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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00029
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: October 9, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00029
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

Full Text































Vol. Notd to the
= Vol. 1.--No. 29.


Aricultural, manufacturing and Industrial interestss of Florida and the South.

New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla. Price 5 cents.


Monday, October 9, 1882.


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.


Our American Forests-Hoy to Take Care
of Them.
An interesting article on the protection of
forests, full of valuable information and wise
suggestion, is contributed to the current num-
ber of the North 'American Review by Prof.
CHARLES S. SARGENT of Harvard University.
Mr. Sargent is one of the most accomplished
botanists in the country ; the forestry bulletins
of the present census are prepared under his
supervision ; and no one can speak with more
authority concerning American forests and how
to take care of them.
The idea that trees make rain is utterly re-
jected br Mr. Sargent. The fact is that rain
makes trees. Wherever there is an abundance
of rain there will be forests. Where rain is
scanty, trees cannot be made to grow without
artificial irrigation. The great forests of the
United States are in the Atlantic region, ex-
tending from the coast to the Mississippi and
beyond, where the rainfall is plentiful, and on
the mountains of the Pacific coast, where it is
still more copious. The great interior plateau
is treeless. The moisture is insufficient. On
its borders, however, says Mr. Sargent, there is
ia broad strip of debatable ground. Trees will
grow here if they are planted and cared for,
but ifany part ofthe outlying forest is destroyed
it will not renew itself. In this region we infer
that tree planting should be encouraged, but
Mr. Sargent denounces the law known as the
timber culture act, because it misleads settlers
into planting trees where they will not grow
unless watered by artificial means.
While insisting that forests do not cause rain,
he emphasizes their importance as conservative
agents in its distribution after it has fallen, and
declares that perhaps "the highest claim for
care and protection which the forest can make
upon man lies in this power which it possesses
to regulate and protect the flow of rivers."
When water falls upon a treeless land,'it rushes
away in destructive torrents and is gone. When
it falls upon a country clothed with forests, it


passes away slowly. The rivulets, the brooks,
and the rivers flow perpetually, instead of only
for a few days or weeks, then to become insig-
nificant or disappear. Wherever there are
forests the snow will melt more slowly in spring,
so that there will be fewer freshets, the earth
will be held. in place by the trees so that there
will be less erosion, and evaporation will be
checked so that the temperature of the country
will be more equable.
Enormous and reckless as has been the de-
struction of American forests, Mr. Sargent does
not take a gloomy view of the future. While
the pine forests of the Northern States and
Canada have for the most part disappeared,
falling before the axe or perishing by fire, the
tracts of spruce both north nnd south of the
boundary, says Mr. Sargent, are still extensive,
"and, with proper management, should be able
to meet for a long time any demands which
may be made upon them." So far as the sup-
ly of pine is concerned, he looks with great
ope to the maritime belt of pine forest, nearly
200 miles wide, which stretches along the coast
from Virginia into Texas. The eastern portion
of this Southern pine belt has suffered some-
what from the lumbermen and the turpentine
gatherer, but, "west of the Mississippi a virgin
forest of pine still spreads far and 'wide." The
wants of the world, according to Mr. Sargent,
might be supplied indefinitely from the South-
ern pine forests under sensible management.
Of broad-leaved, hard-wood trees, the finest
remaining forests are on the further slopes of
the Appalachian range and in some of the
States beyond the Mississippi but near it. These
need greater protection against animals, which
are allowed to range among them and destroy
the seedlings. Most people will be surprised
to learn that next to fire the browsing animal
is the greatest enemy of the American forest.
On the Pacific coast the red woods of Cali-
fornia seem likely to disappear before many
years, so far as they possess any economical
importance, although Mr. Sargent thinks the
tree will spring up again; "but centuries must
elapse," he tells us, "before such new forests
can rival in productiveness or extent those
which California is now so rapidly dissipating."
The Sierra forests contain so few young seed-
ling trees that they are peculiarly in danger of


extinction by reason of the browsing habits of
the horses, sheep, cattle and goats which are
pastured among the mountains. They also
suffer from fires. The heavy forests of the Pa-
cific region, however, speaking generally, are
described as still intact.
So far as the Atlantic forests are concerned,
Mr. Sargent sees no occasion for any attempt
to regulate or protect them on the part of the
general Government. The States should enact
and enforce stringent laws for the prevention
of forest fires, and for the exclusion of brows-
ing animals from woods. While "the right of
every man to use his woodlands as pasture can-
not be denied, it is equally evident that a man
may properly be restrained from allowing his
animals to range through his neighbor's woods."
In Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota the law
should require the lumbermen to collect and
burn during the winter, when the trees are
felled, every part of them not .carried away.
Great fires, such as that which recently des-
olated so large a part of Michigan, are started
in the dried branches and tops of trees cut off
in trimming them into logs. "Such debris be-
comes as dry as tinder by midsummer, and fur-
nishes the best conceivable material to feed the
flames."
If the experiment of Government protection
is to be tried anywhere, Mr. Sargent thinks it
should be in the interior forests of the Pacific
region, which do not readily reproduce them-
selves and will not grow again after being once
removed. So far as these are embraced within
the national domain, it would appear to be
clearly the duty of Congress to take proper
care of them and prevent their utter destruc-
tion, which now seems imminent.-N. Y. Sun.

EARLY ORANGES.-The Tampa Prdgress
says: "Mr. F. B. Smith, living on the Alafia,
brought in 1,500 oranges, the first load of the
season, last Monday. They were quite large and
well matured for the time of year. The load
was purchased by Messrs. Miller & Hender-
son."
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


Il i I r II I I i I I II I


~iaP-_lbL





S-e THE FLOR'IDA DISPATCH.
i~~~~ ii- i --. --,. ... .....- i i i .. ......... .~--


Knowledge.
Bacon said that knowledge is power. And
scientific knowledge is indeed power, as the
face of the world of to-day, compared with that
of the world of a hundred years ago, amply
shows. Doubtless Bacon meant positive knowl-
edge or science when he wrote his famous
aphorism. The foremost man in the industrial
democratic civilization of to-day is the man
with a thorough scientific education, and with
the technical skill to apply his knowledge both
on the surface of the earth and in the develop-
ment of its internal resources. The knowl-
edge that makes a man acquainted with his en-
vironment with that nature, which is the
sphere of our activity and which is found so
pliant to human purposes on earth, and air
and sea, when it is intelligently utilized.
Reality, truth is the aim of scientific knowl-
edge. The educated man of to-day is the man
who knows the limitations of his own mind and
who is content to work within those limitations,
ingnoring and disdaining all futile speculations
of which he is utterly impatient. In the light
of the great body of scientific truths, which
have been accumulated by a patient, rational
study of nature, and in view of the immense
material amelioratious which the inventive
faculty, aided by science, has been able to
achieve during the century which is now draw-
ing to a close, it is not to be wondered at that
a purely literary education is beginning to be
regarded with a certain degree of contempt as
well enough for aesthetes, sentimental reaction-
ists, and haters of modern and current life and
idlers, who are able to lead elegantly useless
elaborately frivolous, do-nothing lives, but as
not at all suited to earnest persons, who wish
to give the best possible account of themselves
and to pursue careers in which an intelligent
activity shall produce fruits and results honor-
able to themselves and useful to society.
The age of oratory and rhetoric was along one,
but it is past, never to return. The intellect-
ual man of to-day, who commands the applause
of the world, does not deal in articulated
wind at all. But he is the man who tells the
world some new truth, who can devise some
social, political or sanitary measure for the
chronic ills to which humanity has so long been
heir. The world has had its ears tickled from
time immemorial with honest rhetoric and
with the fervid declamations and preachments


of idealists, theorists, dogmatists and enthusiasts.
In fact, it has been fed on dogma, and handy,
baseless assertions and high wrought Qecula-
tions about human destiny to repletion. What
a thoroughly bored and ennuied world now
demands is real, genuine amelioration, and not
shams; an amelioration, mental, moral, social
and political, which shall make itself palpable,
and a sober certainity of waking bliss in a
generally diffused intelligence, comfort, order-
liness and on a healthful style of living, all of
which means right conduct on the part of the
individual citizen, and a right conduct of pub-
lic affairs or civil service, if you please. To
this end, that sort of knowledge, which in
Baconian phrase, is power, should be taught in
preference to a merely elegant, ornament-
al knowledge. Colleges or universities are al-
ready established in England in which that
sort of knowledge is taught to the exclusion of


merely literary instruction, we are told. Our
modern life, with its complicated apparatus
and appliances, and its altered mode of thought
and outlook, and its deep insight into and util-
ization of nature, is so altogether different from
the life of ancient Greece, Rome and Judea,
that the study of their literature is rather cal-
culated to make students,dreamers, rhetoric ians
and empty declaimers than practical, live, mod-
ern men. For the ancient Greek, Roman and
Hebrew nature, as we know it, had no exist-
ence. Nature, in the eyes of those leading
races of the foreworld, was simply a whimsical
anthropomorphism without law or order per-
vading and controlling its phenomena. The
ablest ancient writers, whose works survive to
us, whenever they have occasion to speak of
natural phenomena, do it in such absurd terms
as to make the modern schoolboy laugh. Here
in this free country, which ought not to be
found in the ruts of a dreary old educational
routine, it is a singular fact that the colleges
are as wedded to such a routine, and to what
may be termed an erudite conservatism, as are
the old medieval universities of Oxford and
Cambridge in England. In all our thousand
and one young seats of learning the past, and
the ideas, speculations, theories and beliefs of
the past, are made to outweigh the present with
its vast fund of demonstrated truths, in regard
both to the subjective and objective world. In
none of them, save in a few exceptional tech-
nological institutes, is science in the foreground.
What wonder is it, then, that the halls of Con-
gress are resonant with the empty rhetorical
declarations of men whose minds were never
disciplined to the business of severe reflective
thought on current social, :political and eco-
nomical questions, and who are, therefore,inca-
pable of talking anything but mere: claptrap
when such questions are up for consideration
and debate.-Boston Herald.
Our Cistern.
When water runs into a cistern through the
conductors while the cistern is full, the same
water, or nearly so, flows at once out of the ex-
haust pipe into the drain, leaving the old water
in the bottom of the cistern to remain there in-
definitely, With a view to change this arrange-
ment, and let the old water out as fast as its
place could be occupied by the new, I attach-
ed to the inner end of the exhaust pipe, which
was laid in the brick just at the top of the cis-
tern wall, a close-fitting pipe extending down
to within a few inches of the bottom of the cis-
tern, so that all the water that ran out must
pass through said pipe, and must of necessity
come from the bottom, thus discharging the
old water as fast as any new comes in, and
constantly renewing the whole. After this was
tried, and the water thus renewed at every
rain, there was less necessity for resorting to
the other method, that of lifting the pipe, as
lately advised by "Sanitas." In fact, it was not
at all necessary in a rainy season, but in a very
dry one I have found it of inestimable value. In


using the pipe alone, one must keep the end of
it near the surface of the water, and to do this
must be careful to observe the rise and fall of
the water, for if the pipe is lifted to a proper'
position, say when the cistern is half full, and
the cistern is then filled with rain, the depth
will often be too great, so that the water will
be offensive, and, should the water fall below
the end of the pipe, of course the pipe would
yeild no water until it was again let down below
the surface of the water. This constant trouble
of watching and changing can in a great
measure be avoided by causing the oldest water
in the cistern to run out first when the cistern
is full, as above directed, that is, merely to
place a pipe inside the cistern through which
all water must flow when the cistern is full,
and the lower stratum first.-J. Hayden, in N.
Y. Tribune.


Courage.
Courage is frequently thought to be simply
the absence of fear. "He is a very courageous
man; he is afraid of nothing," is sometimes
said without any shadow of suspicion that the
two statements are contradictory. Yet if there
were no fear there would be no room for cour-
age. If we did not fear the water or the fire,
no courage would be required to plunge into
them to save a fellow creature from destruc-
tion. If a child had no fear of the dark we
should not appeal to his courage to face it. If
a youth were not afraid of his companion's
sneers he would not be exhorted to bae com-
geous and brave them. Fear has an important
mission to perform for us, that of warning
against danger, and it will and ought to ooa-
tinue as long as danger or evil of any kind
continue to threaten us. When its presence is
felt, however, two opposite courses are open to
us-the one to shrink or yield or run away, the
other to face the danger, whatever it be, witi
resolution and strength. The one is the path
of cowardice, the other of courage. We may
never know the panics of fear and tortures of
apprehension that our brave soldiers suffered
in times of battle (so new an experience for
most of them), but their courage was equal to
the test, and bore them triumphantly through.
Indeed, we may say the greater the fear the
more sublime is that courage which can stand
firm in its presence and unshrinkingly pursue
the path of duty. Aristotle teaches that cour-
age is the first of all virtues, 'because it is the
one virtue that makes all others possible. It
does, indeed, seem to be an element in the
character without which very little progress
can be made. Take physical well-being, for
instance. It seems a simple thing enough to
take care of the body that it receives no dam-
age, and so to observe its laws as to promote vi-
tality and ward off disease. Knowledge may
be needed for this, watchfulness, patience and
care, but not, we imagine, much courage. Yet
when we remember the various temptations that
come so insidiously, yet so forcibly, to induce
us to break these laws, we must admit that it
takes a brave spirit always to withstand them.
Is it not from a lack of courage that we fail to
govern our desires for stimulants and excite-
ments, that sap our vital powers, or fore rich
and unwholesome food that we cannot digest ?
Does it not require a courage, that too few of
us possess, to say "No" to the allurements of
late hours and irregular habits, or to the temp-


stations of over work and overstraining, which
the hopes and fears of business life engender?
Then, in our employment, have we any
greater need than that courage which faces
difficulty with. a bold front and a resolute will;
that exerts thought to the utmost; that under-
takes hard tasks with cheerfulness; that searches
for truth with an unbiased mind, and holds fast
to it, in spite of the sneers and frowns of the
multitude ? Much of the intellectual feeble-
ness, which cares little to acquire knowledge,
or to distinguish truth from error, which es-
capes from the drill of study as from an enemy,
comes not from incapacity, but from cowardice.
The power to do these things lies latent within


I I





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH,


us, but we lack the courage to put it forth.
This is why idleness and cowardice are so often
found together. One who, loving his ease, con-
stantly yields to the self indulgence, feels less
and less courage to make an effort, and the
coward in one thing soon becomes the coward
in all.
In fact, not only is all that is good and de-
sirable in character directly dependent upon
courage for its development, but most of the
faults and errors, and even crimes of humanity
are distinctly traceable to its absence. Un-
truthfulness, hypocrisy,- fraud, extravagarfce,
selfishness, passion, revenge, are never upheld
in an open way by those who commit them;
seldom do we even hear an excuse or apology
made for them. Everyone admits them to be
wrong, unjust, injurious, those who fall into
them as well as others. If we sift down the
reason of their continuance, we find that in
nine cases out of ten it is because there is not
sufficient courage to stand up to one's own con-
victions of right and duty-to do what is
known to be right, to resist what is fully recog-
nized to be wrong. We are cowards as much
as the deserter in battle, not because we are
afraid, but because we do not bring dignity and
courage to bear upon our fears, and gradually
to subdue them.
What then is likely to be the value of a
man without this quality? Nerveless, soft and
indulgent to impulse, he can be depended on
for nothingthat requires firmness or strength;
without resolution to attack.difficulty, his pow-
ers end in incapacity; without moral stamina
of self-restraint, his character dwindles into
feebleness and falls a prey to every temptation.
Perhaps we may never be called upon to bear,
arms, to plunge into flames, or to face a wild
bull, but the same courage which should serve
us in such emergencies we need as a daily com-
panion, to guard us from harm and wrong-
doing, and to inspire us with moral heroism to
embrace the good. Virtues thus developed
through courage become at length instinctive,
and require it no longer. No bold firmness is
now requisite to avoid the crime of cannibal-
ism, or to prevent the horrors of martyrdom.
Happily there are thousands now in our midst
who are never tempted to' break the laws of
the land. It needs no courage for a gentle
person to avoid violence, for a generous person
to prevent avarice, for one who is the soul of
honor to speak the truth. But courage, having
fulfilled her mission in one direction, hastens
to another; having conquered temptation on a
lower plane, rises to a similar conquest upon
a higher. The truly courageous man is ever
climbing the ladder of human progress, and
while he looks backward upon steps that he no
longer needs, he also looks upward with a
brave spirit to those he has yet to climb.--
Philadelphia Ledger.

Newspaper Work and Workers.
In an article on "Newspaper Work and


Workers" it is truthfully remarked that there
is no other profession but enjoys immunity from
observation as to its modes. The preacher
writes in the privacy of his study and can con-
coct platitudes or pad out plagiarisms that
would be the ruin of the editor and the re-
porter. The lawyer consults his client and or-
ganizes his campaign in private, bringing into
court only as much as makes for his cause and
against the cause of his adversary. The doctor
plies his potions and launches in his lancet in
secret. If the patient recovers it may be the
medicine, or it may be in spite of it; it he dies,
it may be the pills or Providence, the physician
is scathless. None of these come to light that
their deeds may be reproved.
Moreover the work of the press is continuous


as well as constantly public. There is no rest
for the weary. Space is no more annihilated
by the telegraph than time by journalism.
Every minute of every hour of the twenty-four
is occupied by some workers that shows itself
in the newspapers of the day and afternoon.
Repetition is as impossible as rest.
Facts are ever new. Comments must be as

fresh as facts, and the edition is the remorse-
less giant that eats up the seconds. The mak-
ing of newspapers is perpetual motion in a
thousand fields. In such a work demanding
ceasless effort, permitting no. pause, exacting
external and ever-varying exercise, it is impos-
sible for wheat to be mixed with chaff, for ac-
curacy not to be impaired by mistakes, for in-
justice not occasionally to be done.-Ex.




Florida's Crops-September Report.
Judge Knapp, of Limona, the Statistical
Agent of the Department of Agriculture of
the State of Florida, has made his returns for
September, 1882, based on the returns of one-
half the counties, the balance not being repre-
sented, because proper persons have not been
found to undertake the work of making the
reports.
Apples are reported from only three counties,
and at very low figures.
Peaches.-Six counties report small yields,
and many trees are dying.
Grapes.-Eleven counties in the northern
portion of the State report good yields. These
are of the Scuppernong.
Tobacco is reported from four counties, and a
full yield is given.
Irish Potatoes are placed in the truck gar-
dens, and the reports are limited, but the yield
good.
Oats rust badly, except in the northern
counties, where there is a strong admixture of
clay in the soil.
Corn is reported from every county in the
State, and in all the counties of the State above
the average, some as high as 125, except Clay,
which is placed at 50. The average of the
State is 110.
Sweet Potatoes are placed at 110, and Clay,
Calhoun, Washington and Taylor counties are
placed at 125. Columbia alone is below 100.
This is one of the staple crops of the State, and
in the central and southern portions, where
they can be had at all seasons, constitute nearly
one-half the food of the people.
Sorghum is little raised, except as a fodder
crop, and but little planted.


Sugar-Cane.-All the counties reporting
place sugar at 100 to 125, except Hamilton 90.
The average is 110. This is another of the
staple crops of the State. The great amount
of land which may be cultivated,, and the still
greater amount that may be brought into cul-
tivation, and the farther fact that every county
in the State is by climate adapted to its growth,
and that in nearly one-half the State the griqd-
ing season may be extended to March and
April without danger from frosts, and that the
cane ripens to an average of seven feet, indicate
that Florida, in the near future, must outstrip
all the States in the production of sugar. Man-
ufactories that can work up the cane of the
small farms of neighborhoods, will work
out the result.
Cotton is another of the staple crops of Flor-


ida. The reports have placed the crop at only
84. This is attributable to a dry time at plant-
ing, not giving a full stand and the attack of
the cotton worm, but more to the low prices
paid for the seed cotton. Sea island cotton,
which alone is raised in the central and south-
ern portions of the State, is not a profitable
crop at four and a half and five cents a pound;
and will not be planted at that price. 'There is
great need of cotton gins more convenient to
the growers and better ones than those now in
use, and better prices must be paid.
The circulars of the department called for
reports upon wheat, rye, barley, buckwheat and
hops. A small amount of rye has been raised
in some of the northern counties; but in none
of the others is it raised in the State, if indeed
they can be raised. Fruits are not called for,
but Judge Knapp has reported upon these
from such sources as has come to his hands.
Oranges are fast taking the lead of Florida
crops. These are produced in nearly every
county of the State, but can only be considered
perfectly safe from frosts below the 29th paral-
lel. The crop in the Southern portion of the
State may be placed at 75 above last. year's
yield, owing to an increase in the bearing trees
and to a larger yield of the trees.
Lemons and Limes are more tender than the
sweet oranges, and less attention has been paid
to their production. The lemon does not come
as true to variety as does the orange from seeds;
and most of those that have been offered in the
markets from this State, have come from such
seeds, and are unfit for market purposes. This
has been a great damage to the Florida mar-
ket, and it will cost many times more than
those sold have brought to create a new mar-
ket.
The limes are very rich in citric acid, but owing
to the flavoring of the peel it has not come into
use for cooking and for ades, though the juice.
commands a good price; and great use is
made of the small fruits in mixed pickles. The
tree comes into bearing very young, and is the
most prolific of the tribe.
Shaddock and Grape Fruit.-These belong
to the same family, and produce large fruits,
much used by persons who have acquired an
appetite for them, and understand the method
of preparing them. More wine can be made
from three acres of well grown trees than
from an acre of grapevines. They are great
annual bearers, and their cultivation may be
made profitable.
Guavas are also destined to take high rank
among the fruit crops of Southern Florida.
This small tree, little more than a bush, is very
sensitive to frosts. The fruit is used in as many
ways as the peach, and by many is preferred
to that delicious fruit. It can only be sent to
market in cans, as preserves, jellies, &c. It is
very prolific, and easily raised from seeds, cut-
tings, layers and suckers.
Pine-apples and Bananas grow in the South-
ern portion without protection ; also, the man-
go and custard apples. The cocoanuts grow at
.and south of Charlotte Harbor. The date-palm


can be grown and fruited in all parts of the
peninsula, and the olive in every part of the
State.
Eventually all the lands of Central and
Southern Florida will be cut into small fruit
farms of an average under forty acres.
The amount of culture required in raising
fruits will compel this small farm method. The
wetter lands, nearly all of which may b,
drained or dyked, will be planted with rice,
sugar, corn and sweet potatoes, and heavy crops
raised. Some of these may be covered with
grasses and made into profitable stock farms for
cattle and sheep. Hogs are small and the
lowest grades of stock, and it is believed by
many that the product of the hog required for
Florida can be cheaper imported from farther
north than raised in the State.


0


I





Q THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


changeable climate until the lungs are a mass
of tubercle, then send them to Florida too
feeble to take outdoor exercise, often with but
little money to procure attentions or delicacies
necessary, and among strangers the poor inva-
lid becomes nostalgic and sinks rapidly, and
then Florida is blamed. This ought not to be,
but every season finds our hotels filled with
cases that should be at home among friends,
making ready for the rapidly approaching close
of life.


m


Therm i Wind. tS

DATE. ;Zbb 0

4u 90 o Q3

Saturday 30...... 30.18 8172 74.7 76.0 0.00 E 6 Fair.
Sunday. I........ 30.10 81 70 72.0 90.0 0.53 NE 5 Clear.
Monday 2..:.... 30.04 81 70 76.3 70.0 0.00 NE 7 Clear.
Tuesday 3........ 30.03 81169 73.71 75.0 0.01 NE 6 Clear.
Wednesday 4.. 30.07 7968 74.0 78.3 0.03 NE 8 Cloudy.
Thursday 5.... 30.12 806 73 75.3 78.0 0.34 NE 8 Fair.
Friday 6......... 30.1182173 76.0 63.7 0.00 NE Clear.
Highest barometer 30.18, lowest 30.02.
Highest temperature 82, lowest 68.
NOTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Observer U. S. A.

The Climate of Florida.
Dr. Haywood's experience, as given
in the Record of August 12th, conflicts decided-
ly with that of most medical men in this State.
In my own case, several years' residence in the
highlands of Central Florida have relieved me
of a harassing cough, night sweats, a hectic
flush, anorexia, and from the invalid of one
hundred and thirty pounds weight, dreading
the cold, I now am able for continuous labor,
weigh one hundred and sixty-six pounds, and
have long ago discontinued the use of cod-liver
oil, phosphites, etc.
Dr. Z. H. M- of Apopka, Fla., has a
similar experience. Coming from Georgia to
find a tenMporary respite, year after year has
passed away and the doctor now is the picture
of rosy health in his old age.
Dr. C. J. K- of Jacksonville, an old
traveler, a scientific investigator, and widely
known, for his own case has tried many cli-
mates, and has fixed upon Florida as the best.
Twelve years ago Dr. McM- of Charles-
ton, S. C., brought his wife, a confirmed con-
sumptive, to Gainesville, Fla., to spend what
seemed a small remnant of life more comfort-
ably. To-day she bids fair to reach the "three
score and ten," despite the "exceedingly debili-
tating" climate.
Col. J. H. R- came from South Carolina
as a winter resort, having all the symptoms of
phthisis in an advanced stage. Now he is an
active, comparatively healthy man, utterly un-
like his former self.
SI need not multiply examples, almost every
neighborhood in this section can supply them
of competent medical men who in their own
cases are satisfied of the value of this climate
as both preventive and curative of tubercu-
losis.
In this section of the State, high, dry, roll-
ing pine land, and perfect drainage, in six
years, and in one thousand cases I have seen
but four of pneumonia, and two of these trau-
matic.' Can Dr. Haywood say as much even
for Beaufort or Raleigh ?
During the summer we have a mild form of
malaria, but as to the effect of such a climate
upon phthisis, I would refer him to Dr. Law-
rence, pp. 297, 389. Aitken, vol. i., p. 265.
These malarial attacks are easily subdued,
and fatal cases are rare. Too many physicians
allow their patients to remain in a cold,


-c~---


No. of days in January..................6 8 11 4
46 46 February................. 2 2 3 5
i" March.....................2 4 2 3
i" April........................ 4 5 4 6
"4 "6 May...................... 6 4 6 6
"4 6 June.......................2.. 3 4 6
June, 1882; Monthly mean, 30.041; Rainfall, 9.56 in.
May, 30.014; Rainfall, 1.71 in.
Clear days-Winter, 59.8; Spring, 64; Summer 55;
Autumn, 56.4.-Medical Recorder.

SPECIAL PREMIUM.-We are requested by
the State Fair Secretary, Maj. A. J. RUSSELL,
to announce that the Special Premium, for the
best exhibit and display of products, from any
one farm, grown by one farmer, will receive
the premium of $50.0a. There must be two
or more exhibits to compete. By some unac-
countable oversight, this Special Premium was
omitted from the regular List, noticed in a
former issue.


METEOROLOGICAL REPORT.
Weather for week ending October 6, 1882.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION
SIGNAL SERVICE, U. S. A., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


I __ _--'- -- -- __ ------
____~ - c ~--1--3 t ~-;L~I~PP~ T-yC4j?~-i-
__,-~~,~..~, ,---,--. r~-=r--r~ ~~--. -I-- -----T.~--,,,P--r. ~~~-~~~


There is, however, a positive curative agency
in this climate for certain ailments, and to
guide the professionrI begto submit'the results
of many years of careful study both of cases
and climatic factors.
These factors are location, soil, drainage,
water, sunshine, temperature, humidity and
air-pressure. And with reference to a strip of
elevated land, lying forty miles from either
coast and extending from 28.300 to 300 lati-
tude, I think no place east of the Rocky Moun-
tains is better suited for the amelioration, if
not cure, of incipient tuberculosis, asthma, ca-
tarrh, nervous complaints and bronchitis.
The location.-Almost insular, constantly
traversed by warm breezes from the sea and
gulf, in the track of trade winds, and the fresh-
ness tempered by miles of almost unbroken
forest.
Soil.-Very sandy with but little humus, or
animal remains; configuration broken, rolling
often eighty to one hundred and fifty feet ele-
vation above the gulf. Drainage perfect, no
stagnant pools or marshes.
Water.-In the main freestone, in wells
twenty-five to sixty feet deep, with an average
temperature of 650 F.
Timber.-The long-leafed pine, with little
undergrowth, allowing free circulation of air.
Sunshine.-Twenty-two days of each month
of almost clear skies, the remainder often part-
ly available for out-door exercise, and during
the winter the rains are usually at night, leav-
ing the day cool and bright (see note). The
rainy season begins in June and lasts till Sep-
tember. Often a week of showery days, then
clear skies a week. During the rains the tem-
perature falls to 720 F., and this season, in
comparison with the torrid days of the North.
is quite endurable, and as these showers rarely
last but a few hours, the remainder of the day
is available for exercise or labor.
Temperature.-Unquestionably a climate al-
lowing a loose, easy costume with few wraps,
and no requirements of hot, stove-heated, badly
ventilated rooms, is best for weak lungs. The
houses of this section are built for free ven-
tilation-no stagnant air in cellars or close
dusty bedrooms. Blizzards, northers, sudden
changes, causing cold extremities, visceral con-
gestions, or surface chilling, are extremely rare,
and as they occur, if at all, in December or
January, can easily be kept from harming.
The summer maximum is usually 960 F.,
and this for only a few hours. But 96 is not
common. In 1880 it reached that point but
four times in June, once in July, and once in
August; this year twice in July and once in
August.
The night temperature for the months from
May to October is from 700 to 760, and from
October to May, 600 to 650. The hot, swelter-
ing nights so common in the North are un-
known here. October, November, and till
April are months comparable with the Indian
summers of Pennsylvania-days dry, breezy
and bracing, the whole season enjoyable. (See


I
.14


note.)
Humidity.-Much has been said of the
dampness of Florida, but the observations of
the Signal Service show nothing excessive in
its humidity, and this section compares favora-
bly with most health resorts, the annual mean
for a loig series of years being 690 against 730
at Menton, 680 at Nassau, 670 at St. Paul,
Minn.
Air-pressure.-I have no doubt but that this
is the most important factor of value in our
climate-its remarkable equability of air-press-
ure. If we regard in the lung the pressure of
the heart upon the mass of the blood as bal-
anced against the air-pressure and strength of
the blood-vessel walls, it is readily seen that in
a diseased lung, a decrease of air-pressure tends
to congestion, and at points of weakened tis-
sues from any cause, if the air-pressure be sen-


I








ism I


sibly diminished, hemorrhage may occur.
Any physician will recall instances showing
that the changeable months of spring and
autumn occasion great distress to tuberculous
patients, and the cold of January was not as
fatal as the storms of March. A fall of even
one-tenth inch mercury in the barometer pro-
duces a decided discomfort, and the descent of
half an inch a temporary congestion, dyspnoea,
headache, or neuralgic pains. Hence patients
can often predict storms from their disagreeable
sensation.
A climate offering- the maximum of air-
pressure and the minimum of change, with a
genial temperature, leaves but little to be de-
sired for patients requiring rest and warmth,
and this section surely meets the wants of such
cases. (See note.)
A dozen invalids live near me,some hemorrh-
agic, some neuralgic, but all have experienced
relief, and the majority of cases of rheumatism,
asthma, bronchitis, and catarrh are alike favor-
ably affected by this equability.
The practical deductions are readily appa-
rent.
Northern invalids, in which the deposit of
tubercle is incipient or limited; aged invalids
requiring rest, warmth and relaxation; neural-
gic cases, nerve-worn patients, the whole range
of uterine troubles resulting from congestion,
all cases that grow better in the warm settled
days of May or October, and get worse in No-
vember and March-these should be advised to
try Florida, especially this section, with hope
of betterment.
With discharging cavities, or fully tubercu-
lized lungs, little aid can be given, though our
220 clear days, average air-pressure of 30.03
inches, and mean temperature of 71' will aid
in pleasantly prolonging life.
Many when here neglect the most common
sanitary laws, expose themselves recklessly to
heat, rain, and dew, take fatiguing exercise, sit
in draughts, eat to excess, and do not derive
the benefit they should.
A little common sense would obviate this,
and save much blame now given to Florida.
JAMES C. NEAL, M.D., PH.C.
ARCHER, FLORIDA, August 28, 1882.
NOTES.- Temperature. Mean, December and January,
550; February, 58 ; March and November, 630; April and
October, 700; May and September, 770; June, 80; July
and August, 82.
SPECIMEN DAYS, 1880.
Observations, 7 A. M., 2 and 9 P. x. Archer, Fla.
Jan. 7.. 520 720 730 Feb. 11.. 540 730 680 Mar. 14.. 68 83 740
8.. 58 75 68 12.. 62 76 71 15.. 67 84 75
9.. 56 72 68 13.. 70 80 73 16.. 72 76 70
Diurnal range, 14.40. D'nai range. 14. D'nal range, 14.9.
May 12.. 720 77 730 June 17.. 960 860 760 July 25.. 76 0080 78
13..72 76 73 18..76 83 75 26..78 80 80
14..72 74 72 19..81 88 76 27..76 80 76
Diurnal range, 160. Diurnal range, 170. D'nal range, 18.
Oct. 11.. 760 84 760 Nov. 28.. 64 80 720 Dec. 14.. 60 720 58
12.. 73 84 74 29.. 64 7672 15.. 63 74 70
13.. 68 82 76 30.. 59 77 68 16.. 64 76 70
Diurnal range, 17.6. D'nal range, 13.40. D'nal range, 13.90.
Air-pressure.-Mean, 6 months, 1882, 30.061. Range, .03.
SPECIMEN DAYS, 1876.
June 3..... Mean Bar., 22.937 Oct. 29.....Mean Bar., 30.090
4..... 29.904 30..... 30.073
5..... 29.902 31..... 30.055
Monthly Mean Bar 30.029 Monthly Mean Bar., 30.027
1880.Barometric Change less than .01 in..02 in..03 in..04 in.





THE PLORIt).A PfISPArPTC'~f44


Peach Culture.
ARCic R, FLA., Sept. 27, 1882.
Editors of the Florida Dispatch:
The note of inquiry from W. E. Tate, Bir-
mingham, Ala., and your reply to the same, on
peach-growing, in your issue of Sept. 17th, in-
duces me to send you the following article on
that subject: But little attention has been
given the peach in our State, the orange being
the all-absorbing subject of interest, and hence
there is but little known of peach-culture with
us. Indeed the generally prevailing opinion is
that our soil and climate is not adapted to this
fruit and the influence of this opinion has
largely paralyzed eibrt in this direction. There
are a few, however, who have confidence in the
success of the peach in Florida, and I here ven-
ture the prediction that in a few years these
few will be increased to a multitude. For five-
years W. P. Lipsey, Dr. J. C. Neal, of Archer,
and myself have paid some attention to the
peach, and it is a matter of gratification that
I am able to report some success. Hence,
First. We, the gentlemen above referred to
and myself, have found peaches that will grow
in Florida, of various kinds, bearing their fruit
in their season, from 1st of May to the middle of
October. In accomplishing this, Florida has
been searched over, and many varieties from
other States, as far West as California, have
been tried.
Second. The varieties found in Florida are
those most to be relied upon for fruit, still, there
are others from other States,which promise well,
and which may, possibly, in time, become accli-
mated and be good bearers.
Third. The peaches brought here from States
North and West, are total failures, except in
rare instances, and so far as we have observed,
they are short-lived. When my attention was
first called to the peach, the idea occurred to
me that by budding early varieties from other
States into our native stock, we could possibly
grow them. I suggested. this to Mr. Lipsey,
and he had thought of the same thing. We
both tried and we both signally failed. The
buds used were from trees which were obtained
from Georgia nurseries and which happened to
bear the first year they were planted here, and
from the limbs which bore, were the buds taken,
but without success. We were induced to make
this experiment, because it was known by those
who have tried them, time and again, that


peach trees from Georgia and Alabama, and
northern States, were, as a general thing, utterly
worthless when planted in Florida. Still, in
view of these facts, which have been demon-
strated by thousands of people in Florida, and
which have been published to the people of the
State, over and over again, annually thousands
of dollars go out of the State for peach trees,
and the consequent and certain failures, go to
confirm the opinion that our soil and climate
are not adapted to peach-growing.
Fourth. In my experience and observation,
I am not prepared dogmatically to state where
peaches will grow and where they will not. I
can only go so far as to say, I know where they
do best in our State, east of the Chattahoochee,
so far as they have been tried. I am certainly
of the opinion that they can be raised more
generally than they now are, if sufficient atten-
tion were given them, not only as to varieties,but


also as to cultivation, and the selection of con-
genial soil. Those counties lying between the
Chattahoochee and Suwannee, consisting of
Madison, Jefferson, Leon and Gadsden, are not
adapted to the peach. The time was when they
excelled almost'any part of the South, but by
reason of the borer and worm in the peach, the
fruit is almost useless and the tree short-lived.
Of course there are in each of these counties,
places more favored than others, but as a gen-
eral thing, the fruit is abandoned or almost en-
tirely neglected, because of these pests,. And
this is also true, in part, as to the counties of
Suwannee, Hamilton and Columbia, which lie
east of the Suwannee. But where they
are more certain-less attacked by borer,
and entirely free from the worm-where, when
the season "hits," they reach their highest per-
fection, is the northern and western portions of
Alachua, western portions of Bradford, imme-
diately on the St. Mary's River in Baker, north-
ern sections of Levy, northern and western
part of Marion Counties. In the section I live,
the Northern portion of Levy County, peaches
do well. It is a common thing for us to have
them from three to four inches in diameter and
of the most delicious flavor. The trees live long,
grow large and bear heavily. I cannot say,
however, that the crop is a certain one every
year. It is my opinion, however, that by
proper cultivation, it will not be long before it
can be said that the peach crop is a certain crop
every year. Thus far, the Peen-To has proven
itself to be, while other varieties are not so pro-
nounced in their habits. Still, I have peaches
more or less every year, and if I had trees in
sufficient number bearing, would be able to
realize a handsome income from them annually.
I am free to say that in a few years Archer will
be a point from where large quantities of the
finest peaches will be shipped to all parts of the
country. Last spring, in April, the first ship-
ments of the Peen-To, by Mr. Lipsey, from this
point, were made north, and the first sold
brought 75 cents a-piece. Later they fell to 20
cents each in New York. In regard to the
Peen-To, I would remark that its preference
seems to be for sandy soil and a warm climate.
This peach I think is adapted to South Florida,
where, doubtless, it would mature its fruit in
March. It is to be desired that persons living
in Sumper, Hernando, Hillsboro' and Manatee
Counties will try this variety and report results.
I would suggest to those who desire to make
peach-culture a specialty, to come to this
section of the State, for while no section is
better adapted to the peach, it would be hard
to find in Florida a soil or climate better suited
to the orange and to other fruits, such as the
pear, fig, grape, pomegranate. Of course, our
lands, which are of the very best pine and ham-
mock, will grow vegetables and strawberries to
perfection. JAS. P. DEPASs.

THAT FEVER.
For the peace of mind of any who contem-
plate a visit to Florida, and have been de-


tered therefrom, through fear of the prevalence
ofyellow fever at Pensacola, we would say : Pen-
sacola is in the extreme western portion of the
State, on the Gulf coast. The means of commu-
nication from Pensacola to other parts of the
State, has been very limited. To get from
Pensacola to Jacksonville, a distance on an air
line of over 350 miles, one has to go north by
rail to Montgomery, Ala., thence by different
rail routes, diverging through Georgia to East
Florida. One can go from Pensacola to New
York City in less time than he could get to
Jacksonville. There is no line of steamers or
connections from Pensacola to Eastern Gulf
Ports. Hence there has been no communica-


tion, save by rail, as above, and on this route a
strict quarantine has been established and vir-
tually a cordon placed around the unfortunate
city. Examine a map and the rail routes from
Jacksonville via Savannah, Jesup or Albany,
and see how far the lines to the North and West
are from Pensacola. There is no yellow fever
or any other dangerous disease, in any other
part of the State. We have had a delightful
summer and the season has been remarkably
healthy throughout the State. Dengue or break-
bone has worried some of us, but nothing seri-
ous. After having it, one smiles at his fellow's
misery while undergoing these fashionable tor-
tures, that makes the enquiry, how's your back ?
the latest thing. We append the mortuary re-
port from Dr. Knight, Health Officer of Jack-
sonville:
"During the month of September there were
only ten deaths in this city; of these six were
white and four colored ; three were under two
years of age, and two were over sixty. Three
were natives of Georgia, one of South Carolina,
four of Florida, one of Virginia, and one un-
known. One died from old age, one from or-
ganic disease of the heart, one from consump-
tion, one from convulsions, one froin paralysis,
one from meningitis, one from inanition, one
from congestion of the brain, one from typhoid
fever, and one from remittent fever. This is
the lowest record for September in any year
since 1876, when there were ten deaths recorded.
Since that time the growth of the city has been
very rapid, and the limits have been greatly
enlarged, by taking in a portion of East Jack-
sonville, LaVilla and Brooklyn.

BRADLEY'S ORANGE TREE FERTILIZER.
The attention of orange and vegetable-grow-
ers is called to the advertisement of this fertil-
izer appearing in this issue.
Mr. A. M. Beck, at Jacksonville, is agent,
and he is too well known throughout the State
to require comment at our hands; suffice it to
say that his acceptance of the agency is a suffi-
cient guarantee that the fertilizer is something
superior.
Lime, gypsum, aluminium, carbonic acid, &c.
and vegetable mould, in the form of muck and
decayed vegetable matter, seem to exist
in abundance in all Florida soils, but phospho-
ric acid is lacking.
Now, phosphorus or phosphoric acid, is one
of the most essential properties, in tke develop-
ment of plant-life, as it is the principal agency


in dissolving the other mineral constituents
that so largely enter into vegetable-life. In other
words, it prepares these for being properly
assimilated by plants.
Bradley's fertilizers are rich in phosphoric
acid. All who have tried them are greatly
pleased with results, and we hope our fruit and
vegetable-growers will give them a fair trial.
For circulars and recommendations address, A.
M. Beck, Agent, Jacksonville, Fla.

The first box of oranges from this section this
season was shipped from the Florida Southern
station Tuesday, 12th Sept. They were grown
at Perry, on the line of the road, and were ship-
ped to Georgia.-Palatka Journal.






i6 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


'o oRnd Rnew._


as a most profitable branch of their agricultu-
ral system, hereby invite the vegetable growers
of Middle Florida to meet in convention, on
Monday the 16th day of October, at Gallie's
Hall, in the city of Tallahassee, to take counsel
together upon such subjects pertaining to
this industry as may be suggested for discussion.
to compare notes concerning this season's crop
and its incidents, and experiences with commis-
sion-merchants, and thus collect a fund of in-
formation for guidance in the future conduct
of the business.
To this end it is earnestly requested that
every grower of vegetables in Middle Florida


unbudded trees.
Apple trees of the Astrachan variety, do
well and bear good crops, but require much
more care and watchfulness than farther north,
especially to keep the suckers frequently re-
moved and worms and leaf-rollers killed.
Pine-apples cannot be relied upon, unless
properly protected, but are, nevertheless, so
far, the most profitable fruit raised, when pro-
tected. The fruit for shipment, requires much
more careful handling than is usually given. ]
If cut at the right time and wrapped in dry ]
moss or paper, packed in ventilated barrels, I
they will go safely to any part of the Union, (


An Important Convention.
TALLAHASSEE, Sept, 27,1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
In the Floridian of July 18th, appeared the
call, (appended below,) of the President of the
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical
Association, for a convention of vegetable-
growers, to be held in Gallie's Hall, in Talla-
hassee, on the 15th of August. In the Flori-
dian of August 1st, a notice was published,
October. As the 15th of October falls on
Sunday, it is reasonable to suppose that the con-
vention will be held on Monday, the 16th.
This will be a very important and desirable
opportunity for all vegetable-growers along the
line of the Florida Central and Western Rail-
road, (and as many others, from other sections,
as can and will attend,) to meet together and
exchange ideas and experience; especially
upon the subject of commission merchants who
handle the crop, and methods and fertilizers
used in planting, besides many other subjects of
almost equal interest and importance.
Many of the leading growers are expected
to furnish and read papers on these various sub-
jects; and every grower is invited to bring or
send a statement of his past experience to be
read before the convention for the mutual dis-
cussion, information and profit of its members.
You cannot do your large "chintage" in this
section a better service than to reproduce the
call and urge upon your readers the advantages
and importance of attendance upon the sessions
of the convention. A good attendance at this
first meeting will doubtless open the way for
the holding of subsequent annual conventions,
the practical benefit of which, to the large and
constantly increasing class, it is intended
to bring together, can scarcely be estimated.
The transactions of the convention, whether a
subsequent one is held or not, will be probably
published in convenient form for reference,
and will thus be preserved for future use, mak-
ing one of the most valuable of collections.
C.
CONVENTION OF VEGETABLE GROWERS.
The officers and members of the Middle Flor-
ida Agricultural and Mechanical Association,
recognizing the business of growing early vege-
tables for shipment to Northern markets as an
industry of vital importance to this section,
and with a view to the encouragement of the
most intelligent and systematic pursuit of the
business by the people of the middle counties,


Peace Creek, a river that flows through two
counties, viz: Polk and Manatee. We are
twelve miles from Charlotte Harbor. We have
a saw-mill, and three splendid stores, managed by
experienced merchants, who sell their goods
much cheaper than Tampa or Manatee store-
keepers. Our people are prosperous, as you
will judge from the fact of their building a
college and are about to build two churches.
We are, of course, "below the frost line." The
pine-apple and banana grow here to perfection.
I have planted out, this season, 2000 of the
former, and two acres of the latter, and all are
doing well. We welcome new comers, show


will carefully prepare and bring, or send By
mail to the Secretary, a detailed statement in
writing of his experience with such crops as he
has grown this season, whether for home or
foreign markets, giving full particulars as to
Character and Preparation of Soil ; Time and
Method of Planting ; Amount and Kind of
Seed Planted; Amount and Kind of Fertilizers
Used; Cost of Seed and Fertilizers ; Cost of
Cultivation and Harvest; Method of Cultiva-
tion ; Method of Using Fertilizers ; Time and
Method of Harv.etmg XieJL. total, dlat
ized; Experience with different Commission
Merchants, giving full name and address.
The transactions of the convention will be
faithfully reported, and, together with such
papers germane to the subjects discussed as
may be presented and read by any member,
and the statements above named, will be care-
fully edited and published by the Association.
Arrangements for reduced rates of transpor-
tation to and from the convention will be made
and published hereafter, and everything will
be done by the officers and members of the
Association, and by the citizens of Tallahassee,
to make the occasion one of pleasurable enjoy-
ment as well as profitable instruction.
The editors of all newspapers in Middle
Florida are requested to publish this call, to-
gether with such additional editorial notices
from time to time, up to the date of the con-
vention, as may serve to give the matter the
widest publicity and ensure the fullest attend-
ance; and they are especially invited to be
present and take part in the deliberations of
the convention.
P. HOUSTOUN, President.
H. S. ELLIOT, Secretary.

Notes and Comments-Sumter County.
LEESBURG, FLA., Sept., 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I find that cuttings from the rough Florida
lemon tree, stuck in January, make bearing
trees sooner than seedlings, being budded one
year after planting, and set in grove one year
from bud.
Orange seedlings, raised in shallow boxes--
only the largest and thriftiest being allowed to
remain-removed at one year, without disturb-
ing tap or side roots, have, for six years,
remained free from attacks of scale or other in-
sects, whilst adjoining trees, three years from
seed and twice transplanted, have suffered
badly.
Peach trees do best raised from seed of native


--- ---
" C ~ i I- I I


I


and be pronounced far superior to any imported
or bulk-shipped fruit. In Leesburg, choice pine-
apples, with their adherent burs, have readily
sold for 75c. to $3.50 each, the latter price for
fancy and rare sorts. One variety is known there,
which is entirely destitute of the unpleasant
serrations on the leaves and crown, and when
about to fruit, presenting a remarkably brill-
iant display of crimson and gold in the foliage.
It is not very generally known that the root of
the pine-apple can be cut into pieces, and from
~iibiarpf~tbvItrbn itn snoots' that staft from
the dormant eyes.
For a forage plant, I still consider the old
and well-known Guinea grass, equal to any I
have seen; but the ground cannot be made too
rich for it to do its best, and few people fertilize
enough or cut it sufficiently often.
For feeding to cows and calves, 1 find noth-
ing equal to the sweet potato vine. If the
ground is heavily coated with stable manure
and the potatoes frequently cultivated with a
sweep, the vines can be cut every two weeks,
and two crops of tubers obtained from the same
field, one in August, the last in December.
To obtain a large quantity of stable manure,
one should go with a very sharp and heavy hoe
to a "prairie" and scrape or skim off the sur-
face sod, an inch deep, rake it into heaps and
cart to the stable every week ; one hand can
go over one-third of an acre in ten hours.
The tops of sugar-cane, too soft for planting,
and containing the embryo seed, make excellent
forage for all stock, cut and cured like the tops
of Indian corn. Were it not for its value for
winter feed, I would not grow it, good as it is to
have one's own syrup and sugar.
The grass known as "carpet" or "blanket"
grass is apt to die out on dry soil, if allowed to
go to seed. On the range, the cattle never per-
mit it to do this, as they are extremely fond
of it.
By a test, extending over six years, the fig-
ures show it to be more profitable to keep a
small lot of poultry, fenced in a yard and well
attended to, than to allow them a range of house
and garden, piazzas and bedrooms, as is by no
means uncommon. SUMTER COUNTY.

Fort Ogden--Fruit Bill, &c.
FORT OGDEN, )
MANATEE Co., FLA. Sept., 1882. j
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Your paper is a welcome weekly visitor, and
should be taken by all lovers of agriculture.
Fort Ogden is fast building up, situated on


"ft





A* niteh fbr their habits, neb w ft 4iie n
-K3
4. KHep lonystr.;g, abdarlw
it s pils ith a ,ood fertile gaed, dt d
tht they at't e t or hofydey, to .
2. Ii iMnakiwg f ase-hW.s (wo neoesiwh d'&
be deid) ee that all paes where ow si4b i
to beiilt 'iare tot less than o e-q Artrwriew
twreei&hths of ai ieh wide. If lethn d-
onetuMarterf V inhwide,-the bbfevll- -ed
up both edge with propolis, and la"e a s idg
teti the worm. If -over threfght
thywl filSl k with hmoney henever they getO

Keep Italian or hybrid be6s, as tbetide


THE FLORIDA DISPATCHOI.
U ,--- _______________________________________________


I


tham the besI avitablehlad, and do all we can
for the bettrinent f orf o ection.
Please publish this bill in your, ext issue.
I forwarded these limes, 6,500, and lemons 700,
ad got the great ~tatn of M6c.!! These limes
a ileiomsd cost me 25e. pr 100 on the trees,
beside $(250 freig to West.
Ac ountsales himes and 2lmous ex "Guada-
loape" :
7 Boies Limes,
2~i LR s, Sold......................*r..O.w100a
I R. I.Bbls.mes, j
6 ... o,................... ............ .........................,o
: p er:. . .. ... e .. .. ... .. .. ...S. ....i
rodit A t......... ee ...o .. .
IL *AO.ELBeaner tPlbkwe*,
New York, Aug. 1, 1882. per C. W. Pinkny.
Credit' ''-'' oss


Ng. w $OiTmWA;, LA., SBpt. 22, 1882.
Edis a if The F5ffs Div *k:
In response to your arequst for information~
ln' regard& to preventing the raages of t-e t e a
enteillar, I will ey the bee-moth is a Wliym
litItH winged inset,-and- the female seems btt
eo the alert to e~ter a hli for the' rtiwose of
depositing hMr eggs. Where fhae amre bat fwrw
beeo to guard the entua tiftkraateasey mt*-
ter; but frt mor diffie4ilt here thi lony is
strong, as the bees seem to know her: to be a
enumy, Mad will thwart her f -pible. AIf
et: into m te hive, her atmt ease is to ftd a
eradA or crevice- that is too -amaAi for a bib
etter, and into this ersek she- insertM er t'-6
,duct, which she has She power of -ta&ndin
some distance, apd there deposits her eggs.
'he wprmion aig, spin about ie;lf aweb
so tough that it i hard for the bees to tear it
ope#, As thme worm amove forward it forms a
tunnel fom which it .r.ject.its head. (whiic
ie incased r hrd- scle) 'only. It prefers to
work our of reach ote b as, uh as po-
ole, chooses n j ~s 4 bWeeito
frames and sides ofthe 1 i69ve, w p the.dsT
of the corner. lose to th~ ,ptua, ,w ajnd
then passing Atrogh .it from onese ide t th;
other, and often f toi te
intotI '. o1' so ~.t" ey. ,a evr
Ave.. e tahan bees g e rnuch jnyre p^
getic i: t o ,venti A sqo .... t ,,.,
,.A. 2 +tumblg .t woqrj.t. ^

over the worm and saiee him out, unless his
tunnel rums %ack ite ioae -tci $ t e they
odnnot enter, i: which ese he t` bte aithd' is
safor the timebeing. It iAs o c -e4i
'th enith lays many eggs Iethe-tIeW w,1"ad
tbhe they be~bmeattaehed to th.V4eg, ea


being almost itri h proof, hey have many
other points of operloriity ovet the blacks. The
-first two reaiedies will prevent the worms from
e#t doing much damage in a ivri of bldck
bees, but take the three together and theytake
a "Oib rtear ttht nb be~moth can~ injure or
other common enemy destroy.
W. S. HA;T.

SO t .Sore fHead" in Fowls.
FORT GEORGE ISLAND, FLA., Sept. 26,188.
F :4Titor;a.f. TIAeF9rida Dipatch :
For the benet f those who may t e inter,
ested in chickens, and in answer to the arti-
ole'i yot Di.i cnPATH, headed, "gore ]lead m
PooItry"IrWiId state, fhat after two years'
experieneei,.td having tried very many eme-
dies for this trsblesome disease in fowls, that I
=fipapn (,- placed in their drinking e t Aer
a u Augst i5th, and co.ntiIed .. 4~i
e iisT, a sure preveiiive gidenerally ,a
caofti m if it has gotten in the 'oc. dLet no
other water be where' the fowls oia get at it.
Respeefefy,Y'
SJNQ.. STUALBT,:
certainlyy a very y and cheap preventive,
and we shall try it next season.]

SIvhtiMcd Horse.
C*ATHAk,, Y. TySept. 28, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispaith :
Please answer through your paper this
question. I'have a hBrse with a spavin, and a
Mind of mine paid61.00 for a bottle of' th
"Kentucky Spawin Care," lde Eby that eom
ppy, at Mors .tn, N, J,; PO. 0.Box 83, and.
cured his horse perfectly, and yises m tos nW
it. Do you know anything about it Is it

tWe know nothing of the remedyy]


-D aTRnoYIp TiOs--Will you please girva
eipte gfA 'Cm g ticg -afid other Vjir n,
from cattlp ep that the skin and hair will upt'
e injiimrd or the animal made sick .? IB., ,-A*
X Washing the stock wy(toh tobpo
after, or water and kerosene, wli~ ipeetoa
ys ed ill destroy parasiltp vp~Wit on
battle. Feeding them a,.oio*4d iiad it d
meal daily will give their t a shiny appear-

It is estimated that 63 per cent oftie1eople
if this country are farmna:s. Th peeenge
used to be about 70, but the increase in amwau.
facturing has caused the decrease. 1
Fish-farming has becofime oplar with tie
farmers of Georgia, .and there are '-a&!.e.
2,500 pnds in that StAWe which have b e
stocked with German carp.


-1


i' r


progress: att '~ ty quick irte, hlwids of
several meters pet second. After some time,
perhaps an hour, contraction gradually recurs.
The contraction began at an upper part of an
acacia afte tea minutes, wherE the~' fsinn
at the lower part continued fity minutes. Thi
shows that the cotraction is due to the activity
of the foliage, and is graduallyextending
dowtiad.4` '
BURNING AND DRINKING UP LAND.-Thi a
shrewd and long-headed "FiRMMER" / w riteh
for the Lake City Reporter says:.
One.acre of good:pine land canhbe botght-
for fifty oents in Columbia County. A boy e..an
put it out in orange trees, attend tW them jr-
fectly, and mmke a respectable living at some-
thing ele for ten years, whte his bfAtte Acr
will sell for $1i000 at least.
Many of our boys and young i~: nen& iio
away an acre, of land daily, and.some. dr
whole acres after supper;,and then speak of hard
times and wonder why they cannot get situations.
This will Altin~irn y be the age 6ng
sOtion of the country. Weather stations
be aitancgd so that every Inan will havezlot ce
at least tweafty-fou& hur 'boreLo fhe cold *iVe
strikes us, and+ smoke and fires will welcome
Jack Frost on every, hand, while the orange
will remain unharmed. Energy is what s
needed ; watch as well as pray, atdd don't be
too lazy to do either.
LECTUnEs oIN FLOIIDA.-C06t"d ry iemtt
mat: L A. ` CHA, of Wnte r .-Pa ha
been delivering lectures oFloridat _th6peo.
p e of Bloomington, 111. The dloal. pers
9tpak in very complhiIteatpy fttr of p M.
Chase and his lectures, and state that his aidi.
e6e6 was composed of the bhe b itik f 6 t
place, includiIg. leading capit,=tal ite.. fbdt e
tAgaph says:
Mr, Chase may be relied upon in a Jre1i~r
as an honorable gejatleman, whoe sttatmata
can be. accepted without hesitation. There has
be ., eomueh-inter tekitedlWttf. e suhect6.

^f dir.oo ..i.p .cmf. direction. >,W+ of..l
; woad.. would do wll to oonfe~ wi h M-.:
Cha.e upon the subject;
StEDY FOR SOiE EYEs.--The Ait 4
(Ga.) NJes ,4etmies,^ a .mu*4y hp the sore
Seyef, snoW o-prevteft : .
"One eaUlte of water,. onehalf teaieoonful
bf epsom salts, and sir drops of laudanum,
well mixed, till prove emaiipns- ijthe rAit
epidemic of o~re eyes pie imife in .
f Georgia. Batohe .e eyeiS the,.e," t
several times dfrin the day, Bd T"mle thekm
Well on going to beat mightt" : -
)_ _ __. j * t : * -


I


< oifcMe.t means of measurement Herr
im 's tareeetly proved the existence of a
phenomenon in all pant organs, which isa o-,
n with their variable water content, and
qsid a p eodil m swelling and contac-,
ltwety-fou hours. Lieavej m A,
in :thi &~ee from the early morning
6.I8 e naJ0enoon, when they, b~g to.wel, t I
BgPa, ig te jnx by: zU whau
l (this is is we ween in agavlom and the
like); sinikarly with buds, fow r n O~ge ,
it4, &c., and with stems Aand .brbsp Ilerr
arhas before proved such a period in
"nks of trees, and Herr Kraus ows that
both wood and bark sh'ae a it, independently
or unitedly.
vTh various experiment of IHer Krau Ea-'
rVal offoliage, watering, shutting ut lht,,
d.-lead to explanation of'the phonqi ,
h4 tarying reeiroarclattia oft
bring -wta into the 1idt hiapt tMe
which carry it away; By nightea he ar,
absorbing activity of tk.e pt below ground
operates, by.y, the4W4* fxectity
the parts above ground o t
Water-consumng ac tvity, opn i ly n
d fbig afd'oh light (rtmbt t.of I e or
of, tioin) ii' 6dlSti<

a short time, less thas.,a hour, the .ep bo-
his to l well; ,othf woo and i k take part
ithis, -the-wOod always flist. The selling


r


..f .. ',


^:






THEl F LORIDA DISPATCH.
0 0- . . . l -.. ..... I.I -_ _


She $fridda fisjch.
JACKSONVILLE, OCTOBER 9, 1882.
DO Redmond, D.H. Elliott, W.H. Ashmead,
EDITORS.
"tbscription '$1.00 per annum, in advance.
IRATMES OF ADVERTISING.


SQUARES. I TIRE.


1 0o. 3 MO. 6 MO. 1YEAR


One.1 ....... ....... $ 100 $2 50 $550 $1000 $1850
T O, .......... ........... 200 500 1000 180Q 3400
Three 3.....0........... 3 00 7 00 1400 00 00 4600
FoUir.................... 400 900Q 1750 3000 5800
Five ................. ... 4 50 1100 -1960 5 00 65 00
Eight............. 800 16 50 3000 5000 oo 10000
Sixteen................ 1600 80 00 5000 80 00 15000
Ten lines Solid nonpareil; type make a square.
LOCAL ADYVRTISING (seven words to line) ten cents
per line. .D C
The FLORDA."DIw aTCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the best ad-
Vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those :sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.
OPPICIAL ORGAN OF TvifE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS ASSOCIATION.
special Club Rates with "The Dispatch."
W ha.ve qpade arrangement s with the publishers
anad. will, club THE DISPATCH with any of the
following publications, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt .6fprice, for oiE YFAR :
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH AND
Saannath Weekly. News................ ...........$2.50
Floi4da W weekly Union...... .........p.....o............. 2.25
New. York r eekly Sun................................ 1.75
New York Weekly Herald................ 1.75
New York Weekly Tribune.......................... 2.50
New York Weekly Times.... ..................... 1.75
New York Weekly World............... ... 1.75
Philadelphia Weekly Times......................... 2.50
American Agriculturist............................ 2.00
Country entleman......................... ...........2.75
Southern 'Osasivator..o............................a 2.00
Atlantic monthly Magazine......................... 4.00
Harper's. monthlyy Magazine...................... 4.00
The Century Monthly Magazine (Scribner's)..... 4.00
Lippincottvs .Monthly Magazine............... .345
Popular Science 0onthly...........;:...:... 5.00
North Americ'n Rteview............................ 500
Harper's Illustrated Weekly................. ... 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Bazar............... ....... 00
Ylos'l's.ated Young People................. 2.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly................ 4:00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4.00
Frank.Leslie's Popular. Monthly................ 3.15
Frank Leslie's Sunday MagaziAe..... ....... ... 3.15
Scientific American................................... 75
WaVefly Maoazne ..... ..........................5.00:
Detroit Free rress,.. .... ..................... 2.35
Ne raska Farmer........................... ........... 2.00
Florida Agriculturist ...................... ............ 2.25
The above are among the very best publications"
Remittances should be sent by Check, Money Order,
or gteistered Letter, addressed to
AS. AIHEMEAD BRO'S,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
NE W ADVER TISEMENTS.

,Fertilizers--A. M. Beck, Jacksonville, Fla.,
Qomminsion. Merchants-M. George &'Co.,

omission Merchants--John 0. More, Cin-
cinnati. :
cLaw Blanks-Ashmead Bros., Jacksonville,
F la ... : . *-
Pink-Curlew Wings--F. W. Hatch, Oak
Hill, Fla.
Choice Orange Lands-W. B. Clarkson, Jack-
sonville; .Fla.
Land to Exchange-Hanson Moorman, Val-
ley Station, Ky.
StraWberry Plants for Sale-P. E. Johnson
& Son, Jacksonville, Fla.
The genuine Bermuda Seed can be had from


J. E. Hart, Jacksonville, Fla.
THE MIDDLE FLORIDA CONVENTION meets
at Tallahassee, on Wednesday, 18th of October,
instead of the 16th, as printed elsewhere.
ORANGE WRAPS.-Order your orange
wrips from Ashmead Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
For prices see advertisement. tf


FROST REPORTS.
It is desired by the Agricultural Department
of the United States Government to furnish re-
ports of approaching cold or other weather
damaging to the crops in the different sections
of Florida, and it only requires organization
on the part of the respective sections desiring
such reports to perfect some plan or designate
some telegraph office at which they will be re-
ceived, and say to whom they shall be sent.
This is a very important move, and one in the
right direction, looking to the protection and
development of our agricultural and horticul-
tural interests. As it is free, and only require
co-operation on the part of thecommunity andm
selection of localities and persons to whom the
reports shall be sent, we trust the different see-
tions engaged in fruit and vegetable culture
will ad dress the Secretary of the Florida Fruit
Growers' Association, or Dr. C. J. Kenworthy,
Jac konville, Fla., giving 'the name of the tel-
egraph office and person" to whom such reports
should be addressed and by whom will be dis-
seminated throughout their respective localities.
SOUTH QE. OCALA.
We are indebted to D. E Maxwell, General
Superintendent, and Mr., F. B. Papy, General
Freight Agent of the'Transit Railroad, for a
very pleasant trip by special train over a phrt
of the Transit Road and the Peninsular 'and'
Tropical Railroad to W-ildwood, about 25
miles south of Ocala, the present terminus of
that division, which is designed to run via"
iLeesburg:to Indian River.
The country for several minies south of Ocala
is a dense hammock, through which the road
runs, then emtnergea on the east side and runs
parallel with the hammock for several miles,
through a gently rolling section of pine land
interspersed with a growth of hickory and oak,
indicating g66d and. 'Further South, or from
Lake Weir station to Wildwood, is a beautiful
rolling pine land section; the laid of the first
quality, in fact, as good as we have seen iin the
State. It is not densely settled, but we-
noticed many very desirable'iniprovemnents and
the indications of thrift, energy and comfort
among the settlers. It is particularly healthy,
We Understand that thieie are no State or Gov-
ernment lands vacant immediately in the line
of road, but that such as are not at present oc-
cupied can be bought at reasonable prices. To
the immigrant who desires to locate on first-
class pine land in a section partially developed
and accessible to moderim inaproveirieits anmd
transportation, we would recommend'an exam-


nation of the section adjacent to Wildwood.
As an evidence of the fertility of th natural
soil, -e were presented with a stalk of corn
over fifteen feet in height, that matured three
good ears, and the crop yielded forty bushels
per acre-pine land.

SCUPPERNONG WINE.
To "M. J. H.," of Remington Park:
We regret that your postal was inadvertent-
ly mislaid until too late fqr the desired formula
or recipe to be of any useto you this season;
but we will give brief directions for making
the kind of wine concerning which you in-
quired: When the grapes are fully "dead


ripe'"-not before-gather carefully on ai dry,
warm day, press the juice all out, without brieakL
ing or crushing the seeds, place the juice iri I
demijohn, keg or cask, filliig to the bung and
providing apd k. eeping..on. Iand, somwe freoh
juice, so that yoty can-replea jh .or, filk up the
cask as often -as may be neeisary during the
process of fermentation. During this first fer-
mentation place a piece of milinet or common
mosquito-netting over the bung-hole of the
cask or keg, to exclude insects, and when thd
violent fermentation has entirely, ceased, loos1y.
insert the bung for a few days, and then cork
tight and do not disturb the cask for six or
eight months, when the wine may be drawn off
carefully and bottled. -We should have stated
earlier-that, the; vYinAr- maiftadilfl) m raw
grapejuice, as it comqs from, lbe .press, from
one to three pounds of good,, ir sugar to each
gallo :of juice, tq. supply the re.q uisite amount
of sacharine natteqr needed, to, eyoLve .alcohol
enough to preserve the win Tena perWat, of
alcohol will be sufficient for this purple.. a4.d,
generally, about two pounds of sugar to each
gallon of fresh. juice v.wl be found to answer.
The white scupperaong,? properly handled,
makes a very nice wine, resembling golden
sherry, while the dark grapes of this family,
such as the "Flowers," "Thomas," &c,, produce
a rougher and heavier-bodied .darkish wine,
which, in time,; makes a pretty fair Claret ,or
Burgundy--i. e., wipes somewhat resembling
these famous foreign brands, .
FROM the author, Rev. J. F. Rtichmond,
Leesburg, Fla', we have reqeied "Our Ameri-
can ittaly, a 68 page pamphlet,' descriptive 'of
Suimtdr County, PFla. '(on!e6its are :-Sit'ua-
tion, climate, soil, productions, people, trans-
portation lines, laI4s, rivers, its inducements to
settlers and tourists, and its advantages in
general. It is an admirably writtefi work, arid
THE FLORIDA DISPX CH' would recommend it
as a model for other counties in the State to
imitate. So much similarity 'exists between
different sections 6t theSate, in soil, climate
arid productions, that the above pamlhIet, al-
though specially devoted to a description. of
Sumter County, we yet find is hi reality a won;
derful epitome of the reboiirces 'o he. while
State. : : .\ : i: ":
FREIGHT TARIFF 0 FRWIT.
Your attention is called tW th iffon friit
for season of 1882 and 1883; publihed on pag_
457 of this isue, where it will renuaiw until sub--
stituted by tariff on vegetables, in the early


spring,. Thi' is the official tariff.; Corrispod-
ents of. newspapers. ithe Sthaverappwpeced
an erroneous rate on fruit,)o :doubt,. from the
fact that the rates this season pgn fr*it pm~oised
to be the same as that of 4iat seaPoi, 4A mi-
taking the gate pn yegetabls: f Tors MAh rteion
fruit. Were the rate iadeper:,lp9und (which
we believe the bat) instead .f per package,.
this difference~ woad; npt xio.but avqgetables
are in smaller packages and weigh less than the
standard orange-box, 'the crate rates differ. To,
illustrate: The standard vegetable-crate, is
8x14x22 inches, estimated to hold one bushel.
and weigh about 50 lbs. The standard orage.
box is 12x12x27, which holds over:onua,, Asiel


I
-
-----
...~ .-.,-, r'.--~-. -- "-






TPHT19 FLtOR-1D A 19P1~A TIOH1-


and is estimated to weigi 80 lbs. The rate on
the former from Jacksoiville' to New York was
40cts. each, the rate on the latter is 5Octs each.
The through rate from any point south of Jack-
aiiville is made by adding the rate by 'th local
lines to the through rate by Florida Dispatch
Line from Jacksonville or Callahan. The S.
F. & W. Ry. Co., is the Florida Dispatch Line.
Any freight going over .theaS. F. & W. Ry.,
either by way of Live Oak, Callahfan or Jack-
sonville, is via the Florkla -Dispatch Line. This
name was given t0 this business and the move-
ment of perishable matter made a department,
with D. H. Elliott as its General AgAent, the
department being under 'the immediate care
and supervision of the officers of the S. F. & W.
.Ry. 0C who have labored earnestly to perfect
through rates and quick time to all the princi-
pal markets for Florida products.
THE DATE-BANANA.
GAINESVILLE, FLA., Oct. 5, 1882.
Editors 8f The Florida Dispateh:
I send you ih the same mail with this, a small
box, containing a species of fruit, the name of
which I would be pleased to learn through THE
DISPATCH. The roots from- which the fruit
Wias gathered, were purchased some four years
8go, on board a schooner, in Jacksonville, Fla.,
and said to be a "West India Banana." I have
a small patch of the plants growing in very
rich soil. They fruit every year, putting out
.bunches resembling the banana, with fingers, of
which the enclosed is a fair sample for size. I
have the common Florida banana surrounding
this variety, which fruit heavily and are of
good flavor. Trusting you, may be able to give
me someinformation respecting this fruit, I re-
main respectfully, J. E. WEBSTER.
REPLY.-The fruit sent is a delicious variety
of the banana, known in the West Indies as the
DATE-BANANA, where it is very highly es-
teemed. It is the first we have seen that has
perfected its fruit in Florida, although it may be
grown in South Florida. Gainesville is almost
too far north for it to mature perfectly, and they,
lack the rich, delicate flavor they. have in the
tropicsd We congratulate Mr. Webster on
sWcuring this choice variety, and return thanks
for the specimens.--Es.
Cotton Manufacture.
Statistics show that more than 1,500,000 op-
eratives are emfiy~d"in" flie' iAanufacture of
cotton goods in the principal countries of the
world. Of' these, 480,000 are employed in
Great Britiaun *France follows with 210,000
andthe other countries in order of precedence
are the United States, Russia, Germany and
India. With regard, howeveqrto the annual
value of cotton goods produced, the United
States comes second, with about half the value


of Great Britian, and Germany and Russia
follow, the joint product not being quite equal
to that of the United States. There are 252
cotton mills in the South, with' 1,237,409 spfip-
dles, 20,609 looms, 1,931 sets of cards, an'd
$ / ;I5 cap 'aJl. P

CHOICE ORANGE LANDS in Hernan-
do County, lying near surveys of railroads,
can bomight at FIVE DOLLARS PERR ACRE
from W. B. CLARKSON, Jacksonville, FPt.
Send for descriptions. oct9-tf
lAW..BLAN4KS.-A full line for Justices
of the" 1eace, Circuit Courts, etc. Deeds,
Mortgages, etc., are printed and published by
ASHMEAg eBR.OS, Jacksonville, Fla. Write
for a catalogue. tf


FLORIDA ILLUSTRA2
ies of'which.have just been is
of 20 imperial size colored
some cloth case, illustrating
tions of the State of Florida
This is the handsoniest wor
published on Florida. Price
free, $1.00.. Every one inte
should have a copy. Address
ASE
tf J
PINK CURLEW WING
some pairs, nicely preserve
mail, on receipt of $3 and
Two pair, post paid, $6. Ad
F. p
oct9-2t p


rED.-10,000 cop-
sued by us, consists


ORANGE SEEDLINGS-4sour or sweet-
one or two years old-wanted IN QUANTITIES


views in a hand- of one thousand and upwards. Address, D.
the different sec- REDMOND, Jacksonville, Fla. oct2-tf.
rk of the kind ever THE SUBSCRIBER would be pleased to
e by mail, postage exchange 250 acres TENNESSEE RIVER LAND,
:rested in Florida twenty-seven miles above Paducah, for land in
Florida. Address, HANSON MOORMAN,
[MEAD BROS;, oct9al6-2t p Valley Station, Ky.
acksonville, Fla.
TO ADVERTISERS.-Large circulation:
.S.-A few hand- For the next two months THE FLORIDA DIs-
)d. One pair, by PATCH will issue from 8,000 to 10,000 copies
four 3c. stamps. every week; about 40,000 a month.
Dress, Merchants and others should take advantage
W. HATCH, of this and advertise liberally.
Oak Hill,' Fla. For Advertising Rates see editorial page. tf
ESTABLISHED 1QO 6.


1.. 1. xGEOBE & CO.,

Gen e r a I C om m is sion M e r c ha nts,

95 Soatli Water Street, E1 C Or .

FLORIBA 6RANIIn8 ANB- YB- TABLI8 A 8P II

REFERENCES:-National Bank of Illinois, First National Bank, Commercial Agencies, or any Wholesale
Grocer in CHICAGO.
Stencils furnished by

J. C. LANIER,


to apl 8, '83.


LEESBURG, FLORIDA.


JOHN 0. MORE & CO.,

FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,
AND GENERAL

Commission Merchants,

s West' Sixth. Street, OINZ I ATI, OpZIO.
REFERENCES:
Commercial Agencies, or any Wholesale Grocer in CINCINNATI.
STENCILS FURNISHED BY

J. C. LANIER,


to apl 8, '83.


LEESBURG, FLORIDA.


V3EGET ABLE GROWERS
CAN MAkE MONEY BY RISING

FORRESTER'S. 'CHEMICAL MANURES,
PREPARED ESPECIALLY FOR

Vegetables, Orange Trees
AND ALL
SEEK TROPIALX+ FRXITS,

GEO. B. FORRESTER, 169 Front St., New York.
*'"O- -i---
THESE MANURES ARE PREPARED XROM CONCENTRATED CHEMICALS; ARE FREE FROM ODOR;
Do not Breed Vermin or Insects in the Soil.
They have been used on FLORIDA LANDS for Years, and produce Wonderful Results.
Foro sale Oby
S. ..Sanford, Orange County, Florida.


w-l-end for circulr.


(to mar. o, '";)p


--







_ THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
* ... . i ; . ";' h *l ... .... T ... ... .... ... . .. ............. ..... ... ... .... ... .. ... .. .... . .. .... ... .. . ... ... i .... .... ... .. .... .... .... . .. .... .. . . . ..... ... .... .. . .. .. .


Ap-riewturalf, fortieeultura and Pomologieal
Associations.
Florida Fruit-Growers' Association-Office at Jack-
sonville-D. Redmond, President; W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; W. H. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding Sec-
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee--Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, 0. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official organ-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA STATE GRANGE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICES.-Master, Wm. H. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Wm. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B, F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Pield-
ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. H. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate
Keeper, --Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Wm. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T.W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H.
Lee, Suw&nnee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Geo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo,. Umstead, Ho"s.
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville.-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice- re
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J'. C. Greeley, TreAtlrer.
Directors-J. H. McGinniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney. Annual meeting-
LAttFrfky in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; 0. E. Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. 0. Taylor, Secretary and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Floridas--President, A. B. Bartlett, Georgetown; Vioe-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. a*wktin, tLake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George; George H. Thom, Treasurer,
Georgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
mond, Fort Gates.
Pieolata Agricultural and Horticultural Society.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, W. N. Parxer, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Huga, Corresponding Secretary,
N. R. Fit*zHuglf, Jr., Recording Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer. Meets first Saturday in each month.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. MY er- SeconA Viceisqi ot .
W. Powell, Corrn-poM~ng ecretay f B. F. or'Sah,
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical ,trAit Growers' Association of Monroe County,
FI6rida.-Home office, Myers, FlorIda; F. A. $fenory,
President; T. 1f. Parks, secretary Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson,,
President; Thomas Tlllis First Vice-President; J. B.
Suttonr, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary ; J. M. Barco Redording Secretary;
L. W. Iamlin Assistant Recering Secretary.
Florida Agricultural ad lntcal.As.oiatiou.-
John Bradford, President, Bradfodvllle, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida.
Pinellas, Florida, Pruit Growers' Assoeiation.--D. W.
Meeker, President; Wm. P. Neeld, Seeretary-,
Central Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida.-Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
Evergreen Horticultural Society, Dunedin, Florida.-
J. W. Matchett, President; W. Tate, Vice-President;
Geo. L. Jones, Secretary.
Decatur County Fair Association Bainbridge, Geor-
gia.-Maston O'Neil President I. KWileeki, Secretary.
Lake Wier Agricultural and Pomological Society (of
Marion Coulr, FlDi [)--Captain J. L. Oainy, Presi-
dent Dr. tL 4y .44 lespnding Secretary.
We aka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Higgins, Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Association, Albany,
Georgia.-L. E. Welch, President; T. M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
tSumter rwt a A_
clation.-ci.r 3 ( l-ruiffciie bars .
Vice-President; A. P. Roberts, Corresponding Secre-
tary; R. E. Sharrard, Recording Secretary;. Thos. W.
Spicer, Treasurer. *


SF Cnt Fir swetlon.-Col. TCI Lanierj
Pres.iflei*t Aq h.Bs,V icPresldent ; iR. jhatrrt,
SeqfetaxyTr'Is W piewr,:.reasurer. :- .
FlO liS e ?Itlh'Agrfeultufal Society.--Th0o. F. King,
President Gainesvllle; Secretary, -
v ; W. K. Cessna, Corresponding Secretary, Gaines-
ville.
Archer Agricultural Association.-W. B. Lipsey,
President, .Arhetr; A. PiAe, Secretary; Dr. J. C. Neal,
Corresponding eita, archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President; John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward ewis, Treasurer, Tallahassee.
Indie Vll^ Aaric lt'ra1 and Ppmologcal-Soclety.-
A. Pi Cevelehd, resfLt; W. m[H. Sharp, Setretarry,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second .Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
AssWlationa-R. J. Mays, President; Praalq W. t pe,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
Orange County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred L. Robertson, Corresponding
secretary.
Gadsden County Fair Association.-Jesse Wood Pres-
ident; W. H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R. Haitars,
Second Vtce-President; J. W. Kendricks, Sectetary; E.
C. Lou Treasurer.
South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion, Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors inti
which we may have fallen in the naming ofofficers, Ac.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH ?]


AS.HMEAD, BROTHERS,

21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,


PUBLISHERS, BOOK-SELLERS, STATIONERS

PRINTERS AND BINDERS,
AND DEALERS IN

TOYS AND FANCY ARTICLES.
NEWSDEALERS.-We keep all the latest Daily and Weekly Papers from Boston, New York, Philadelphia
Baltimore, Chicago, St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, New Orleans, Charleston, Savainnahslthd Jacksonville, And
take subscriptions to all publications at publication price. Orders by mail promptly attended to.

LIST OF BOOKS ON FLORIDA.
FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, INVALIDS AND SETTLERS (Barbour, Profusely Illustrated)... ........Price $1 50
FLORIDA: ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE AND HISTORY (Lanier>.........................Price 150
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paper........ .............. ............ ...............Price 10
FAIRBANKS' HISTORY OF FLORIDA............ .................... ....................................... ...Price 50
"W UIDE TO JACKSONVILLE.............................................................. .. ..................................... .... Ptl........ ee 25
TOURISTS AND INVALIDS REFERENCE BOOK OF WINTER TRAVEL.........................................Price 75
.SOUTH WORIDA, THE ITkY OF AMERICA............................................................................................Price 25
ODWI'KSl IASG A LTWIEnew editlon)enlarged and improved....... ..... ..................Price 50
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edition, enlarged and improved)..........................Price 1 00
ORANGE INSECTS-Illustrated (Ashmead, ...............................................................................................Price 100
OANE ULTURE I AIFONIA, by A.T. Garey, (cloth)......................................................Pre 5
A MANUAL OF GAItDENING IN FLORIDA (Whitner)................................................................................ rice 50
COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA..................... ......................................................................................................T e 75
COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-the best).................................... .......... ............... ............. ee 1- 9
NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF ST. JOHN'S RIVER..................................r..........Price
McCLELLAN'S NEW DI.EST OF LAWS OF FLORIDA, (8v6 sheep, postage extra)......... ..........Price 600
INDEX TO THE DECI89ONS OF THE SUPREME COtJRT OF FLORIDA.................................................Price 00
NOTEBJROM SUNIAAe.,ON THE MANATEE RIVER, GULF COAST OF SOUTH FLORIDA.
Its Cihate, Soil, a PNrbductlHons, (By Samuel C. Upham)............ ... ... ......... Paper .5
Any of the above books mailed on receipt of price.
LAW BLANKS.
W ARRANTY DEEDS, per dozen .......................................... ................. ..............0 -................. Price 80
QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS, per dozen................................. ................................. .... .... .................. Price 80
MORTGAGES, per dozen.................................. ......................................... .. ...................Price 650
NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, made to order..................................................... ................. ......... .........Prte 00
We publish a full line of Law Blanks for Lawyers and Justices of the Peace. Price-list mailed on application.
Special prices to large buyers. Adddress
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
feb 12-tf q1 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


GREAT INDUCEMENTS IN

ORAi1GE GRbV ES

A chance for small as well as large Capitalists.
I kAM OFFERING FOR SALE some of the finest young
Mran O Grdves in Florida, at prices far below their true
alkfE, y ref4gar tbhe extraordinary offers is that
I wlrh to concentrate my-kttention and means upon my
other property.
First.-I offer nine groves of 20 acres eac known as
part of 4inmyyde a.rk ~oe, one ihile soeth of O-saa.
These groves are fully set with trees, one-half being
sweet seedlings five years old, and the remainder five
ySr-old trees with sweet buds. Trees all growing luxu-
riantly. Price, from $150 to $200 per acre, according to
location and siz of trees.
Second.-l offerr thirty-two (32) lo-part of same tract
and same location-each conning five acres, upon
which no trees are planted. Price 500 per lot, and I to
furnish (without extra charge) to the purchaser of each
lot 250 sour trees containing dormant sweet buds.
These lqnds are desirable for the following considera-
tions:
LocATION.-They are situated one mile south of the
growing town of Ocala, the county site of Marion
County.
QUALITY.-They are of the best quality of marl ham-
aoo r.in|^ .ly-i.ll 4 a a4d, admirably
EAL H po 6 n oe can show a better
record fpr health.
TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES.-The Florida Southern


uVbt r eight. e t 0
SURROUNDINGS.-The lands adjacent are being rapidly
settled by first-class people, including, among others
Generals CHAMBERLAIN and TILLSON, of Maine and
tIr. G. T. MAXWELL late of Atlanta, but hqw of 6cala,
lo haved t .s( 1a4* making
iuablemnp tl. Te 6 .y iVas good as can
be found anywhere, and the religions and educational
advantages are unsurpassed. Besides the public schools
in the vicinity, the Ocala High School a first-class in-
sitE entl near.to be ateded t the chil-
'd oM e'ln-Xa nse lands. "*
Sumoter Co ty G o~vves-
I vmff oiWr he -1floIwrnIg lahdS in Bumter County,
First.-Forty-acre lot (known as Hacienda Grove),
with eighteen acres in grove of oranges and lemons,
having pon the sae a good .Wel ftg h-hte. Of the
trees in this grove, fifty are now bearing and all will be
beating n two years. Uonm this tract s a nursery of
12,0xbudaded trees from four to five years old-one-half
oranges, and the rest in my celebrated lemons, that
took the premium at the Atlanta Exposition and the
Orange County Fair.
.eSoesd.- whthh twelte acres are in orange trees, about two hun-
dred of which are bearing, and the remainder will be
bearing in two years. There is also upon this tract a
nursery of ten thousand five yeariold sour trees budded


with orange and lemon buds.
Third.--Forty acres of unimproved hammbck land.
LOcATION.-The above traUts are.all beautifully situa-
ted on Panasoffkee Run, one mile from Panasoffkee
Lake, in which is known as the "Tropical .0iitre'
where the tenderest tropical plants are never injured by
cold weather. They adjoin the celebrated groves of Lt.
Rev. Bishop John F. Young and A. C. Brown; are qpon
a navigable stream, and nine miles from a depot of the
Tropical Railroad. The lands in the immediate vicinity
are being rapidly settled by the best of eitizens.
PRICES.--Tract No. 1 $15,000; Tract No. 2.$10,000; Tract
No. 8, $5,000-with budded trees sufflient to plant the
whole iorty acres.
QUALITY OF LAND.-The above-mentioned t eta ate
of the best quality of rich marl hammock, high, rqiltui
and well watered, and, in my opinion, better udaptl
than any other lands in the State to thexrowth of Or-
anges, Lemons, Limes and other ttopltal fruits.
For further information, address
A. LE 1,& 4'.L 'PdigKg Agoiri.
to oct 25.] A" MartonCo., Florida.

FOR, SALE.

One hundred thousand Wilson's Albany Sttw-
berry plants, Two Dollars per Thousand.
P. BARRENTIE,
to oct 18-p .Buflko Blhff,


A COOK for small family in thwcountry. High wages
and light work. Address
JAM.S FANKMI .
to Oct 17, 82p.] Yalaha, Fla.


RICH'D H. MARKS'


ORANUBCOURTYLANMIHR
SANFORD, FLORIDA,

Agent in Orange County for

FLORIDA LAND AND IDPROVIMNT OIPTY,

BUYS AND SELIA "

Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Com isio.

ALSO ORANGE TRIBES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATESLOANS, iTC.
June 12-tf


- ~ ----..-~--,----.--.g.-~-


`


I






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


.attention o0Iultry 2enw.
DR. R. BACHMANN'S Vermin Hate; the only relia-
ble antidote to Vermin on Poultry of every description
now extant, viz: Lice on Fowls and Fleas on Dogs; all
other domestic animals are benefitted by its use. This
being an internal remedy to be given mixed with the
food, because all external remedies have been a failure.
It is put up in packages of FIFTY CENTS and ONE DOL-
LAR. Sold at Groceries and Seed Stores. The best of
reference given on application to the proprietor.
R. BACHMANN, M. D.,
Jacksonville, Florida.
Depot with PAINE BROS., 36 Bay Street.
aug. 21 to feb. 21. '83.

A. N. DOBBINS & BRO.,


Gun, Locksmimhs na stencil cutters
24 LAURA STREET,
JACKSON VILLE - FLO-RIDA,
funsmithing done in all its branches.
U IRON SAFE WORK.
Special rates on Stencil Cutting, by mail. Address,
to June 12'83, (1P. 0. Box 833.)

"E. 1 a s ,

Commission Merchant,
AND DEALER IN
Florida Oranges and Lemons,
74 WEST BAY STREET.
N. Y. Depot, MAXFIELD & Co., 67 and 69 Park Place; Mag-
azine and Packing House, Waycross R. R.Wharf.
MANUFACTURER'S AGENT FOR
THE BANGOR BOX MATERIAL, HOOPS, Etc.
Have a large quantity of Manilla Wrapping
Papers, at Lowest Market rates.
Send in your orders for BOX MATERIAL. Can
ship promptly while freights are light. Have great
difficulty in getting it transported during the busy
season. [to March 25 '83


. ff


N

4


U

N

N

U

U
U


to sept


The agent of the "Royal Mail Line to the Nether-
lands," and of the "Florio Italian Line," in Jackson-
ville, offers his services to reliable parties in search oj
competent labor for their
Groves or Gardens,
to try to induce people from
Northern and Southern Europe
to come to Florida.
AiCorrespondence solicited.
C. TI. VANDER LINDEN,
Care Florida Land and Imp't Co.,
sept 4, '82, tf. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


BUY THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

-0--

GOULD & CO.'S


PER TILI Z ER
-AND-


Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange Growers and Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, con-
tains potash, lime, phosphoric acid, ammonia and the other essential elements of Plant Food, making a corn
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & Bro.'s, and other high-priced Fertilizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity, and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $4 per barrel, $32 per
ton.
All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.
MESSRS. GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-I used one-half ton of your Fertilizer, in connection with the same amount of Baker & Bro.'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gave as good results as the others, which are much higher priced fertilizers-costing
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $51.50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12, 1881.
LEESBURG, SUMTER CO., FLA., March 6,1882.
GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed your
agents at this point (Messrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer,
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its fostering care, I having had the honor
to win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer better and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer "kills two birds with one stone," inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies
at one and the same time. I bave been testing it in the field, garden and orange grove for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For my part, I ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. if I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork.
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOURT,
GOULD & CO.,
to oct 27, '82 NO. 6 W. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


GEORGETOWN NURSERIES.
-----0------
ORAN E ANDLEMONTREES Budded from tried and approved varieties, and
ORANGE AND LEMON TREES on good healthy stocks.
Also, JAPAN PERSIMMONS, LECONTE PEARS, GRAPES, and a general line of Fruit Trees suitable to
Florida. Address,
AAo a WoA3p, .Georgeetown, Forida.
to Nov. 6 p.


WHOLESALE GROCERS,

AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


ACER'S DItY HOP YEAST CAKES, 60. PER


DOZ.


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND

SNOW-DROP PATENT FLOUR.

First E3-anLs oz Vinest Qiality

Best Butter In Tubs at 30 to 31 Cents per Pound,


No. 7 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
tf

F. S. CONE, A. H. MANVILLE, E. A. MANVILLE,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer
46 I3T VZ7L:, LXjSE ZTT7MMSE 0aESF
Lake George, Florida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums
Peaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, and over one hundred varieties of the Citrus.
ORANGE A ]ND LEEMON TIREES a specialty.
Catalogue free. to apr 17, '83


SIRWBERYY LANTS FOR SALE.

Several thousand Nunan Variety. Price $4 per 1,000,
packed and shipped in good condition. Money must
accpmpany each order.
Address, MRS. A. A ATTY,
t, Nov. 6. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


LANDS FOR SALE
SUITABLE FOR

In lots to suit, in the town of Satsuma, Putnam County,
Flora. Send for circular to
WHITNEY, GOLD. & HODGES,
Satsuma, Nashua P. O.,
June 2 f FLORIDA.


-- ~ --


-


?Irr ----i- ~c~-- -- - .J
- cr -







THki FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Smoking-"the Boss" Durham /s
and Y4s.... ............................
"The Boss' Durham 1 ib pkge.........
"Sitting Bull" D. (genuine) Ys........
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) 1s4...... .....
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) s............
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) 1ib pkge..
Plug-"Shell Road" 4 plugs to lb., 30
lb boxes.......... ......................
"Florida Boys" 5 plugs to lb., 30 lb
boxes...............................................
"Florida Girls"-Bright twist, 14 to
lb., 17 lb boxes.............. .........
Cigars-"Long Branch"a very pop-
ular brand, per thousand.........
"Our X," choice cigar, easy smok'r
"Our XX" a very choice smoker....
"Florida Boys," (we are State Agt,)
These are all fresh goods and will compare favora-
bly in price and quality with any goods.
SOAP AND STARCH-Colgate's 8 oz., per box..
Peerless, 8 oz., per box............................
Starch, lump, per lb...... ................
HOPS, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS-
H ops, per lb........... ............................... 1
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz..........
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
doz. 1 lb........ ... ........... ......
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. 1 lb.
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. / lt.....
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. l bt......
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl., new..................... 3 5(
CHICKENS, each................................................
EGGS- Per doz.....................................................
HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lb., first class
Country Dry Salted, per lb..................
Butcher Dry Salted, per lb...................
Damaged Hides.....................................
Kip and Calf, 81bs. and under................
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lbt.....................
Deer Skins Salted, per lbt..................
FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter........................................................ 1 5(
Raccoon, each.......................................
Wild Cat, each..... .....................
Fox, each............ ...............................
BEESWAX-per lbf.....................................
WOOL-Free from burs, per lbt......................
Burry, per lb................................
GOAT SKINS-Each per lb.........................


32
30
50
75
49
45
55
36
50
27 00
24 00
26 00
35 00

350
3 50
6Yc
5@22c
60c
225
225
2 70
1 50

)@3 75
20@40
18@20
13
9@11
9@10
6
10
35
26@30
)@4 00
5@15
10@20
5@15
20
17@22
11@15
10


PLANTS
STRAWBERRYFR SALE.
- THE OLD RELIABLE WILSON,-
$ per 1000, delivered on steamboat or rail-
2 road office in city. Address,
MARY L. SHANE,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Residence two miles north of Panama (Sawdust)
Road. It


XIF YOtD WA T
An Orange Grove or Orange Lands, in a healthy, beauti-
ful country,
Entirely Free froxn Frost,

where you have the finest

FISHING,
OYSTERS,
SHRIMP,
CRAB,
GAME

of all descriptions, and the best chance to raise early
vegetables, in a new country. Address me with stamp,
at Anclote, Hillsborough County, Florida.
I can sell you five acres, or five thousand acres, as you
desire.
to aug 20, '83 M. EL. &M&ALIS.


.


TREE


enwwi .
Jacksonville WIholesale Prices.
Corrected weekly, by JONES & BO WEN, Wholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.
SUGARS-Granulated .......................... ............ 1012
W hite Ex. C........................................ 9
G olden C ............................................ 8 .
Pow dered............................................. 113
Cut L oaf............................................1..1
COFFEE, I io- Fair............................................. 10
G ood ............................................. 10Y
C choice .......................................... 11
B est ............................................ 12
Java O G ......................... ................... 25
M ocha ................................................. 35
Peaberry............................................... 18
M aracaibo............. ........................... 18
Any of above grades roasted to order
FLOUR-Snow Drop, best.............................. 8 00
Oreole, 2d best....................................... 7 50
Pearl, 3d best..... .......... ......... 7 00
Orange Co., No. 1.............................. 6 50
M EATS- Bacon..................................................... 16
Hams (Merwin & Sons)..... ............ 18
Shoulders............................................ 14
HoMINY-Pearl, per bbl................................ 5 50
MHt -rjt v V9.l) .. ,, ,. ............... .......... .... 5 50
CHEESE- Full cream .......................................... 14
H alf cream ............................ ............ 12Y2
TOBACCO-We have made arrangements direct with
the manufacturers and offer you to-day as fol-
lows:


Manufacturers of the Celebrated

"EBrsdle3-y's "lE'hos-lph te,"
the Standard Fertilizer for all Field and Garden Crops, and especially adapted to the wants of the
Cotton Crop.
MAIN OFFICE, 97 KILBY STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.
For further particulars and pamphlets giving testimonials from some of the best orange growers in the
State, address,


to oct 9, '83.


A. ME. BECIK, General Agent for Florida,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


~KIGEY d BRETIL


Wholesale Dealers in



Foreign and Domestic Fruits.


COMMISSION MERCHANTS FOR THE SALE OF


Florida Oranges and Lemonns,


167 South Water St.,


CHICAGO, ILL.


------ -----

-CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED
AREFERENCES.-First National Bank, Jacksonville, Florida. Union National Bank, Chicago, Illinois.
sept 4, tf.


FRANK W. MUMBY.


JNO. N. C. STOCKTON.


* RAYMOND D. KNIGHT.


MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,


1879.
F. W. MUMBY & CO.


-- SUCCESSORS TO.--

IMPORTERS AND WHI(LESALE AND RETAIL


1870.
JNO. S. DRIGGS & CO.


Crockery, China, Glass and Earthenware.

We have the largest and most complete stock in the State. All the Latest Novelties in Majolica and Fancy
Goods, Vases, Motto Cups and Saucers, etc. Decorated Tea, Dinner and Chamber Sets in a large Variety. Lamps
and Chandeliers, Fancy Vase Lamps in Majolica Faience, Kito, Porcelain ana other Wares. Wood and Willow,
Stone and Tinware. The American, Crown and Peerless Ice Cream Freezers, Water Coolers, Filters, etc.
SOLE STATE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED

Monitor Oil Stoves and Little Joker Oil Cans.
THE BEST IN THE WORLD. Send for Price Lists.
The best and only absolutely safe Oil Stove in the World. It is Economical, Ornamental, Convenient, Dura-
ble, Compact and Cheap. Its fuel is Coal Oil. No Dust! No Ashes! No Smoke! No Trouble! Testimonials
from those using the Stoves given ort application.
Fruit Jars and Jelly Tumblers, Wine Bottles, Flasks, etc. Special inducements to the trade.
Merchants, Hotels, Boarding Houses and Bars will find it greatly to their advantage to give us a trial. Send
for list of assorted packages.
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD.
MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
13 WEST IBAV STREET. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to July 5, '83. (Mention this paper)


4:5e


BRADLEY'S ORANGE
We have prepared this Fertilizer
especially for the culture of the or-
ange tree, and from the results al-
ready obtained from its use on the
orange groves of Florida, we feel
justified in claiming that it cannot
be surpassed, if equalled, by any
other fertilizer.
It is composed of the purest and
highest grade materials, combined
in such proportions as to furnish all
the elements of plant-food in prop-
er quantities and in the best form
to promote a rapid and strong
growth of the wood and insure an
abundant yield of line fruit.
A sutlicient proportion of its -
phosphoric acid, being readily sol-
uble in cold water, is immediately
available as food for the young
rootlets of the tree, while a consid-
erable portion, being-present in the
form of pure ground bone, undis-
solved by acid, becomes entirely
soluble in the soil only by the ac-
tion of the elements of nature in
due course of time. Thus this all
the ground by h avy rtinr,', ue-i
supplied in abundant quantities


1


I


FERTILIZER.
throughout the season.
The nitrogesi and potash also are
furnished in the most nutritious
forms and approved proportions
for this crop.
After giving this Fertilizer a
thorough trial of three years on or-
i..ige trees in Florida, we intro-
duced it last season quite exten-
sively throughout the State, and
the results have even exceeded our
most sanguine expectations. We
have yet to hear of a single instance
where the most satisfactory returns
have not been derived.
We have nothing to say about the
fertilizers manufactured or sold by
other parties, as we believe, with an
established reputation of twenty-
two years in the manufacture of
high grade fertilizers, we can stand
upon our own footing, without call-
ing the attention of the public to
the record of any of our competi-
tors, or to the value of their manu-
factures as compared with that of
our own. Our fertilizers are all an-
alyzed, when manufactured, by
knowil to"vexup to vue (hinncma'n re


I


--





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. B


f


THROUGH TARIFF ON ORANGES ONLY,

VIA THE FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE, ALL-RAIL VIA ATLANTA OR MONTGOMERY,

I31"T 7E"PFIT"ECT OCrOBE1il st, 1882.


FROMN A 0 FROM o' 2 | IN CONNECTION WITH STEAMSHIPS OF M. & M. T. CO.
JACKSONVILLE AND t ^ JACKSONVILLE AND PP ^ AA
CALLAHAN JUNCTION CALLAHAN JUNCTION FROM SAVANNAH VIA BALTIMORE.
TO From
Macon .................................... 35!$ 70 $61 25 Madison, Ind.................... 751 501125 00 From Landings From From From
Augusta................................ 401 801 70 00 Jeffersonville, Ind............. 75 1 501125 00 Jackson- on Florida Tampa J., P. & M.
Atlanta...................................40 801 70 00 Evansville, Ind...................... 7 1 50 125 00 v le. St. Johns Transit and R. R.
Columbus, Ga ..................... 40 8070 00 Cairo, Ill.......... .....75 50125 00 River. R. R. Manatee.
Montgomery, Ala.................. 40 80 70 00 Indianapolis ........................... 80 1 60 130 00 TO . ------
M obile......................................501 00 87 501 Terre H aute............................. 80 1 60 130 00
Chattanooga, Tenn................ 501 00i 87 50 1Columbus, Ohio..................... 801l 60 130 00 S
New Orleans...........................6 12010500 St.Louis... ....... .. 851 70140 00 o iot
Nashville, Tenn ....... .......... 60 1 201105 00, Chicago.....................................85!1 70 140 00 0 i P_ "- p
Memphis, Tenn....................... 60 1 20 105 00 Peoria, Ill................................ 85 1 70 140 0055 3 9- 41 0 70- 1
Louisville, Ky......................... 70 1 40 115 00 Cleveland ................................. 901 80 150 00 Boston ...... ..................... 55 1 10 65 $1 30 70 1 30 95 1 60 70 1 35
Cincinnati, Ohio... ........... 7011 40115 00 Toledo...................................... 901 80 150 00 Providence ......................... 55 1 10 65 1 30 70 1 30 95 1 60 70 1 35
H enderson, Ky.................... 70 1 40 115 00 Detroit ..................................... 1 80 15000 W ashington............................... 100 70 1 201 80 1 20 1 0 1 50 65 125
Columbus, Ky..................... 70 1 40 115 00 Miwaukee ....................... ...... 901 80 150 00
Hickman, Ky.......................... 70 1 40 115 00M aI Steamship connection from Savannah for New York every Tuesday and Friday.
^For Boston every Thursday. For Philadelphia every Saturday. For Baltimore
The dimensions of the Standard Box for areand e Tuesday and Friday.
weight is estimated at 80 pouStands.ard Box for ranges are 10x12x27 inches, and the To make through rates from points tributary to the above, add the rates for
The Stanrdard Barrel is double the capacity of the Standard Box. transportation lNew connecting to above rates.
Excess cpacityover eboe i be iable to proraexss charges. Shipments via New York will be charged at the current rates from that point,
The Car-load is estimated at 20,000 pounds, or 250 Standard Boxes. Excess of this wI
amount will be charged for pro rata. Car-load shipments must be to one destn Single packageswill be charged $1 each to Boston, New York, Philadelphia and
oti(n wland to one charged shipments must be to one destin- Baltimore. If shipped beyond, they will be charged in addition the single package
tion and to one consignee.
Prepayment of freight will not be required, but good order and condition of rates of connectingtines and cost of transfer.
shipetilutencils, shipping receipts and inforation furnished on application to any of
shipments will be an absolute requirement. It is clearly understood between the the agents of the Line.
shippers and the transportation companies that no responsibility shall attach for I agents of the Line.
loss or damage, however occasioned, unless it be from negligence, and that such loss
must attach solely to the company upon whose line such negligence may be located.
The above points are the only points to which rates are guaranteed, and to AILL LRAIL
which Bills Lading will be issued. The Bills Lading will be issued only by the -
Agents of this Company at Jacksonville and Callahan Junction, guaranteeing rates osavannaI lorida a estr ailwmpawa
from those points only.
The charges advanced by this Line in good faith to connections at those points FORMING WITH ITS CONNECTIONS THE ONLY FAST MAIL PASSENGER
will not be subject to correction by this Line. ROUTE AND THROUGH FREIGHT DISPATCH LINE TO AND FROM
Unlessotherwise instructed by the shippers, the original Bill Ladin will be FLORIDA AND SOUTERN AND SOUTtWESTERN GEORGIA.
mailed the consigee at destination, and all claims for overcharge or loss and damage
must be presented at destination, accompanied by the original Bill Lading.
Shipments of single packages charged double rates.
In every case the full name and address of consignee must be given for insertion FREIGHT DEPARTMENT.
in Bill Lading and on the Way-bill. ....... | .


PRO1 TO SAVANNAH. TO CHARLESTON.
FROM -- --
____ __ Per Box. Per Bbl. Per Box. Per Bbl.
Jacksonville..... ............ ... 25 $ 50 35 $ 60
Landings on St. Johns River............ 35 70 40 75
Stations on Florida Transit R. R .......... 45 75 i 50 80
Tampa and Manatee........................... 70 1 05 i 75 1 10
Stations on the J. P. & M. R. R ........... 40 75 I 56 85

In Connection with Steamships direct from Savannah.
From
From Land'ngs From From From
Jackson-[ on Florida Tampa J., P. & M.
ville. St. Johns Transit and R R.
TO____ River. R. R. Manatee.

-_ _-_-________ -- ------ _

Boston via New York......... 73 $1 45 83 1 65 88 $1 65)$1 13 $1 15 88 $1 65
New York ................................ 50 1 00. 60 1 20 65 1 20 t 90 1 01 65 1 25
Philadelphia........................... 50 1 00 60 1 20 65 1 201 90 1 50 65 1 25
Baltimore..................... ......... 50 1 00 60 120 65 1 20 90 1 5 65 125
Providence via New York........ 65 1 30 75 150i 82 1 59 1 07 1, 0 80 1 55


i LUovementlib ti r eignu in inruugil arst, buereby A. v IJIN Tu -x -IIK 1- pO
TRANSFER to and from all points on the Florida Central and Western Railroad,
Florida Transit Railroad, St. Augustine, and all landings on the St. Johns and
Ocklawaha Rivers, Chattahoochee, Flint and Apalachicola Rivers, and Havana,
Key West, Tampa and Manatee.

Fruit and Vegetable Shipments Through in Ventilated Cars
NO DELAYS. PROMPT ADJUSTMENT OF CLAIMS.
Between Jacksonville and Savannah daily. TRANSFER TO SHIPS' SIDE
AT SAVANNAH WITHOUT BREAKING BULK.
Rates always as LOW AS BY ANY OTHER LINE. Take out Bills Lading via
Savannah, Florida and WVestern Railway to insure ADVANTAGES OF THE ALL-
RAIL ROUTE.
Days of sailing subject to change without previous notice. For further informa-
tion, if needed, apply to
GEO. YONGE, Agent Central Railroad Steamships, 409 Broadway, New York.
Gen. W. L. JAMES, Agent, 25 South Third St., Philadelphia. A. L. HUGGINS,
Agent Merchants' and Miners' Line, Baltimore. WM. H. RING, Agent Boston and
Savannah Steamship Line, 18- Wharf, Boston. 0. G. PEARSON, Agent S., F. &
W. Railway, 219 Washington St., Boston. C. D. OWENS, General Agent S., F. & W.
Railway, 315 Broadway, New York. J. B. ANDREWS, Agent S., F. & W. Railway,
43 German St., Baltimore. J. M. CLEMENT, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, Pier 41
South Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, or to either of the undersigned..
W. 0. AMES, General Freight Agent, Tallahassee.
F. B. PAPY, General Freight Agent, Fernandina, Fla.
JAS. L. TAYLOR, General Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.
D. H. ELLIOTT, General Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent S., F. f W. Railway, Jacksonville, Fla.


_ 3_____





8 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


COLONEY, TALBOTT & CO.,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Have lands in every county in the Orange Belt, at from
$3 to $100 per acre. Orange groves from $1000 to $100,000.
Government lands in every part of the Orange Belt.
Can guarantee all of our property.
Strawberry Plants.
We have 200,000 best varieties for sale low.
Orange Trees.
We have 300,000 trees, all ages, for sale, at from 10 cents
to $2 per tree, as to age.
COLONEY, TALBOTT & CO.
Sep. 18, tf.



If you have any Books, Magazines, Pamphlets, etc.,
that you want bound, you cannot do better than send
them to the undersigned. They do all kinds of work in
the best style and at Northern prices.
Quotations furnished when desired. Address
ASHIMEAD BROS.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

o S.ALE.
Hickory Bluff, 46 acres, 18 acres Hammock, cleared and
enclosed with Picket fence. 200 thrifty young Orange
trees growing on the place. Bold bluff river front of over
a quarter of a mile, and steamer channel close in shore,
and over five miles of water protection to the northwest giv-
ing perfect security against frost. Nine miles below Jack-
sonville, and one mile from New Berlin. Can come to
city every morning on mail steamer and return in the
afternoon. A choice place for orange growing and truck
farming. Price, $2,500.
Also, two desirable city lots 53x209 feet, and one 70x156
feet covered with thrifty orange trees 6 years old, half
mile from business center. Good neighborhood (all
white). Price of first, $600 each. Price ofsecond, a corner,
very handsome, $800. Apply to
J. H. INORITOIN,
No. 1 West Bay Street, JACKSONVILLE.
State that you saw this in THE DISPATCH.
July 3, tf
n S VI RPlt RBUT OUR ENGINE IS
COTTON isKINKINGoffCOTTON
invaluable patented improvements found no other
EfGJNlS int the world. For Pamphlets and Price
List (also for SAW MILLS) address
THE AULTMAN & TAYLOR 00.. Mansfield. Ohio.
(to Oct 6, '82)

THE SUWANNEE


STAM SAW & PLAIN MILLS,
TELLAVILLTE, FTALORID A,


DREW & BUCKI, -


Proprietors.


o-
We respectfully announce to our friends and the pub-
lic generally, that, having secured the services of com-
petent Draughtsmen, Architects and Mechanics, we are
prepared to estimate on and contract for the building of

DWELLINGS,
COTTAGES,
FACTORIES,
HOTELS
PUBLIC EDIFICES,
etc., at any point accessible by the several railroad and
steamboat lines. Possessing the advantage of manufac-
turing our own lumber, we are enabled to offer very lib-
eral inducements as to terms and quality of material.
Draughts, plans, estimates and information furnished
on application.
We have also made extensive additions to our Plan-
ing Mill, and will continue, as heretofore, to manufacu-
ture and keep in stock a full line of Framing and Finish-
ing Lumber, Mouldings, Brackets, Balusters, Pickets,
Laths, etc.
DREJVW & BUCIKI,


July 17, '82-tf.


Ellaville, Florida.


(True to name.)
CRESCENT SEEDLING per M...................$5.00
N U N AN 'S............................................... 4.00
Address CAPT. WM. JAMES,
to Oct. 26 '82. Jacksonville, Fla.


-Real Estate


Agents,


GOLD AND METAL LEAF, OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
BRONZE, COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE, Y E A R.


Sand and Enmery Papers, &c.
AGENT FOR
PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIIE TEST.
John8on's Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, Martinez and Longman's
'Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
to mar25,'83 JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

aOs S A.-, E.
Fine Nunan Strawberry Plants. The best known
variety for shipment.
100 Plants........................................................... .75
500 Plants........................................................ 2.00
1000 Plants........................................................ 3.00
Terms cash delivered at Express Office or Railroad,
Charleston. Address,
JAlMES PRICE,
112 Broad Street,
to Oct. 7-P. CHARLESTON, S. C.
ELLIS & McCLURE,


Archlitcts d Civll ED iuurs,

Plans, Specifications and Estimates for Buildings of
all kinds. Water Supply, Drainage, Sewerage, Bridges'
Roofs, Etc. P. 0. Box 784. Room No. 12 Palmetto Block,
Bay Street. to Feb. 7, 83

RUBBER STAMPS
Are manufactured right in our establishment in the
best manner and at the shortest notice.
j9#Send in your orders.


May 1-tf


ASHMEAD BROS.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


DBti to Whiltowm s.
MAXWELL'S PREPARED GYPSUM, for Whiteing
and Coloring Stores, Factories, Mills, Dwellings,
Churches, Barns, or for any purpose where whitewash
or calsomine is used; is easily applied; keeps clean
longer than lime ; will not crack, peel or rub off; does
better work than lime; its sanitary qualities are excel-
lent. Packed in barrels, half-barrels and kegs. Send
for circulars. -1azlett & Foster,
sept 11 tf 132 W. Pratt-st., Baltimore.


to April 23, '83


StawboITy Plaits For s !
200,000 Choice pure Beatty's stock........$4.00 per Thousand
100,000 Pure Nunan's......... ............ 6.00 per Thousand
50,000 Pure Crescent Seedlings............ 6.00 per Thousand
Terms : Cash with order.
Address. E. SCUIlL,
to nov 3, '82. Jacksonville, Florida.





Garden mneld, and Plower
ARRANTED .,SEEM and Everythin
r the Farm and Garden. Illustrate Cat
loue ntfree. JOHNSON & STOKES,
Seed and Agricultural Warehouse,
No. 1114 Market Street, Philadelphia
(to Jan 9, '83)
O LKEENE,

MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,

Laces, Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF

HIED GXLOVS.
67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to feb 20, '83

S. B. HUBBARD & CO.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in

Hgirwarv 8tovos, Doors,Sas, Blinds
PAINTS, OILS, PUMPS, LEAD AND IRON PIPE.
Sugar Mills, Rubber and Leather Belting,
Steam Gas-Fitting, Plumbing Tinsmithing,
Agricultural Implements of all Kinds,
HAZARD'S POWDER,
BARBED FENCE WIRE.
AGENTS FOR S. L. ALLEN & CO.'S GARDEN TOOLS.
Aa- Send for Price List and Catalogue, "t
to june 11 '83


D. G. AMBLER. .T. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as

AMBLER'S BANK.
rTRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
T Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf

AT MANDARIN, FLORIDA.
20 FORTY-ACRE TRACTS only 12 miles from Jaclk-
sonville; extra good land, well located, between river
and J., St. A. and H. R. R. R. Price, $10 per acre. Will
sell on monthly payments of $12.50. These lands will in-
crease in value, being located in an already prosperous
town, making a paying investment at small outlay.
Maps can be seen at No. 41 East Bay Street.
to nov 21, '82. GEO. R. REYNOLDS.
Jacksonville, Fla.


DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHESy
GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.


W. I. PILLOW'S

STRABERRY PPINOG AWENtY
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE
REPACKING AND
COMMISSION HOUSE,
Has closed till NOVEMBER. Present address,
may 12, '83.. R I1hester, TN. Y.

VIEWS OF FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In Book Forxm, Containing 1
Views Each.
Souvenir of Florida., (small size)..............%.... 25c.
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size)..................................................... 25c.
Souvenir of Jacksonville,( large size)...............50c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine,(large size)...............50c.
Stereoscopic Views, per Doz. $1.50.
Address
ASHMEAD SROT.HERS,
J AC K ONVILLE, FLA.

ST. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILL',LO RIDA.
-0--
CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.






TIE FLORIDA DISPATCH E


Merchants' Line,



CARRYING THE U. S. MAIL.




ELEGANT SIDE-WHEEL STEAMERS.



FREDERICK DE BARY, Capt. Leo. Vogel.
H. B. PLANT, Capt. J. W. Fitzgerald.
ANITA, Capt. C. H. Brock.
One of the above-named steamers will leave De Bary
Wharf, foot of Laura Street, daily except Sunday, at 3
p. m., for PALATKA, SANFORD, ENTERPRISE, and
all intermediate landings.
ROSA, Capt. J. L. Amazeen.
GEO. M. BIRD, Capt. G. J. Mercier.
Steamer ROSA leaves De Bary Wharf every Sunday
at 1 p. m., and every Wednesday at 5 p. m. for above-
named landings.
Steamer GEO. M. BIRD leaves De Bary Wharf every
Tuesday and Friday at 5 p. m. for same landings.
Connects at Palatka with Florida Southern Railroad
for Gainesville and Ocala.
Connects at Astor with St. John's and Lake Eustis
Railroad for Ft. Mason, Yalaha, Leesburg and all points
on the Upper Ocklawaha.
Connects at Volusia with coaches for Ormond and
Daytona.
Connects at Sanford with South Florida Railroad for
Longwood, Maitland, Apopka City, Altemonte, Orlando,
Kissimmee, and with steamers for Lake Jessup, Salt
Lake and Rock Ledge and Indian River.
Connects at Enterprise with coaches for Daytona and
New Smyrna.
Rqturnlng Mail Steamers leave Enterprise every
morning at 7'a. m. and Sanford on arrival of train.
Steamer Geo. MS. Bird will leave Enterprise every
Thursday and Sunday at 5 a. m.
Steamer Rosa leaves Enterprise exery Friday at 5 p. m.
AThrough bills of lading given to all points.
The steamers of this line are all first-class in every
respect.
For further information, apply at General Ticket
Office, corner Bay and Laura Streets, Leve & Alden,
corner Bay and Ocean Streets, or on board.
W. B. WATSON, Manager.
C. B. FENWICK, Gen. Pass. Agent. Aug. 7-tf.


BALTIMORE -EXPRESS
-o-
MERCHANTS & MINERS


TRANSPORTATION COMPANY!







The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail
From BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH
EVERY FIVE DAYS,
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE, as follows:
Friday, September 15th at 8:30 a. m.
Tuesday, September 19th, at 11 a. m.
Friday, September 22d, at 2 p. m.
Tuesday, September 26th, at 4 p. m.
Friday, September 29th, at 9 a. m.
Tuesday October 3d, at 11 a. m.
Friday, October 6th, at 2 p. m.
Tuesday October 10th, at 4 p. m.
Friday, October 13th, at 8 a. m.
Tuesday, October 17th, at 10 a. m.
Friday, October 20th, at I p. m.
Tuesday, October 24, at 4 p. m.
Friday, October 27th, at 8 a. m.
Tuesday, October 31, at 12 inm.
The steamers are first-class in every respect, and every
attention will be given to passengers.
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $159,
Including Meals and Stateroom.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Baltimore.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
column.
JAS. B. WEST & CO., Agents.
30-t


"tora W a Pim Rnt Homo."
A 32-PAGE PAMPHLET. PRICE, 10C.
Address,
TELFAIR STOCKTON,
to oct 23. Jacksonville, Fla.


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
--0--
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
-0-
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers for September are appointed to sail as follows:
CITY OF SAVANNAH, September 2d, at 10:00 a. m.
JUNIATA September 9th, at 4:00 p. m.
RAPIDAN, September 16th, at 8:00 a. m.
JUNIATA, September 23d, at 2:00 p. m.
RAPIDAN, September 30th, at 8:00 a. m.
AGPThe Rapidan does not not carry passengers.
Days and hours subject to change, without notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, WM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13S., Thil St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.


Ocean Steamship Company.


SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.





SAVANNAH, October, 1882.
The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Tuesday, October 3d, 11:30 a. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Friday, October 6th, 2:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON Tuesday, October 10th, 5:30 p. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Friday, October 13th, 7:00 a. m.
TALLAHASSEE, Sunday, October 15th, 8:00 a. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Tuesday, October 17th, 10:00 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Friday, October 20th, 12:30 p. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Sunday, October 22d, 2:30 p. m.
TALLAHASSEE, Tuesday, October 24th, 4:30 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Friday, October 27th, 7:00 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Sunday, October 29th, 8:30 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Tuesday, October 31st, 10:00 a. m.
TALLAHASSEE, Friday, November 3d, 12:30 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Sunday, November 5th, 2:00 p. nim.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
H. YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agentof Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS,
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. Y.


Fast Mail.
Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at................ 9:00 a. m.
Arrive Jacksonville at............... 6:15 p. m.
Leave Callahan at........................ 9:45 a. m.
Arrive Waycross at......................11:45 a. m.
Arrive Jesup at............................ 1:32 p. m.
Arrive at Brunswick at............... 5:25 a. m.
Arrive Savannah at................. 3::5 p. m.
Arrive Charleston at..................... 9:10 p. m.
Arrive at Augusta at................ 5:20 a. m.
A rrive M acon at.........................................
Arrive Atlanta at................................
Arrive Louisville at.......................I.........
Arrive Cincinnati at................................
Arrive Washington at.......... 9:30 p. m.
Arrive Baltimore at.......... 12:25 p. m.
Arrive New York P. R. R............ 6:45 a. m.
Arrive St. Louis at...... ....................
Arrive Chicago at........................................
TIME.
To Savannah ..................................................
To New York................................................
To W ashington. .............................................
To Chicagou ....................................................
To St. Louis....................................................


Jack'lle Ex.
Daily.
6:10 p. m.
7:30 a. m.
7:05 p. m.
9:20 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
2:30 a. m.
8:45 a. m.
1:30 p. m.
7:00 a. m.
12:50 p. m.
7:30 a. m.
7:00 a. m.
7:40 a. m.
9:30 a. m.
3:50 p. m.
7:00 p m.
7:00 p. m,

6:40 hours.
45:45 hours.
36:30 hours.
49:00 hours.
49:00 hours


THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
&..Jacksonville to Cincinnati.
*..Jacksonville to Charleston, connecting with
through Pullman Cars for Washington.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
Passengers going to the West and Northwest take the
evening train.
The Dining Car attached to the train between Savan-
nah and Charleston affords supper to passengers going
North and breakfast to those coming South.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. mn. and arriving at Savannah at 2:35 a. m., or train
at Jacksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vannah at 3:40 p. m.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam.
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Bleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, and at Depot
Ticket Office. JAS. L. TAYLOR,
Gen'l Freight and Pass. Ag't.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*]


I3F "rO WAjT

An Orange Grove or Orange Lands, in a healthy, beauti-
ful country,

Entirely Free fr-om Frost,

where you have the finest

FISHING,
OYSTERS,
SHRIMP,
CRAB,
GAME

of all descriptions, and the best chance to raise early
vegetables, in a new country. Address me with stamp,
at Anclote, Hillsborough County, Florida.
I can sell you five acres, or five thousand acres, as you
desire.
to aug 20, '83 M.. U.. MARKH ;.


.Ahra


' -, ----


Boston a Rld m l\ ItOM shil Cos







ONLY DIRECT LINE.
Transhipment and extra handling avoided. Cars
unloaded at wharf in Savannah. First-class passenger ao-
commodations.
The magnificent new Iron Steamships sail from Bos-
ton every 2 hursday at 3 o'clock, and from Savannah as
follows:
Gate City, Thursday, September 28th, at 7:30 a. m.
City of Columbus, Thursday, October 5th, at 2:00 p. m.
Gate City, Thursday, October 12th, at 7:00 a. m.
City of Columbus, Thursday, October 19th, at 12 m.
Gate City, Thursday, October 26th, at 6:00 p. m.
City of Columbus, Thursday, November 2d, at 12:30 p. m.
FIRST-CLASS CABIN PASSAGE SAME AS TO NEW
YORK.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
F. W. NICKERSON & CO., Savannah, Ga.
General Agents, Boston. 44-tf

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA


A


WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.

ON AND AFTER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7th, 1882, Pas-
senger Trains will run over the Waycross Short Line
as follows:


AWN





O THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


JA.MES' IJM( OVE(
Plant Extractor.
SAVE TIME AND PLANTS.
Address, W. JAMES, Jacksonville, Fla.
For Sale at S. B. HUBBARD & CO'S,
JAOKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
PRICE 60c.;-BY MAIL 75c.
to nov 1-'82.
REMOVED.
I have removed my seed store to No. 22 East Bay st.,
next door to post-office, where I have the largest and
most complete stock of pure and fresh Seeds in the State.
S. L. TIBBITTS,
to Dec. 3, '82 Jacksonville, Fla.

lOiMES IN T LEIINNY SOUTH.

SPLENDID OFFER TO SETTLERS.


108 Miles


SOUTH GEORGIA LANDS FOR SALE
-BY-
J. M1. STIGER,
Glenmore, Ware Co., Ga.
tojan 9, '83.

RICH'D H. MARKS'
OIANE UOINTY LANDl AlGENY,
SANFORD, FLORIDA,
Agent in Orange County for
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMP'Y,
BUYS AND SELLS
Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission.
ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
june 12-tf
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT,


FRUIT AND


PROPiUCE ,


COMMISSION MERCHANT
Soatliern. iFrit anid. Vegetables a Speciltry.


S.


30-0 and 382 North Delawvare Avenue, Philadelphia.
to jan 6, '83

DISSTON PURCHASE---4,O000,00 ACRES!

THE FLORIDA

LAND AND IMPROVEMENT
COMPANY

Offer from October 1, 1882, till May 1, 1883,
ALL THEIR LANDS


At


Government


Price of


$1.25


per


Acre


IN BLOCKS OF NOT LESS THAN 80 NOR MORE THAN 640 ACRES.
These lands include all varieties of upland and lowland, and are adapted to Oranges, Lemons, Limes, Pine-
Apples, Bananas, Sugar-Cane, Early Vegetables, etc., and-are chiefly in the counties of
St.Johns, Volusia, Brevard, Orange, Sumter, Levy, Hernando, Hillsborough,
Polk, Manatee and Monroe.
The following are reserved and for sale at graded prices:
"Gulf Coast Rierve," 288,000 acres, M. R. MARKS, Agent, Anclote, Fla. .
"Timber Reserve," 100,000 acres, comprising choice tracts of Pine and Cypress, chiefly in St. Johns and
Volusia Counties. Address _. _t--- --- _.. .


to mar 24 '83


FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT C
JacksonvHle, Fla.


SCHOOL BOOKS,
-AND-
SCHOOL SUPPLIES.

THE LARGEST STOCK IN THE STATE.
W0Lg--I ES6 T'I:E -.::rTI l:SET.A.L-.
CATALOGUE MAILED FREE ON APPLICATION.
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ORANGE WRAPS,


10x10
14 c. pr rm.


se


[Full count-480 sheets to the ream.]
11x11i
17 c.prrm.
17 c. pr rm.


12x12
19 c. pr rm.


Special Prices to Large Buyers.
Remit by check, money-order or registered letter, and in ordering, give shipping directions.
Ashmead Brothers,
pt 11 tf JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


j


A


STRAWBERB Y PLANTS FOR SALE.
Crescent Seedling.
These plants are very thrifty and perfectly hardy,
even in the climate and soil of Florida, a merit
which will be duly appreciated by growers the pres-
ent season.
Exceedingly productive, berries always large and
of good quality and fine appearance. Its firmness
and shipping qualities are beyond question.
In ripening it is the earliest of the early, three
weeks in advance of the Nunan or Wilson.
It is undoubtedly the plant needed for the success-
ful growing of strawberries in Florida.
Price $5 per 1,000. Special rates on orders over
5,000.
Pot-grown plants for garden cultivation per dozen
50 cents, 100 $2, 1,000 $15. Orders for these should
be sent two weeks in advance of shipment.
All orders must be accompanied by the cash to re-
ceive attention. P. E. JOHNSON & SON,
to nov8 Jacksonville, Fla.


i


CHOICE CABBAGE SEED!
CHOICE BERMUDA ONION SEED !T
ALSO
General Stock of Select Seeds for Gardeners.
The Cabbage Seed Crop of '"82 is almost a Comnplete
failure 3>Tortho but I have secured a fexw pounds
each, of such select -varieties aS are a success i=n our
climate. I h-a-ve a stool of Cabbage Pertilizers,
MBone lV.eal, Cotton Seed V.Eeal, Bto.

to Jan 6, '83 Jaclksonville, Fla.
ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]
J. A. BAR N ES & O0.,


40 Hours from New York City;
from Savannah.


J-