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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00028
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: October 2, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00028
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

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eoted to the gricultural, tanufacturin g andJndutstrial Interests of Florida and the South.

Vol. 1.--No. 28. New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla. Price 5 cents.


Monday, October 2, 1882.


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.


Okeechobee Drainage Scheme I-I. Coryell
its Originator.
We take great pleasure in copying from the
Savannah News, of the 20th, an extract from
its Tallahassee correspondent, "Leon," in which
he very highly compliments our former citizen,
Mr. I. Coryell.
The facts stated therein are beyond a ques-
tion correct, and Col. I. Coryell is entitled to all
the credit "Leon" gives him. He undoubtedly
was the originator of the drainage scheme and
was also greatly instrumental in influencing
Hamilton Disston in his big land purchase.
That section of country lying west of Indian River
had never been thoroughly explored, but from the
imperfect data of each survey, it was believed by
some that not only would the Everglades, but Lake
Okeechobee itself would be drained. One company
had been formed with this view, but failed to do any-
thing for lack of capital. At last, in the winter of
1880-1, Colonel I. Coryell went before the trustees of
the internal improvement fund and contracted in the
name of the company he represented to drain the
levees in the region of the great Lake Okeechobee.
As an earnest that the company that Col. Coryell
represented meant business, I am told that $5,000 were
deposited, to be forfeited if the work was not com-
menced within a time limited in the agreement. Soon
after and during the meeting of the Legislature, this
party of capitalists were incorporated as a company
under the name of the Atlantic and Gulf Coast Ca-
nal and Okeechobee Land Company, with a capital
stock of ten millions. Among the corporators were
Hamilton Disston, and Colonel I. Coryell. Opera-
tions for the dredging of the Caloosahatchie, the nat-
ural outlet of Okeechobee, were at once commenced
under the direction of Colonel Coryell. The favora-
ble report of the engineers, and the promptness with
which the new company commenced their work, to-
gether with the capital which it was known to com-
mand, excited general interest-in other words, it was
a big advertisement for Florida.
The scheme was favorably coirmented on by the
leading newspapers of the United sttates, and public
attention more than ever was turned to Florida.
But Col. Coryell did not stop here. It was through
his influence that Mr. Disston was induced to make
the now celebrated purchase of four million acres
from the trustees of the internal improvement fund,
thus saving the fund from bankruptcy and subjecting
to taxation over a million dollars worth of property.
While in South Florida in the interest of the com-
pany, Col. Coryelldiscovered to his surprise that wild
jute grew in profusion, and sending prepared speci-
mens to Dundee, where it is prepared for market, he
was gratified by a favorable report. The reclamation


of valuable la# in the Okeechobee region and the
purchase of the our million acres by Disston having
thus drawn public attention to Florida and the lands
in that vicinity mentioned, there was no longer any
difficulty in finding capitalists for the long talked of
canal, connecting the waters of the St. John's with
those of Indian River, and accordingly Col. Coryell
succeeded in forming the Florida Coast Line Canal and
Transportation CTompany, which have contracted
with the trustees of the internal improvement fund
to give interior water communication from the upper
St. John's River to Biscayne Bay, a distance of about
three hundred and seventy miles. This will open up
one of the most favored sections of Florida, and those
who have heretofore been compelled to send their pro-
duce to a market by a tedious and roundabout -route
can now ship direct. More than this, as'the rich al-
luvial soils of that section are thus placed injuxtapo-
sition to the highways of commerce and travel settlers
will pour in, and this great work of internal improve-
ment must prove a success. The work is being rap-
idly pushed forward under the superintendence of
Colonel Coryell, and now, as I write, steam dredges
are possibly in operation. If not now they soon will
be.
Too much praise cannot be awarded to Colonel Cor-
yell for his pluck and vim in all these matters. But
for him South Florida, in the region of Okeechobee,
would still bean unexplored and unknown section.
The favorable publicity given to these schemes has
attracted a large immigration to this State, and
though we of Middle Florida are not immediately
interested, we have been to some extent benefited by
the increased notoriety given our State.
[The land reclaimed by the Okeechobee
Canal, will be the richest sugar lands in the
world, and we understand these will be taken
up and planted in this profitable crop just as
soon as the canal is finished.-EDs.]
*
Clean Cotton.
There can be no doubt that the South suffers
a serious loss in the price of cotton from the
want of care in picking and preparing the
staple for market. In picking, quantity instead
of quality is too often sought after, and dirt,
trash, leaf and boll are thrown indiscriminate-
ly into the baskets.
After a storm, the cotton which has been
beaten out upon the ground, is passed through
the gin without sunning or cleaning, and too
often gives cause for complaints of sandy cot-


p-


ton, which reach us from the manufacturers of
England.
With a reasonable amount of care the en-
tire crop may be prepared in good merchant-
able order.
A liberal supply of sacks and baskets is ab-
solutely necessary; also ample scaffold space for
drying out the freshly picked cotton before it is
bulked away in the pick room.
Too little attention is generally paid to clean-
liness in the gin-house. At this season a great
quantity of nondescript dirt and trash has ac-
cumulated on the floor of the lint-room. The
walls are festooned with flakes of dirty cotton,
and every crack and crevice is filled with dirt
and dust to mar the beauty of the freshly
ginned staple.
The provident planter will see to it that the
gin-house is thoroughly cleansed before.he be-.
gins to gin the present crop. ,
The sweeping and cleaning should be re-
peated after every pressing. Too much care:
cannot be given to the preparation of this pre-
cious staple for the market.
The mote board should be properly adjusted
and watched carefully from time to time, and
the motes and trash often cleaned out' from
under the gin stand: We would advise the:
burning of motes as fast as they accumulate, as*
we have several times since the war discovered.
an "intelligent" freedman in the act of pack-
ing motes into a bale of cotton.
After the cotton has been baled-covered:
thoroughly with bagging--it should be pro-
tected from the weather and put upon the mar-
ket free from damp and mud stains, thus avoid-
ing the expense attendant upon the pickery,'
drying out, and so forth.
It is well known to our planters that the cot-
ton crop requires a whole year for its perfec-
tion, but no part of the labor will pay so well,
as that expended in preparing the staple prop-i
early for the market. It is a matter of millions:
of dollars to the South.-New Orleans Demo-
crat.

ORANGE WRAPS.-Order your orange
wraps from Ashmead Bros., Jacksonville, Fla;
For prices see advertisement. tf






:6 THE FLORIbA DISPATCH.
............


and fungus growth plentiful, and of course
many scale. The trees had been the victims
of many washes, like whale oil soap, which
produces insects, not to speak of sulphurous
powders and oils and soaps made from caustic
soda, all but the powders having a tendency to
harden the bark and hinder the free flow of
sap. The land is medium pine. To-day I do
not believe anything in hammock lands, even,
can be found more healthy or vigorous, and no
better results on the same sized trees than the
crop of lemons just cut. The fungus and lich-
ens are gone, and insects no longer trouble. No
washes have been used or time, worse than
thrown away, with them. The trees have had
what we thought was ample plant food, and
with its use they have thrown off disease. The
ground has been kept partially shaded, never
bare or clean. The plow has not been there to


That "Experimental Acre."
GOSHEN, CT., September 15, 1882.
Editorsof The Florida Dispatch :
PEAR Sins,--Your widely circulated paper
of the 11th inst. has a clipping from one of my
country papers, the Sanford Journal, what they
term "An Experimental Acre at Belair Grove."
It is manifest, if any one knows about "the fig-
ures" relative to that acre, and has a right to
speak of them, I have. The grove is under
my direction; I receive all monies, audit all
bills; we have not yet dignified the acre
enough to call it "an experimental" one. We
were not ready to publish our bulletin, nor are
we now, yet the acre is experimental in more
ways than the writer in the Journal knows.
The work has been done under a system; but
of the hundreds who have seen and approved,
I say they have seen nothing as good for its
age. Probably no two have drawn the same
conclusions from what was manifest on the
surface. It is too early to formulate a positive
rule, that always the same results would follow
from the same methods. Trees and plants, like
men, are scarcely twice under the same condi-
tions. We confess to sympathy with Davy Crock-
ett: "Be sure you are right, then go ahead."
There is a saying about "going farther and
faring worse." If the writer in the Journal
had gone farther than the part of one balance
sheet, he would have fared better. My balance
sheets (made up to August 3d) will show that
credit is given to that acre for $694; there
have since been sold, lemons $250 ; some fruits
and plants have been accounted for not in dol-
lars and cents; something more than $50 worth
have been sold, of which I have not the exact
figures; there are probably $50 worth of or-
anges to cut in their season; some more lemons
and pine-apples, certainly enough to raise the
totals to more than $1,000. These are young
trees, some few only three-yeai-old buds. The
whole hundred trees with their large crops of
fruit have doubled in size during the last two
years.
This has been done under most unfavorable
circumstances. We have suffered grievously
for lack of rain; there has been the least rain
fall this year of any of the eight I have been
in Florida--not enough moisture to set free the
fertilizers applied-and chemical conditions,
new to me, have been present, which I do not
understand. The trees, two years ago, were
badly diseased, bark dark and hard, lichens


call, he was digging his late Irish potatoes and
getting $3 net per barrel, and they were yield-
ing from 100 to 125 barrels to the acre. His
corn, he thought, would yield 100 bushels
(shelled) to the acre.
For some seasons I have been watching the
crops of these farmers on Long Island, and on
the Connecticut side of the Sound, getting at
their methods and seeing results. To-day I
fully believe, what made little impression on
them or myself a few years ago, "these men
who grow crops for the New York market, will
in time rely almost entirely on chemicals to
produce them, and they will be the great gain-
ers by so doing." A majority of them are act-
ing on this prediction now. Prices for "truck"
have been unusually good all the season in New
York. They are so now. The prices for the
early cabbages, the potatoes and the onions,
from Florida, will certainly rule high next
spring. There is a very short crop in many


mangle or prune the delicate rootlets which take
up the nourishment and carry it forward to all
parts of the tree.
Only chemical manures have been used; we
emphatically believe in them for fruits and veg-
etables. If they are complete in reality, as
well as name, and they are; if the manufac-
turer of then is master of his work, knows the
law of "how plants grow" and "how they
feed," and the elements in perfect fruit and
plant life, according to its kind, then I say
they never over-stimulate, when used with care.
With them, poor lands can be more quickly
built up, and at less cost, than by cow-penning
or with stable manures, and profits can be
reached which have not been heretofore, with
the stable or cow-pen. Complete chemical ma-
nures contain, in concentrated form and ready
to be taken up, all the elements required for
bringing forward and maturing each plant and
fruit, where there is present sufficient heat and
moisture, i. e., "when God gives the sunshine
to the farmer, and the latter, rain." No
stable manures are complete; they contain an
excess of some elements, a deficiency of others.
They make a watery succulent soft growth, on
which the insects can readily feed and thrive,
and are lacking in the mineral elements which
are necessary to make good firm wood. When
too freely used, die back results, i. e., the
watery ends of the summer growth wither and
die for want of mineral elements to mature or
harden them, or from disease brought on by an
excess of ammonia or some isonous acids,
like cremic or apocremic, imhe land, and
which tend to neutralize the mineral ash.
On Wednesday last, I went on a little tour of
observation among the farmers of Queen's
County, Long Island. I stopped first at Mr.
C. Schoonmaker's, who has the reputation of
being one of the best and most successful of
farmers. He lives across the street from a
large livery, sale and training stable, in the
outskirts of the city of Brooklyn, where he
could have stable manure for the hauling. He
does not haul it. He even said to me: I do
not know what I shall do with that pile,"
pointing to several cords stacked in the yard of
his own stables, to decompose. Three weeks
before, I heard him give an order for fertilizers
for his crops for 1883. On the same morning,
I had been to see his commission merchant,
Geo. Boyce, Nos. 27 and 29, Country Row,
West Washington Market, New York, and
was told he had paid Mr. S. $3,400 for the
prime cabbages grown on twelve acres of
ground, and the seconds were yet to market
from the same piece of land. Mr. S. said
"these were grown with Forrester's manures,
and it was the fifth crop grown with them on
the same ground;" adding, with a "merry
twinkle of the eye," "I have twenty-five acres
more to harvest and market. My crops this
year, considering the drouth, are the best I
have ever raised." On Wednesday, at my last


pines were grown under unfavorable condi-
tions, during the worst drouth I have expe-
rienced in Florida, and the only severe one.
The pine is one of the largest nitrogen feeders
of anything I grow. It must also have plenty
of mineral element to give high flavor and
keeping qualities. To get the benefit of both
of these it.tnust have a constant supply of
water. This we have not had for more than a
year. Each year we are learning something
about the habits of them, and are trying to
learn what varieties are best and most profita-
ble for the section in which, we are not sorry,
our lot is cast.
We have at Belair a large variety of Gen.
Sanford's importation-some sixteen-and have
more coming, from South America, from Bom-
bay, from the Islands, and a friend has prom-
ised some from Taheita, where our best limes


- --


I


1



places, owing to the extended drouth. We can
plant, on the St. Johns, with good prospects, if
we do our part, with no doubts but the prices
will be remunerative.
New York is fuller of lemons than I ever
saw it at this season of the year. Prices are low,
and not many get here from Florida in the best
condition. There is too rough handling and
too little care by the transportation lines, and
too careless packing, and not enough sorting
and grading.
I have many letters asking about the "pine-
apple culture, etc., in Orange County. If they
will grow there." We have raised a few, but
we are hardly ready to write, not so ready as
when we had seen less and done little. This
much we can safely say, the prices we have
gotten have been remunerative. We have
many complimentary letters from those who
had the fruit. We have been told gratifying
things by dealers in New York, whose judg-
ment we value, about the pines shipped from
Belair. One old fruit house, at No. 1 Dry St.,
with a record of many years for keeping the
best of fruit, said: "They were the best they
ever had, and kept well." In evidence, they
showed me some "Red West Indies," which I
had shipped three weeks before, and they were
still sound and good. I kept some this sum-
mer that length of time here, hanging in the
air under a porch, and I never tasted a better
one freshly cut from the plant than the last one
eaten. Again, I was told by one who formerly
had a line of steamers running to Brazil and
handled many pine-apples: "The Trinidad
Pine you sent me was the best I ever ate," "but,"
to my regret, he added: "I can't say as much
for any Florida oranges I have seen. Those
seedless ones in Brazil are much finer." I could
only reply, I feared he had not seen the best.
It was the Mr. Mallory, of the Mallory Line,
and we all know that he has seen plenty of
Florida oranges. I asked the privilege of
clearing up the error about Florida oranges
about next Christmas time, by seeing that he
had some seedless ones grown in Orange
County. We have no doubt of the result. We
are not envious-Floridians are not given to
breaking the Tenth Commandment; we are
a contented people, as a rule. Again, an old
dealer and importer said to me in Fulton Mar-
ket: "I never saw as handsome and well de-
veloped as those you sent, the Trinidads. The
common Birdseye, too, were well developed,
and kept the best of any ever brought.to New
York. They were in excellent condition on
their arrival. When they had hung till they
were black on the outside, there was no decav--'"
they still held their high flavor." He further
added: "The best pines that have heretofore
come to New York have been from Key West.
They are better than the Porto Rico pines, but
do not keep as well as those you sent." This
man sent his own vessels to Porto Rico for
large pines Centennial year, for the Philadel-
phia market, and he still handles many.
This is something, when we remember these




*


fiiE FLORID A DIiS AC C H ;


come from. We have not offered any but the
Trinidad for sale, of the finer varieties, nor de-
sired to do so till we had fairly tested them,
and could send out specimens of the fruit, as
we did this year with the Trinidad, to tell their
own story of whatever merit they have. We
expect to put some new varieties on the market
next year, the same as we did the Trinidad last
June and July.
We had a right to feel complimented with
the first premium on pines from the State last
winter. We are confident we can do better
next year.
The plants we have gotten fromsemi-tropical
regions, like our own, are more hardy than our
common varieties, which come from Key West
and the Islands. They are going to be more
profitable to cultivate. They will all live un-
rotected in the open air, but if you desire the
est results, they should be protected during
the winter, and partially shaded during the
summer, while maturing and ripening their
fruit. Very truly yours,
LYMAN PHELPS.

LeConte Pear-Again.
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.,'August, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
In your issue of the 7th of August, a corre-
spondent, X. T., advises the world and the bal-
ance of mankind to go slow on the "LeConte
pear boom." He does not confine his advice
to any particular people or section, he neither
gives his name or address, neither does he state
how many acres he has in these trees, and I
can't help thinking he is like Gov. Bloxham's
boy with the rabbit: The rabbit was good to
roast, to fry, to stew, to bake, &c., but as soon
as he got away, "he was not worth a durn, no
way ;" anl under these circumstances his ad-
vice should be taken cum grano salis, and why ?
First, he says they tumbled in New York
from $6 per crate to $1.75 when confronted by
better pears. The same thing has happened
to this pear when confronted by fine peaches
in New York, and is liable to happen to any
fruit in any large market. No one has ever
claimed (except perhaps ignorantly) that the
LeConte pear is in every respect a first-class
fruit, but that it is a good pear no one can deny,
when it will bring $6 per crate in New York
and Boston markets.
X. T. bases his advice upon what these pears
will bring in the New York market, as though
there were no other uses they could be put to.
Well, for the sake of argument, this is con-
ceded, and fifty cents per crate, net, is about as
low as they would sell for in said market, when
they would sell at all, which would give, at his
lowest figures, $1,25 for expenses. Well, at
this low figure, this would give $5 per tree, each


one in full bearing averaging ten bushels; and
fifty trees to an acre would give $250 per acre,
a yield, or rather a profit per acre, that would
make many a poor fellow in the Gulf States
dance with joy. Second, X. T. complains that
the LeConte does not ripen early enough to
"take the market" far in advance of the better
pears, Well, this can be remedied by another
variety of the game family; one, the fruit of
j mi blaje1 fh iy omp krp4kgt
Florida, and from all accounts, it is a larger
and handsomer pear than the LeConte.
It is a mistake to suppose that the LeConte
is a sport, or a pear standing by itself among
fruits. It is a cross between a Chinese and
European pear, and there are several other hy-
brid pears that originated in the same manner,
among them the "Keiffer," a pear that is cre-


eating a great furor in the North and West, one
that is being extensively planted in the above
sections, right among the finer sorts of pears.
The LeConte and other varieties of this family
of pears are also being planted in the same sec-
tions. This being the case, is not any man living
in Florida simply stupid who hesitates to plant
out this strain of pears, if he lives in a locality
where they will grow, especially when it is the
only family of pears that will flourish in his
soil and climate?
Had the orange men listened to the "croak-
ers" and the "go slow" men, they would not
now be receiving their golden ducats for their
fruit annually, neither would they be enjoying
steamboat and railroad facilities, good society,
&c.; nor would the magnificent climate of
Florida have been noised abroad, and utilized
to the mutual benefit of the resident and visi-
tor, or consumptive. Now, as poor as this fam-
ily of pears is, in the estimation of some per-
sons, it is superior to the orange in some res-
pects. Man alone eats the orange, and as it
comes from the tree; whereas other animals
besides man eats the pear. It makes a cheap
and wholesome dessert. They can be canned,
dried in evaporators, and it will pay to do this
when evaporated pears sell in the Eastern mar-
kets at thirty cents per pound. They can be
mashed into cider, distilled into brandy, and
made into pear butter; and lastly, they can as-
sist largely in raising a supply of pork.
This family of pears is a boon to the people
of the Gulf /e tes, and especially to the poor
man, for he is only to possess himself of one
tree, prune it in the winter and stick the limbs
in the ground, and in a few years he can grow
as many trees as he wants from that one; but
the "go slow" men won't even do this, they are
afraid.
We live in a fast age, and it is better to have
a "smash up" occasionally, than to poke along
forever in an ox-cart. Yours truly,
B. S. HERRING.

Preserving Fruits in Sand.
FEDERAL POINT, Sept. 18, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Several articles have lately emanated from
the Tavares Herald, and been freely copied
by other papers, recommending dry sand for
preserving oranges and the more perishable
tropical fruits. It is spoken of as a new dis-
covery of great economic value, and one yet to
be taken advantage of by growers and dealers.
Years ago, I remember reading the same plan
in an old almanac of the days of our grand-
mothers, and had the process been of any nota-
ble practicable benefit, it would undoubtedly
long since have come into general use. In our
boyhood,when cutting corn, we were accustomed
to hide away peaches and apples under the
shocks, and regale ourselves upon them with
great satisfaction two months after, when husk-


ing time came round. The Virginia house-
wife buries her seed sweet potatoes beneath the
hearthstone, and her Northern sister puts into
the cellar a barrel or two of beets mingled
with sand to keep them plump, and a few
boxes of grapes similarly treated into the gar-
ret, and I have kept Irish potatoes in prime

away in dry muck beneath a shed. Happily,
the introduction of fruit-preserving buildings,
refrigerator cars and rapid transportation, have
rendered us independent of such laborious and
primitive methods of handling large crops.
The strictly tropical fruits are generally so ex-.
tremely perishable, that nothing short of a low-
ering of temperature can postpone decay in


43i


them. So far from sand-packing being effica-
cious in preserving the banaiha, I ilay say that
I have often employed it to hasten matifity.
As regards oranges, when by a proper selec-
tion of varieties, they can be had fresh from
the tree the year round, Why go to the trouble
of stowing them in sand; as our friend Dr. K.
would say, cui bono ? As well might a North-
ern orchardist refuse to plant late apples and
pears, and cast about for the means of preserv-
ing his Early Harvests and Madeleines till
after the holidays.
On the 28th of August, I picked a Tardiff, or
Hart's Late orange, as fresh, sweet, and juicy
as the most exacting critic could desire. And
if left undisturbed, it would unquestionably
have hung several months longer, or until the
ingathering of the new crop. For the past
half dozen years I have fruited this variety and
found the characteristics invariably the same.
It can be shipped in April, or left till August
or September. This year, I picked them in
April, as instructed by my agent, who said
that later on, when the berry season began,
oranges would have to take a back seat. Still
there are drawbacks to late oranges. Some
summers,the cotton bug is more or less abundant,
and takes to puncturing the fruit with his mos-
quito-like proboscis, causing it to sour and drop.
Again-during the long, thirsty, heated days,
the aggregate number dwindles down un-
der the resistless temptation to passers-by to
refresh their parched throats with the golden
"bags of luscious juice." Another point-
should a freeze occur early in winter, severe
enough to cause any fruit to drop, this late
orange, like those from summer blooms, being
green, falls much more readily than those
which are ripe. The rind, though thin, is
tough as buckskin, to which peculiarity is
probably owing to its remarkable durability.
The flavor, harsh and tart at first, becomes
finally mellowed down to a rich and sprightly
sweet, scarcely to be excelled by any variety.
I have heard of one or two other sorts said to
keep as long, but have not proved the assertion
by personal experiment, So we see that in the
matter of oranges, the sand process is superflu-
ous, as we can go clear round the year with
them and even lap over. E. H. HART.

Cotton-Seed Cooking Oil,
GLENCOE, FLA., Sept. 18th, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch
In one number of your valuable paper, you
speak very highly of cotton seed oil for cooking
purposes. I sent for a gallon, and have used
some of it, finding it much superior to the lard
we are able to obtain here. It is sweet and
odorless, leaving no taste in anything it is
cooked in. One of my neighbors has used
some, and was pleased with it, but now says
she shall use no more of it, as she has a sister
living in Mississippi who writes her the physi-
cians there pronounce the oil to be poisonous,
and say it is dangerous to use to cook with.
This lady says her daughter made an ointment


with some of the oil, and it poisoned her skin.
1 think if there is any truth in this statement
I would like to know it, and if not, it ought to
be contradicted. I would like to have your
opinion of the matter through the columns of
your valuable paper.
I think every week I will send TIE Dihe
PATCH to friends at the North, but there is al-
Mer t73} ff r Nfcfl djfyolAlnt, to
Yours respectfully,
Mrs. M. B. RQoIuE,
REPLY.-Before the refined cotton-seed oil
was put upon the market for cooking purposes,
it was very carefully analysed by competent
chemists, and pronounced perfectly harmless.
We are using it now, daily, "without any im-


- _~PC~L*I. ~ ~


I


I





32 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


will kindly answer the above questions in your
valuable paper, you will greatly oblige
Yours respectfully,
W. S. H.
P. S.-Can you give us a remedy for black
ants that are eating the young sprouts on our
orange trees ? They girdle the sprout where it
puts out from the parent limb.
REPLY.-We are compelled to refer the
fence question to some of our legal readers,
who will please favor us with an answer. See
DISPATCH of July 3d, for a remedy for the
black ants.-[EDS.
Florida Taxes-Judge Hilton in Error.
FEDERAL POINT, Sept. 19, 1882.
Editors of the Florida Dispatch:
I noticed in a neighbor's paper of the 11th


punity," (as the old lady said); but, for the
satisfaction of our fair correspondent, and oth-
ers, we shall endeavor to hunt up the authori-
ties and print "all about it."-[EDS. DISPATCH.
Hay Fever.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Having been, as previously stated, entirely
relieved from hay fever by my residence here
this summer, and desiring to spread broadcast
through your valuable columns whatever con-
firmatory intelligence can be obtained, I en-
close two letters received from prominent phy-
sicians here,(one Allopathic, one Homoepathic),
which you are at liberty to publish if you
think the matter of sufficient interest.
Respectfully, etc.,
ALBERT S. ASHIMEAD.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., Sept. 22, 1882.
Albert S. Ashmead, Esq.:
Dear Sir.-Yours of 20th inst. is received, in
which you state that from your residence this
summer in Florida, you have escaped your
regular summer attacks of hay fever. I have
no doubt that any one who suffers from regu-
lar attacks of this disease at the North would
experience immunity, by a summer resi-
dence in Florida. My son, while living in
Utica, New York, had an attack every summer.
Since his return and residence in Jacksonville,
he has been entirely free from the disease, and
I have known of numerous other instances of
like immunity; for I -have, during a resi-
dence here of forty-four summers, never been
called on to prescribe for a case of the kind.
Respectfully,
A. S. BALDWIN, M. D.
A. &. Ashmead :
Dear Sir.-Your note 20th received. After
observation extending over several years, I am
convinced that those who suffer from annual
attacks of hay fever in the North, are entirely
exempt in Florida. Persons living in this
State, with whose cases I am familiar, pass
through the hay fever season perfectly free
from any symptoms of the disease.
H. R. STOUT, M. D.
Fencing Laws of Florida.
NEW SMYRNA, FLA., Aug. 29, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
I have a lot of land to fence that is surround-
ed on three sides by lands owned by other par-
ties. Is it incumbent on them to build or pay
the expense of building one half of the fence
between my land and theirs? I also own sev-
eral lots of land alternating with that owned
by other parties. We propose to fence them all
into one lot, thereby saving the expenses of di-
vision fences. Where the end lot is owned by
another party, and I have land adjoining that,
I do not care to take in, can I be compelled to
do one half the fencing on that line? ,If you


Yours, J. H. FOSTER.
REPLY.-The disease is evidently caused by
a fungoid growth.

STARKE, Sept. 15, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I send you a worm or caterpillar of some
kind, which I would be glad for you to name
or classify in your journal. It is found on the
orange tree. Respectfully,
R. J. WILLIAMS.
REPLY.-The caterpillar you send is known
as the stinging caterpillar, and is the progeny
of a small moth, termed the woolly bear, Lagoa
opercularis. It is omnivorous in its habits, and
although occasionally to be found feeding on
the leaves of the orange, does but slight dam-
age.


inst., on page 386, second column, half way
down, the writer compares the taxes of Flor-
ida with North Carolina, and to our injury,
when it is really the other way, according to
his own showing, for while a farmer in North
Carolina, worth $10,000, is taxed $32.50, a farm
here, worth $10,000, is only taxed at about
$20.00 to $24.00. The reason is, our valuation,
for taxation is very much lower than in North
Carolina. I think you ought to notice that in
some way. Yours respectfully,
W. A. E.



OAK HILL, FLA., August 24th, 1882.
Editors of Thie Florida Dispatch:
I send you by to-day's mail a little box con.
training a chrysalis, and a sort of fly, which I
would like you to name through your valuable
paper. The fly seems to stay almost exclusive-
ly around the guava bushes, and in quite large
numbers. Do they do any harm ?
Respectfully,
J. W. HATCH.
REPLY.-The chrysalis you send is the
chrysalis of the orange butterfly, Papilio Cres-
phontes. What you take for a fly, is the leaf
footed plant bug Leptoglossus phyllopus. They












are at times very injurious, from their sucking
the juices from the tender shoots and terminal
branches of plants, vines and trees, causing
them to blight and withei. No doubt they
have been feeding on your guava bushes. We
give a figure of the pest.

TANGERINE, FLA.) Sept. 5, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I send you, marked "From J. H. F.," a pe-
culiar piece of grape-fruit wood, diseased. A
tree about five feet high had this condition on
trunk, and top died, but a sprout on trunk, six
inches from ground, put out, and is doing mid-
dling well. There is not much of the diseased
condition below where the shoot comes out.
This section is from trunk at about fifteen
inches above ground. Thought it might inter-
est you, but perhaps you know all about it. I
have never met but this one case.


the pressing points which have caused the sores
should be removed. It should be made a rule
to sponge off the accumulated sweat and
dirt from the collar and saddle part of the
harness, as well as from the shoulders and
back of the horse, when he comes in from work.
A lotion should then be used to annoint the
bruised parts every night, after they have been
dried with a soft cloth. Such lotion may consist
of two quarts of clear lime water, to which is
added half a pint of linseed oil and two ounces of
powdered sugar of lead (the latter being first dis-
solved in a little warm water.) Mix the whole
well together and keep it in a corked bottle for
use."


.
i I 'g ~ I I I L --*I ' II -ri--------'.~-. ----~I~


I
40


T. N. Mc Cormick, Cross Swamp :
The rust on the orange is caused by the rust
mite (Phytoptus oleivorus.-Ashmead). THE
DISPATCH has already published several arti-
cles on the subject.
-i
MOUNDGROVE, Sept. 14, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
We send you to-day an insect which we wish
you would give the name of in THE DISPATCH.
Also, we enclose a section of an orange limb,
showing the manner it cuts them off. If there
were many of them, they would do a great deal,
of damage in a grove, as the limbs they attack
invariably break over, even if they are not en-
tirely girdled. They seem to be around only
in the fall of the year.
Yours, very truly,
BEED, KNOX & BEED.
REPLY.-The beetle is called the Twig Gir-
dler- Oncideres cingulatus, and is at times very
annoying and troublesome, girdling all kinds
of trees and plants. The eggs are laid on the'
outside bark of the girdled limb in the fall of
the year, when the limbs fall to the ground, the
eggs hatch and the larve feed on the dead
wood during the winter and the following sum-
mer.

MISTAKES CORRECTED.-In our last number,
page 417, the name of that beautiful Mexican
climber should have been printed Antigonon
instead of "Antigoney;" and the price of Mu-
riate of Potash as stated on page 416 (same
issue) should have been 4 or 5, instead of 21
cents per pound ; as it is worth $60 per ton, in
New York. We were (unintentionally, of
course,) mlisled by one of our largest commis-
sion-merchants, who is also a dealer in fertil-
izers.

BRUISES ON HORSEs.-The veterinary editor
of the "Prairie Farmer," in answer to corres-
pondents, says:
"Farm horses are in some seasons more than
in others-in wet and warm seasons especially
-subject to galled shoulders and backs, and
which, when not timely or properly attended to,
are apt to produce troublesome sores. The skin
not only is abraded by the collar and saddle,
but the flesh irritated and inflamed and if the
irritation is kept up, an inchorous discharge
takes place which is difficult to heal without
giving the horse prolonged rest or freedom
from work. When a saddle or collar gall is
observed, the harness should be looked to, and


































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33-s THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


The Pleasures of Business.
No mind is contented without occupation.
No human soul is without an aim or purpose in
life. The greatest success in life consists, not in
the mere accumulation of riches, but in being
able to acquire wealth with a disposition to apply
it in such a manner that it shall be a comfort
and blessing to others-not in the mere giving
away of money, but in putting people in a way
to labor and help themselves. There is no
pleasure in oppression. There is no pleasure in
grinding and exacting gold from the poor;
but there is a great deal of genuine satisfac-
tion in being able to offer steady and honorable
employment to the many willing hands that
have nothing to do. One of the greatest en-
joyments of the prosperous business man consists
in being able to comfortably provide for the
many employes in his house or manufactory.
In doing this he is fulfilling his obligation to
society ; he becomes a useful and honored citi-
zen ; business to him is a real pleasure ; he
enjoys his successes, when they are fairly won,
because he feels that he deserves them.
When a business man has the right kind of
purpose in life he always enjoys his occupation.
He feels a just and worthy pride in his pros-
perity, he is pleased with the respect and grati-
tude of those whom he directs and controls in
the management of his affairs, and he feels that
in benefiting himself he is conferring a favor
upon others.

Florida's Pine Forests.
The Nashville American, of a recent date,
gives a review of the lumber trade in that city,
and furnishes statistics to show that over 50
million feet of lumber are annually consumed
in building and other industries of that city.
It is stated that white pine lumber has advanc-
ed in price within the last year fully one hun-
dred per cent., and that the remainder of the
pine forests of the North will not furnish the
present annual demand for more than twelve
years longer. The reliance of the country for-
the future must be in the pine forests of the
South.
Owing to a Want of co-operation among the
mill-owners at the South, our yellow pine has
never sold for anything like its value, and our
forests have been cut down on a very small
margin of profit to the manufacturer. Our
people should now begin to realize the fact that
in a few years the pine timber on every acre of
our forests will be worth five times the present
price of our pine lands.
Our Southern pine possesses an intrinsic
value far greater than that of the white pine ;
is far more durable, susceptible of a higher
polish ; is far more ornamental, and possesses
at least three times the strength.
We have an immense wealth in our pine
lands, and it is suicidal to destroy such timber
by the wasteful process of girdling.
We have seen hundreds of magnificent spars


destroyed in the upper part of Alachua county,
which would readily have brought $25 a-piece
for masts, delivered at tide-water.
We think there is every encouragement for
the future in the preservation and manufacture
of lumber. The demand for crates for vegeta-
bles, and heading for orange-boxes is becoming
an important business for the mills. Our doors,
sash, mouldings, mantles, etc., ought to be
manufactured at home.-Fernandina Mirror.

If you once learn to get the whip-hand of
yourself, that is the best education. Prove to
me that you can control yourself, and I'll say
you are an educated man, and without this all
education is good for nothing.-Mrs. Oliphant.


THE SOUTH.

HOW IT MAY BECOME RICH AND INDEPENDENT.
Our old friend and co-worker, Col. DANIEL
DENNETT, Agricultural Editor of the N. O.
Picayune, is a Northern man, who has "sum-
mered and wintered in Louisiana long enough
to know the wants and needs of the people of
his adoption, and these are some of his matured
opinions :
The South evidently can never become pros-
perous and independent through large planta-
tions and colored labor. It can become rich
through small farms, mixed farming and intel-
ligent labor, together with its factories, its mines
and forests. The mud-sills of the whole super-
structure of prosperity in the South are mixed
farming and intelligent agricultural labor.
This opens the door to manufacturing, mining
and the unveiling and utilizing of all the val-
uable resources of the South. Southern prop-
erty in agriculture will draw capital and en-
terprise from abroad, as well as create and
stimulate them at home.
But how is this intelligent labor to be brought
about ? We mean general and almost universal
industrial intelligence among the farmers of
the South ; we do not question that all of these
States have very many farmers whose intelli-
gence and enterprise will compare favorably
with those of any other portion of the United
States.
The South suffers severely to-dby, and will
continue to suffer, by her neglect to teach
Southern boys, thirty, forty and fifty 'years
ago, how to work, how to make a living at
farming, horticulture, stock-raising or some
honorable trade, calling or profession that would
make them useful to society as well as to them-
selves. Slavery and African labor formerly
stood as a great impediment to the proper train-
ing of the boys through successive generations
down to the close of the late war.
And how are boys taught farming and useful
trades now, in 1882, in the South ? Who are
their teachers, and what useful and practical
lessons do they study in the great industries of
the South ? How many generations will be left
to acquire agricultural knowledge without
teachers, acquiring habits and erroneous ideas
that will plague them and keep them poor as
long as they live ?
IHighly intelligent farming will form and
fashion beautiful farms, and greatly improve
the rural architecture of the South, and this
will make famrning more and more attractive
to the young men. The character and habits
of Southern boys, as being formed to-day, will
in a great measure be the character of the
South thirty or forty years hence, or sooner.
If we had thousands of industrial schools in
the South at the present time, most of them
agricultural schools, with efficient teachers,


they would do the country an amount of good
which 'could be represented in part by hundreds
of millions of money ; but the benefits to com-
ing generations, morally, politically, socially
and religiously, would be far greater than that
which may be reckoned in gold.

WOOD AsHEs.-The best results from wood
ashes are secured by adding a small proportion
of common salt. Ashes contain all the min-
eral elements of the plant, and they exert a
good influence in unlocking fertility that would
not be otherwise available. In burning any-
thing the chlorine it contains is carried off with
the smoke, and salt, chloride of sodium, sup-
plies the deficiency.

If religion does not make a man heartsome
and pleasant at home, it is of no particular
benefit to a family.


Only One Life.
Too many farmers appear to be only skir-
mishing around during the present life without
any of the real enjoyments which this world of-
fers to every one who will gather them. In the
first place, if he does not marry a good wife,
the fatal mistake is made, which can never be
remedied. If a man intends to be a farmer,
and through that channel of industry enjoy all
of the comforts and pleasures of life, he should
surround himself and family with as many of
the conveniences of life as his means and in-
dustry can command. He should keep in mind
that on his farm and with his family is the best
place for contentment and happiness. And the
best way to be happy is to make his family
happy and his home pleasant. Every hour
needlessly spent away from the home of domes-
tic happiness is just so much lost in the great
sum of life's comforts. One life-one home-
one wife-one aim-and one end to all of life's
struggles and hopes. Without happiness all
work is a burthen, and life a failure.-Iowa
State Register.
DON'T HEAT YOUR SAw.-Heating spoils
saws. Some sawyers will run a saw until it is
tremendously hot, and, to make it worse, they
throw cold water on the side, thus causing sud-
den contraction on that part of the saw, and
after a few such times the saw has to go to the
factory to be hammered and put in order, and
to come back to meet the same fate as before.
If the saw is round, hangs true in the mandrel,
is in line with the carriage, filed square at top
and bottom, the backs of the teeth lower than
the points, with the required amount of spread
set and the teeth kept well chamfered with a
gummer, so that when the saw runs only the
point will come in contact with the lumber,
then a saw will run free and cool, and there
will be no extra strain on the plate, no heating,
no danger.

VARNISHING WOOD.-It is often desirable
to retain the grain of the natural wood exposed
to view, and at the same time to preserve its
surface from decay, and give it a more beauti-
ful appearance ; this is done either by polishing
or varnishing. To varnish such woods a little
skill is required to obtain a really good gloss-
smooth as glass-upon its surface, all rough-
ness should be carefully removed, being par-
ticular not to leave any marks, especially
across the grain, of the sandpaper, or other
material used in smoothing, and the work
should be afterwards well sized with gelatine or
good glue size; this size is to prevent the ab-
sorption of the varnish in soft places, and to
obtain a more even gloss. Sizing sometimes
has a tendency to raise the grain of the wood,
more particularly of soft wood, especially if ap-
plied warm. Use oak varnish.

The South, of New York, says:-It is clear
that the South can invite population for de-
cades to come and still have room to spare. She
can invite it with assurance, because she has the


most munificent inducements to offer. Her
lands are cheap, her soil yields the richest pro-
ducts, her forests are vast, her mines are ex-
haustless treasuries, and her climate is unsur-
passed.
Unless a man can link his written thoughts
with the everlasting wants of men, so that they
shall draw from them as from wells, there is no
more immortality to the thoughts and feelings
of the soul than to the muscles and the bones.

Always say a kind word if you can, if only
that it may come in, perhaps with singular op-
portuneness, entering some mournful man's
darkened room like a beautiful firefly, whose
happy circumvolution he cannot but watch, for-
getting his many troubles.


I __ --- I
-





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. :3


Another Silk Claim-Royal.
The Tallahassee Floridian remarks, in copy-
ing the claim announced by an Orange County
correspondent of THE DISPATCH, of the pro-
duction of silk and the manufacture of dresses
in this portion of the country prior to the in-
stance of Mrs. Blocker, that any facts elicited
which would give other parties credit prior to
the Leon county claim, would be that much
added to the history of the industry, and in
that respect an advantage. We have men-
tioned the morus multicaulis fever of 1835-
1840,and its subsidence, until these pleasant
incidents connected with it were forgotten.
England has had its morus multicaulis rage,
and no greater than a British Queen raised the
cocoons with which a silk suit was woven for
James the First, in which he graced his Court.
At the time, James had immense numbers of
mulberry trees planted about ten miles from
London, at a place called Charlton Park.
Some years ago a great sale of them, grown to
a size to make them of vast commercial value,
with other timber, took place there. The
French had supplied the English with silk
fabrics, and upon a change of the policy of
raising silk at home, the scheme fell through,
and the mulberry forest of James I. was a last-
ing monument of the failure.

SILK CULTURE.-The Avalanche says that
silk culture has become an established industry
of North Carolina. From a four years' or-
chard of 3,000 white mulberry plants, Mr.
Fasnasch, of Raleigh, reports that in April and
May, with an ordinary laborer and his daugh-
ter, he gathered a crop of 200 ounces of eggs,
worth $1,000, and the punctured cocoons, 40
pounds, are worth 75 cents a pound, or $30
more. The product in cocoons was $350 from
three ounces of eggs, worth $175. A hand-
some return for six week's labor from four acres
of average soil.


The Unknown.
As a fond mother, when the day is o'er,
Leads bythe hand her little child to bed,
Half-willing, half-reluctant to be led
And leave his broken playthings on the floor,
Still gazing at them through the open door,
Nor wholly reassured and comforted
By promises of others in their stead,
Which, though' more splendid, may not please him
more
So nature deals with us and takes away
Our playthings one by one, and by the hand
Leads us to rest so gently that we go,
Scarce knowing if we wish to go or stay,
Being too full of sleep to understand
How far the unknown transcends the what we know.
-Longfellow.
DESTROYING STUMPS.-The Scientific Ameri-
can gives the following information to those
who desire to get rid of stumps on the farm:
"In the autumn or early winter, bore a hole one
or two inches in diameter, according to the
girth of the stump, and about eight inches
deep. Put into it one or two ounces of salt-
petre, fill the hole with water and plug it close.
In the ensuing spring take out the plug and
pour in a gill of kerosene oil and ignite it.
The stump will smoulder away, without blazing,
to the very extremity of the roots, leaving
nothing but ashes."

HERBS for winter use should be gathered
when the plants are in flower; just as the flow-
ers begin to fade is considered to be the best
time to harvest them. The herb garden was
Formerly of greater domestic importance than
it is in these days of patent medicines, but
whether this change is an advantage to health
may well be questioned. To dry herbs, it is
best to tie them in small bundles and hang
them up in an airy shed.- Washington Tribune.


Low Branching Fruit Trees.
From long experience and close observation,
we are prepared fully to endorse every word of
the following article, from a late number of the
Rural Canadian, and would add, that it pos-
sesses far more force and significance for the
growers of orange and other Southern fruit
trees, than for the constituency of our North-
ern contemporary :
"Nearly all the troubles with tree trunks in
orchards may be traced to an unnatural mode
of culture. Nature has ordered that there
shall be a growth of branches on all fruit trees,
from quite near the ground, but man has de-
termined that there shall be a bare trunk from
six to ten feet in height. On nature's plan, a
thick leafy shade is formed around the trunk,
and as the eggs of those insects that cause bark
troubles are laid by the parents when in the
wing state, and they do not incline to fly into
the shade, such trees enjoy immunity from
these evils, while the bare trunks are fully ex-
posed to them. Nor is this all. The growth
of branches low down on the trunk protects
from the heat of the sun in summer, and from
the severity of the wind in winter, while it
keeps the ground moist and cook, so favoring
the healthful growth of roots. It is only in the
dense forest that trees grow up with high, bare
trunks, and there the number of them, and
their close proximity to each other, secures the
benefits which the tree, growing singly and
alone, obtains from the encircling wall of its
own leaves and branches. We shall escape a
host of orchard troubles when we permit young
trees to take their own way of branching out
near the ground. The impossibility of plowing
close to orchard trees, and the difficulty of gath-
ering the fruit off them, are the only objections
of any weight to the natural development
which has been described. In regard to the
first objection, the answer is the same which
was given by a literary man to the remark that
his study was too small to swing a cat in. "My
dear sir," said he, "I don't want to swing a cat
in it." In like manner, we do not want to
plow close to fruit trees. It tears the roots,
which form a network very near the surface of
the ground, and it exposes the trunks to injury
by the team and the whippletrees. In regard
to the second objection, it is indeed removed by
the common practice, but, to a great extent, it
is only removed a few feet higher into the air,
where the difficulty becomes complicated by the.
necessity for using a ladder. The fruit of trees
naturally grown can be largely gathered from
the ground, and only half the necessity for a
ladder will exist on this plan. By all means
let us have leaves and branches as a defense for
fruit trees, instead of whitewash, or any other
bungling device resorted to by man to counter-
act the effect of his own folly.
Ferns-Pressing and Drying.
Ferns--Pressing and Drying.


holds of ships ; and the practice of oiling the
saws of cotton gins endanger lives and prop-
erty to an extent that cannot be estimated.
Many fires at sea that have not been accounted
for may have originated from this cause.
I would be glad if all the papers in the
country would call the attention of farmers to
the danger of this practice, of which, no doubt,
most of them are unaware."
LIQUID GLUE.-Dissolve fifty parts starch
in water. Dissolve in another vessel, at a
moderate heat, over the water bath, fifty parts
gelatine, or glue, in sufficient water. When
the gelatine is well dissolved, fifty parts turpen-
tine are mixed with it, and the starch solution
is then added. When the different ingredients
are well mixed together, the glue is takan away
from the fire, and water is added to it in order
to give the required fluidity.


This is about the best season of the year for
gathering ferns, and it will be of interest to many
of our readers to know how to take care ofthem.
The paper used in pressing should be of a
porous nature, unglazed. Newspaper is good,
blotting paper is, perhaps, better. The best
process is as follows: Upon a smooth surface
place a sheet of paper, and upon the paper,
enough ferns to occupy all available space, face
downward. Next put on about fifteen sheets
of paper; repeat the ferns and so on. Care
must be taken to keep the edges perfectly
smooth. Upon the top of the package thus
made place a smooth board and a heavy weight,
rocking the whole back and forth to smooth
the ferns. Remove the heavy plate and replace
it with one weighing 10 or 12 pounds. Let


~_
- --


remain till perfectly dry, say three or four
weeks.
To prevent ferns from curling in- damp
weather a good plan is to wax them, which is
done in this manner: After they are pressed
and become thoroughly dry, lay them face
downward upon paper. Heat an iron just
enough to melt wax readily, and upon its sur-
face melt a little yellow beeswax. Move quickly
over the fern. If the iron is too hot or the
move too slow, the fern will stick to the iron
and be spoiled.-Richmond Palladium.
The Egyptian Lotus in the Connecticut
River.
EAST HAMPTON, CONN., Aug. 26, 1882.
Editor of The South:
Referring to the notice of the Egyptian lotus
in the South for August, I would state that I
was at Seldon's Cove yesterday. I learned
that the lotus lilies have been in bloom since
about the first of August. The buds were
abundant yesterday, but owing to the rush, the
flowers were scarce. The lily is of a light yel-
low color and has a vanilla-like odor. Yet,
while the flower is quite pretty and the odor
pleasant, its attractiveness is almost wholly due
to its size and rarity.
The flower is very large, being from eight to
ten inches in diameter, with salver-shaped
leaves from twenty-four to thirty-six inches in
diameter. The flower has no calyx, conse-
quently no sepal. It has a corolla, consisting of
thirty petals. Anthers and stigmas are both
very numerous. The ovary is from an inch
and a half to two inches in diameter. The
petals rise little above the stigma, that is the
upper end of them. The lotus is a native of
Egypt, and is found in the United States (as
far as I can learn) in only two places, Vir-
ginia and Seldon's Cove. They were brought
to this cove about a half a century ago by a
sea captain. While there is nothing peculiar
about the cove, so far as I could learn or ob-
serve, it being an ordinary river cove covering
an area of eight to ten acres, with water from
two to three feet deep, yet all attempts to grow
the lotus at other points along the river have
failed. Yours truly,
D. A. MARKHAM.

SPONTANEOUS BURNING.-A correspondent
of the Savannah News says: "I beg to call
attention, through the columns of your paper,
to a very dangerous practice among cotton
ginners that has recently come to my knowl-
edge. I learn that when cotton is fed to the
gin in a damp state it clogs the saws, so that
the gin cannot, run rapidly, but that if oil is
poured on the saws the cotton does not adhere
to them-and it is a common practice among
ginners to oil the saws whenever they have
damp cotton to gin. Oiled cotton will take fire
spontaneously, at a temperature of about 110
degrees, a temperature often reached in the
sunshine, in close cars or warehouse, and in the







3 1THE FLORIDA DISPATCH,


L


dh kloida4 .szaith
JACKSONVILLE, OCTOBER 2, 1882.

D. Redmond, D.H. Elliott, W. H. Ashmead,
EDITORS .
$ubscription $1.00 per annumn, in advance.
TIA.TPES OF ADV IJBTISING.
SQUARES. 1TIME.' 1 MO. 3 MO. I 6 O. 1 YEAR
One ..............1....... 1 00 $ 2 50 $ 150i $1 000 $18 50
Two...................... 200 5 00 1000 18 00 34 00
Three............... 00 7 00 14 00 25 00 4600
Four................ 00 9 00 17 50 30 00 58 00
Five........................ 4 50 11 00 19 00 35 00 65 00
Eight .............. 800 1650 3000 5000 10000
Sixteen .................. 16 00 30 00 5000 80 00 150 00
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words to line) ten cents
Super line.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
. in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the best ad-
vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business-
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.


. Special Club Rates with "The Dispatch."
We have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
following, publications, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt of price, for ONE YEAR:
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH AND
Savannah Weekly News.................. ....... $2.50
Florida Weekly Uion.. ......... .............. 2.25
New York Weekly Sun............................ 1.75
SNew York Weekly Herald........................... 1.75
New York Weekly Tribune................. 2.50
New York Weekly Times............. ........... 1.75
New York Weekly World................... 1.75
Philadelphia Weekly Times.... .............. 2.50
American Agriculturist................................ 2.00
Country Gentleman ................ ................. 2.75
Southern Cultivator .......................... 2.00
Atlantic Monthly Magazine........................... 4.00
Harper's Monthly Magazine.......... ............ 4.00
The Century Monthly Magazine (Scribnlr')).... 4.00
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine............. 3.15
Popular Science Monthly ......... ................ 5.00
North American Review........................... 5.00
SHarper's Illustrated Weekly......... ............. 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Bazar........................ 4.00
HIarper's Illustrated Young People................... 2.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly...... ........ 4.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4.00
Frank Leslie)s Popular Monthly.................... 3.15
Frank Leslie's inday' Magazine............. 3.15
Scientific American........ ..;.................... 3.75
SWaverly Magazin................................ 5.00
Detroit Free Press................... ...... 2.35
Nebraska Farmer'......... ....... .................... ... 2.00
Florida .Agriculturist. ............ ......... 2.25
The above are among the very best publications*
Remittances should be sent by Check, Money Order,
or .Registered Letter, addressed to
ASIIMEAD BRO's,
.JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

NE W AD VER TISEMENTS.

Jamps's Transplanter.
Strawberry.Plants-WNm. James.
Fine. Poultry-D. Redmond.
Orange Seedlings-D. Redmond.
NEW Information of Florida; 192 pages of
new matter, with map for 1882. Send 6c. to
R. C.Long, Tallahassee, or C. Drew, Jackson-
ville, Fla. _
For copies of the Premium List for
Florida State Fair, to open here on the 13ttf of
February, 1883, address the Secretary, Maj.
A. J. RUSSELL, Jacksonville, Fla.
WINTER GARDENING,-NoW is the time to
Prepare for a good winter garden. For hints
and suggestions, see "Work for October," in
present issue.
To 'CORRESPONDENTS.-We have many com-
munications of value and interest on file for
insertion. Our space is limited, and we crave
the patience of our kind friends.


new and projected railways, &.c., and fuller in
detail than most maps of the kind heretofore
published. We could not, within reasonable
limits,'attempt anything like a fair or satisfac-
tory analysis of the work; but we can and do
strongly advise all who are looking toward
Florida as a future home or as a field for safe in-
vestment to send for a copy. It may be ob-
tained from the Commissioner, A. A. Robinson,
Tallahassee, or from Columbus Drew, of this
city, by enclosing two 3c. stamps for return
postage. _
ORANGE SEEDLINGS-sour or sweet-
one or two years old-wanted IN QUANTITIES
of one thousand and upwards. Address, D.
REDMOND, Jacksonville, Fla. oct2-tf.


Work for October.
In the genial Florida climate, October may
be regarded as our "second spring;" and the
enterprising gardener, farmer and fruit-grower
now shakes off his summer apathy, and vigor-
ously bestirs himself for the work before him.
In the Garden, clear away all weeds, grass
and trash, generally; provide a full and liberal
supply ofgood and rich fertilizers; apply freely;
plow and work into the soil (not too deep) and
harrow, rake, pulverize and level off, for the
seed you intend to sqw.
All vegetable seeds put into the ground du-
ring the last month, will now grow off vigor-
ously, and should 'have constant and careful
culture.
Look over our hints for September, and
straighten up all work left unfinished for that
month.
Lettuce and Endive may be planted out for a
succession. Sow Spinach, Cress and Radishes
every ten days. Sow, also, Early York, Dutch
and other Cabbages, for winter planting-
also, Beets, Turnips, Carrots, Parsnips (in clay
soil,) Mustard, &c., &c.
Brocoli, Cauliflower, Cabbage, &c., may, also,
be set out, now, if not attended to last month.
Onions may still be planted. Try some of
the fine, large, mild varieties, such as "Grant's
Red Tripoli," "Early White Italian Tripoli',
etc. Also, the genuine "Bermuda." (See list
of those who have fresh Bermuda seed for sale,
in present number.
Celery, should now be worked carefully, and
a little earth drawn up around the plants, in
dry weather.
Asparagus and Globe Artichoke beds should
be cleaned up and manured.
Peas, of the earliest and finest kinds may be
planted.
Turnips, should receive particular attention,
at once. If you have a piece of cow-penned
land, use that in preference to any other; but
we have made excellent turnips by the free use
of superphosphates or Peruvian guano, com-
posted with dry muck,bone-dust, salt and ashes.
Irish Potatoes, planted last month, should be
cleanly worked, but not much hilled up. If
the weather is warm and sunny, they may be
mulched, with benefit. :
Oats and Rye, for winter forage, mut be put
in at once, if not already growing. If you de-
sire a good and profitable yield, put on the ma-
nure.,
Sweet Potatoes may be dug and housed or


I


"banked," the last of this month;.or, you may
cut off the tops just before frost, and let the
roots remain in the ground all winter.
Many other seeds and plants not mentioned
may be planted and set out in our Florida
gardens during the fall and winter ; and, with
a little care and attention, we may have several
varieties of fresh vegetables on our tables every
day in the year.
FRUIT-TREES, VINES, &c.-Prepare now,
for planting deciduous fruit-trees and vines,
such as the Peach, LeConte and Keiffer Pears,
Japan Persimmons, Jujube, Pomegranate,
Grape, &c., &c. In budded Peaches, we can
only recommend the Chinese varieties, such as
Peen-To and Honey. It seems useless to plant


r


_ --


_ -I I I


I


any of the budded Persian varieties in East or
South Florida; though native seedlings from
some of these succeed well. Plant your Peach
trees on high, rolling ridges; and if there is
clay near the surface, or if you can find and
use it in a compost around your trees, so much
the better. If you lack clay, use ashes freely,
composted with vegetable matter.
Orange trees may safely be transplanted, in
damp, cloudy or rainy weather, from this time
on during the winter.
Florida State Fair.
The "Premium List of the Eighth Annual
Florida State Fair"-a large and attractive
pamphlet of 16 pages, from the Florida .Union
Job Office -has just reached us, and we find
thatit is in nearly all respects, superior to any
similar List heretofore issued by the Associa-
tion. It is very comprehensive in its awards
and liberal in its provisions ;' and it now only
remains for the good people of Florida to "make
an effort," and we shall have a grand exhibi-
tion in every department of productive indus-
try and mechanical skill. It is no boast to say
that our favored.State possesses more peculiar
and varied capacities and resources than any
other commonwealth on this continent, and our
people can easily prove this to the satisfaction
of the world, by bringing forward to the com-
ing Exposition everything which the mind
can invent, the hands fashion, or the soil pro-
duce Let each and every Departmentbe well
filled, and let us place Florida whii;e she rightly
belongs-in the front rank of American States!
The Fair opens in this city on the 13th
of February next, and continues four days.
Sen d for Premium List !
The New Florida Pamphlet.
THE RESOURCES AND NATURAL ADVANTA-
GES OF FLORIDA; containing special papers
descriptive of the several Counties. By. A. A.
ROBINSON, Conmmiioner of Immigration.
1882.
A neat, closely-printed and well-filled pam-
phlet of nearly 200 pages,(from the Floridian
press at Tallahassee;) which, frankly, honestly
and admirably sets forth the Resources and
Natural advantages of Florida, without any
sensational statements or verbal extravagance.
It affords us sincere pleasure to be able to give
this pamphlet hearty and unstinted praise, and
to recommend it to all who are seeking correct
information in regard to our State. The map
of Florida, accompanying the Report, is a very
excellent and valuable one, embracing all the






r


























i


Our Equine "Daisy."
Through the courtesy of Richard :'K oi:
Esq., proprietor of the National Police Gazette,
we are enabled to present to our readers this
week, a full page portrait of the renowned trot-
ter "Police Gazette," formerly "Emma B."
We do this, not with the idea of encouraging
the raising .of trotting-stock in our State, but
for the purpose of attracting the attention of
our agriculturists, and trying to induce them to
infuse more pure and distinguished blood into
all stock that may be raised here; and hope to
be able from time to time to present portraits
of other blooded stock, trusting that our
new comers, at least, will devote more time to
the raising of good stock than many of our
older citizens have done.
Emma B. won a record of 2:23 when but six
years old, and now, in the prime of life, gives
promise .of achieving still greater lause. She
is a silky-coated grey, of good size'and bearing,
with clear cut head, intelligent eyes, and a neck
of moderate length oblique shoulders, strong,
muscular back and lomis,witngoodfeet and sym-
metrical limbs. In fact, she possesses every-
thing for the making of a superior trotter, and
her records show she is destined to achieve
"wonders" in the near future.
Among her arAcest6r' rhaf- be melitioned
Maud S. Nutwood, 2:181; Mambrino Gift,
2:20; Noontide, 2:201; Mambrino Pilot, son
of Hannis, 2:171, and John Morgan, who was
a formidable competitor of Flora Temple.
No MORE RACING.--We heartily agree with.
the ridi U whihsy: I
bOur State Fanis cani cease to pay so mu'dl
attention td ricimig and save the Aidne thus
squandered to swell their premium list for val-
uable, agricultural products. We .trust our
own Fair Associatibn will put this suggestion.
in their pipe and smoke it.
[They have smoked the pipe out, and resolved
that, hereafter, as an industrial, practical
and progressive Association, they will let all
"agricultural racing" alone, "severely."-Dis-
PATCH.]


Orange Trees--Distance, &c.
Iepying to tih inquiries and suggestions of"
Sour, friend and subscriber, "N. L. S.," we would
say that 20x20 feet seems to us about the
proper distance to plant ordinary "standard"
orange trees, in grove. Were we planting a
grove of Mandarins, Satsumas, or other dwarf-
ish or low-growing sorts, we should reduce the
Sspaces to 15x15, or even 10x10 feet each way.
The following calculations of number of trees
on an acre at certain distances, is, probably,
sufficiently correct to answer our subscriber's
purpose: At 4 feet apart each way, 2729; at
5, 1742; at 6,1200; at 8, 680; at 10, 430; at
S12, 325; at 15, 200; at 18, 135;'at 20, 110;
at 25; 7i; at 30, 50. The number of plants
required for an acre at any given distance
Apart, may be ascertained by dividing the num-
ber of square feet in an acre (43,560) by the
number of square feet given to each plant,
which is obtained by multiplying the distance
between rows by the distance between the
plants. Thus, strawberries planted three feet
by one foot, give each plant three square feet,
or 14,520 plants to the acre.


Florida Dispatch Line Cars.
All of the new freight cars of the Savan-
nah, Florida and Western Railway, are made
ventilated fruit cars, as per cut, on page 441 of
this paper. The old style box cars are also be-
ing transformed and made over to the new
style Florida Dispatch Line car. This car can
be made either a close or ventilated car by the
movement of the doors, which is controlled
from the outside.

Orange Statistics.
We were rather severely criticised last season
upon our estimate of the orange crop. We
placed it at 50,000,000 oranges or about 312,-
500. boxes. Since then, the census report, which
is said to be as near accurate as a year's labor
therein, by an efficient Bureau could obtain,
placed it 46,097,856. The statistics from trans-
portation companies indicate the movement of
about 310,000 boxes of oranges, season of 1881
and 1882. We now estimate the crop of sea-
son 1882 and 1883 at 47,250,000 oranges or
315,000 boxes. Next ?

Analysis of Commercial Fertilizers.
As per resolution passed at the last annual
meeting of the Florida Fruit-Grower's Associ-
ation, a committee was appointed, to draft a
suitable memorial to the Legislature, to have
passed, an act; requiring the inspection
and analysis by competent authority, of all
commercial fertilizers, offered for sale, within
the State. This is a matter of considerable
impoitai ce to the farmers and fruit-growers,
arid worthy of intense thought and free discus-
sion, previous to the next session of the Legis-
lature, that such an organization may be ef-
fected, as will meet all requirements, and at
the same time not be incorporated with poli-
tics, or its offices or emoluments farmed out
bytAly ilnalApapa[t#I*lk&l e *0 f.eitter, s~
gested frqgn a glance at the experience of other
States,whi-M his matter is aade political,to the
extent thit, the if~iers in charge of the latter,
secure e. appointmt .through ..th influence
they maexertieai previous election. We
cannot foresee C anent efficiency, when aspi-
rants to, chositiot ar*imfluendle .by such
motives. ',
The idea then would be, that we want the
law'.lol^Me authority of:the o gtaf W c4, and
itra~isihce: it i thaeiolletionanklc a iil di~tutemierit'
of the expenses, not from the State's treasury
or'revenue, but by a board or bureau of the
farmers and fruit-growers' own creation, and a
revenue for its sustenance derived in some


ridge, Jacksonville.
-THE LARGEST QUADRUPEDALL) HOG !-The
N. Y. World, in answering an Ohio corres-
pondent, says : "We have no means of know-
ing the weights of the largest hogs, except as
they are published in such local newspapers as
we may see. We know of no official record
being kept anywhere, not even in the Agricul-
tural Bureau among other useful statistics.
The heaviest hog of which we have any record
noted is one of 1,332 pounds, killed in Missouri
last year. If you have any list of big hogs
and will send it, it would doubtless be an item
of interest to some persons."


437


II I


ow


able tax upon it? The old farmers depend
upon their stock and stable manure ; some
make an orange grove with cattle ; others upon
muck and homemade composts. Many of the
latter are drifting into the habit of buying com-
mercial fertilizers, as also the truckmen ; they
depend almost entirely upon money and not
muscle for plant-food. The experienced have
so figured it down, that they can foretell, very
nearly, what they can make on market gard-
ening. The profits in this section are so great
that it has a tendency to make one lazy the
balance of the season, and hence he is averse
to working the year round; and buys his fertil-
izers. The trade in commercial fertilizers seems
to be rapidly increasing, hence this thought
and action, as to what steps had best be taken
by the purchasers to protect themselves, and
know that they get what they bargain for.
Our columns are open to a discussion as to
what is required, and we trust those interested
will quickly and freely make known their ideas
as to the best course to pursue. We have no
settled policy in the premises and only indite
this to provoke reply.
THE WEEKLY UNION has been enlarged to
an eight page 56-column paper, and will be
sent from date of receiving subscription to 1st of
January, 1883, for 25 cts., or to 1st of January,
1884, for $2.00.
THE CONVENTION OF VEGETABLE GnOWERS
will be held in Tallahassee, on Monday, the
16th of October. We will publish the excel-
lent article of our correspondent "C." in Dis-
PATCH of October 9th. It was, unfortunately,.
received too late for this issue.
MAP AND CIRCULAR, descriptive of Gulf
Coast Agency; M. R. Marks, agent, Anclote,
Fla. From Florida Land and Improvement
Company, Jacksonville, Fla. It is an admira-
bly gotten up little map, showing 268,000 acres
of land on Gulf of Mexico. It is known as
the Disston Gulf Coast Reserve, and the lands
represented in it are especially adapted to the
culture of tropical fruits and products.
BERMUDA ONION SEED.--For the benefit of
our readers, we give the names of firms from
whom the fresh and genuine Bermuda Onion
Seed (Tucker's importation) may now be ob-
tained : C. H. Leffier and J. T. Kelly, San-
ford ; Bruce, Rodgers & Co., Orlando ; Andrew
Aulin, Lake Jessup; Dr. G. L. Jones, Apopka;
Charles T. Smith & Co., Fort Mason; Messrs.
Hunter & Son, Live Oak; R. R. Snowden,
Ocala; W. O. Waltz, Palatka; Dr. T Hart-





way from the business itself. 'This would seem
to necessitate the taxing of the fertilizers man-
ufactured or offered for sale within the State.
Tdef Mettei i done-lt Georgiaf and South "Caro-
lina, and a fund derived thereby, that not only
maintains the bureau, but returns a handsome
surplus to the State.
The manufacture and sale of commercial
fertilizers in Florida, has been rather limited,
owing nq ddubt to the iany natural iigredi-
ents and facilities for homemade fertilizers. The
question would then arise, will the demand and
sale of commercial fertilizers in Florida, justify
the establishment of an efficient bureau for its
regulation, that could be sustained by a reason-


T~fE F IL 0 R 11) ~ A D I S.P A T CH or.





3S -THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


NOTE.-The highest and lowest temperature of th e
month and the maximum wind velocity occurred on
one day, the 9th. The rainfall was abnormally heavy
and decidedly in excess of that of any month as far as the
station extend, (nearly three years) except August of last
year, when the precipitation, as will be seen by the
comparative figures, was about one-tenth of an inch
heavier.
M. McGAURAN,
Observer Sig. Ser., U. S. A.
[EXTRACT, FORM No. 113, A.]
CEDAR KEYS, FLA., Sept. 1, 1882
Monthly mean actual barometer, 7 a. m., 3 p. m., 11p.
m. observations, 30.046.
Monthly mean reduced barometer, 7 a. m., 3 p. m., 11 p.
m. observations, 30.066.
Highest barometer and date, 30.220, on 6th.
Lowest barometer and date, 29.893, on 28th. Range 0.327
inch.
Monthly mean temperature, 81.40.
Highest temperature and date, 920, on 22d.
Lowest temperature and date, 700, on 29th.
Monthly range of temperature, 22.
Greatest daily range and date, 19, on 22d.
Least daily range and date, 70, on 3d and 7th.
Monthly mean humidity, 74.6 per cent.
Monthly mean dew point, 72.2.
Total rainfall, 13.72 inches.
Total monthly movement of wind (11 p. m. to 11 p. m.)
5,622 miles.
Maximum velocity of wind and direction, 29 miles per
hour, east on 20th.
Number of clear days on which rain fell, 3; on which
no rain fell, 5.
Number of fair days on which rain fell, 10; on which
no rain fell, 9.
Number of cloudy days on which rain fell, 4;on which
no rain fell, 0.
Number of days on which rain fell, 17; on which no
rain fell, 14.
Dates of solar halos, none observed.
Dates of luna halos, 27th.
Dates of zodiacal light, none.
Dates of frost, none.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 7 a. m. for month, 6.2 miles per hour-northeast.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 3 p. m. for month, 8.3 miles per hour-west.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 11 p. m. for month, 7.4 miles per hour-southwest.
GALES OF 25 MILES PER HOUR AND OVER:
2d, southwest-28 miles per hour.
16th, south-26 miles per hour.
20th, northeast-29 miles per hour.
Prevailing wind direction, determined from the three
telegraphic observations, west.
Prevailing wind direction, determined from the five
daily observations, west.
Number of fair sunsets, 21; verified, 16; not verified, 5;
Number of foul sunsets, 10; verified, 9; not verified, 1
Number of doubtful sunsets, 0.
Percentage of verifications, 80.6.
FRED. VW. MIXER,
Pvt. Signal Corps, U. S. A.
PUNTA RASSA, FLA., Sect. 1,1882.
Highest barometer, 30.265, on 6th.
Lowest barometer, 29.931, on 14th.
Monthly range of barometer, 0.334
Highest temperature, 920, on 7th.
Lowest temperature, 72, on 19th.
Monthly range of temperature, 200.
Greatest daily range of temperature, 180, on 19th.
Least daily range of temperature, 7.50, on 13th.
Mean of maximum temperatures, 88.40
Mean of minimum temperatures, 7.5.9
Mean daily range of temperature, 12.50
Prevailing wind direction, east.
Total monthly movement of wind, 5,840 miles.
Maximum velocity of wind and direction, 36 miles,
south.
Number of foggy days, none.
Number of clear days 4
Number of fair days, '1.
Number of cloudy days on which no rain or snow
fell, 1.


Meteorological Summary for August, 188 4.
SIGNAL OFFICE.
PENSACOLA, FLA., Sept. 1, 1882
Average barometer for month, 30.037.
Highest barometer for month, 30.194, on 6th.
Lowest barometer for month, 29.815 on 28th.
Range of barometer for month, 0.379.
Average temperature for month, 78.80.
Highest temperature for month, 92.00 on 9th.
Lowest temperature for month, 70.10 on 9th.
Variation temperature for month, 21.90.
Greatest daily variation of temperature, 21.90 on 9th.
Least daily variation of temperature, 5.10 on 21st.
Average daily maximum of temperature, 85.30
Average of daily minimum of temperature,73.30
Average daily variation of temperature, 12.00
Average temperature of warmest day, 82.90 on 8th.
Average temperature of coolest day, 75.40 on 21st.
Average temperature of dew point, 73.50
Highest temperature of dew point, 790 on 8th
Lowest temperature of dew point, 68 on 2d
Average humidity, per cent., saturation, 100, 81.7
Average humidity of moistest day, 96.0 on 21st
Average humidity of driest day, 75.3 on 15th
Total rainfall for month, inches, 18.39.
Greatest rainfall in a day, inches, 2.32 on 212d
Prevailing direction of wind for month, south.
Total movement of wind, miles, 4,525.
Greatest daily movement, miles, 241 on 5th
Least daily movement, miles, 98 on 16th
Maximum hourly velocity of wind, miles, 29 on 9th
Average cloudiness per cent., obscuration 100, 59
Number of cloudy days, no rain fell, 1
Number of fair days, no rain fell, 2
Total number of days rain fell, 26
Number of clear days, 2
COMPARATIVE STATISTICS. 1880 A IGST
I 1880 [11881 i 1882
Average barometer............................ 30.008 29.987 30.037
Average temperature...........................80.3 81.0 !78.8
Highest temperature...................... 93 93 92.0
Lowest temperature................................. 70 69 170.1
Total wind movement miles............. 5,274 6,412 4,525
Highest hourly veloctly, miles.............. 32 40 29
Prevailing wind direction..................... SW. IS S.
Total rainfall, inches ............................... 4.68 18.52 18.39
Number of days rain fell....................... 19 10 26


24 LAURA STREET,
JACKSON VILLE - FLORIDA,
Gunsmithing done in all its branches.
u IRON SAFE WORK.
Special rates on Stencil Cutting, by mail. Address,
to june 2'83, (P. 0. B0ox 833.)

E- B1& T,

Commission Merchant,
AND DEALER IN
Florida Oranges and Lemons,
74 WEST BAY STREET.
N. Y. Depot, MAXFIELD & Co., 67 and 69 Park Place; Mag-
azine and Packing House, Waycross R. R.Wharf.
MANUFACTURER'S AGENT FOR
THE BANGOR BOX MATERIAL, HOOPS, Etc.
Have a large quantity of Manilla Wrapping
Papers, at Lowest Market rates.
Send in your orders for BOX MATERIAL. Can
ship promptly while freights are light. Have great
difficulty in getting it transported during the busy
season. [to March 25 '83


r
J


A COOK for small family in the country. High wages
and light work. Address
JAMES FRANKLIN
to Oct 17, 82p.] Yalaha, Fia.

RICH'D H. MARKS'



ORANE OOIUTY LAND AGENCY,
SANFORD, FLORIDA,
Agent in Orange County for

FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMP'Y.

BUYS AND SELLS

Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission,

ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
june 12-tf


~L-- --


Number of cloudy days on which rain or snow fell, 5.
Total number of days on which rain fell, 17
Depth of unmelted snow on ground at end of month, 0
Dates of auroras, none.
Dates of solar halos, none
Dates of lunar halos, 26th.
Dates of frosts, 0
COMPARATIVE TEMPERATURE.
1871, 00; 1872, 810; 1873, 80.2; 1874, 81.20; 1875 80.50; 1876,
11.40; 1877, 82.10; 1878, 830; 1879, 80.9; 1880, 80.3, 1881, 80.6;
1882, 80.80.
COMPARATIVE PRECIPITATION.
1871, 00; 1872, 4.09 inches 1873, 9.85; 1874, 5.11; 1875, 12.49;
1876, 5.19; 1877, 8.33; 1878, 3.45; 1879, 12.75; 1880, 8.55; 1881, 7.28;
l882, 3.62.
W. J. EVANS,
Sergeant Signal Corps, U. S. A.
KEY WEST, FLA., Sept. 1, 1882.
Monthly mean actual barometer of three telegraphic
observations, 30.021.
Monthly mean reduced barometer of three telegraphic
observations, 30.011.
Highest barometer and date, 30.143 on 6th; lowest and
date, 29.952 on 19th; range, .191.
Monthly mean temperature 84.60; highest and date,
930 on 4th, 26th and 27th; lowest and date, 720 on 13th.
Monthly range of temperature, 210; greatest daily
and date, 170 on 19th; least daily and date, 9 on 8th, 22d
and 25th
Monthly mean humidity, 72.00.
Monthly mean dew point, 74.30
Prevailing wind direction determined from three tele-
graphic observations, southeast; three daily observa-
tions, east.
Total rainfall or melted snow, 4.97 inches.
Average depth of unmelted snow on ground at end of
month, none.
Total monthly movement of wind from 11 p. m. to 11 p.
m., 4,591 miles.
Maximum velocity and direction, 36 miles, north-
east, 13th.
Number of foggy days, none.
Number of clear days on which rain or snow fell, 2; on
which no rain or snow fell, 9.
Number of fair days on which rain or snow fell, 9; on
which no rain or snow fell, 9.
Number of cloudy days on which rain or snow fell, 2;
on which no rain or snow fell, 0.
Number of days on which rain or snow fell, 13; on
which no rain or snow fell, 18.
Dates of auroras and times of beginning and ending,
none observed.
Dates of solar halos, 6th, 7th 18th and 19th
Dates of lunar halos, none observed.
Dates of zodiacal lights, none observed
Dates of frost, none occurred
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 7 a. m., for month, 4.9 miles, southeast
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 3 p. m., for month, 7.1 miles, southeast.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 11 p. m., for month, 4.4 miles, east.
Gales of 25 miles per hour and over (dates, wind direc-
tions and wind velocity); 28 southeast, 9th. 36 northeast,
13th, squalls lasting but a few minutes.
Thunder-storms on.the 7th, 9th, 12th, 13th, 18th, 19th
and 30th.
Number of fair sunsets, 10.
Fair sunsets verified, 9; not verified, 1.
Number of foul sunsets, 21.
Foul sunsets verified, 10 ; not verified, 11.
Number of doubtful sunsets, none.
Per centage verified, "61.3
SBR. H. PAXTON,
Sergeant Signal Corps, U. S. A.


A. N. DOBBINS & BRO.,


1


GREAT INDUCEMENTS IN

ORANGE GROVES.

A chance for small as well as large Capitalists.
I AM OFFERING FOR SALE some of the finest young
Orange Groves in Florida, at prices far below their true
value. My reason for these extraordinary offers is that
I wish to concentrate myattention and means upon my
other property.
First.-1 offer nine groves of 20 acres each known as
part of my Hyde Park place, one mile south of Ocala.
These groves are fully set with trees, one-half being
sweet seedlings five years old, and the remainder five
year-old trees with sweet buds. Trees all growing luxu-
riantly. Price, from $150 to $200 per acre, according to
location and size of trees.
Second.-I offer thirty-two (32) lots-part of same tract
and same location-each containing five acres, upon
which no trees are planted. Price, $500 per lot, and I to
furnish (without extra charge) to the purchaser of each
lot 250 sour trees containing dormant sweet buds.
These lands are desirable for the following considera-
tions:
LOCATION.-They are situated one mile south of the
growing town of Ocala, the county site of Marion
County.
QUALITY.-They are of the best quality of marl ham-
mock-high rolling and well watered, and admirably
adapted to the growth of the orange.
HEALTH.-NO portion of the State can show a better
record for health.
TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES.-The Florida Southern
Railway, and the Tropical Railroad pass through these
lands, and each will have depots or flag stations on the
same-thus giving every facility for travel and ship-
ment of freight.
SURROUNDINGs.-The lands adjacent are being rapidly
settled by first-class people, including, among others
Generals CHAMBERLAIN and TILLSON, of Maine and
Dr. G. T. MAXWELL late of Atlanta, but now of Ocala,
who have invested in adjacent lands, and are making
valuable improvements. The society is as good as can
be found anywhere, and the religious and educational
advantages are unsurpassed. Besides the public schools
in the vicinity, the Ocala High School, a first-class in-
stitution, is sufficiently near to be attended by the chil-
dren of settlers upon these lands.
SUjter Ooiamty Gro-~vesm.
I also offer the following lands in Sumter County,
Florida:
First.-Forty-acre lot (known as Hacienda Grove),
with eighteen acres in grove of oranges and lemons,
having upon the same a good dwelling house. Of the
trees in this grove, fifty are now bearing, and all will be
bearing in two years. Upon this tract is a nursery of
12,000 budded trees from four to five years old-one-half
oranges, and the rest in my celebrated lemons, that
took the premium at the Atlanta Exposition and the
Orange County Fair.
Second.-Watula Grove, containing twenty acres, of
which twelve acres are in orange trees, about two hun-
dred of which are bearing, and the remainder will be
bearing in two years. There is also upon this tract a
nursery of ten thousand five year-old sour trees budded
with orange and lemon buds.
Third.-Forty acres of unimproved hammock land. u
LOCATION.-The above tracts are all beautifully situa-
ted on Panasoffkee Run, one mile from Panasoffkee
Lake, in which is known as the "Tropical Centre,"
where the tenderest tropical plants are never injured by
cold weather. They adjoin the celebrated groves of Rt.
Rev. Bishop John F. Young and A. C. Brown; are upon
a navigable stream, and nine miles from a depot of the
Tropical Railroad. The lands in the immediate vicinity
are being rapidly settled by the best of citizens.
PRICEs.-Tract No. 1, $15,000; Tract No. 2, $10,000; Tract
No. 3, $5,000-with budded trees* sufficient to plant the
whole forty acres.
QUALITY OF LAND.-The above-mentioned tracts are
of the best quality of rich marl hammock, high, rolling
and well watered, and, in my opinion, better adapted
than any other lands in the State to the growth of Or-
anges, Lemons, Limes and other tropical fruits.
For further information, address
A. L. EICHELBERGER, AGENT.
to oct 25.] Ocala, Marion Co., Florida.

FOL, SALE.

One hundred thousand Wilson's Albany Straw-
berry plants, Two Dollars per Thousand.
P. BARRENTINE,
to oct 13-p Buffalo Bluff, Fla.

WANTED.






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.S

REMOVED. BUY THE BEST AND CHEAPEST
I have removed my seed store to No. 22 East Bay st.,
next door to post-office, where I have the largest and
-------o-----
-0
most complete stock of pure and fresh Seeds in the State.
S. L. TIBBITTS, GOULD & CO. eS
to Dec. 3, '82 Jacksonville, Fla.


An Orange Grove or Orange Lands, in a healthy, beauti-
ful country,
Entirely Free from FroFt,


where you have the finest
FISHING,
OYSTERS,
SHRIMP,
CRAB,
GAME
of all descriptions, and the best chance to raise early
vegetables, in a new country. Address me with stamp,
at Anclote, Hillsborough County, Florida.
I can sell you five acres,.or five thousand acres, as you
desire.
to aug 20, '83 M. R. MARKS.
C 00 g I RIp1UT OUR ENGINE IS
COTTONisKINGKINGf6TTNi
u AING fCOTTONI
Invaluable patented improvements foad in no other
EJY1JVES in the world. For Pamphlets and Price
List, (also for SAW MILLS), address
THE AULTMAN & TAYLOR CO., Mansfield. Ohio.
(to Oct 6, '82)




Nurseryman Florist

A full and choice stock of

Flowers, Plants & Trees,
CONSTANTLY ON HAND.
1ROSES a specialty.
Several thousand Sweet Seedling Orange Trees, Chero-
kee Roses and Strawberry Plants for sale.
Wilson Albany Strawberry, price per M.................. 2.00
Address, WM. DALE,
to nov. 27 82. Jacksonville, Florida.

Pitman's Phonography
thoroughly and successfully taught through the mail by
a practical short-hand writer. It is so simple as to be
easily learned by any one of ordinary ability in a very
short time, and the public benefits to be derived from
it are entirely incalculable. Especially adapted to tak-
ing notes at lectures and every variety of verbatim re-
porting at a speed of 150 to 200 words per minute; com-
manding a salary of from $40 to $175 per month. Tui-
tion, includingbook, $12; also, for $1.00 will be mailed
a system of acqTiring proficiency in penmanship with-
out an instructor. The trade supplied with books of
instruction at ptiblisher's prices. Circulars on applica-
tion. CHAS. R. MITCHELL,
Sept. 4 & 18, Oct. 2 & 16, Hawkinsville, Ga.

THE SUWANNEE


STEAM SAW & PLANING BILLS,
EL.LA-VI LLE, FLORIDA,

DREW & BUCKI, Proprietors.
0
-----0-
We respectfully announce to our friends and the pub-
lic generally, that, having secured the services of com-
petent Draughtsmen, Architects and Mechanics, we are
prepared to estimate on and contract for the building of

DWELLINGS,
COTTAGES,
FACTORIES,
HOTELS
PUBLIC EDIFICES,


etc., at any point accessible by the several railroad and
steamboat lines. Possessing the advantage of manufac-
turing our own lumber, we are enabled to offer very lib-
eral inducements as to terms and quality of material.
Draughts, plans, estimates and information furnished
on application.
We have also made extensive additions to our Plan-
ing Mill, and will continue as heretofore, to manufacu-
ture and keep in stock a full line of Framing aid Finish-
ing Lumber, Mouldings, Brackets, Balusters, Pickets,
Laths, etc.
DJuREW E e, UCl 2I,
July 17, '82-tf. Ellaville, Florida.


FERTILIZER
-AND-
I3I2TSECT EM2CTE!VIZI3N.-A.TaO,


Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange Growers and Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, cor-
tains potash, lime, phosphoric acid, ammonia and the other essential elements of Plant Food, making a corn
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & Bro.'s, and other high-priced Fertilizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity, and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $4 per barrel, $32 Der
ton.
All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.
MESSRS. GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-I used one-half ton of your Fertilizer, in connection with the same amount of Baker & Bro.'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gave as good results as the others, which are much higher priced fertilizers-costing
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $51.50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12, 1881.
LEESBURG, SUMTER CO., FLA., March 6, 1882.
GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed your
agents at this point (Messrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer,
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its fostering care, I having had the honor
to win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer better and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer kills two birds with one stone," inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies,
at one and the same time. I bave been testing it in the field, garden and orange grove for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For my part, I ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. if I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork.
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOURT.
GOULD & CO.,
to oct 27, '82 NO. 6 W. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


GEORGETOWN NURSERIES.
----o------
OR AN E AND LEMON TREES Budded from tried and approved varieties, and
ORANGE AND LEMON TREESon good healthy stocks.
Also, JAPAN PERSIMMONS, LECONTE PEARS, GRAPES, and a general line of Fruit Trees suitable to
Florida. Address,
Aug. OeorNoeto-wiv. Florida6
Aug. 14 to Nov. 6.


JOZTB 3 BOWBZW.


WHOLESALE GROCERS,

AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


ACER'S DRY HOP YEAST CAKES, Oc. PER


DOZ.


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND


SNOW-DROP PATENT FLOUR.

MIrst I-:=cds on Fiinest Q ualit3r

Best Butter in Tubs at 30 to 31 Cents per Pound,

: 10EP0rr7 O0 0 IC -0..-

No. Y' West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
tf

F. S. CONE, A. H. MANVILLE, E. A. MANVILLE,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer
lVX. .. T73 ILLE Ti. "T :SE rIE ,
Lake George, Florida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums
Peaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, and over one hundred varieties of the Citrus.
ORANGE03 ANITD LEMON TREES a specialty.
Catalogue free. to apr 17, '83


STRAWBERRY PLANTS FOR BALE LANDS FOR SALE
11TTTT A RT.T F nR.


Several thousand Nunan Variety. Price $4 per 1,000
packed and shipped in good condition. Money must
accompany each order.
Address, MIRS. A. -BEArJTTY,
to Nov. 6. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


In lots to suit, in the town of Satsuma, Putnam County,
Florida. Send for circular. to
WHITNEY, GOLD & HODGES,
Satsuma, Nashua P. O.,
june 26-tf FLORIt A..


I
1-~- -- - --- ------ -~ -V --~- --- 4 _L I -- L_-__ _~_ ____ ___ _






THE FtLORIDA DISPATCHIL


Agricultural, Hlorticultural and Pomnological
Associations.
Florida Fruit-Growers' Associatioii-Offi6e at Jack-
sonville-D. Redmond, President; W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; W. H. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding Sec-
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee-Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, 0. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official organ-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIBA STATE GRANGE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICES.-Master, Wmin. H. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Wm. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B. F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Field-
ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. H. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate
Keeper, Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Win. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T. W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H.
Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Geo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Umstead, Hous-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville.-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J. C. Greeley, Treasurer.
Directors-J. H. McGinniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro, P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney.. Annual meeting-
Last Friday in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; 0. E. Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. 0. Taylor, Secretary and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Florida.-President, A. B. Bartlett, Georgetown; Vice-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. .Hawkins, Lake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George; George H. Thorn, Treasurer
Georgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
mond, Fort Gates.` .
Picolata Agricultural and Horticulttral Socfety.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, W. N. ParKer, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugn, Corresponding Secretary,
N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., Recording Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer. Meets first Saturday in each month.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. Mathers, Second Vice-President; B.
W. Powell, Corresponding Secretary; B. F. Jordan, Sec-
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical Fruit Growers' Associailon of orioroe County,
Florida,-Home office, Myers, Florida; F. A. A. endry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson,
President; Thomas Tillis, First Vice-President; J. B.
Sutton, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-'
ponding Secretary; J. M. Barco Recording Secretary;
L. W. Hamlin, Assistant Recording Secretary.
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Association.-
John Bradford, President, Bradfordville, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida .
PineJlias Florida, Fruit Growers' Association.-D. W.
Meeker, President; Win. P. Neeld, Secretary.
Central Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida.-Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
Evergreen Horticultural Society, Dunedin, Florida.-
J. W-. :Matehett, President; W. Tate,, Vice-President;
Geo.. Jones, Secretary.'; :
Decatur Couinty Fair Association, Bainbridge, Geor-
gia.-Maston O'Neil President I. Kwilecki, Secretary.
Lake Wier Agricultural and Pomological Society (of
Marion County, Florida).-Captain JS. L. Caeny, Presi-
dent; Dr. L. M. Ayer, Col-responding Secretary.
Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Higgiis, Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Association, Albany,
Georgia.-L. E. Welch, President; T. M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
Sunmter County Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation.-Col. T. C. Lanier, President; D. L. Hubbard,
Vice-President; A. P. Roberts, Corresponding Secre-
tary; iR. B. Sharrard, Recording Secretary;. Thos. W.
Spicer, Treasurer.


Suniter County Fair Association.-Col. T C. Lanier,
President; A. J. Phares, Vice-President; R. E. Sharrard,
Secretary; Thos W. Spicer, Treasurer.
Florida Central Agricultural Society.-Thos. F. King,
President Gainesville; Secretary,
---- ; W. K Cessna, Corresponding Secretary, Gaines-
ville.
Archer Agricultural Associatlon.--W. .Lipsey,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine, Secretary; Dr.J. Neal
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President; John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewis, Treasurer, Tallahassee.
Indian River Agricultural and Pomological Society.-
A. P. Cleveland, President; W. H. Sharp, Secretary,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
SMadison CQunty Agricultural arid Mechanical Fair
Association.-R. J. Mays, President; Frank W. Pope,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
Orange County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred L. Robertson, Corresponding
Secretary.
Gadsden County Fair Assodiation.-Jesse Wood Pres-
ident; W. H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R. Harris,
Second Vice-President; J. W. Kendricks, Secretary; E.
C. Lou, Treasurer.
South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion, Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations _above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
which we may have fallen in the naming of officers, &c.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH ?]


WVhoelesale Dealers in


Foreign and Domestic Fruits.


COMMISSION MERCHANTS FOR THE SALE OF


Florida Oranges and. &eons,


167 South Water St.,


CHICAGO, ILL.


,. - 0 ,

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED ,.
AtF-REFERENCES.-First National Bank, Jacksonville, Floridad v Unih;o Tational'anuk,, Chicago, llinois.
sept 4, tf. ___ :_



CAN MAKE MONEY BY USING


FORRESTER'S CHEMICAL MANURES,
PREPARED ESPECIALLY FOR

Vegetables, Orange Trees
SAND AIL. " L ,


4- BY -

GEO. B. FORRESTER, 169 Front St., New York.

THESE MANURES ARE PREPARED FROM CONCENTRATED CHEMICALS; ARE FREE FROM ODOR;

Do not Breed Vermin or Insects in the Soil.
SThiy have been used on FLORIDA LANDS for Years, and produce Wonderful Results.
For .sale by
.- _: ... LYMA.S N:or tELPS .o,
;, Sanford, Oran'ge Couiity, .Ilotrida.


FRANK W. MUMBY. JNO. N. C. STOCKTON. RAYYMOND 1). KNIGHT.

S MUM BY, STOCKTON & KNIQH T
SUCCESSORS TO -
1879.. I : ,
F. W. MUMBY CO. A JNO. S. DRIOGS & CO,
IMPORTERS AND WH LESALE AND RETAIL


Crockery, China, Glass and Earthenware.

We have the largest and most complete stock in the State. All the Latest Novelties in Majolica and Fincy
Goods, Vases, Motto Cups and Saucers, etc. Decorated Tea, Dinner and Chamber Sets in a large Variety. Lamps
and Chandeliers, Fancy Vase Lamps in Majolica, Faie4ce, Kito, Porcelain and other WAres. Wood and Willow,
Stone and-Tinware. The Amoeitan, rownii and Peerless Ice Cream Freezers, Water Coolers, Filters, etc.
SOLE STATE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED

Monitor Oil Stoves and Little Joker Oil Cans.
THE BRCST IN THE WORLD. Send for Price Lists.
The best and only absolutely safe Oil Stove in the World. It is Economical, Ornamental, Convenient, Dura-
ble, Compact and Cheap. Its fuel is Coal Oil. No Dust! No Ashes! No Smoke! No Trouble! Testimonials
from those using the*toves given on application.
-Fruit Jars and Jelly Tumblers, Wine Bottles, Flasks, etc. Special inducements to the trade.
Merchants, Hotels, Boarding Houses and Bars will find it greatly to their advantage to give us a trial. Send
lfor'ist of assorted packages.
S WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD.
MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
13 WEST BAY STREET. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to July 5, '83. (Mention this paper)


; O. L-. 3FOR SALE.

My residence in the town of Lie Oak. House con-
tains four rooms and hall, lathed and plastered; kitch-
en, pantry and dining-room attached under one roof.
House has been recently painted inside and out. Good
cistern convenient, large garden and yard, has fifteen
or twenty young orange trees, fine scuppernong grape-
vine; also, flowers and shrubbery,. To a cash purchas-
er a bargain willbe given. Apply to
A. L. WOODWARD, Callahan, or
Mus. A. L. WOODWARD, Live Oak.
to oct 3


Stra-wboerry. 'Lanrts-
(True to name.)
CRESCENT SEEDLING per M....................$5.00
NITNAN'S................................. ......... 4.00
SAddress CAPT. WM. JAMES,
to Oct. 26 '82. Jacksonville, Fla.
-
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


440


I ~I


- -- I-


I


1Y,7-Rend f6r cifeular.


(to mar. 13, '83)






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. -4f


FLORIDA


DISPATCH


LINE


I"RT E I'ECT fRue'I-raT"T .' eT0, T&FSF2.



Subject to Uniform Classification of Southern Railway & Steamship Association


To Stations on Florida Transit, Peninsula and Tropicai Railroads, Tampa, Manatee and
Gulf Coast Points, via Cedar Key.


BETWEEN
NEW YORK, BOSTON, PHILADELPHIA
AND BALTIMORE
(By Direct Steamship Only)
AND


Hart's Road......................... Florida.
Dutton's......... ..................... "
Tolu.................................... "
Brandy Branch .................... "
Maxville ................................ "
Highland.............................. 1
Lawtey................................ "
Temple's............................ ',
Starke..... .............. ....... "
Thurston.... ......................... "
W aldo............................. ........
Gainesville............... ......... "
Fairbank's............................ "
Arredondo ................... .. "
Archer.................................... 1 23
Batton's..............................
Bronson................................ "
Otter Creek...........................
Rosewood .......... .. ........ ...
Cedar Keys........................... 1 10
Tampa ................................... 10
Manatee.............. ................. . 1 10
Santa Fe.............................. "
Dixie..................................
Hawthorn .........................
Lochloosa.............................
Island Grove....................... "
Orange Lake......................... 1 2
Sparr's ............ ................ 1 23
Anthony Place... .................
Silver Springs................ .. "
Ocala.......................................
Lake W eir............................ "
W ildwood .......................... "


PER ONE HUNDRED POUNDS. PER BBL.


vi vii i hl "o


n^ ,,,sQ 0l 0
I I d


85178


1 03i



90
95




1 03


60 68



5565
50 75




60:68


)'73 83


II


1
634078



503265
60 4575




63 40 78


1 50


1 00 1 65



70il 25
90 1 35




1 00 1 65


90






90



90
90




90


To Landings on St. John's River, Palatka, Tocoi, St. Augustine, Stations on and via St. John's
& Lake Eustis Railway, Sanford, Enterprise and points on and via South Florida Railroad, Etc.

BETWEEN PER ONE HUNDRED POUNDS. Per Bbl.

NEW YORK, BOSTON, PHILADELPHIA
,, I "; I


AND BALTIMORE
(By Direct Steamship Only)
AND


Mandarin ....................................Florida.
Hibernia ............................... "
Magnolia ............... ....................
Green Cove Springs....................
Picolata ..................................... "
Federal Point ........................... "
Orange Mills................................
T ocoi ..........................................
Palatka..................................... "
St Augustine ............................... "
San Mateo...................................
Buffalo Bluff...............................
Welaka ...... ............................. "
Norwalk ....................................
Fort Gates................................ "
Georgetown....................... ..........
Seville.......................................
Volusia.................. .....................
Astor ..........................................
Bluffton......................................
DeLand Landing.......................
Lake Beresford.............. .........
Blue Spring................... ...............
Sanford ..................................
Enterprise................................ "
Stations on the St. Johns &
Lake Eustis Railway.............. "
Fort Mason, Yalaha................
Leesburg, etc...............................
Longwood...............................
Snow's ...................................
Maitland.........................
Orlando .....................................
Kissimmee City........................ "


90




1 20





1 10


0
Qj
(M


80



1 05





95


1 45 1 25


1 50 1 25

1 60 1 351


iii

0
Uj


a '~I a CFidi FiI
u c- r ~
00WW


E
n8
0/


50 40 140M4 i0


98180 67 55


I


0


U


90



130


85 70 5545 50505032 55 55 65 1 20






1 13 9577 65 7270 68 47 80 77 95 1 80


1 10192,75 63686570 5080 75 1 00 1 85

1 20198 79 65 72 67 75 54 85 801 1 15 2 20


Special Rates on Hay, Hoop-Iron, Empty Barrels, Moss, and Salt, furnished on application.

Through i'w1 Bills Lading =eguaranteeing RMates to Destinatio:n.

Prompt adjustment of all just Olaims.

V-IMarkl: aand consig7 Xreig-ht "6via S., P. &t T7"7. 1aillera-y."


F&For further information, call on or address
H. YONGE, Jr., C. D. OWENS,
Agent Ocean Steamship Company, General Agent S., F. & R'y,
Pier 35 North River, New York. 315 Broadway, New York.


JAS. L. TAYLOR,
General Freight Agent,
Savannah, Ga.


I ? ~-1-1-1-1--1, 1 I


--r~~-- -- '----~1- 1--1--1 --1-1-111 1-1 I-I~-1--( L I-


-- ~- -- - -- -- I ----- .-- ----- -- ___ -- c~ I
----~----- ----.....


"i I


1lf rigIS


Vol


...... I ...I.....








THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WE AILWAY
IA-tUIA




WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
eN AND AFTER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7th, 1882, Pas-
senger Trains will run over the Waycross Short Line
as follows;


THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
Jl,Jacksonville to Cincinnati.
i.,Jacksonville to Charleston, connecting with
through Pullman Cars for Washington.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lisled at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
Passengers going to the West and Northwest take the
evening train.
The Dining Car attached to the train between Savan-.
nah and Charleston atffrds supper to passengers going
North and breakfast to those cooling South.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Molbile IRailroad either take train at Live uak, leaving
2 p.1n. m and arriving at Savannah at 2:3.5 a. ml., or train
at Jacksonville, leaving at 9 a. mi. and arriving at Sa-
vaninall at 3:10 i). Im.
Con ecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Pliladelplia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connect ing at (Charleston with steamers for New
York,Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through ticketss sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, and at Depot
Ticket Office. JAS. L. TAYLOR,
Gen'l Freight and Pass. Ag't.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*]

COLONEY, TALBOTT & CO.,


Real Estate


Agents,


I


- ` im


I


jacUKi lle J. .
Daily.
6:10 p. m.
7:30 a. m.
7:05 p. m.
9:20 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
2:30 a. m.
8:45 a. im.
1:30 p. m.
7:00 a. m.
12:50 p. mn.
7:30 a. m.
7:00 a. m.
7:40 a. m.
9:30 a. nm.
3:50 p. m.
7:00 p m.
7:09 p. m,
6:40 hours.
45:45 hours.
36:30 hours.
49:00 hours.
49:00 hoursA


DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,

GLUES, BRUSHES,

Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
--o-

CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.


COLD AND METAL LEAF, OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
BRONZE, COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE, Y EAR


Sand atnd E mnery Papers, &e.
AGENT FOR
PRA TTS MINERAL COLZA OIL,
300)O, 3FII3E TEfET.


Johnson's IPrepared Ailcsomine. 1
worth, Martinez and Longman's
T .... -,-,, D,,,o


/18s-


JL/. I L&, L tt0. IO
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
to mar 25,'83 JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Fine Nunan Strawberry Plants. The best kno'yn
variety for shipment.
100 P lants..................... ....................................$ .75
500 Plants........................................................ 2.00
1000 Plants............................... ....................... 3.00
Terms cash delivered at Express Office or Railroad,
Charleston. Address,


to Oct. 7-P.


JA1IES PRICE,
112 Broad Street,
CHARLESTON, S. C.


ELLMIS & McCLUTTRUE,


Architects an Givil ERMn nors.


Plans, Specifications and Estimates for Buildings of
all kinds. Water Supply, Drainage, Seweraug, Bridges'
Roofs, Etc. P. 0. Box 78. RIooin No. 12 Palmnetto Block,
Bay Street. to Feb. 7, 83


RUBBER STAMPS
Are manufactured right in our establishment in the
best manner and at the shortest notice.
A-Send in your orders.


May 1-tf


ASHMEAD BROS.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


---- ---- -r - -- :-----3t -- -- ~ .. .. ... ....... .. .


Mogth to WhiteOwasR,
MAXWELL'S PREjPARED GYPSUM, for Whiteing
and Coloring Stores, Factories, Mills, Dwellings,
Churches, Barns, or for any purpose where whitewash
or calsomine is used; is easily applied; keeps clean
longer than lime ; will not crack, peel or rub off; does
better work than lime; its sanitary qualities are excel-
lent. Packed in barrels, half-barrels and kegs. Send
for circulars. tFI azlett <& Foster,
sept 11 tf 132 W, Pratt-st., Baltimore.


to April 23- '83


Sti ery Plants For Sale!
200,000 Choice pure Beatty's stock........$4.00 per Thousand
100,000 Pure Nunan's............................... 6.00 per Thousand
50,000 Pure Crescent Seedlings............ 6.00 per Thousand
Terys : Cash with order.
Address. W. 3. SCUT.T,
to nov-3,12. Jacksonville, Florida.


rGrde eldad lower
WARRANTED ''S eJa,n and Everything
for the Farm and Garden. Illustrated Catat
logue sent free. JOHNSON & STOKES,
Seed and Agricultural Warehouse,
No. 1114 3Market street, Philadelphia
(to Jan 9, '83)

0. L. KEENE,


MILLINERY,


FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS, -


Laces, Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF


67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to feb 20, '83


S. B. HUBBARD & CO.,
JACK SONVILLE, IF'LA.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in

Hagrwaro, Stovfos, Doors, as1h, lB1s
PAINTS, OILS, PUMPS, LEAD AND IRON PIPE.
Sugar Mills, Rubber and Leather Belting,
Steam Gas-Fitting, Plumbing Tinsmithing,

Agricultural Implements of all Kinds,
HAZARD'S POWDER,
BARBED FENCE WIRE.
AGENTS FOR S. L. ALLEN & CO.'S GARDEN TOOLS.
Ar-Send for Price List and Catalogue,
to june 11 '83


1I


1.


I


D. G. AMBLER. .T. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON


Oldest-Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as

AMBLER'S BANK.
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., NeW
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf

AT MANDARIN, FLORIDA.
20 FORTY-ACRE TRACTS, only 12 miles from Jack-
sonville; extra good land, well-located, between river
and J., St. A. and H. R. R. R. Price, $10 per acre. Will
sell on monthly payments of $12.50. These lands will in-
crease in value, being located in an already prosperous
town, making a paying investment at small outlay.
Maps can be seen at No. 41 East Bay Street.
to nov 21, '82. GEO. R. REYNOLDS.
Jacksonville, Fla.


STRAWBERRY SHIHPPlNG AGENCY
-AND-
FRZTLI44Ia~U"-fl *ETABLE
REjPACKIN3G AND
COMMISSION HOUSE,
Has closed till NOVEMBER. ,sew ent address,
may 12, '83. tterI, N. Y.

VIEWS OF FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In Book Form, Containing 12
Vie vs Each.
Souveilir of Florida, (tinall size).................. 25c.
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size)...... ............ ........................... 25c.
Souvenir of Jacksonville,( large size).................0c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine,(large size)...............50c.

Ste pic Vie s r Doz. $1.0.
Address
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
J AC 1i$- IN V I L L E, FLtA.


I


Fast Mail.
Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at................. 9:00 a. m.
Arrive Jacksonville at................ 6:15 p. m.
Leave Callahan at.................... 9:45 a. m.
Arrive Waycross at .......................11:415 a. m.
Arrive Jesup at........................ 1:32 p. m.
Arrive at Brunswick at.............. 5:25 a. m.
Arrive Savannah at........... 3:35 p. m.
Arrive Charleston at.................... 9:10 p. m.
Arrive at Augusta at.................... 5:20 a. m.
A arrive M acon at................... ....................
Arrive Atlanta at......................
Arrive Louisville at.....................................
A arrive Cincin nati at ......................................
Arrive Washington at................... 9:30 p. m.
Arrive Baltimore at...................1..2:25 p. m.
Arrive New York P. R. R............. 6:45 a. m.
A arrive St. Louis at......................................
A arrive Chicago at.......................................
TIME.
To Savannah ..................... ......................
To N ew York .............................. .................
To W ashinglton ............................................
To Clhica-go....... ......... ........ .....
To St. Louis................................... .............


- __ -- I ---- I Il I I I I I L


--------


T I--1t^ "1I_


AY -wE2Iso ST.ST MARK'S HOTEL,


JACKSONVIL LE, FLA.
Have lands iir every county in the Orange Belt. at front
ti to $100 per acre, Orange groves from $1000 to 5100,000.
Government lands in every part of the Orange Belt.
Can guarantee all of our property.
Stra-wberliy Plants.
We have 200,000 best varieties for sale low.
Or-ange Trees.
We have 300,000 trees, all ages, for sale, at from 10 cents
to 52 per tree, as to age.

COLONEY, TALBOTT & CO.
Sep. 18, tf.



If you have any Books, Magazines, Pamphlets, etc.,
that you want bound, you cannot do better than send
them to the undersigned. They do all kinds of work in
the best style and at Northern prices.
Quotations furnished when desired. Address
ASHIMEAD BROs.,
Jacksonville, Fla.


Hickory Bluff, 46 acres, 18 acres Hammock, cleared and
enclosed with Picket fence. 200 thrifty young Orange
trees growing on the place. Bold bluff river front of over
a quarter of a mile, and steamer channel close in shore,
and over fire m iles of water protection to the northwest, giv-
ifjl P':rct seeurily against frost. Nine miles below Jack-
sonville, and one mile from New Berlin. Can come to
city every morning on mail steamer and return in the
afternoon. A choice place for orange growing and truck
farming. Price, $2,500.
Also, two desirable city lots 53x209 feet, and one 70x150
feet covered with thrifty orange trees 6 years old, half
mile from business center. Good neighborhood (all
white). Price of first, $600 each. Price ofsecond, a corner,
very handsome, $800. Apply to
JT. H. 1NO:RTON,
No. 1 West Bay Street, JACKSONVILLE.
State that you saw this in THE DISPATCH.
July 3, tf


I


T Ds 47'
tp s
HE, EL







THE FLORIDA. DISPATCH


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
-0--
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
0--
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSTJED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Ph ladelphia steamers for September are appointed to sail as follows:
CITY OF SAVANNAH, September 2d, at 10:00 a. m.
JICNIATA, September 9th, at 4:00 p. m.
RAPIDAN, September 16th, at 8:00 a. m.
JUNIATA September 23d, at 2:00 p. m.
RAPIDAN, September 30th, at 8:00 a. m.
9-The Rapidan does not not carry passengers.
Days and hours subject to change, without notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, WM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.


Ocean Steamship Company.


SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.





SAVANNAH, October, 1882.
The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Tuesday, October 3d, 11:30 a. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Friday, October 6th, 2:00p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Tuesday, October 10th, 5:30 p. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA; Friday, October 13th, 7:00 a. m.
TALLAHASSEE, Sunday, October 15th, 8:00 a. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Tuesday, October 17th, 10:00 a. nm.
CITY OF MACON, Friday, October 20th, 12:30 p. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Sunday, October 22d, 2:30 p. m.
TALLAHASSEE, Tuesday, October 24th, 4:30 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANINAH, Friday, October 27th, 7:00 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Sunday, October 29th, 8:30 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Tuesday, October 31st, 10:00 a. m.
TALLAHASSEE, Friday, November 3d, 12:30 p. in.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Sunday, November 5th, 2:00 p. in.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
H. YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agent of Line, and C. R. R. ofGa., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS,
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. Y.


Dl^ B Y BALTIMORE EXPRESS
0-o
MERCHANTS & MINERS

Merchants' Ine, TRANSPORTATION COMPANY!


CARRYING THE U. S. MAIL.



ELEGANT SIDE-WHEEL STEAMERS.
The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail
----- From BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH

FREDERICK DE BARY, Capt. Leo. Vogel. E VER Y FIVE DA Y S,
H. B. PLANT, Capt. J. W. Fitzgerald. and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE, as follows:
Friday, September 15th, at &830 a. m.
ANITA, Capt. C. H. Brock. Tuesday, September 19th, at 11 a. m.
Friday, September 22d, at 2 p. m.
One of the above-named steamers will leave De Bary Tuesday, September 26th, at 4 p. m.
Wharf, foot of Laura Street, daily except Sunday, at 3 Friday, september 29th at 9 a. n
p. m., for PALATKA, SANFORD, ENTERPRISE, and Tuesday, October 3d, at 11 a. m.
all intermediate landings. Friday, October dth, at 2 p. n?.
ROSA, Capt. J. L. Amazeen. Tuesday October 10th, at 4 p.m.
Friday, October 13th, at 8 a. im.
GEO. M. BIRD, Capt. G. J. Mercier. Tuesday, October 17th. at 10 a. m.


Fridayv"0etcher 20t!i, it I p. m.
Steamer ROSA leaves De Bary Wharf every Sunday Tuesday, October 24, at 4 p. n.
at 1 p. m., and every Wednesday at 5 p. m. for above- Fiday Otober, at p. in.
named landings. Tuesday, October 31, at 12 a .
Steamer GEO. M. BIRD leaves De Bary Wharf every The steamers are tirst-class in every respect, and every
Tuesday and Friday at 5 p. m. for same landings. attention will be given to passengers.
Connects at Palatka with Florida Southern Railroad CABIN FARE fmSavannahBaltimore $1
for Gainesville and Ocala. Including Meals and Stateroom.
Connects at Astor with St. John's and Lake Eustis For the acco odationof the Georiand Florida
Railroad for Ft. Mason, Yalaha, Leesburg and all points F the accommodation of the Georgia d Florida
on the Upper Ocklawaha. FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
Connects at Volusia with coaches for Ormond and
Daytona. this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
Connects atSanford with South Florida Railroad for perishable freight is transported to the principal
Longwood, Maitland, Apopka City, Altemonte, Orlando, points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Kissimmee, and with steamers for Lake Jessup, Salt Baltimore.
Lake and Rock Ledge and Indian River. By this route shippers are assured that their goods
Connects at Enterprise with coaches for Daytona and wil receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
New Smyrna. Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
Returning, Mail Steamers leave Enterprise every column.
morning at 7 a. m., and Sanford on arrival of train. JAS. B. WEST & CO., Agents.
Steamer Geo. M. Bird will leave Enterprise every -tf
Thursday and Sunday at 5 a. m. 30
Steamer Rosa leaves Enterprise exery Friday at 5 p. m.
*4'-Through bills of lading given to all points. | |
The steamers of this line are all first-class in every
respect. IUoria a PUuL UIt Homo
or further information, apply at General Ticket
Office, corner Bay and Laura Streets, Leve & Alden, A 32-PAGE PAMPHLET. PRICE, 10C.
corner Bay and Ocean Streets, or on board. Address,
W. B. WATSON, Manager. TELFAIR STOCKTON,
C. B. FENWICK, Gen. Pass. Agent. Aug. 7-tf. to oct 23. Jacksonville, Fla.


4-4-3


Boston fl Savannah stogmsliD Co.






ONLY DIRECT LINE.
Transhipment and extra handling avoided. Cars
unloaded at wharf in Savannah. First-class passenger ac-
commnodations.
The magnificent new Iron Steamships sail from Bos-
ton every Thursday at 3 o'clock, and from Savannah as
follows:
Gate City, Thursday, September 28th, at 7:30 a. m.
City of Columbus, Thursday, October 5th, at 2:00 p. m.
Gate City, Thursday, October 12th, at 7:00 a. m.
City of Columbus, Thursday, October 19th, at 12 m.
Gate City, Thursday, October 26th, at 6:00 p. m.
City of Columbus, Thursday, November 2d, at 12:30 p. m.
FIRST-CLASS CABIN PASSAGE SAME AS TO NEW
YORK.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
F. W. NICKERSON & CO., Savannah, Ga.
General Agents, Boston. 44-tf



ROUND-TRIP TICKETS TO

New York and Return.
OVER TIHE

Savannah, Florida & Western Railway,.
Via
Waycross Short Line and Ocean Steamship Company.

----o----

Close connection with the magnificently appointed
steamships
SAILING FROM SAVANNAH
every Wednesday and Saturday.
Passengers via this route will find every comfort and
convenience in this fleet of elegantly equipped steam-
ships, rivaling in construction and appointments the
finest ocean-going vessels of the day. The mixtures of
rail and water transportation-both of the best charac-
ter-combind the attractions of a first-class Summer
Excursion Route.
For tickets, engagement of staterooms and other in-
formation, apply to the office of the Savhnnah, Florida
& Western Railway Company, 84 West Bay Street (Astor
Building), or at the ticket office at the Waycross Short
Line Passenger Station.
JAS. L. TAYLOR,
General Pass. Agent.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent, Jacksonville. [to Oct. 2.



TO NEW YORK RETURN $43.50.



GOOD TO NOVEMBER 1st.



Via all Rail to Portsmouth, Virginia, and
thence by the elegant steamships of the
old Dominion Line to New York.


Persons leaving Jacksonville by the fast mail on Sun-
day, Monday, Tuesday and Friday, at 9 a. m., arrive at
Portsmouth the following afternoon, making close con-
nection with steamships, and arrive in New York the
next evening thereafter.


The appointments of this line, and elegant steamship
accommodations, the absence of delays, whether going
or returning, together with the low rate of fare, make it
a most desirable summer excursion route.
For tickets and other information, apply to office of
the S., F. & W. Railway, 84 West Bay Street (Astor
building), or the Ticket Office at the Waycross Short
Line passenger station.
JAS. L. TAYLOR,
Gen. Pass. Agent.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent, Jacksonville.
to Oct. 2.

tterntiot i Foultry :h^en:.
DR. R. BACHMANN'S Vermin Hate; the only relia-
ble antidote to Vermin on Poultry of every description
now extant, viz: Lice on Fowls and Fleas on Dogs; all
other domestic animals are benefitted by its use. This
being an internal remedy to be given mixed with the
food, because all external remedies have been a failure.
It is put up in packages of FIFTY CENTS and ONE DOL-
LAB. Sold at Groceries and Seed Stores. The best of
reference given on application to the proprietor.
R. BACHMANN, M. D.
Jacksonville, Florida.
Depot with PAINE BROS., 36 Bay Street.
aug. 21 to feb. 21. '83.


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_: _THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


FINE POULTRY. 'M"KS
American Sebrights-a few pairs, nice fowls
at $5.00 per pair. Address, D. REDMOND,
Jacksonville, Fla. oct2-1t.


N
U
83


to sept 10 '83

The agent of the "Royal Mail Line to the Nether-
lands," and of the "Florio Italian Line," in Jackson-
ville, offers his services to reliable parties in search oj
competent labor for their
Groves or Gardens,
to try to induce people from
Northern and Southern Europe
to come to Florida.
o-Correspondence solicited.
C. 1. VANDER LINDEN,
Care Florida Land and Imp't Co.,
sept 4, '82, tf. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

A Fine Imported Jersey led Boar, four
months old; and an Alderney B13ull, seven
months old.
Stock guaranteed. For prices and further information,
address
2k. 0. BLSAkND II G, ,
to oct3'82 Battonville, Florida.
BEESWAX WANTED.
I will pay 22 cents per pound for pure, bright beeswax
in lots of of 20 pounds each, or upwards. Five hundred
pounds wanted. Address
W. S. HART
to Oct. 3, '82 New Smyrna, Fla.
DIEHL'S PATENT BEE-HIVE,
"The most effective, simple and economical Hive yet
invented. All bee-keepers in Florida should take hold
of it. The agent is here, and you can buy rights for $5.
Address Z. G. HEGE, Agent,
to Oct. 3-p. Jacksonville, Fla.
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING "IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


Offer from October 1, 1882, till May 1, 1883,
ALL THEIR LANDS
At Government Price ofr 4tldf per, Acre
IN BLOCKS OF NOT LESS THAN 80 NOR MORE THAN 640 ACRES.
These lands include all vadftieg ofClyla~ d an lowlad, fnl. are adapte3qt q(~i1tsePM, I ine-
Apples, Bananas, Sugar-Cane, Early :Vetables; et., and are ehTetl in the counlef ...
St.Johns, Volusia, Brevard, Orange, Sumter, Levy, Hernando, Hillsborough,
Polk, Manatee and MVonroe. :- :
The following are reserved and for sale at graded prices:
"Gulf Coast Reserve 268 000 acres, M. R. MARKS, Agent, Anclote Fla.
"Timber Reserve,; 100,00 acres, comprising choice tracts of Pine and Cypress, chiefly in St. Johns and
Volusia Counties. Address
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT CO.,
to mar 24 '83 Jacksonville, Fla.


SCHOOL BOOKS.,


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-AND-.
SCHOOL SUPPLIES.
HE LARGEST STOCK IN THE STATE.
"-.S,,.X,"X-EOI-,"ES,. 3,I .A 3>r3D I 'T -"A 'r':-
CATALOGUE MAILED FREE ON APPLICATION.
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
JACl~SONVILiE, FLA.
~ -------------- -

ORANGE WRAPS,
[Full count-480 sheets to the ream.]
)x10 -lxll 12x12
c.pr rn 17 c. pr rm. 19 c. pr rm.
Special IFrices to Large Buyers.
Remit.by icelhec monoy-ord lor registered letter, and in ordering, give shipping directions.
Ashmead Brothers,
tnt 11 tf JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


J6U -....


MMMR


I I r I I II- 1?3


CHOICE CABBAGE> SEED!
CHOICE BE RMUDA. ONION..SEED !
ALSO
General Stock of Select Seeds for Gardeners.
Thee Cabbawe Seed. Crop pf '"2 is almost a complete
failure lTortl, buLt I h.atve sbseoured a; e. -- poo.nd.s
each, of such select varieties as are L oees ~in our
clirnate. I have a stock: of Oabbae fertilizers ,
Bon.e Zeal, Cotton. Seed Mvleal, 2Eto.
t VPART
to Jan 6, '83 I acsonv ille, la.
ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]
J. A. nAg NE & ,CO.,
;FRUIT AND, PRODUCE ,

COMMISSION MERtCHANTS.
Southern i Mruit an4so ."Teg'etables a Specialty..
3"0 andd 32S North Diefavrre Avenue, Philadelphia.
to jan 6, '83 -

DISSTON PURCHASEE-.4m,000,O ACRES!

THE FLORIDA

LAND AND IMPROVEMENT
COMPANY


f AJIES' I.M JI O VEr
Plant Extractor.
SAVE TIME AND PLANTS.
Address, W. JAMES, Jacksonville, Fla.
For Sale at S. B. HUBBARD & CO'S,
-JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
PRICE 60c.;-BY MAIL 75c.
to nov 1-'82.


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