI STMAS 0GOO-D"S
: 'PECIAtLI'Y,
CHRISTHAS AND NEW YEAR'S CARDS IN GREAT VARIETY.
We carry the largest stock in our line south of Baltimore.
i- Orders byn mal solicited and promptly attended t,,
Anything we s t, notsate ,ory,", ,4 ll ke bjtk a re.futh tey.
,@ I ,,) ..-..': *17 .7- j .- W

S[ 1 .unt-480 sheets to the ream.]
FU, %'i . -. 4 -h ..

14 c. pr rU,. 17 c. pr rm. 19 c. prmin.
Address AS."MEAD' .ROTH.ERS,
S. WEST.BAY STJIET, JAQg.VILP0, .LOI IpA


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