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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00021
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: August 14, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00021
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

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'Ici~rstc4 1i dtie ~pdcuitural, flanufacturint and Indtstrial Tnter'osts of Elovida and the Soawth


New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.


Monday, August 14, 1882.


Lying About Florida.
A very intelligent gentleman of the North,
who desires to make Florida a home for himself
and family, writes one of the editors of THE
DISPATCH as follows:
"Mr. who is stationed in Boston, for
the purpose of selling Florida lands, [and also
'selling' the purchasers, as a general rule.
EDS.] tells me that I can, if I buy a few acres
of landfrom him, set out an orange grove which
will commence bearing in three years [?] and
so increase in productiveness that in ten years,
it will yield me a liberal income. He also states
that, during the short time I have to wait for
the trees to come into bearing, I can raise
enough vegetables between the rows of orange
trees, on five acres, to support myself and fam-
ily-wife and three children-handsomely. [!!]
Will you be kind enough to tell me if this is
really true? as there are 'other friends inclined
toward Florida, who desire correct information
on these important points," etc.
REPLY.-For the benefit and guidance of
this correspondent and others, we desire,
clearly and emphatically to state:
1. Only budded orange trees can be reason-
ably expected to show any great sign of fruit
in three years; and the number of oranges pro-
duced by the young trees, at that age is, of
course, very few, except in rare cases. No pay-
ing crop of oranges should be expected, even on
budded trees, and under the most favorable cir-
cumstances, in less than from five to eight years ;
and in the case of seedlings, ordinarily, this time
may be extended to read from ten to fifteen
years. In reply to the question almost invari-
ably propounded by novices, as to "How many
oranges a tree can or will bear ?" we reply:
From one or a dozen, up to ten thousand, ac-
cording to the size, age and treatment of the
tree. The orange tree must be allowed, in a
measure, to'take its own time about fruiting. It
cannot be coaxed or driven into bearing a "big
crop" until it has reached a certain stage of
maturity, any more than a child of tender years


Price 5 cents.


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.

can be forced into manhood. A good deal can South Florida.
be done by budding on strong, vigorous and The Tampa Guardian says the following
somewhat advanced "stocks"-also by proper items are intended especially for the benefit of
careand attention. But, if you stimulate your correspondents, who desire information concern-
ing Hillsborough County:
tree tgo much; and if you do not deal out your The best lands, both pine and hammock, are
forcing fertilizers with sound judgment and a unexcelled in fertility, and capable of produc-
skillful hand, you will get a large crop of wood ing in abundance every species of tree, plant,
and a beautiful tree-but no fruit! The state- fruit and flower adapted to the climate of Flor-
ida.
ment of this land agent, therefore, which is evi- ida.
The productive capacity of the poorer grades
dently intended to convey the impression that of land is neither better nor worse than lands
a paying crop of oranges may be, ordinarily, of a similar quality in other sections of the
produced in three years, is unqualifiedly false State.
and deceptive. Corn, cotton, potatoes, sugar-cane, peas and
In regard to the other statement, we re- rice, are the principal field crops.
S atThe yield of corn per acre, varies from five to
mark that, only in very exceptional cases could twenty bushels according to location and meth-
it possibly be made true. A strong, muscular, od of cultivation.
healthy man, long inured to hard labor; of sober, Sweet potatoes are produced in large quanti-
economical and very frugal habits ; owning a ties, the yield ranging from 100 bushels and
upwards per acre.
first-rate piece of land, and understanding, per- The average production of sugar per acre is
fectly, the raising, gathering, packing and mar- 1,500 pounds, but much greater results are of-
keting of vegetables, might, possibly, eke out ten obtained.
for himself and family of four, some sort of Sea-island cotton is the variety principally
subsistence by cultivating the slips between his cultivated.
The county is comparatively free from insect
young orange trees-but, (with all the advan- pests of every kind, yet mosquitoes may be found
lages just enumerated,) we should not like to in swamps, and fleas are occasionally met with.
take the chances! That statement may, also, Lumber at the mills here ranges in price
be set down as false and misleading; and its from $8 to $15 per 1,000 feet.
Throughout the county land can be pur-
promulgator deserves the strongest reprehen- .Throughout the county land can be pur-
S d t chased at $1.25 per acre and upwards, accord-
sion and speediest suppression. ing to location, quality and improvement.
FLORIDA! in her lovely and unequalled Many valuable tracts are yet held by the State
climate, and her wonderful variety and fecun- and United States Governments, and are sub-
dity of production, has certainly enough and ject to entry or purchase at nominal rates.
more than enough to attract the multitudes who Timber of all kinds is good and plentiful.
are now thronging to her shores. The bare, hon- The orange family, together with all fruits
est truth about the country seems ful of the common to the State, succeed here admirably,
marvelous and incredible to the dwellers in less such as pine-apples, guavas, bananas, Japan
favored regions, and there really is no excuse plum, Japan persimmon, grapes, alligator pears,
for the invention of such outrageous, false and mangoes, and a variety of other fruits too
damaging statements as those mentioned by our numerous to mention.
correspondent.-EDs. DISPATCH. Stock-raising is carried on profitably to a
large extent, the range being good enough to
ERRATUM.-On page 309 of last DISPATCH dispense with feeding of cattle.
(Aug. 7,) the second line, at head of second Houses are nearly all occupied, and would-
column, should read "leading interest," not be renters find some difficulty in obtaining
"leading writers." suitable dwellings.


~~ .-~~--- -T-`` ` i--`--- - ----- ----------------c. ----- --- :nn- -----I--~I~-. -_ ~. I-rl--L.` .- ` -- -~ -- L I__ _ _ _~__


~ lese~


Vol. 10--NOO 210





31j. THE FLORIDA DISPATCH,
,, ,, II---- --


Educational Advantages of Florida.
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Editors of the Florida Dispatch :
During the year A. D. 1881, Mr. J. Pots-
damer, County Superintendent, reported fifty-
six public schools in session for three months,
with an average daily attendance of 1,156
scholars, at a cost of $2,744. For the year A.
D. 1882, he reports sixty schools in session for
four months, at a cost of $4,220.
These schools are established throughout the
county, accessible to the greatest number of
children. The appropriation from the public
fund being necessarily small, the patrons gen-
erally contribute about an equal amount, thus
indicating a desire and willingness, on the part
of the people, to provide for the education of
their children. A number of communities, at the
expiration of the public schools, then employ
the teachers to continue the schools, thus secur-
ing educational advantages for six or eight
months in the year.
The schools in the country generally rank third
in grade, the teachers being required to hold
certificates of qualification from the Superin-
tendent. These schools, as a rule, teach reading,
writing, spelling, arithmetic, grammar, geogra-
phy and history. There is scarcely a homestead
in the county that is not in easy reach of some
school.
At Lake City, the county site, the public
schools are continued for five months, and rank
second in grade. An appropriation has gener-
ally been secured from the Peabody fund, which
has prolonged the sessions. This appropriation
is not permanent, but, so far, has been regular.
The school for white children has on its roll
one hundred and two scholars, with an aver-
age attendance of seventy per cent. The
school for colored children has on its roll one
hundred and fifty-two scholars, with an aver-
age attendance of eighty-five per cent.. At a
very small additional cost the country children
can complete their education at the more ad-
vanced school at the county site.
Lake City, besides the public schools, sup-
ports two private schools-white and colored.
Instruction on the pianoforte and guitar, and
lessons in drawing can be secured from private
teachers.
The St. James Academy and Boarding School
for girls, just entering upon its second year,
offers superior advantages as a preparatory
school for girls and young ladies.
The church, hall and school buildings 'are de-
lightfully situated in the healthiest portion of the
town. The accommodations are limited at pres-


ent to 20 scholars, but will be enlarged as patron-
age demands it. The discipline of the school,
under the management of the principal and mat-
ron, with two assistants, is firm, and careful, but
not necessarily strict. The curriculum is so ar-
ranged as to secure a substantial English educa-
tion, and at the same time to prepare girls to grad-
uate in the senior department of St. Mary's,
Raleigh, N. C., or at any other female colleges,
if such graduation is desired. A full course in
English is required of all scholars, and can be
secured at an entire cost of $150 and $160 for
first and second grades, respectively, per annum.
Music, Latin and French are optional, at an
extra cost of $40, $10, and $10 per annum re-
spectively. The St. James offers a comfortable
and well-ordered home for the daughters of
widowers, and otherwise orphaned girls, from
eight to fifteen years of age, at the lowest pos-
sible cost. Circulars mailed on application.
*


For special information, address the princi-
pal, REV. C. S. SNOWDEN,
Lake City, Florida.

Life in Suwannee, Ind Queries.
LURAVILLE, FLA., July 30, 1882.
Dear Dispatch:
It is not often that old Suwannee comes to
the front before the public. She does'nt seem
to know how to blow her own horn" as well
or as loudly as some of the counties, yet she has
many good points. For instance, rolling, well
drained pine land, with clay under, that will
hold manure. Our lands, however, bring good
long cotton without the aid of fertilizers. In fact,
none of our farmers have tried fertilizers, ex-
cept to cow-pen" a patch for turnips or sweet
potatoes. None of us have ever tried intensive
farming, but we intend to do so the coming
year. "Westward the star of empire takes its
way," you know, and the star of civilization
too, and when it strikes fairly upon old Suwan-
nee, you may expect to hear something surpris-
ing. This place is in what is called the
"Bend," of the Suwannee River. Our neigh-
borhood is pretty thickly settled. We have a
nice large painted frame church, and two good
schools, well attended, from which one may right-
ly judge that the general tone of our community
is considerably above the average. The farm-
ers raise all their meat and bread (corn bread),
sugar and syrup in abundance, some rice, and
cotton as a surplus. But we are greatly in
need of a steam gin and a store. The planters
in this neighborhood take a very large portion
of their cotton to Live Oak, seventeen miles off,
to be ginned, and do by far the greater part of
their trading there. If some good man would
put up gins and a store here, it would benefit
the neighborhood; and, what is more to the
point, he could make money.
We think we are in the very best part of the
country, but I guess those in other parts think
the same. When we came through Florida,
from the Perdido this far, they said at every
place, you'll miss it if you go any further,
this is the very best part of the State," and they
really thought so.
Oranges, figs, peaches and pears do well here,
with almost no care, and yet the farmers have
but little fruit. They are waking up, however,
on this subject. If all the farmers would take
THE DISPATCH, and you would poke us up now
and then, it would do us an immense amount
of good. In fact no farmer ought to be with-
out this splendid paper; we get from it so many
useful ideas. And if you will let us farmers
air our brilliant ideas in it, it will do us lots of
good. (1.) Now, for instance, I have been
wondering and wanting to ask why the farmers
of the South will use so much hog meat during
the summer? Why don't they use more beef?
They seem to think that they can only use a
mess or two before it spoils. Not so. If you
will take a tight cask or tub ; be sure it doesn't


leak ; make a brine strong enough to bear up
an egg; cut your meat in pieces handy to han-
dle or to cook, let it cool over night, then pack
it down in your cask, sprinkling salt pretty lib-
erally between the layers, and pour over it your
brine (previously boiled and cooled); be sure
your meat is always under the brine, and you
can keep it nice all summer; and it is far
superior to the pickled beef brought from the
North, and doesn't cost fifteen cents per pound.
Some put in the cask a piece of saltpeter the
size of an egg, and it may do better, but the
strong brine is the thing. Then, goats make
nice meat. A great many have a prejudice
against them, but a goat is about the most
cleanly of animals, and a fat kid, well cooked,
is splendid. A goat will keep fat where almost
any other beast would die of starvation, and
they are much less trouble or expense than
turkeys. In Asia, Southern Europe and in


Mexico, goats are the commonest article of diet.
A good-sized family can make use of a kid
while it is fresh. Some of the farmers raise a
few sheep-that is they shear them once a
year-the sheep raise themselves, and the dogs
raise about half of them. But they do pretty
well here without feed or attention. Of course
they would do better even with a little atten-
tion. Corn in this section has done splendidly
this summer, but the cotton is not doing well,
on account of the wet weather. We have had
an excessively wet summer. I want to ask you
if any one raises lucern or alfalfa on sandy pine
land, and if so, how it does? (2.) And if any
one has the preparturiensis walnut in Florida.
And if some of the alfalfa seed and praepar-
turiensis walnut trees can be had, and where-
We fear from what we have read in THE DIS-
PATCH, that we have set our orange trees too
deep. Would it be better to raise them or
leave them so? (3.) They are two and three
years old and set out last spring. How early
and how late may one bud orange trees?
(4.) I am saving up the numbers of THE
DISPATCH to make a book of them at the end
of the year. It is in a convenient form for a
book, and will be useful reference, especially
on orange culture. I cut out things as I see
them in other papers and paste them in my
scrap-book, but if I cut anything out of THE
DISPATCH, I am almost sure to cnt into some-
thing on the other side that is equally valuable.
I put about five cents worth of glue in a can
and pour enough strong vinegar on it to cover
it, and have a cheap, convenient mucilage
always at hand with which to paste scraps in
my book-another thing that every farmer
ought to have.
I have written such a long letter that I fear
I shall be ruled out; but you know how it is
when a woman gets started.
Yours very respectfully,
PATTY PARVUM.
REPLY.-(1.) Let us have the "brilliant
ideas," by all means. We agree with you en-
tirely in regard to the beef and mutton, and
kid; and thank you for the beef-curing recipe,
which is correct, to a word.
(2.) Alfalfa or Lucern can be raised on
sandy land, but a liberal top-dressing of dried
muck and ashes helps it very much. It is best
sown in drills, eighteen inches to two feet apart,
and you can hardly plow too deep, cultivate
too cleanly, or give it too much of the compost
we have mentioned-say four parts of muck
and one part unleashed ashes. Or, if you cn get
clay readily, give your Lucern (sandy) land
a top-dressing of that, from time to time. P.
J. Berckmans, of Augusta, Georgia, (" Fruit-
land Nursery,") can furnish the early bearing
walnut, (Juglans prceparturiensis). Send for
his Fruit Catalogue, noticed in this issue of
THE DISPATCH.


(3.) If your land is well drained, do not dis-
turb your young orange trees. If it is not,
raise them up, so that the top-roots, surface"
roots, or collar roots are on a level with the
surface, or a little above it, and make a slight
mound over them.
(4.) Bud whenever the bark of the stock
slips freely; and when you can, also, get good,
plump, well-developed buds. If your buds
"strike" early in the season, you may get a
growth of several inches, or even feet, the first
summer. If you work or bud trees late in the
season, the buds, though living, remain dorm-
ant," and do not sprout until the following
spring. Your mucilage recipe is good.
Many thanks! for your pleasant and in-





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, 316


V4dbft


and wheat bran mixed, divided between the
three per day, I am satisfied that we can have
all the milk we wish in Florida, all the year
by giving it our attention. I am sure if a young
cow was taken, with her first calf, well milked
and cared for, she could be made to give there(
or four gallons of milk, per day (Florida stock
I mean.) There is nothing so healthful here
especially for children, as plenty of .milk; the
want of it causes many of them to be sallow, life
less in spirit, and delicate.
Another matter that is of interest to us all
here,is to have fruit the year round, and I have
never had so great a hunger for fruit anywhere
as in Florida. Since May I have been general
State agent for a nursery. Though mysell
and others, have been testing and investigating
all fruits, other than the Citrus family, (wE


structive letter, and please come again,
soon !-EDs. DISPATCH.
Postmasters I Take Notice.
NEW SMYRNA, FLA., Aug. 3, 1882.
Editors of the Florida Dispatch:
GENTS-I see by the last issue of THE DIs-
PATCH that a postmaster has sent you $2.40 for
three subscribers for THE DISPATCH, allowing
him 20 cents commission on each subscriber.
I herewith send you $2.40 for THE FLORIDA
DISPATCH to be sent one year to three
subscribers. Now, if $2.40 is not cor-
rect, please drop me a card and I will
remit the balance, but the paper must be had
at any price. I have no hesitation in saying it
is the cheapest and best paper in the South, if
not in the Union.
Yours respectfully,
R. C. SMITH, P. M.
Postmasters are allowed a commission of 20
per cent. on all yearly subscriptions sent us.-
EDITORS.

HAWTHORN, FLA., July 27, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I have been reading THE DISPATCH with
much pleasure since you have made it so inter-
ing a paper, and find much there that we feel
an interest in. As I have not seen anything
form our place, I will give you a few points.
Hawthorn is situated at the crossing of the P.
R. R. and S. F. R. R., surrounded by a fine
pine land farming country, healthy, good water,
pretty lakes, good people, and combines many
of the good things of Florida. The place is im-
proving nicely; a first-class livery stable build-
ing is nearly completed, a new Baptist church
is in course of erection, and several other build-
ings are going up. Our nine stores are doing a
good business. People seem satisfied with them-
selves and everybody else, and the general
motto is-" Onward." I have seen most of the
State within the last year, and must say that I
think Florida offers more, and is now, the best
country that I know of. For I think a man
who will can have anything he wants in Flor-
ida. I must mention one thing that interests all
of us up-country folks-I'm a Tennesseeian-
and that is milk and butter. The idea is that
we can't have milk in Florida; Florida cows
won't milk, etc. A little perseverance and at-
tention has proved to me that idea to be an erro-
neous one. Last February I bought three Flor-
ida piney-wood cows at $17 each, said to give
one-half gallon of milk per day, and that they
would eat nothing but grass. A little coaxing
and attention has taught them to eat anything,
except slops, that is given them, and regular and
good milking has brought the three up to giving
over five gallons of nice, rich milk per day, from
the range; twenty cents worth of cotton seed


water the same day they are taken from the
tree, while the pores of the skin are open, so as
, to take the salt freely. Water can be changed
Through the bungs if headed.
We hope this will be the means of opening
up a good trade for Florida limes,
Yours truly,
CROCKER & BLAKE.
CANNING SWEET CORN.-A Fruit Re-
corder correspondent, instead of canning sweet
corn for winter use, puts it through the follow-
ing process, which has the merit of being easy,
l cheap and new. She says: "Take. the corn
f whenjust in the milk; scald itjust enough to set
the milk; cut it off and pack it in a stone jar
With a layer of corn and a layer of salt; one


have left that to the many,) we find that never
was any section so solely dependent on variety
as this State. Of the 120 varieties of peaches
we have tested, we can recommend only eleven:
eight Chinese and tree of South Georgia origin,
these do splendidly here. These varieties will
produce from May to November. LeConte,
Keifer and California pears, also grapes, and five
or six fine varieties of California plums, do
well. These, with strawberries and figs, supply
this very great want.
I feel that I may at least say that, in the
near future but few places.on earth can offer a
greater or a finer quality of fruit than Florida.
With kind wishes for THE DISPATCH,
I remain, yours truly,
WM. S. MOORE.



Florida Bee-Keepers.
NEW SMYRNA, VOLUSIA CO., FLA.,
July 28, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
To assist me in making a correct report for
this State, to the National Bee-Keepers' Society,
I shall consider it a great favor if my brother
bee-keepers, all over the State of Florida, would
write down what the general character of the
season has been, and its effect on the bees of
their neighborhood, the results obtained in their
own and their neighbors' apiaries since last
September, and anything else worthy of note
connected with the industry, and send the re-
ports to me by October 15th, so that I can ar-
range my general report in season to have it
in Cincinnati at the commencement of the Na-
tional Convention; November 3d.
Everything promises well in this section for
an unusually large crop of late honey to come
in November and December, that cannot, of
course, be included in the reports. I would,
however, be glad to have the prospects for a
late crop included in the reports.
Respectfully,
W. S. HART,
Vice-President for Florida.



Limes for Pickling.
BOSTON, August 1, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Let them be a bright yellow before taken from
the tree ; pick carefully, place in tight barrels
or casks. Make a pickle of salt and water; salt as
ocean water, or ocean water will do as well;
fill the barrels with limes, then cover with the
, salt water and head up tight. The water should
be changed two or three times, about three days
apart, to take out the bitter taste, when they
are ready for market.
N. B.-Limes must be covered with salt


I AUOVA


MESTOWN WEED.-It is said that a Geor-
rmer has discovered that the stalk and
of the gympson or Jamestown weed
weevil exterminator. He mixed them
his field peas, and drove out the weevils
ssfully.


qd&d


s of The Florida Dispatch :
ve just read in a copy of your paper for
.2th, the article signed "D.," in which it
ned that Mrs. H. D. Blocher, of Talla-
"made the first American silk gown
n 30 and 40 years.ago."
;y-three years ago-in 1839-when about
irs of age, I went with my father, who
i enthusiast on silk and morus multicau-
visit a gentleman and daughter, named
Yhast, I think. Much valuable informa-
ras imparted by them in regard to silk-
;, and in the course of the evening he
ced, with much pride, an elegant silk
very heavy, and a sample of black sew-
k. The specimens, he said, had been pro-
by his daughter, from the rearing of the
orm to the making of the silk dress, and
they appeared perfect in every point, and
achievement of the lady impressed itself
my mind as being every way worthy of
; and, without wishing to detract from
urels of Mrs. Blocher, I have felt that
Pillinghast deserved being placed upon the
PEARL.
POSEFUL WOMEN.-Reposeful women are
ght to their friends; one can almost for-
lovenliness when it is accompanied by an
complete ease from care; an air which
" I am always ready to talk to you or
to your list of joys or sorrows." On the
try, the woman who is continually on
)" is extremely tiresome. We have be-
ur eyes a girl who is a fair representative
latter type. She is wasting her nervous
and her life in a lamentable manner. She
ds enough force and energy in a day to
ne so slim of stature for a week, Noth-
le does is done slowly or deliberately.
ys in the hottest possible hurry, her life
to be wound up to the highest possible
She dashes about the house, slams
and bolts her food in half the time that
sober people take to eat theirs. With
ifles are momentous; her tongue seems to
capable of uttering a soft sound; her
r is all afire at a moment's notice; her
ives are all superlatives, and sometimes
ready to weep because she has no bigger
lore expressive superlatives to use. Her
y, if properly engineered, would almost
Niagara; she never moves except as if she
m Maud S. and going for a wager. Fer-
ss and rapture are her daily food. Where
11 this end? We answer-in the mad-
or the grave. It is "the pace that kills ;"
his pace which renders nervous prostra-
ne of the most prolific diseases of the day.
lose of our women who are always intense
a thought for the next generation, in
Sthe seeds of this abnormal haste are be-
>wn with fatal effect.- The Housekeeper.


I


pint of salt to a gallon of corn in layers al-
ternately; fill the jar and weight it down, and
cover to keep out dirt, flies, etc., and when one
wants to use it, freshen it and season to taste.
I like butter and cream."



The First Silk Dress.
TANGERINE, ORANGE CO., FLA.,
August 4, 1882.


m






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


BRONSON, FLA., July 21, 1882.
Editors of The Florid' Dispatch:
Herewith I send you a specimen of earth or
clay found in the bottom of a dry pond near
the Istemhatchee River. Is it anything.or noth-
ing in value ? By mail, I also send you a speci-
men that I am under the impression is the in-
dication of gypsum. Please give these the
proper direction for, analysis, and I will cheer-
fully pay any charge that is incurred.
Respectfully yours,
B. A. COACHMAN.
REPLY.-What you send is pure clay and
talc, mixed with small pieces of quartz. It is
of no particular value, and there is no gypsum.
Deeper beneath this layer you may possibly
find a marl deposit which would be of value.


VERMILLIONVILLE, LA., July 21, '82.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
For some time, an insect has been discovered
upon the orange trees of this place. I have, in
vain, applied the wash recommended on page
15 of your book. As it does not check its
progress, I suppose that I did not use it in
proper time; but I will continue its applica-
tion. I have been unable to discover the in-
sect on the many figures represented in your
book. Therefore, I take the liberty of sending
you herein a leaf covered with the pest. Be kind
enough, gentlemen, to examine it, and write
me a few lines on the subject.
You will very much oblige your
Obedient servant,
J. J. REVILLON.
REPLY.-The orange leaf you send us is cov-
ered with the most destructive of scale insects,
known as the Long Scale, Mytilaspis Gloverii.
It was originally introduced into this country
on imported nursery stock from China. All
your specimens are immature female scales,
and accounts for your inability to see the in-
sect proper; also, for your want of success in
destroying them. The young will hatch from
these the last of this month, which will be the
proper time to apply your wash. You will find
them quite numerous, running about on the
leaves and twigs, and readily discernable with
the naked eye.
For two efficacious washes, see Nos. 10 and
20, of THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. Syringe your
trees with either of these, and the evil will be
averted.
.\ .


The Mealy Bug.
Our cut represents this destructive insect very
greatly enlarged. For description, see last
week's issue.


Disease on LeConte Pear Trees.

aBY ISAAC C. MARTINDALE.

In a previous issue of THE DISrATCH we
asked for information on a disease attacking
the LeConte pear tree, with which. we were
unacquainted. We are indebted to Mr. GEO.
C. RIXFORD for the following, taken from the
Gardner's Monthly, which we take pleasure in
publishing for the benefit of our readers :
"Sometime since, I received from FRANK
ERBLAND, Waldo, Florida, a piece of a branch
of LeConte pear tree, which had been attacked
by fungus. As this variety of pear has been
supposed to be entirely healthy, and proof
against disease, the matter is of more than or-
dinary interest to pear culturists. I submitted
the specimen to J. B. ELLIs, Newfield, N. J.,
one of our best authorities on fungus growths.
His reply is so interesting that I have thought
it proper to have it published in the Monthly."
He says:
"I have just examined the piece of limb of
LeConte pear, affected in a peculiar manner by
a fungus growth which appears to be quite in-
jurious. The first appearance is of little red-
dish brown circular disks, about one millimetre
in diameter at first, and slightly elevated above
the surface of the surrounding bark. The little
disks continuing to increase, becoming concen-
trically cracked and enlarged to one-fourth or
one-half an inch in diameter, or by confluence
spreading along the surface of the limb for one
or more inches, and nearly surrounding it.
This diseased growth bears some resemblance to
the diseased blotches or black raspberry canes
sent me last season by Mr. WILLIAMS, of Mon-
telair, New Jersey, but differ in the blotches
being of a darker color and concentrically
cracked and having a distinct raised border.
On this diseased growth are two distinct species
of Spheriaceous fungi, belonging to the genus
Sphoerella. The species of this genus are found
mostly on fallen leaves and dead vegetable
stems. A few, however, attack living plants;
although not known to be specially hurtful,
must, of course, cause more or less injury to the
living organism. It may be that this deseased
growth on the pear limbs is caused by the my-
celium of the fungus which has somehow found
a lodgment on or in the living branch, and by
its growth and development caused the abnor-
mal scab-like excrescences which may be neces-
sary to the production of the perfect ascigerous
fungus. In favor of this view the analogous
case of the fungus causing the Black Knot on
plum and cherry trees may be cited.. The only
known remedy for Black Knot is to cut off and
burn the affected parts, and that would certainly
be a safe method with the diseased pear limbs,
for it is not likely that the affected limbs where
the natural bark has been in great part broken
up and destroyed by this excretionary growth
will ever recover even if left on the tree."


METEOROLOGICAL REPORT.
Weather for week ending August 11, 1882.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION,
SIGNAL SERVICE, U. S. A., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
STherm. a Wind.

DATE. |

*q o L 1
Saturday 5....... 30.169375 8.368.3 1.00 W 5 Clear.
Sunday. 6........ 30.15 94(77 86.0 65.0 0.00 SW 3 Clear.
Monday 7........ 1 30.06 9578 867 59.0 0.00 SW 4 Clear.
Tuesday 8........ 29.97 95179 88.0 58.7 0.00 SW 7lClear.
Wednesday 9.. 29.97 9681'88.3 60.3 0.00 SW 10Clear.
Thursday 10... 30.07 95 80186.7 66.0 0.00 SW 8 Fair
Friday 11........ i 30.12 94!77 81.3 75.3 0.43 SWI 5 Fair.
Highest barometer 30.21, lowest 29.90.
Highest temperature 96, lowest 75.
NOTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Observer U. S. A.


Meteorological Summary for July, 1882.
CEDAR KEYS. FLA., August 1, 1882.
Monthly mean actual barometer, 7 a. m., 3 p. m., 11p.
m. observations, 30.082.
Monthly mean reduced barometer, 7 a. m., 3 p. m., 11 p.
m. observations, 30.102.
Highest barometer and date, 30.230, on 26th.
Lowest barometer and date, 29.867, on 5th.
Monthly mean temperature, 81.50.
Highest temperature and date, 92.50, on 31st.
Lowest temperature and date, 700, on 13th and 24th.
Monthly range of temperature, 22,5.
Greatest daily range and date, 170, on 16th.
Least daily range and date, 60, on 2d and 5th.
Monthly mean humidity, 74.1 per cent.
Monthly mean dew point, 72.10.
Total rainfall, 10.33 inches.
Total movement of wind 5,665 miles.
Maximum velocity of wind and direction, 36 miles per
hour, east.
Number of foggy days, none.
Number of clear days on which rain or snow fell,
2; on which no rain fell, 6.
Number of fair days on which rain or snow fell, 7; on
which no rain fell 9.
Number of cloudy days on which rain or snow fell, 6;
on which no rain fell, 1.
Number of days on which rain fell, 15; on which no
rain fell, 16.
Dates of auroras and time of beginning and ending,
none.
i)ates of solar halos, none.
Dates of luna halos, none.
Dates of zodiacal light, none.
Dates of frost, none.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 7 a. m. for month, 7.5 miles per hour-east.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 3 p. m. for month, 7.7 miles per hour-west.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 11 p. m. for month, 6.8 miles per hour-east.
GALES OF 25 MILES PER HOUR AND OVER:
3d, southwest-26 miles per hour.
26th, east-36 miles per hour.
29th, east-27 miles per hour.
Prevailing wind direction, determined from the three
telegraphic observations west.
Prevailing wind direction, determined from the five-
daily observations, southwest.
Number of fair sunsets, 23; verified, 17; not verified, 6.
Number of foul sunsets, 8; verified, 7; not verified, 1.
Number of doubtful sunsets, 0.
Percentage of verifications, 77.4,
FRED. W. MIXER,
Pvt. Signal Corps, U. S. A.

[EXTRACT, FORM NO. 113, A.]
PUNTA RASSA, FLA., August 1, 1882.
Monthly mean of barometer, 30.088.
Highest barometer, 30.192, on 26th.
Lowest barometer, 29.915, on 24th.
Monthly range of barometer, 0.277.
Monthly mean temperature, 80.40.
Highest temperature, 91.50, on 1st.
Lowest temperature, 70.5, on 18th.
Monthly range of temperature, 210.
Greatest daily range of temperature, 19.50, on 18th.
Least daily range of temperature, 50, on 4th.
Monthly mean dew point, 72.2.
Monthly mean relative humidity, 77.1 per cent.
Prevailing wind direction, east.
Total monthly movement of wind, 6,145 miles.
Maximum velocity of wind and direction, 34 miles,
southeast on 31st.
Total rainfall, 5.58 inches.
Number of clear days, 2.
Number of fair days, 22.
Number of cloudy days, 7.
Number of days on which rain fell, 23.
Dates of rainbows, 18th and 27th.
Dates of solar halos, none observed
Dates of lunar halos, 31st.
Dates of auroras, none observed.
Dates of polar bands, none observed.
Dates of zodiacal light, none observed.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing 'direction of
wind at 6:40 a. m., for month, 7 miles, east.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 2:40 p. m., for month, 11.1 miles, southwest.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 10:40 p. m., for month, 6.4 miles, east.
Winds of 25 miles per hour and over (dates wind direc-
tions and velocities) 4th, 26 miles, southwest; 5th, 30
miles, west; th, 27 miles, southwest; 8th 27 miles south-
west; 18th, 28 miles, northeast; 20th, 26 miles, south; 21st,
28 miles, southeast; 24th, 26 miles, south; 26th, 28 miles
east; 28th, 25 miles south; 31st, 34 miles, southeast.
Number of fair weather sunsets and predictions, 10;
verified, 7; not verified, 3.
Number of foul weather sunsets and predictions 21;
verified, 17; not verified 4.
Percentage of verification of sunset predictions, 77.4.
W.SergeantJ. EVANignal Corps, U. S. A.
Sergeant Signal Corps, U. S. A.


KEY WEST, FLA., August 1, 1882.
Monthly mean actual barometer of three telegraphic
observations, 30.062.
Monthly mean reduced barometer of three telegraphic
observations, 30.082.
Highest barometer and date, 31.165 on 1st; lowest and
date, 29.921 on 24th; range, .224.
Monthly mean temperature 850; highest and date,
94.50 on 10th; lowest and date, 730 on 21st.
Monthly range of temperature, 21.50; greatest daily
and date, 170 on 21st; least daily and date, 80 on 15th.
Monthly mean humidity 69.60.
Monthly mean dew point, 73.70
Prevailing wind direction, east.
Total rainfall or melted snow, 4.45 inches.
Average depth of unmelted snow on ground at end of
month, none.
Total monthly movement of wind from 11 p. m. to 11 p.
m 4,452 miles.
Maximum velocity and direction, 19 miles, north;
date, 8th.
Number of foggy days (g), none.
Number of clear days on which rain or snow fell, 4; on
which no rain or snow fell, 3.
Number of fair days on which rain or snow fell, 8; on
which no rain or snow fell, 12.
Number of cloudy days on which rain or snow fell, 2;
on which no rain or snow fell, 2.


320


_ _


*I


*


I





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH 322


Number of days on which rain or snow fell, 14; on
which no rain or snow fell, 17.
Dates of auroras and times of beginning and ending:
none observed.
Dates of solar halos, none observed.
Dates of lunar halos, 29th and 30th.
Dates of zodiacal lights, none observed.
Dates of frost, none observed.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at, 7 a. m., for month, east and southeast, 4.8 miles.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 3 p. in., for month, southeast, 7.9 miles.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 11 p. m., for month, east, 5.2 miles.
Gales of 25 miles per hour and over (dates, wind direc-
tions and wind velocity); none occurred
Thunder-storms on the 12th and 15th.
Number of fair sunsets, 21.
Fair sunsets verified, 13 ; not verified, 8.
Number of foul sunsets, 10.
Foul sunsets verified, 7 ; not verified, 3.
Number of doubtful sunsets, none.
R. H. PAXTON,
Sergeant Signal Corps, U. S. A.
0.
SFlorida Pine-Apples.
The cultivation of pine-apples is extending
rapidly in Florida, and a largely increased pro-
duct is looked for this season. As yet, they
have been grown only in South Florida, but
Middle Florida is equally well adapted for this
purpose, and considerable planting is now be-
ing done in that section as well as in the south-
ern part. (1.) The pine-apple mostly grown in
Florida is the strawberry or red variety, and it
is a curious fact that many of the pine-apples
which have been received in this market were
grown from shoots originally sent from this
city. Very few, if any, of the sugar-loaf or
green pine-apples are grown in Florida, but the
gentlemen who sent the other shoots there in-
tend to send some shoots of this variety also.
The shoots which he intends to use will be
taken from the Cat Island pine-apple, a superior
kind of the sugar-loaf variety, but one which is
rarely seen in this city.
The average life of the strawberry pine is
about three years, and that of the sugar-loaf
about five. The plants are set out about two
feet apart, and it is then only necessary to keep
the weeds down. The fruit will mature in eight
or nine months, (2.) and then the main stalk
dies, leaving a number of young shoots, which
in turn spring up and bear fruit. The plant
grows to about thirty inches in height, and
each plant bears one;apple. An acre of good
land will easily bear 6,000 plants of the sugar-
loaf variety and about 5,000 of the strawberry,
and with cultivation this number may be in-
creased. The strawberry-pine ripens about a
month earlier than the sugar-loaf. The first
cuttings on the strawberry-pine are made in
April, and the crops last until July. The
sugar-loaf is cut during July and August. The
plants furnish one regular crop in a year.
There are very large tracts of good land suita-
ble for the cultivation of the pine-apple yet
available in Southern Florida at cheap prices.
The best and dearest land is of course that in
proximity to a harbor or a railroad.
Last year was the first in which these pine-
apples came upon the market in any considera-
ble quantity. This year, the amount received
was about three times as large as last year.
About 30,000 Floridas were received here the


present season, and about 50,000 dozen of them
were received in New York. It is estimated
that Boston will receive next year double the
number received this season. The fruit is
brought mainly in sailing vessels to New York,
though a considerable number come direct to
Boston by steamer from Savannah, to which
they are brought by rail from Florida.
These pilte-apples find- a ready sale at higher
prices than the foreign varieties, as they are of
superior quality. The foreign varieties come
from the Bahamas and the West Indies, and
the Porto Ricos are probably the best. The
Floridas, however, surpass them all, as they
are what might be termed closer-grained and
much sweeter; in fact, but very little sugar is
required for them. The Floridas come to mar-
ket more nearly ripe and in a better condition
than the others, as they are allowed to remain


on the stalk until more nearly ripe. As they
can be brought to market quicker, but very
few are lost, while large quantities of the for-
eign rot on the voyage.
It is claimed also that the Floridas are
tougher than the others, and will therefore
keep better when on the market. The size of
these pine-apples varies from three to ten pounds,
and they sold during the last season at from 20
to 50 cents each, while the foreign varieties
sold from 8 to 20 cents. At present there is a
good home demand for them, and they sell in
Florida at from 15 to 35 cents; but as their cul-
tivation extends, we will get them much cheaper.
There is no doubt also that the quality will be
improved by careful cultivation as the growers
become better acquainted with the business.
It is then only a question of a few years when
Florida will supply the Northern markets with
a better and cheaper pineapple than can at
present be obtained.
REMARKS :
1. The above, from the Boston Commercial
Bulletin, contains a few errors, which we shall
endeavor to correct. The Pine-apple cannot be
raised successfully in Middle Florida, or in many
parts of Eastern Florida, either, unless it is cul-
tivated under glass, or very carefully protected
from the cold in winter. At present thelargest
growers of Florida Pine-apples are at Key Lar-
go, in extreme South Florida, and in the neigh-
borhood of Lake Worth, below Jupiter Inlet,
on the Atlantic Coast;-also, at the Belair
Grove, of Gen. Sanford, near the town of San-
ford.
2. We believe it requires from 12 to 18
months, even in the most favorable Florida lo-
calities, to produce fruit, from the time of plant-
ing the "suckers" or off-sets; and it is better to
set out these off-sets in well-prepared soil than
to depend upon their spontaneous growth.
The opinion expressed as to the superiority
of the Florida Pine-apple, is undoubtedly cor-
rect-the market price settles that question;
and the greatly increased culture of this fruit
at nearly all points south of latitude 290 must
now follow, ex necessitate rei.-EDs. DISPATCH.

LeConte Pears.
Editors of the Florida Dispatch:
In your issue of August 7th, No. 20, a cor-
respondent (X. T.) in a communication enti-
tled, LeConte Pear-Go Slow," seems to labor
under the impression that the cultivation of this
pear may be overdone, or become unprofitable,
from two causes: First, that it is not a good
pear; second, that it is not sufficiently early in
its maturity to secure the top prices in market.
With all of which we beg leave to differ ; first,
for market it is a VERY good pear. The Geor-
gia State Horticultural Society, than whom
there is no better authority, recommend it very


highly in their catalogue for the middle and
coast region of Georgia, and remark "very
good for table and market."
The pear ships well, and sells well. It is
only a few years that it has been marketed
from Georgia, and in very limited quantities,
yet it has at the beginning of every season in
order of maturity and prices, ranked with the
Bartlett. X. T. cites the fact that "he has
seen the prices in New York suddenly drop
from $6.00 to $1.75 per crate, when confronted
by the splendid Bartlett of California, and the
Jargonelle and the Doyenne d'Ete of the
North." We doubt the correctness of his de-
ductions and the propriety of assigning to such a
cause the decline in price. It is generally be-
lieved that the growers on receipt of such good
returns as $6.00 for seven-eighths of a bushel


of LeConte Pears, hurriedly stripped their
trees and forced into market immature fruit.
Pears are gathered for market mature, but not
ripe or eatable. They have to be ripened after-
wards, or gathered in that state they will ripen
en route and be eatable on arrival at destina-
tion. As a general thing, commission mer-
chants do not hold such matter, but place it at
once upon the market. The same treatment to
any other pear or fruit as that given the Le-
Conte recently will damage it.
In the cultivation of fruit for market one ex-
pects to make money, and desires to cultivate
such varieties as are attended with the least
risk of loss and promising the best returns.
LeConte Pear trees require very little atten-
tion or cultivation, are not subject to any dis-
ease or ravages of insects, are planted at about
sixty trees to the acre, at ten years of age will
bear at least twenty bushels per tree. Sixty
trees at 20 bushels to tree makes 1,200 bushels.
One thousand two hundred at from $1.75 to
$6.00 for bushel crate, gives a revenue that
none will go slow in realizing who engage in
LeConte Pear culture. Yours,
"SOUTH GEORGIA."
.-
Sugar Boiler Wanted.
WILSON, FLA., August 4, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Please inform me and others, where the best
sugar boilers are manufactured in the United
States, averaging from 30 gallons and upward;
and whether one large boiler or two small is
most advisable, for common clay furnaces.
Would a saccharometer be of any advantage
and use? Where is the best to be obtained ?
Respectfully,
W. C. WILSON.
REPLY.-We cannot undertake to pronounce
upon the respective merits of the different sugar
boilers before the public. HEDGES, of Cincin-
nati, Ohio, is largely engaged in the manufac-
ture of boilers for the making of sugar and
syrup from sorghum, and these, of course,
would answer for sugar-cane juice, as well. A
good saccharometer would undoubtedly be of
much value in testing the strength and quality
of your juice. These instruments may be ob-
tained in New York and Philadelphia.-EDS.
DISPATCH.
THE WANTON CALF-A FABLE.-A calf,
full of Wantonness and Play, seeing an Ox at
the Plow, could not forbear insulting him.
"What a sorry, poor Drudge you are," said he,
"to bear that heavy Yoke, and go turning up
the Ground for a Master !" "See what a happy
life I lead," he added. When at evening the
Ox, unyoked and going to take his rest, saw him,
hung with Garlands, being led by the Flaman, a
venerable man with a fondness for Veal Pot-Pie.


MORAL.-This Fable teaches us that Young
People had better Stick to the Farm and not
study for a Learned Profession, unless they are
fully aware of what it means.

PEACHE BORERS.-As a protection for peach
trees from the ravages of the borer, the weekly
Times recommends the application of the fol-
lowing mixture: Thick lime wash, one pailful;
clay enough to make a thin paste; a shovelful
of fresh cow dung, and one ounce of carbolic
acid. Paint this thickly on the trees up to three
feet above the ground. If it is too thick, dilute
with water and add a little more carbolic acid
in proportion, as this is the effective agent.

FRUIT GROWERS' REPORTS, from various parts of
the State, and other communications of interest una-
voidably deferred until our next. From present in-
dications we shall .soon have to enlarge THE DIS-
PATCH, or transform it into a semi-weekly or daily.





32 TH FLRD DSAC.


Preserving Figs and Limes.
The Editor of the St. Augustine Press says,
that in "sauntering through the narrow streets
of our quiet little city in search of local news,
we chanced to find our way into S. B. Valls'
preserve and marmalade canning establishment,
on Charlotte street, corner of Cuna. We ob-
served large piles of limes ready for manipula-
tion, rows of kettles, full to the edge, of pre-
served figs, also other delicacies beyond our reach.
The figs are excellent; the only trouble is that
Mr. Valls cannot get enough of this fine fruit
to supply the demand. Lately, during the
height of the fig season, he has put up about
60 bushels daily. The result has been that
there are no figs in the city to be had. We are
informed that he has just received about 6,000
limes. This number will probably keep him
busy for a day or so. Mr. Valls is an old ex-
perienced hand at this business, and the pro-
ductions of fruit preserved by his process will
keep in any climate, and never fails to give
entire satisfaction. This industry could be
doubled in capacity, and still be insufficient to
supply the constantly increasing demand. Cap-
italists are putting their means into railroads
throughout the State, when right here in this
town is a rare opportunity to invest and reap a
good profit on their investment."

Orange Culture in Florida
The subject of orange growing in Florida is
one on which we often have inquiries addressed
to us, and we, therefore, give additional facts on
the much-debated question of the cost and profit
of orange growing, for which the United States
Department of Agriculture is authority.
From barely nothing, in a commercial sense,
at the close of the war, the business has grown
to be worth over $1,000,000. Measured by the
progress of the past, it is destined to become, in
a very short time, one of the leading industries
of the State. Last year there were exported at
least 45,000,000 of oranges. The business so
far has been very successful, and is daily invit-
ing more capital and enterprise. There is al-
ready $10,000,000 invested in orange groves in
the State, with a field open for the profitable
employment of $50,000,000 more. Lands suitable
for growing oranges are in abundance and at
low prices. Orange groves can be found in al-
most every part of the State, and on all varie-
ties of soil well drained, the groves numbering
each from 10 tO 10,000 trees. Hardly a family
outside of the cities but cultivates a greater or
less number of orange trees, and many residing
in the cities do the same. Some of the largest
groves in the State are owned by persons living
in the towns, or by non-residents. In some of


the counties there were raised as high as from
4,000,000 to 6,000,000 of oranges last year;
and narrow-guage railroads are rapidly being
built to afford the middle counties facilities for
shipping their enormous crops to market.
Three such roads have been completed within
the past few months, and others are projected,
while more are under contemplation. Oranges
are shipped from off these roads to New York
in 80 and 90 hours' time.
Within the past few years orange culture in
Florida has also attained great perfection. It
has reached that position where it is possible to
analyze the cost of production. Abundant evi-


dence exists that can be brought forward. to
show the value and profit in it, for the invest-
ment of capital results have shown that there is
not at present any pursuit, where the tilling of
the soil is involved, that will yield larger re-
turns with less fluctuation. It is always pleas-
ant to be able to confirm such statements with
facts. An extensive orange grower in Putnam
County has kept, from the beginning of his
grove, an accurate account of the expenditures
and receipts to the close of the thirteenth year,
ending in 1879. The number of trees were 300.
They yielded 442,600 oranges, selling for $7,590,
as against an expenditure, omitting cost of land,
first cost of trees, and interest on the money of
$1,950. This gives receipts over expenditures
$5,640. This is only one instance, but it is as
good as many, because it is only one in a very
large number It conclusively demonstrates
that orange culture is not at all transitory.
Nearly all the obstacles in the path of orange
culture have been removed.
The future of the business is still more prom-
ising. Florida oranges are conceded to be supe-
rior to all others. In point of numbers, com-
pared to the great quantities consumed, they
are few: yet by their greater merit they have
come to occupy the foremost place in the mar-
ket. The genial climate and peculiar soil of
Florida, together with the sufficiently warm
sun to mature and concentrate the juices with-
out destroying the lively aromatic flavor of the
fruit, impart this quality-value nowhere else
attainable to such an extent. The field they are
yet to occupy is practically illimitable. They
are yet to possess our own market, the best in
the world. This will be the labor of years, and
after a great portion of our orange lands have
been brought under cultivation. In 1879, there
were 257,000,000 of oranges entered at the port
of New York alone from foreign countries.
Double the number, at least, were entered at
all the other ports, making a grand total of
771,000,000 consumed in and lost on the voyage
to this country, in addition to our Florida crop.
We cannot predict when the domestic will take
the place of the foreign product, but it is inevi-
table in course of time. Our inability to sup-
ply the demand is the main obstacle.
That this will be the ultimate result is clear
from another cause, independent, or nearly so,
of merit. The liability of loss and damage re-
sulting from uncertainties of a sea voyage forms
an important factor in the conduct of the for-
eign fruit trade, serving to make it extremely
hazardous-a circumstance against which deal-
ers do not have to contend in the shipment of
Florida oranges. We have railroads leading
to all the great markets of America, and when
the fruit is transported by water, all the facili-
ties are afforded by perfect and commodious


steamships.
Orange culture, therefore, may go on indefi-
nitely in Florida, without fear of reaching a
general redundance of product. When our own
market is occupied those of Europe and else-
where will be open to us. The growing desire
everywhere, also of people for semi-tropical
fruits, which the efforts of producers are trying
to satisfy, is unlimited, and, therefore, efforts in
orange culture can continue to be put forth
until this unlimited and independent desire is
met-a goal which, perhaps, never can be
reached.
To persons of foresight and capital, who are
looking to the future rather than the present for
remunerative returns, Florida presents, in her
orange pursuit, the most extended as well as the
most inviting figlJ. But aside from the ques-


tion of profit the culture of oranges presents
other practical advantages. It is not only a
pleasing but an independent occupation. Its
pursuit is no dead level or monotonous exertion,
but one that affords scope for the development
of an ingenious mind. As a producer, the or-
ange grower is working under conditions of
constantly increasing advantages. Young men,
sometimes with little or no capital, are starting
every year in the business; often away from
communities of old and experienced growers,
and have succeeded by dint of tact and indus-
try. In point of regular profits; in point of an
industrious, frugal, and cheerful occupation;
in point of a very general desire to become in-
dependent; in point of repressive and adverse
influences in other pursuits, they have found
orange culture in its practical workings, the
most pleasing of occupations. Persons who own
orange groves in Florida are entirely well sat-
isfied, as a rule, with their investments. A bear-
ing grove is worth a great deal of money, and
to purchase one would require a large cash out-
lay. In ten years' time groves are usually in
full bearing-often in less time-and the in-
ducement to plant one is very great.-Amnerican
Grocer.



Classification of Soils.
Prof. Johnston classifies soils, according to
their clayey or sandy proportions, thus:
1st. Pure clay, from which no sand can be
washed.
2d. Strong clay or brick clay, which con-
tains from five to twenty per cent. of sand.
3d. Clay loam, which contains from twenty
to forty per cent. of sand.
4th. Loam, which has from forty to seventy
per cent. of sand.
5th. Sandy loam, which has from seventy
to ninety per cent. of sand.
6th. Light sand, which has less than ten per
cent. of clay.
Sandy soils, then, are those which consist
mainly of grains of sand, or silica, or flint, and
is called a silicious soil. Nature never bestowed
upon man a soil of greater capability of being
made lastngly fertile than the sandy, light soil.
of New England.
Gravelly soils need no description, though
there are rich gravels, depending upon the
rocks of which they are composed, and the sub-
stances which are mixed among them. Clay
soils consist largely of alumina; that is, having
such an abundance of clay that it is called the
" clay metal." Clay itself is a compound of
silica (sand), acid, alumina, and water. It
also contains potash, soda, and lime. It forms
a compact, fatty earth, soft to the touch, sticky
in a moist state and very hard when dry.
Chalky soils have been formed from rocks
in which lime was abundant.


Peaty soils need no description, although
they differ very widely.
Alluvial soils are formed by deposits of sand,
loam, and gravel brought down by rivers. They
are often very rich, being composed of a multi-
tude of thin layers of mud, in which all sorts
of fertilizing material is mixed. Loamy soils
contain a large portion of decayed matter,
humus or muck, as it is called. Woody fibre
in state of decay acquires a dark color, and
ultimately becomes mould. Loam contains a
variety of ingredients, as clay, sand, lime, in
addition to humus. It is a loose, friable de-
scription of soil, easy to cultivate, and as to
texture is the most desirable description of land
for purposes of tillage.
Small Farms--Fence Telephones--Baggage
Smashing.
The Governor of Florida reports that the
tendency of the agriculturists of that State is


-------------- ---


322


THE FLORIDA DISPATCH*






THE LORIA DIPATC. 32


ter may be; as a natural consequence the great
boxes in which some stow their effects are hard
to lift and are dropped with alacrity that is not
in the least modified by regard for contents.
There are two remedies exclusive of complaint
to the company-which never does any good;
one is to distribute weighty articles more care-
fully among the various pieces of luggage, and
the other is to use smaller trunks. There is not
the slightest possible excuse for'making a trunk
of a large model of Noah's ark, unless, indeed,
the owner like Noah, proposes to transport live
animals, and to smuggle them through as per-
sonal baggage.-N. Y. Herald.

PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING 'IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOt -BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EE CTIT.-


toward small farms. This is good news, and it
is to be regretted that other States are not as
wide awake as Florida. In California, the farm-
ers who earn most money per acre, are those
who have twenty or thirty acres in grapes and
other fruit. The richest New York farmers
are those who have grown berries and added
every year an acre or two to their pear orch-
ards, and the most profitable farms of all are
those within a few miles of this city, whose
managers bank considerable money yearly from
the sale of vegetables grown on a few acres that
are hired at rentals sometimes reaching $300
per acre per annum. One man who bought
an up-river farm of 23 acres 20 years ago
has for years averaged $7,000 yearly on the
yield of pear trees that he planted himself. But
the American farmer generally seems to imag-
ine that humanity needs only wheat, corn and
pork, so he attempts to raise these on a large
scale, while the vegetables and 'fruits on his own
table are purchased at high prices in city mar-
kets. The farmer should learn to eat some-
thing besides meat and bread. He should also
learn that the people who do not own farms are
willing and anxious to buy whatever vegetable
products may be fit to eat.

Some observing genius has suggested;that the
loneliness of home life on the Western prairies,
where farm-houses are often miles apart, may
be alleviated by a general utilizing of fence
wires for telephonic communication. As in some
sections of the country all the fences are of wire
most of the "plant" for several private tele-
phones is already in possession of every farmer,
so only terminal fixtures are necessary to a free
interchange of gossip between families that are
too far apart for neighborly calls in bad weath-
er. The plan certainly has attractive features.
If it were adopted, the farmer's wife, when so
tired of the monotony of home life that she can
get no comfort indoors except by slapping the
children and pecking at her husband, can drop
into a rocking-chair near the telephone and
chat as cheerily with a distant neighbor as if
she had never had a trouble in her life. Then
she could give her husband a chance and let
him swap horses and exchange crop prospects
with the "boys" at the nearest village store.
Aside from its convenience such a telephone
would be a great educator, for when in use by
the gentler sex it would do what society rules
have always been unequal to-it would compel
women to talk one at a time.
*
From the report of a recent interview with a
handler of personal baggage at a railway sta-
tion, we learn that the only wonderful thing
about damaged trunks is that the number is
not greater. The tendency of the traveling
public to carry large trunks, which are
bought as cheaply as possible, is not viewed with
favor by the stout fellows who are expected to
handle baggage. The rule is for a single man
to handle a trunk, no matter how large the lat-


reduce this thing to a purely business basis. It
has been our pleasure to examine the equip-
ments of many farms where it was intended to
raise poultry on a grand scale, and generally,
from the elaborate and costly fixtures, one
would think the purpose was to raise children
rather than chickens. It is very much to be
doubted if a large establishment can ever be
made a success from the start. Just as large
oaks from little acorns grow, a large establish-
ment must grow out of a small beginning that
has developed a capacity in the owner for con-
ducting a large business. We hope some day
to see this, but not until the craze about color
markings has somewhat subsided.-American
Dairyman.

Yield of Eggs.
A Duchess County (N. Y.) correspondent of
the Country Gentleman, says that the compara-


Table vs. "Fancy Poultry."
The chicken question presents an anomalous
condition in this country. Wherever we go,
North, South, or anywhere, we find farmers,
merchants, mechanics, and sometimes even
sailors breeding poultry, contending at fairs,
advertising through the papers and raising a
general hue and cry in behalf of their pets,
and all on account of nothing on earth but the
feathers. One would think from all the fuss
that those people were breeding ostriches in-
stead of chickens; that feathers were of more
value in the market than flesh; that the Ameri-
can people preferred to wear feathers on their
bodies rather than put flesh in their stomachs.
Nothing finds favor with these chicken fanciers
exept the so-called blooded or thoroughbred
fowls that are simply bred to the feather. The
size of the Brahma is sacrificed to the correct-
ness of the tail and hackle markings. The
Dorking has lost his breast in the struggle to
preserve the flesh color of the legs and the uni-
formity of the feather markings. How far this
craze has gone in England we are not informed,
but we know some of the best table fowls known
to the trade originated there.
In France not only are breeds of fine table
fowls originated, but, according to all reports,
they are still bred with an eye singly to table
qualities; and, not only this, but methods of
feeding to the end of quick maturity, economy
of flesh production and perfection of flesh
quality are closely practiced and experimented
with. The French seem to understand this
question as a practical one, and go at it in a
way to make fowls not only a pleasure to breed,
but a profit to handle. Chicken food that is
wasted by the ton in this country, as dead
horses, stale bread, etc., is carefully husbanded
and turned to the finest kind of chicken flesh
in France. Our people are so fearfully
squeamish about such things, that, while they
can stand and see the hen eat worms and car-
rion at her own sweet will, and chop her head
off at the next hour to put her in the pot, they
will not hear of such a thing as feeding her
carrion as a business. The lady, who eats the
oyster raw from the shell, is horrified at the
Italian, who does the same with the snail.
It is a wonder to many people why Ameri-
cans can succeed so well with fancy fowls, and
yet meet with repeated and unvarying failure
when they attempt to raise fowls for the mar-
ket. In one they succeed, with the other there
seems to be no profit. It looks as though the
American character was built upon too large a
scale to make a profit with fowls unless he can
get from three to ten dollars apiece for his
cocks and hens. No one seems to be able to


THE COTTON FLY.-An Archer (Fla.) cor-
respondent of the Gainesville Advocate an-
nounces the advent of the cotton fly in fields
around Jonesville, Wacassassa and Archer, and
gives the following course as one that will save
the crops from their ravages:
"Examine the lowest and rankest growing
spots in your fields every day; look for tiny
blue-green eggs on the under surface of the
leaves, or leaves half eaten through. If as soon
as this is seen the patch be gone over, sprink-
ling thoroughly with a solution of London Pur-
ple, one pound to fifty gallons of water, your
crop is saved. But if you wait till you find the
cotton "ragged," go soon to your merchant and
make the best terms you can for your little
account."


~`. r. .. ;= -LI C ~ -.- L-~~- CL~Q~~li- --~-=1~--+~-~.~T~~~~ilCF~3 lesson p--


tive yield and average standard of eggs laid by
the different breeds, is as follows:
Light Brahmas and Partridge Cochins, eggs
seven to the pound; they lay, according to
treatment and keeping, from eighty to one hun-
dred per annum, oftentimes more if kept well.
Dark Brahmas, eight to the pound, and about
seventy per'auinum. Black, White and Buff
Cochins, eight to the pound; one hundred is a
large yield per annum. Plymouth Rocks, eight
to the pound, lay one hundred per annum.
Houdans, eight to the pound, lay one hundred
and fifty per annum; non-sitters. La Fleche,
seven to the pound, lay one hundred and thirty
per annum; non-sitters. Black Spanish, seven
to the pound, lay one hundred and fifty per
annum. Dominiques, nine to the pound, lay
one hundred and thirty per annum. Games,
nine to the pound, lay one hundred and thirty
per annum. Crevecceurs, seven to the pound,
lay one hundred and fifty per annum. Leghorns,
nine to the pound, lay from one hundred and
fifty to two hundred per annum. Hamburgs,
nine to the pound, lay one hundred and seventy
per annum. *Polish, nine to the pound, lay
one hundred and fifty per annum. Bantams,
sixteen to the pound, lay sixty per annum.
Turkeys eggs, five to the pound, lay from thirty
to sixty per annum. Ducks eggs vary greatly
with different species, but from five to six to
the pound, and from fourteen to twenty-eight
per annum, according to age and keeping.
Geese, four to the pound, lay twenty per an-
num. Guineas, eleven to the pound, lay sixty
per annum.

Breath-Taming.
There is a very curious fact mentioned by
Catlin who traveled in the West, and wrote two
volumes on the Indians. He states that the
calves of the buffalo, if they are caught, and
the air from the lungs of a man is strongly
breathed into their nostrils, will become so
fascinated by that peculiar influence that they
will run after the horse of the hunter,, and fol-
low him five or six miles. It is said, and Mr.
Catlin affirms, that in Texas, or in other parts
of the country where there are wild horses
taken by the lasso, if the hunter succeeds in
taking hold of their nostrils, and then forcibly
expels air from his lungs into the nostrils of the
horse, he will follow him anywhere, and be-
come perfectly tame. These facts deserve to
be studied. I have heard that when Mr. Rarey
acted so powerfully on very violent horses, both
in this country and in Europe, he had some-
thing to do with their nostrils also. What he
dia, however, he kept in a great measure secret,
That part of the system, at any rate, has a great
deal to do in diminishing the activity of the
principal organs. It is very natural, therefore,
that such a power should be acquired by one
who has done such a thing to an animal as in-
telligent as the horse.
.


THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.i


323





32-- 'iiTHE FLORIDA DISPATCH .


SJACKSONILLE, A UST 1 i2.

JACKSONVILLE, AUGUST 11, 1882.


D. Redmond,


D. H. Elliott, W. H. Ashmead,
EDITORS.


Subscription $1.00 per anlnutm, in advance.

RAITE' S O- F -A.-DV.EPRTISING.
SQUARES. 1 TIME.I 1 MO. 3 MO. 6 MO. 1 YEAR
One............. ....... 1 00 2 50 5 50 $10 00 8 50
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Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words to line) ten cents
per line.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the best ad-
vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.

Special Club Rates with "The Dispatch."

Read and Subscribe--It Saves Money and
Will Pay You.
We have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
fill ing pi uliceations, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt of price, for ONE YEAR :
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH AND
Savannah Weekly News................................$2.50
Florida Weekly Union......................... .. 2.25
New York Weekly Sun............................... 1.75
New York Weekly Herald............................ 1.75
New York Weekly Tribune.......................... 2.50
New York Weekly Times...................... 1.75
New York Weekly World....................... 1.75
Philadelphia Weekly Times.......................... 2.50
American Agriculturist.............................. 2.00
Country Gentleman............................ ........ 2.75
Southern Cultivator...................................... 2.00
Atlantic Monthly Magazine......................... 4.00
Harpir's Monthly Magazine....................... 4.00
The Century Monthly Magazine (Scribner's).... 4.00
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine..................... 3.15
Popular Science Monthly.............................. 5.00
North American Review............................... 500
Harper's Illustrated Weekly.......................... 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Bazar............................ 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Young People...................... 2.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly..............:.... 4.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4.00
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly......................... 3.15
Frank Leslie's Sunday Magazine................... 3.15
Scientific American ...................................... 3.75
Waverly- Magazine ........................... 5.00
Detroit Free Press............ ........................... 2.35
Nebraska Farmer......................................... 2.00
The above are among thie very best publications-
Remittances should be sent by Check, Money Order,
or Registered Letter, addressed to
ASI-MEAD BDO'S,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Mr. A. F. STYLES, the distinguished horti-
culturist of "Glenadin Farm," near this city,
*has our thanks for some fine specimens of the
Scuppernong and Thomas grapes.
AN AMERICAN KNIFE.-We have just re-
ceived from the well-known house of MAHER &
GROSH, of Toledo, Ohio, a very beautiful and


substantial three-bladed knife of great value
and convenience. It contains a strong "hawk-
bill" pruning blade; a round-pointed budding
blade, of the "regulation" pattern, and a sub-
stantial jack-knife blade, of the old-fashioned
sort. We have carried the knives of this manu-
factory for several years, and we consider them
the very best pocket cutlery obtainable in this
country. The fine knife we have described
can be obtained per mail for $1.


Fruit-Ripening House.
We are informed that Mr. J. BEAN has de-
cided to put in a curing house for the ripening
of green fruits. We announce this with great
pleasure, as it will furnish a home market for
the Florida production of the Sicily lemons. If
the lemons are left to ripen on the tree, they
grow large and coarse, and are consequently
comparatively valueless. Mr. Bean proposes
to take them, when they have reached a certain
size and state of maturity, without reference to
the color. We learn that he has purchased the
products of Gen. H. S. Sanford's Belair grove,
and other large groves in the State, and is pre-
pared to buy all good lemons at reasonable
prices. We trust that in this new undertaking
he may meet with abundant success.

Vegetable Growers of Middle Florida.
The Tallahassee Floridian of August 1st,
says: "The newspapers of Middle Florida are
requested to give notice of the postponement of
the Middle Florida Vegetable-Growers' Con-
vention, called to meet in this city on the 15th
inst.
"On account of the absence of a great many
persons directly interested in this important
matter, it is deemed advisable to delay the hold-
ing of this convention until they return, in or-
der that all concerned may have an opportun-
ity of attending and participating in its delib-
erations.
"We are authorized to announce, therefore,
that the holding of the convention has been post-
poned until the 15th day of October."

Answers to Inquiries.
A. L. J.-Addire-s S. B. HUBBARD & Co.,
of this city, for full information in regard to
Disston and all other saws. We do not know the
prices or sizes of the largest circulars, but the
Lumber World says that a "circular saw 87
inches in diameter, and believed to be the larg-
est of its kind yet made, has recently been turned
out by a Sheffield firm. It is claimed, however,
by another firm of the same place, that they
have manufactured several saws of 88 inches
diameter. Considering the extreme difficulty
of producing suitable plates of this size, the ex-
pense of the working appliances, etc, these saws
are undoubtedly worthy of notice and reflect
credit upon the respective firms."
W. J. T.-We have already answered your
inquiry in regard to Guinea Cows. See page
308, DISPATCH No. 20, for Auguist 7.
S.-Address Capt. L. L. VARNEDOE, Thom-


asville, Ga.
L. J. O.-We will publish the essay of Mr.
BERCKMANS, on the Japan Persimmon, soon.
This is little or no doubt of the value and suc-
cess of this fruit here. But it cannot be safely
planted north of Georgia or the Carolinas, we
believe; though we have no special data on this
point.

ADDRESS WANTED.-We shall be obliged
to any person who will send us the full and
proper address of" Mr. STAPLETON, of Middle
Florida," who is mentioned in a letter of Mr.
GRADY as a breeder of pure Guinea cattle, on
page 170 of THE DISPATCH for June 5th, 1882.


Write Your Address and Signature Plainly.
One of our large Nursery firms, up the St.
John's River, writes us as follows:
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
Will you kindly call attention to the fact
that we are constantly in receipt of letters that
it is impossible for us to decipher, especially
the signature. We earnestly request parties
writing us on business to write their names and
places of residence legibly.
REMIARKs.-The evil which our correspond-
ent complains of and deprecates is a common
and crying" one. In the course of a long
business life, we have received scores of letters
of which the body and text were legible
enough; but when we reached the signature,
we were "lost" and "at sea." If the writer
happens to have a national reputation, like our
friend General SPINNER, or if he (the writer,)
happens to be known to the person who receives
the letter, all right. But, nothing can be more
silly and short-sighted than for a person to sup-
pose that because he knows his own cramped and
purposely-obscure "sign manual," a stranger
must be able to read it. Any one who writes a
letter to a stranger and signs his name in fanci-
ful, affected and "blind pot-hooks, does not
deserve an answer, and often fails to receive it.
Another reprehensible and perplexing class
of people are those who write the publisher of
a paper, like ours, for instance, to change my
DISPATCH to Hunkydory or Hardscrabble, and
oblige, yours truly, JoHN JONES;" but do not
take the trouble to properly date their letter,
or mention the name of the postoffice at which
they have heretofore received their paper! To
accommodate one of these reasonable and
thoughtful subscribers, we should have to look
through five or six thousand names and post-
offices, and life is too short for such
diversions.
It will be seen by the following, from the
Chicago Inter-Ocean, that the want of proper
care and attention to the most obviously neces-
sary details, on the part of letter-writers, is
wide-spread and of every day occurrence.-EDs.
It is a matter of common complaint in busi-
ness offices that a large number of correspond-
ents, many of them of the most intelligent class,
often neglect to give the name of the State as
well as the place from which their letters are
dated. Subscriptions to newspapers, orders for
goods, and many other communications are
sent through the mails in this incomplete form,
and the receivers are neither able to fill the or-
ders nor to return the money for want of the
full address of the senders. Sometimes letters
calling for answers are posted without even a


date; sometimes they have dates, but the post-
offices or States are wanting. There are firms
which number cases of this kind by the thou-
sand. It does not always answer to take the
postmark on the envelope, even when that is
legible, fobr the regular postoffice of the writer;
because he may have posted the letter at some
other than his regular postoffice, or in a postal
car. There is but one business way of com-
mencing a letter, and that includes the legible
inscription of the place where written in full,
unless the writer prefers to give this informa-
tion at the foot of the page. When the com-
munication is on business, and as a general rule
in all cases, the postoffice address of the writer
should be distinctly given under his signature
or in the body of his letter, whenever it is dif-
ferent from the name of the place at which the
communication was written."


I


---






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, 2If


The Transportation of Fruits t6 Western
Markets.
There was some discussion upon this subject
at the late meeting of the Georgia State Horti-
cultural Society, at Macon, Ga. As Florida is
also interested, it may be well to consider the
wants of Georgia and to what extent the two
interests can be blended in accomplishing the
desired result. The principal varieties of
fruits marketed from Georgia are, peaches,
pears and grapes. The season, is in June and
July. The requirements are quick movements at
low rates. The service furnished by the transpor-
tation companies is by passenger and freight
trains, the former in quick time but of limited
capacity, the latter slow but unlimited in capac-
ity. The service by passenger train schedules is
furnished by the Express Company. While
the early shipments can afford the tariff, the
present facilities are too limited to encourage a
large production. Therefore, it seems necessary
to devise ways of utilizing the ordinary freight
train service for this business.
Improvements are being gradually made in
the movement of these trains, and the sched-
ules, North and South, made more continuous,
and delays at terminal points avoided; but at
best the time to distant markets is too great to
insure deliveries in good order without some
means of preservation en route. This, it seems,
can be accomplished by refrigeration or the use
of cold air, which can be produced in various
ways. The most available and practicable at
present is the use of ice in portable refrigera-
tors, varying in size from the capacity of one
bushel to one car-load. There are a number of
refrigerator car companies who construct and
lease their cars to transportation companies or
individuals, for cold storage in transit. The
terms are usually about $300 a year; the car re-
turned in good order. The rate on an ordinary
car of fruit from Jacksonville to Clicago is
$125, each road over which it passes receiving
its proportion thereof, as agreed upon. The
railroad company owning the car receives from
each of the other companies, over whose road
it passes, 1} cent per mile for the use of the
car. If the car is damaged, it is at the
expense of the company on whose road the dam-
age occurred. The contents are at owners' risk,
of totalloss, shortage or decay. Were the ship-
per to lease the car, he would load it and fur-
nish such appliances as he might deem neces-
sary for the preservation of the contents, pay
the car-load rate to destination, and receive
from each of the roads over which the car


passes 1 2 cent per mile.
If a business arises that justifies the construc-
tion of cars especially adapted thereto, the rail-
road companies will build them. That is their
altitude to-day towards this new industry of
fruit culture in this section. If you have fruit
for market make known the quantity and
character of transportation required and it
will be forthcoming.
The want of co-operation and a concentra-
tion of this matter at prominent points, on
account of the variable supply and demand,
different varieties, and diversified interests and
scattered fields of production, renders .it a
matter of doubt if a regular line of refrigerator
cars could be sustained and accommodate a ma-
jority.
Refrigerator cars necessitate cold storage at
some points accessible to many growers. If at
Jacksonville, Macon and Atlanta, shippers
tributary to those places could store matter


there for shipment in refrigerator cars. But
"A." may desire to ship to Memphis, B." to
Nashville, "' C." to Cincinnati. The car could
not go to all of the above points, and proba-
bly neither A. B. nor C. could ship a car load
at one time. Uuntil there is a sufficient supply
of fruit stored at central points in car-load lots
for distribution by one person, we cannot see
that a line of refrigerator cars would accom-
modate the producers. They may be leased by
individual shippers, but ordinarily they would
not answer. Many producers want to ship
and sell their fruit to their favorites; they
are not disposed, and will not be persuaded, to
consign it with the common lot to be disposed
of and marketed by one person. There are
many and different ideas as to packing and pre-
paration for market in which their advocates
delight to indulge; there are also the likes and
dislikes as to commission merchants, and mar-
kets. The privilege of abusing and avoiding
these, each deems it his right to enjoy, having
paid for it.
Without going further into the matter, we
would suggest that for the present, small re-
frigerators will answer. They will carry as
well as the refrigerator cars. They can be
made in capacity to accommodate the supply
and the demand. Shippers will then have
their cold storage at home; they can fill one or
thirty and put them on the first train in any
kind of a car going to any destination. The
transportation companies will move them at the
same rate per 100 lbs. as other freight. They
can load an ordinary car with them and move
them at car-load rates with as good refrigeration
as in the refrigerator car. They will not pre-
vent the use of refrigerator cars and cold stor-
age at prominent points. This will be the ulti-
mate result, but the business will be encour-
aged by the success of the small refrigerators
in accommodating present needs. The small
shipper of to-day properly accommodated and
with adequate facilities, will be the giant of to-
morrow; therefore, we would again say con-
struct small refrigerators in capacity from one
to five or ten bushels.
The many ice manufactories in the South
make ice available and cheap. The enhanced
price realized from the fruit being clean, nice
looking and in good order will pay for the re-
frigerators in one season. They will last until
the business has so increased as to demand a
refrigerator car. Although we say this and
further that it pays to ship only the best fruit
and bestow all the care and taste possible in its
preparation and arrangement, many will not
believe it until forced by painful experience to
realize it. This experience and preparation
with the small refrigerators will educate them
in marketing their fruit and enable them to
overcome the difference between fast time and
low rates, in securing its preservation by refrig-
eration.

New Publications, Etc.
Prescott. Passages from the works of WILLIAM


HICKLING PRESCOTT. For Homes, Libraries, and
Schools. Compiled by JOSEPHINE E. HODGDEN,
Philadelphia. J. B. LIPPINCOTT & Co., 1882. This
little volume of nearly 100 pages, form one of the
series of Leaflets from Standard Authors;" and, in
answer to the query-" How can our young people
be led to take pleasure in the writings of our best
authors?" the compiler says: It is proposed, by
their use in school, to develop a love for the beautiful
thoughts, and the noble and elevating sentiments that
pervade the choicest literature, and thus to turn aside
that flood of pernicious reading which is deluging the
children of our beloved country." This is a very
noble and worthy object, and so far as we have seen,
it is admirably carried out in these Leaflets,' which
should be in the hands of all our young people to the
total exclusion of the odious dime novel," etc. The


series, or any portion thereof, may be obtained from
ASHMEAD BROTHERS, of this city.
Snlalnd, Notes from-on the Manatee River, Gulf
Coast of South Florida. Its climate, soil and pro-
ductions. Second edition. Illustrated. Published
by the author, SAXIUEL C. UPHAM, Braidentown,
Florida, 1881. The author speaks of his section of
Florida as
"The Land of the Orange and Guava,
The Pine-Apple, Date and Cassava;"
and his little book is one of the most entertaining
and instructive of the many which have been pub-
lished about Florida during the past decade. It is
very neatly printed and illustrated, and very cheap
at 25) cents. It may be ordered from the author, or
from ASI-HMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.
The Lio,,le-'ir IWold is the title of a large and beau-
tifully printed journal of 40 pages, published at Buf-
falo, New York, on the first day of every month. It
is devoted entirely to the Lumber interests of the
country, and is edited with great ability and indus-
try. It is worth at least ten times its cost-(which
is only 1 per year !)-to every saw-mill owner and
lumner-dealer in Florida and the South. As a "touch
of its quality," we will reprint one of its leading Iar-
ticles, entitled '"Our Boys," in TH11 DisPAvrcH of
Aug. 21. Address, Lumbr IWo ld, Buttalo, New
York.
Descripti'e (,,tiel,,ii, of Fruit and Orlnamental
Trees, Shrubs, Rloses, Evergre'ens, Hardy Flowering
Plants, etc. Also: Fruits Adapted to Florida and
the Coact Belt of tie Southern States. From '"Fruit-
land Nurseries," Augusta, Ga., P. J. I EKMIAXS,
Proprietor. 1882-'83.
Hand-Book of Butffl Fooers. Hoo.ES, lUo. &
TIoOM s, West Chester, Pa. 1882.
Seed Annual. 1882. 1). M. FiEnu &' Co., l)Detroit,
Michigan.
PedigK,-es, nD-ceripii .-s, Testiumonials, Essays, etc.,
of Short-Horn Durham Cattle; Improved Kentucky
Sheep; Cashmere, or Angora Goats ; and of XWoburn,
Irish-Grazier, White Bedford, Yorkshire, Berkshire
and Poland-China Hogs, blended. Bred and for sale
bv RenT. M. SCOTT, post-office, Fr:;nktrd, Ken-
tucky. July, 1882.
Corn ,ald Cotto-Report on the Area and Condi-
tion of these crops. Also, Small Grains, Sorghum,
Tobacco, etc. From the Departient of Agriculture,
Washington, D. C., July, 1882. [Extracts in our
next.]
Descriptire C flology' of the Blight-Proof Pears,
LeConte and Keifler, hybrids; the Japanese Persim-
mon, and other fruits, etc., etc. By W. W. THorMP-
SON, LeConte Nursery, Smithville, Lee Co., Ga.
)Descript'ire Price List of the Denison Nurseries.
T. V. MUNSON, Proprietor, Denison, Texas, 1882-'83.
A NEW HUMOROUS BOOK.-S'ketches .from T.ras
Sifting.s-210 pages, containing more than one hun-
dred of the original humorous sketches written by
"The Sifters," ALEX E. SWEET and J. ARMOY
KNOX, and published in T.rNs Siftfings, tlhe celebra-
ted humorous weekly. The book contains 55 orig-
inal illustrations. For 50 cents in stamps, it will be
mailed by the authors, SWEET & KNox, Austin,
Texas, to any address, postage paid. The denma:d


for this book has never been equaled in the history of
American literature. 12,000 copies were ordered by
booksellers before the first edition came from the
press.

LECONTE PEARS.-Our good friend, Capt.
L. L. VARN~ OOE, of Thomasville. Ga., sends
us a generous sample of his LeConte pears. The
Captain was the original introducer and dis-
seminator of this now well-known and popular
fruit; he has, probably, the largest collection of
bearing and nursery trees in the possession of
one individual; and the size and fine appear-
ance of the samples before us, conclusively prove
that he understands their culture and manage-
ment. See advertisement.


I
I






3 TIHE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


shipped from Charleston, S. C., and as the sea-
son advances they begin to be brought from
Moorhead City, N. C., by way of Point Look-
out; from Powell's Point, N. C., through the
canal and sound, and making the sea at Cape
Hatteras. The fruit from Norfolk is brought
by the Old Dominion steamships, and just now
they are loading up very heavy deck and be-
tween-deck loads of the fruit. Up and down
the coast the watermelons may be seen in
transit piled high on the decks of the trim little
oyster boats. These boats in the winter season
are engaged in carrying the luscious bivalves;
then, after a few trips carrying up Irish pota-
toes from Southern ports, the watermelon sea-
son opens and keeps them busy until the sweet
potatoes demand a few trips. Up to thirty
schooner loads in a single day have arrived at
this port, but somehow all the fruit fiads a


A


.,. (

De King ob Fruits. t

UNCLE JOSH.

Some are pa'shel ter de apple, oddahs clamor fo' de
plum; 1
Some tin' joyment in de cherry, oddahs make de
peaches hum,
Some git fastened to de onion, oddahs lub de artichoke;
But my taste an' watahmellen er boun' by a pleasant
yoke!
Hit er meller, hit er juicy,
Hit er cooling hit er sweet!
Hit er painless ter de stummick-
Yo' kin eat, an' eat, an' eat!
Some tin' pleasure in de orange, odd*hs choose de can-
taloupe;
Some er ton' ob de banana, some de huckleberry scoop;
Dar er timber in de punkin' to' de richest kind ob pies;
But dat speckled watahmellen! 0, how it tills my eyes!
Yo' mus' climb ter get de apple, er de cherry, er de
peach,
An' mus' allus, w'en yo' eat dem, keep a doctah winin
reach;
But de lubly watahmellen makes his bed upon de
groun',
An' de darkey, not de doctah, in de moonlight makes
de roun'.
Hit er meller, hit er juicy,
Hit er coolin', hit er sweet!
Hit er painless ter de stummick-
Yo' kin eat an' eat, an' eat!

Watermelons in New York.
New York, with the assistance of a few out-
lying places, really part of the city, can con-
sume, when in full melon-eating trim and in
the height of the season, about 200,000 melons
per week ; at least, so, says a dealer of West
Washington market, who has good reason to
know, as they are all sold by count, and his
firm handle a great majority of those reaching
this market. Taking into account the shipping
trade from this city, including the melons sent
up into the State, to the watering places and
away into the Eastern States, and the grand
aggregate has reached close up to half a million
of the fruit in a week. In weight the melon
runs up to forty and fifty pounds. Those re-
puted the best melons-and the earliest ship-
ments-come from Georgia by way of Savan-
nah. The fruit is a favorite wherever known,
and it is loved as much by the poor laborers of
the North as the poor white and the negro of
the South. Indeed, at the South, the water-
. million is a favorite with all classes. It is an
irresistible attraction to the negro, who will
run almost any risk to obtain it. The present
and growing demand at the North for water-
melons has quickened the enterprise of South-
ern farmers in the production of this fruit, and
a sure and adequate supply is guaranteed at
rates which, compared with other fruit, make
them, as one dealer said, "as cheap as the water
they are named after."
The very first melons to strike the market
come from Florida and they readily bring $1
each. Next the products begin to come from
Georgia, and by this time the pickings in Flor-
ida have largely increased. Next melons are


ceasing to feel that there is anything venerable
and deserving of respect left in the world. This
decline is consonant with the increase of greed


for gain, the growth of selfishness and the
spread of materialism. When men come to


More Reverence Needed.
An exchange paper says: "We no longer
teach our children to say 'Sir' and 'Ma'am' in
addressing their elders and superiors. It is not
considered 'in good form,' according to the po-
lite slang of treatises on modern etiquette. In
old-fashioned times people used to cherish a
profound respect for age, merit and station, and
were punctilious in the expression of it. A
habit of polite deference was universal among
all who pretended to good breeding. Even
strangers saluted each other in courteous recog-
nition of the kinship which relates all members
of the human family. The young arose on the
entrance of their parents or elders into the room
and resumed their places after the latter were
seated. They refrained from monopolizing the
easy chair, leaving it for those privileged to its
use by years of invalidism. They were not
given to lounging and sprawling about on the
sofas and chairs with an air of lawless indo-
lence and license. They sat erect when in com-
pany and maintained a modest demeanor as
though conscious of a presence before whom it
was becoming to osberve a decorous deport-
ment. A maxim conveying a sound fundamental
truth was continually enjoined upon them in
the words, 'Children should be seen and not
heard.' As the result of this scrupulous train-
ing a gracious and attentive bearing became a
sort of second nature which gentlemen or gen-
tlewomen never laid aside in their associations
with the high-born or the humble.
"But we are rapidly changing all that. With
the advent of 'Young America' a new order of
things has come in. The Republican doctrine
of equality is producing, in one respect at least,
a thoroughly leveling effect, and it is a leveling
down instead of up. The theory that 'I am as
good as you' is working itself out in a code of
behavior which carries independence of manner
to the verge of impertinence. Children are no
longer kept in the background until maturing
judgment prepares them to take their turn at
the front. Boys who are looked upon in the
cradle as possible future presidents are not to
have their spirits broken or their wills curbed
by the restraints of discipline. The free Ameri-
can citizen is free from birth to push himself
forward regardless of the claims to consid-
eration of those whom he elbows and jostles in
his rude and selfish clamor. Lonely childhood
and venerable old age are both lost to us in the
uncivilizing struggles. One is compelled by
premature forcing and the other is crowded ab-
solutely to the wall, and society goes on as best
it may, deprived of the sweet, fresh grace and
the benignant and subduing influences they
create.
The fact is our age is one of irreverence.
The very principle on which good manners are
based has declined until we are in danger of


I


*"WAT


Wo-


w


market, though occasionally a dealer insisting
on a certain price finds himself with a lot of
soft fruit on 'his hands, and is compelled to
throw the stuff overboard. The fruit coming
by the sailing vessels is the more carefully
handled, and there is less loss, though now and
then a sudden extra lurch may send a score or
two from the deck load bobbing overboard. At
the steamer docks there may often be seen a
heap of several hundred broken melons, about
which hovers a crowd of street boys and long-
shoremen, each greedily breaking out chunks
of the red, succulent meat within and eating it
with great relish and little ceremony.-N. Y.
Herald.


believe there is nothing beyond earth demand-
ing consideration, it will soon appear that there
is nothing on earth worth holding sacred.
When the last spark of reverence has died out
in the heart the lowest stage of godlessness is
reached, and nothing is thenceforth secure from
a profaning touch. Fortunately for the race,
despite the leveling spirit which marks the
present era, the instinct of reverence continues
to be a great humanizing and civilizing agency.
It is that which prompts tenderness toward the
sick, the infirm, the afflicted, the weak and dis-
abled of every kind, and constrains admiration
for whatever is noble, grand or beautiful. It
is that which impels men to treat childhood and
womanhood with a delicate and chivalrous
honor. It is that which keeps alive his faith
in the existence of virtue, which holds in check
his selfishness and animalism and lifts him into
the realms of spirituality. There is no lurking
danger in the practice of teaching children the
habit of reverence for whomsoever and whqt-
soever is estimable in rank or quality. There
is no fear of the habit degenerating into
servility. Our institutions bravely counteract
that; besides, the very capacity for respecting
others is the best preservative of self-respect.
The child accustomed to speak and act with
proper deference on all occasions stands the
smallest chance of developing into a snob. In
according to others due respect he will be care-
ful to make the thing mutual by meriting re-
spect in return.

THE manufacture of peach baskets has be-
come an important industry. Years ago the
baskets were made by hand, and inasmuch as
they cost from 25 to 30 cents, the loss of any
considerable number of them was a serious
matter. But the establishment of great facto-
ries, required by the growth of the peach trade,
has reduced the price to a moderate figure, vary-
ing from $6 to $8 per hundred. Along the
Peninsula railroads there are now eight or nine
factories, each making from 2,500 to 4,000 bas-
kets a day during the busy season. The bot-
toms and hoops are made of Maryland pine and
the staves from the Delaware gum tree.

-The number of persons employed in opera-
ting the railroads of this country the past year,
averaged fully twelve to the mile of operated
line, or 1,200,000 in all. The niimber em-
ployed in the construction of our railroads
equaled 400,000, increasing the total number
of employes to 1,600,000, or about one thirty-
second of our population, estimated at 53,200,-
000.

-Cotton caterpillars and moths have made
their appearance in Alabama. Thus far we
have not heard of them in this State, although
the recent rainy season has been favorable to
their development.- Union.


I-


Agricultural, Horticultural and Pormological
Associations.
Florida Fruit-Growers' Association-Office at Jack-
sonville-D. Redmond, President; W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; W. H. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding Sec-
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee-Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, 0. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official organ-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA STATE GRANGE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICES.-Master, Win. H. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Wyn. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B. F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Flolida; A. S., T. W. Field-
ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. H. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate
Keeper, Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Winm. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T. W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H.


AN


;Vol






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Geo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Umstead, Hous-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville.-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J. C. Greeley, Treasurer.
Directors-J. H. McGinniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro, P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney. Annual meeting-
Last Friday in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; O. E. Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. O. Taylor, Secretary. and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Florida.-President, A. B. Bartlett, Georgetown; Vice-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. Hawkins, Lake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George; George H. Thom, Treasurer,
Georgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
mond, Fort Gates.
Picolata Agricultural and Horticultural Society.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, W. N. ParKer, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Corresponding Secretary,
N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., Recording Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer. Meets first Saturday in each month.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President, A. H. Mathers, Second Vice-President; B.
W. Powell, Corresponding Secretary; B. F. Jordan, Sec-
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical Fruit Growers' Association of Monroe County,
Florida.-Home office, Myers, Florida; F. A. Hendry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson,
President; Thomas Tillis, First Vice-President; J. B.
Sutton, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary; J. M. Barco, Recording Secretary;
SL. W. Hamlin, Assistant Recording Secretary.
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Association.-
John Bradford, President, Bradfordville, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida.
Pinellas, Florida, Fruit Growers' Association.-D. W.
Meeker, President; Wm. P. Neeld, Secretary.
Central Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida.-Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
Evergreen Horticultural Society, Dunedin, Florida.-
J. W. Matchett, President; W. Tate, Vice-President;
Geo. L. Jones, Secretary.
Decatur County Fair Association, Bainbridge, Geor-
gia.-Maston O'Neil President I. Kwilecki, Secretary.
Lake Wier Agricultural and Pomological Society (of
Marion County, Florida).-Captain J. L. Cainy, Presi-
dent Dr. L. M. Ayer, Corresponding Secretary.
Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Higgins, Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Association, Albany,
Georgia.-L. E. Welch, President; T. M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
Sumter County Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation.-D. L. Hubbard, President, Leesburg. W. C.
Dodd, Recording Secretary, Leesburg; A. P. Roberts,
Corresponding Secretary, Leesburg.
Florida Central Agricultural Society.-Thos. F. King,
President, Gainesville; Secretary, --
--- ;C W. K. Cessna, Corresponding Secretary, Gaines-
ville.
Archer Agricultural Associatlon.-W. B. Lipsey,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine, Secretary; Dr. J. C. Neal,
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President; John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewis, Treasurer, Tallahassee.
Indian River Agricultural and Pomological Society.-
A. P. Cleveland, President; W. H. Sharp, Secretary,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
Association.-R. J. Mays, President; Frank W. Pope,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
Orange County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred L. Robertson, Corresponding
Secretary.
Gadsden County Fair Association.-Jesse Wood Pres-
ident; W. H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R. Harris,
Second Vice-President; J. W. Kendricks, Secretary; E.
C. Lou, Treasurer.


South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
which we may have fallen in the naming of officers, &c.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH ?]



HOMES IN Tu I SUNNY SOUTH.
0-

SPLENDID OFFER TO SETTLERS


40 Hours from New York City: 108 Miles
from Savannah.


Soutlt. Ceorgia Ljan.drl for
Sale by

J. M. STICKER,

June 1-tf Glenmore, Ware Co., Ga.


PIANOS AND ORGANS
..!.. *73B. O.A-, ^'lI'i'r ,
15 East Bay Jacksonville.
SOLD ON INSTALLMENTS, AT LOWEST PRICES-
branch of Ludden & Bates, kavannah-EXACTLY
SAME PRICES AND TERMS, Sheet Music, Strings
and small instruments of all kinds. Send for cata-
logues, prices and terms. TUNING AND REPAIRING
a specialty. My tuner will make regular tours through
the State, and my customers will thus have my repre-
sentative at their doors, a great advantage to purchasers
of instruments, to sept 26, '82

I =E E
THE





DAILY TIMES.







THE TIMES is the official paper of the city and the
leading paper of the State. It has the largest circulation
in Florida, and reaches all parts of it. It is not merely
a local newspaper, but aims to advocate the interests
and promote the prosperity of Florida as a whole.
Its reputation outside the State is very high. It has
taken rank among those journals whose columns are
looked to for news, and whose comments are quoted
with respect throughout the country.
Its editors have had wide and varied experience in
journalism North as well as South; its advertising pa-
tronage is liberal and of the best character; and its re-
sources, financial and other, are ample. It will furnish
Florida with a live, progressive, outspoken, and reada-
ble newspaper, the peer of any.


ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.

THE TIMES has secured by special contract the full
despatches of the ASSOCIATED PRESS. Besides that
its Editor is Agent of the Associated Press for the State
of Florida, which gives him great advantages in obtain-
ing the freshest and most important State news.


SPECIAL DESPATCHES.

With representatives in the leading news centres of
the country, THE TIMES is well served in addition to
the regular Press reports. During the past winter it has
received a very large number of telegraphic specials."


CORRESPONDENCE.
Its regular correspondence from Washington, New
York and Boston is of noteworthy excellence; and its
State correspondence has attracted much attention.
This feature will be extended and improved; and to
this end correspondence containing news or items of
information of any kind is solicited from all quarters.


"OLD SI. "
In addition to his editorial work, Mr. Small will write
regularly for THE TIMES, and in its Sunday issues the
famous "Old Si" will disseminate wisdom in chunks
to the Florida public.
TERM (strictly in advance): One year, $10; Six
months, $5; three months, $2.50; one month, $1. sent
one month on trial for 50 cents.
Remittance should be made by draft or post-office
order, or in a registered letter. Address
JONES & SMALL,
to sept 26,'82 Jacksonville, Fla.


;50,000


THE SUWANNEE


STE SAW M & PLANING MILLS,


ELL AVIL3L-E, F LORIDA,


DREW & BUCKI,


- Proprietors.


---0---


We respectfully announce to our friends and the pub-
lic generally, that, having secured the services of com-
petent Draughtsmen, Architects and Mechanics, we are
prepared to estimate on and contract for the building of

DWELLINGS,
COTTAGES,
FACTORIES,
HOTELS
PUBLIC EDIFICES,

etc., at any point accessible by the several railroad and
steamboat lines. Possessing the advantage of manufac-
turing our own lumber, we are enabled to offer very lib-
eral inducements as to terms and quality of material.
Draughts, plans, estimates and information furnished
on application.
We have also made extensive additions to our Plan-
ing Mill and will continue, as heretofore, to manufacu-
ture and keep in stock a full line of Framing and Finish-
ing Lumber, Mouldings, Brackets, Balusters, Pickets,
Laths, etc.
DREW V f BTUCKI,


July 17, '82-tf.


Ellaville, Florida.


ELLIS & SMcCLUTJRE,


Architcts ancl ivil EnM inDOrs.


Plans, Specifications and Estimates for Buildings of
all kinds. Water Supply, Drainage, Sewerage, Bridges'
Roofs, Etc. P. O. Box 784. Room No. 12 Palmetto Block,
Bay Street. Aug. 7 to Feb. 7.


COTTON is-ING "UT OUR ENGINE IS
CU/UflKI.KINGofCOTTON!
Invaluable patented improvements found in no other
ERTEGJES in the world. For Pamphlets and Price
List, (also for SAW MILLS)) address
THE AULTMAN & TAYLOR CO.. Mansfield, Ohio.


RUBBER STAMPS
Are manufactured right in our establishment in the
best manner and at the shortest notice.
4G-Send in your orders.


May 1-tf


ASHMEAD BROS.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


TO NEW YORK i ITURN $43,50,


GOOD TO NOVEMBER 1st.


Lente Pear Trs a. nttings Via all Rail to Portsmouth, Virginia, and
Lbo U U Rlo Ur I1U UU UOS a Unl s thence by the elegant steamships of the


FOR SALE AT

Di2cie 1T7ursery.

H. H. SANFORD Proprietor,
to Aug 21 THOMASVILLE, GA.

37 : s.-ai i E-
Fine Nunan Strawberry Plants. The best known
variety for shipment.
100 Plants........................................ .75
500 Plants............................................ ......... 2.00
1000 Plants.......................................................... 3.00
Terms cash delivered at Express Office or Railroad,
Charleston. Address,
JAMES PRICE,
112 Broad Street,
Aug. 7 to Oct. 7. CHARLESTON, S. C,


old Dominion Line to New York.



Persons leaving Jacksonville by the fast mail on Sun-
day Monday, Tuesday and Friday, at 9 a. m., arrive at
Portsmouth the following afternoon, making close con-
nection with sieamships, and arrive in New York the
next evening thereafter.
The appointments of this line, and elegant steamship
accommodations, the absence of delays, whether going
or returning, together with the low rate of fare, make it
a most desirable summer excursion route.
For tickets and other information apply to office of
the S., F. & W. Railway, 84 West Bay Street (Astor
building), pr the Ticket Office at the Waycross Short
Line passenger station.
JAS. L. TAYLOR,
Gen. Pass. Agent.
GEO. W. IAINES, Agent, Jacksonville.
Aug. 7 tp Oct. 2.


U~~~ 1 -- ,-.--


327


I






32 THE FLORIDiA DISPATCH.
-.... ,,, : .9 i "cj "~ , i7 :, h~ ~r cm Ti i"' "" """ '' ...


Market Quotations.
FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE,
315 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, August 2, 1882.
Watermelons are scarce for good quality and bringing
top figures for large size; Georgia and South Carolina,
$20@(45; North Carolina, $120f30 per hundred.
Peaches-Georgia, 735c. 1..3; North Carolina, $1.50@3.25
per crate.
Pears-Georgia, Bartlett, $3@4; Virginia, Bartlett, ex-
tra, $4@5; Virginia, Bartlett, fair, ,2@3 per crate; Geor-
gia, LeConte $1.50da 2 per box.
Grapes-Georgia, Concord, prime, Sc.(o 12c.; North Car-
olina, Hartfords, 8c.@(10c. per pound.
Lemons- Florida, .44. 8 per crate; Sicily, $4@6 per box-
Respectfully,
C. D. OWENS,
General Agent.

Jacksonville Wholesale Prices.
Corrected weekly, by JONEES' & BO WEN, Wholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.


SUGARus-Granulated .........................................
White Ex. C ................. ..................
Golden C......................................
P ow dered..........................................
Cut L oaf.............................................
COFFEE, Rio-Fair............................................
Good............................... ......
C h oice .......................................
B est ...........................................
Java 0. G.........................................
M och a ............................... .............
Peaberry...........................................
Maracaibo............................ ..............
Any of above grades roasted to order
F ou- Snow Drop, best ...................................
Oreole, 2d best....................................
Pearl, 3d best .................................
EATS-Bacon................................................
Hams (Merwin & Sons).....................
Should ers. ...........................................
IIOMiNY-Pearl, per bbl................................
MEAI--per bbl .................................................
LARD-Refined in pails..................................
BUTTER-Very best, kegs (on ice)...................
CHEESE-Full cream ........................................
Half cream.... ..................................
TOBACCO--We have made arrangements direct with
the'i anufctirers and offer you to-day as fol-
r ........Q


Smoking-"the Boss" Durham 1,s
an d s.......................... .... ......
"The Boss" Durham 1 lb pkge.........
"Sitting Bull" D. (genuine) 4s ........
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) s..........
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) s ............
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) 1 lb pkge..
Plug--"Shell Road" 4 plugs to lb., 30
lh boxes .............. ...... ........
"Florida Boys" 5 plugs to lb., 30 lt
boxes......... ...........................
"Florida Girls"-Bright twist, 11 to
t)b., 17 )b boxes.............................
Cigars--"Long Branch"a very pop-
ular brand, per thousand.........
"Our X," choice cigar, easy smok'r
"Our XX," a very choice smoker....
"Florida Boys," (we areState Agt,)
These are all fresh goods and will compare favora-
bly in price and quality with any goods.
SOAP AND STARCH--Colgate's 8 oz., per box..
Peerless, 8 oz., per box..........................
Starch, lum p, per Ibt...... ........ .......... 5
HoPs, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS-
H ops, per lb............... ...........................
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz..........
Grrnnt' s 3-Dime Baking Powder. per


10
811
11 4%

11
12
25
35
18
18
8 75
7 75
7 50
14
1.8
1.4
5 75
5 75
141
30
14y
122


32
30
50
49
47
45


36
50
25 00
24 00
26 00
45 00

3 50
3 50
i @6c
(5@22c
60c


doz. 1 lb...................................... ...... ...... 2 25
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. 1 1b. 2 25
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. fIt,..... 2 70
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. b ...... 1 50
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl., new.... ............... 4 25
CHICKENS, each................... ............................. 20 40
EGGs-Per doz..................................... 15@18
HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per It., first class 13
Country Dry Salted, per lb.................... 11
Butcher Dry Salted, per b.................... 9(' I0)
Damaged Hides................................
Kip and Calf, 81ts. and under................ 10
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per tb.......................... 3
Deer Skins Salted, per lb................ 26@30
FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter..................................... 150@4 00
R accoon, each........................................ 5 15
W ild Cat, each........................................ 10 20
F ox, each ................................................ 5 (15
BEESW AX-per ............. .............................. 20
WooL-Free from burs, per tlb..................... 17@22
Burry, per ............................................ 11@ 15
GOAT SKINS-Each per Itb.................................. 10
Hominy and meal advancing rapidly ; will be worth
10 per cent more in next 30 days.


DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

The largest stock in the State. Country

buyers will consult their own interests

by corresponding with me. All orders

promptly filled at prices to compete with
any house south of Baltinore. Remem-

erl my only Florida address.

GEO. HUGHES,
to june 26, '82 Cor. Bay and Ocean, Jacksbnville, Fla.


GEORGETOWN NIURSE RIES.

0-
ORANC AND LEMON TREES Budded from tried and approved varieties, and
on good healthy stocks.
Also, JAPAN PERSIMMONS, LECONTE PEARS, GRAPES, and a general line of Fruit Trees suitable to
Florida. Address,


Aug. 14. to : ov. 0.
Aug. 14 to Nov. 6.


- -errgetown.,3= ,1ozlida.


FRANK W. MUMBY. JNO. N. C. STOCKTON. RAYMOND D. KNIGHT.

MVUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,


1879.
F. W. MUMBY & CO.


-- SUCCESSORS TO

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE AND RETAIL


1870.
JNO. S. DRIGGS & CO.


Crockery, China, Glass and Earthenware.

We have the largest and most complete stock in the State. All the Latest Novelties in Majolica and Fancy
Goods, Vases, Motto Cups and Saucers, etc. Decorated Tea, Dinner and Chamber Sets in a large Variety. Lamps
and Chandeliers, Fancy Vase Lamps in Majolica, Faience, Kito, Porcelain and other Wares. Wood and Willow,
Stone and Tinware. The American, Crown and Peerless Ice Cream Freezers, Water Coolers, Filters, etc.
SOLE STATE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED

Monitor Oil Stoves and Little Joker Oil Cans.
THE BEST IN THE WORLD. Send for Price Lists.
The best and only absolutely safe Oil Stove in the World. It is Economical, Ornamental, Convenient, Dura-
ble, Compact and Cheap. Its fuel is Coal Oil. No Dust! No Ashes! No Smoke! No Trouble! Testimonials
from those using the Stoves given on application.
Fruit Jars and Jelly Tumblers, Wine Bottles, Flasks, etc. Special inducements to the trade.
MeIrch1ints, Hotels, Boarding Houses and Bars will find it greatly to their advantage to give us a trial. Send
for list of assorted packages.
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD.
MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
13 WEST BAY STREET. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to July 5, '83. (Mlention this paper) ______



NEW .CROP TURNIP SEEDS!
warranted Strictly Fresh and Genuine. Purple Top Flat, White Flat, Red Top Globe' White Egg, Golden
Ball, free by mail, postpaid, 75c. per lb. White Globe, Large Cow Horn, Yellow Aberdeen, Amber, Globe, Im-
proved Purple Top Yellow Ruta Baga, White Ruta Baga, &c., 70c. per lb., postpaid. Customers ordering by
freight or express can deduct 16c. per lb. from these prices. Catalogues Free.
Biranchain/ Soryhtuni Seed, 1Oc per pound, $3.00 per bushel. Address

JOH NSON & STOKES, Seedsmen, 1114= ar/k:Sket St. t hiladelphlia
to June 9, '83.

Ocean Steamship Company.


SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.





The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, August 2d, 8:30 a. m.
CITY CF AUGUSTA, Saturday, August 5th, 11:00 a. m.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, August 9th, 3:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, August 12th, 5:00 p. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, August 16th, 8:00 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, August 19th, 10:00 a. m.
GATE CITY. Wednesday, August 23d, 1:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, August 26th, 4:30 p. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday. August 30th, 7:30 a. m.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
H. YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agent of Line, and C. R.R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS,
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. Y.

AT MANDARIN, FLORIDA. O. L. KEENE,
20 FORTYAACRE TRACTS, only 12 miles from Jack- D
sonville; extra good land, well located, between river MILLINERY, FANCY DRESS GOODS,
and J., St. A. and H. R. R. R. Price, $10 per acre. Will '
sell on monthly payments of $12.50. These lands will in- NOTIONS,
crease in value, being located in an already prosperous I
town, making a paying investment at small outlay.
Maps can be seen at No. 41 East Bay Street. a W s
to nov 21, '82. GEO. R. REYNOLDS.
Jacksonville, Fla.
M. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the AND A FINE LINE OF
of the Marshall House. Screven House.
THE HARNETT HOUSE, GLO E-lLlZSi
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARN ETT & GEORGE, Proprietors. 67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
RATIO, $2 PER DAY. JACKSONVILLE, - FLORIDA.
- -to feb 20,'82
This favorite family Hotel, under its new manage-
ment, is recommended for the excellence of its cuisine.
homelike comforts, prompt attention and moderate "PIf1 I f e mnnt om
rates. to sept 4,'82 .I I

PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD- A 32-PAGE PAMPHLET. PRICE, 10C.
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS- ,


PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO- TELFAIR STOCIKTON,
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT. july 24 to oct 23. Jacksonville, Fla.


~
- I






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


329


To-


i r From Florida Tran- I
Fr om Jacksonville, sit Railroad, except Florida Transit Rail- Florida Central and
Callahan and Live Ocala and Points be- road, 0 c a a and Western Railroad.
Oak. yond. Points beyond.


A tlanta ............................................................................. .................................................... $ 60 00 $ 85 00 $ 90 00 80 00
A ugusta............................................................................................................................55 80 85 75
B altim ore....... ....................................................................................................................100 125 130 119
B oston .............................................................................................................................. 100 125 130 119
B ristol, T en n.......................................................................................................................... 90 115 120 110
C harleston S. C ................................... ...................................................... ........................... 36 61 66 56
Colum bus, G a.......................................... ....................................................................... 60 85 90 80
Chattanoora, Tenn.............. .................. ........................................................... ......... 70 95 100 90
C in cin n ati 0 .......................................................................................................................... 880 105 110 100
C airo, Ill................................................................................................................................ 90 115 120 110
Colum bus, 0 ........................ ....... ........................................... .......................................... 100 125 130 120
Cleaveland, ......................................................................................... .... 100 125 130 120
Chicago, Ill............................................................................................................................ 110 135 140 130
D alton, G a............................... ................................. .............................................. 70 95 100 90
E vansville, Ind............................................................................ ...................................... 80 105 110 100
Indianapolis, Ind .......................................................................................... ........... .... ...... 90 115 120 110
K noxville, Tenn........................................................... ......................... ....................... 84 50 109 50 114 50 104 50
Louisville, K y .... ....................................................................................................... 80 105 110 100
Macon, Ga............ 45 70 75 6................ ......... ............................................45 70 75 65
M ontgom ery, A la............................................................ ......................................................60 85 90 80
Mobile, Ala.... ...................................................................... ........70 95 100 90
M em phis, Tenn............. .................................................................................................. 80 105 11 100
Nashville, Tenn........ ................75 100 105 95
New Orleans, La.............................................. ..................... 80 105 110 100
N ew Y ork, N Y ... ....................................................................................................... 100 125 130 119
P eoria, Ill..................................................................................................................... ........... 110 135 140 130
P hiladelphia, Pa.................................................................................................................... 100 125 130 119
R om e, G a............................................................................................................................. 70 95 100 90
Savan nah G a........................................................................................................................ 22 47 52 41
St. Louis, M o........................... ........................................................... ............................. 90 115. 120 110
Terre H aute, Ind.......................... .... ................................................................................100 _125 130 120
Excess of 20,000 pounds will be charged forpro rata, provided the weight loaded does not exceed the capacity of the car, as marked thereon. If cars are not
marked with the capacity thereof, the weight of load must not exceed 20,000 pounds. All excess of load above capacity of the cars will be charged for at double rates.
Melons must be loaded and unloaded by the owners. Shipments of Melons will be receipted for only as "Shipper's Count." This Line will not be responsible
for deficiency in quantity loaded in the cars, nor for damage resulting from improper loading. Shipments via Florida Dispatch Line will not be required guaranteed
or prepaid.
D. H. ELLIOTT, Gen'l Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla. JAS. L. TAYLOR, Gen'l Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE in connection with A LAN IOA T


Rates on Watermelons in Car Loads of 20,000 in Cents per 100 Ibs.


To take effect May 20th, 1882.


To- Fr



B a ltim o re.................................................................................................................. ..........
B o sto n ................................................................................................................ ................
New York................................................................................................................................
Providence .............................................................................................................................
Philadelphia...........................................................................................................................
Portsmouth, Va.................................................................................................................
Petersburg, Va........................................... .............. ........................
Richm ond, Va o ..................................................................
W ilm inr ton, N. C................................................................................ .......................
W ashington, D. C. (via Portsm outh)...............................................................................
Shipments via "ATLANTIC COAST LINE" must be prepaid to destination.
will be charged at double rates.


"o
an


Florida Transit and
9m Jacksonville Peninsula Railroad, Florida Transit Rail- Florida Central and
ad Callahan. except Ocala and road, 0 c ala and Western Railroad.
Points beyond. Points beyond.

Cts. Cts. Cts. Cts.
.632 .76 .78Y .73
.681 .81 .831 .78
.68Y2 .81 .830 .78
.68 .81 .83 .78
.48 .1 .63Y .58
.4812 .61 .63Y .58
.48Y .61 .632 .58
.381 .51 .53Y .48
.6312 .76 .7812 .73
20,000 lbs. will be the minimum rate charged for. All excess of capacity of cars


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE.



Rates on WATERMELONS in Car Loads of 20,000 Pounds.


TO TwA=I a E E IEnTm cI .CAv 20t1-., 3 1Q2.


AM








30 THiE PLORIDA DISPATCH.


WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, JUNE 4th, 1882, Passen-
ger Trains will run over the Waycross Short Line
as follows ;
as llows;Fast Mail. Jack'lle Ex.
Daily. Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at................. 9:00 a. m. 5:35 p. m.
Arrive Callahan at................. 9:00 p. m. .........
Leave Callahan at....................1 9:45 a. m. 6:45 p. m.
Arrive Waycross at.................11:45 a. m. 9:15 p. m.
Arrive Jesup at............................ 1:32 p. in. 11:25 p. m.
Arrive at Brunswick at ................ 6:10 p. 8:20 a. m.
Arrive Savannah at........................ 3:35 p.m. 2:30 a. m.
ArriveCharleston at..................... 9:30 p. m. 8:45 a. m.
Arrive at Augusta at.................... 5:20 a.. 2:30 p. m.
Arrive Macon at........ ..................... 7:00 a. m.
Arrive Atlanta at.................... 3:40 a. m. 12:50 p. m.
Arrive Louisville at...................................... 8:00 a. m.
Arrive Cincinnati 4t...................................... 7:00 a. m.
Arrive Washington at................... 9:40 p. 7:40 a. m.
Arrive Baltimore at.....................1:45 p. m. 9:15 a. m.
Arrive New York (limited express).......... 3:50 p. m,
Arrive New York P. R. R............. 6:50 a. m. 5:20 p. m.
Arrive St. Louis at.......................................... 7:00 p m.
Arrive Chicago at...................................... 7:00 p. m,
Fast mail arrives at Jacksonville daily at...... 6:10 p. m.
Jacksonville express arrives at Jacksonville
daily at.................. ... ........... .......... 8:10 a. m.
TIME.
To Savannah o.................................. 6:40 hours.
To New York............................................. 45:45 hours.
To W ashington............................................. 36:30 hours
To Chicago...................................................... 49:00 hours'
To St. Louis............................. 49:00 hours'
THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
CDaily Jacksonville to Charleston.
~l )aily Jacksonville to Cincinnati.
Sleeping car from Jacksonville to Savannah (5:35 p.
m. trains) Tuesdays and Fridays.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
The morning train from JacKsonville to Savannah,
connects daily with through Pullman sleeper for New
York.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to Montgomery and New Orleans
take the evening train.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. m. and arriving at Savannah at 2:30 a. m., or train
at Jacksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vannah at 3:35 p. im.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, at Depot Ticket
Office. JAS. L. TAYLOR,
Gen'l Freight and Pass. Ag't.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*]


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
o
MERCHANTS & MINERS

TRANSPORTATION OIMPANY!






The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail
From BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH
EVERY FIVE DAYS,
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE, as follows:
Monday, July 3d, at 9 a. m.
Saturday, July 8th, at 1 p. m.
Thursday, July 13th, at 5 p. m.
Tuesday, July 18th, at 9:30 p. m.
Monday, July 24th, at 1 p. m.
Saturday, July 29th, at 5 p. m.
Thursday, August 3d, at 10 a. m.
Tuesday, August 8th, at 1 p. m.
Monday, August 14th, at 8 a. m.
Saturday, August 19th, at 10 a. m.
Thursday, August 24th, at 2 p. m.
Tuesday, August 29th, at 8 a. m.
The steamers are first-class in every respect, and every
attention will be given to passengers.
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $15,
Including Meals and Stateroom.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Balt1more.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quickdispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
column.
JAS. B. WEST & CO., Agents.
Savannah, January 8th, 1878. 30-tf

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA


W IME 00-


w.


C. PITTMAN,


No. 3 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0-
Guns, ]Pistols, Riflees and Cutlery,
Shooting and Fishing Tackle.

SHELLS LOADED TO ORDER.
1 yr to April 23, '83


DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,
GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
San ad and'1Emery Papers, &c.
AGENT FOR
PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIRE TEST.
Johnson's Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, .2Oitrtinez and Longmnan's
Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
to mar 25,83 JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


LANDS FOR


SALE


SUITABLE FOR

Orange Groves,
In lots to suit, in the town of


8atsuma, Ptlam Conlty, Floriaa.
Send for circular to
WHITNEY, GOLD & HODGES,


june 26-tf


Satsuma, Nashua P. O.,
IFLORIDA.


SEND $1.50 TO


35 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.,
And get a bottle of Richmond's Samaritan Nervine.
Cures Nervous Disorders, Dizziness, Vertigo, Seminal
Weakness. The only sure cure for Epileptic Fits.
Address HOLT'S PHARMACY.
to aug 20, '82


"Florifa aus a Pfrmaun t Home,"
A 32-PAGE PAMPHLET. PRICE, 10C.
Address,
STELF'AIR STOCK KTON,
july 24 to oct 23. Jacksonville, Fla.


D. G. AMBLER. .T. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON
EBa A6T2E=MS.
Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as

AMBLER'S BANK.
T RANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
SDeposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., NeW
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit, apr 10-tf

Sportman's Emporium.


A


Good Investment!


o-

In the County of Hernando, East of Brooksville, the
county seat, and near the
Tropoicel 7 ,l oridia M. M3.,
which is now actively building, two tracts of land. The
first contains two hundred and forty (240) acres in a body;
the second contains eighty (80) acres. These tracts both
touch Upon a Lalke of about 150 acres area; are
well timbered with pine suitable for lumber; the second
about half a mile southeast of the first; between them
lies a cultivated farm. These lands are well adapted to
Oranges and Other F'ruits, being of good
soil, with little underbrush and afe easily cleared. They
were selected by HCon. Walter Gwynn, Ex-
Treasurer of the State of Florida, and they may be relied
upon as being what is represented. These lands are in a
part of the State that is rapidly settling up
and offer a good field either for an investment in Flor-
ida real estate, or for orange groves and the like.
Price and terms will be so arranged as to be satisfac-
tory to the purchaser. Apply to
WALTER B. CLARKSON,
Box 877. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
In corresponding, please mention this paper.
to August 29, '82.

S. B. HUBBARD & CO.,
JACKSONVILLE, F13LA.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in

HaRrfw Stovos, Doors, Sgsh, BliMs
PAINTS, OILS, PUMPS, LEAD AND IRON PIPE.
Sugar Mills, Rubber and Leather Belting,
Steam & Gas-Fitting, Plumbing d- Tinsmithing,

Agricultural Implements of all Kinds,
HAZARD'S POWDER,
BARBED FENCE WIRE.
AGENTS FOR S. L. ALLEN & CO.'S GARDEN TOOLS.
Aq- Send for Price List and Catalogue, 1
to june 11 '83


MFAM -


W. I. PILLOW'S

STRAWBERRYP IIIPPHN AGENCY
-AND-
FTIUIT ANI> VEGEiTABLE
REPACKING AND
COMMISSION HOUSE,
Has closed till NOVEMBER. Present address
may 12, '83. 1MACON, GA.

VIEWS OF" FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In Boo0k 1Forn, Contsaiuingi 12
Viev s Eac Souvenir of Florida, (small size)...............25c.
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size)........ ......................... ......... ..25c.
Souvenir of Jacksonville,( large size).................50c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine,(large size)...............50c.
Stereoscopic Views, per Doz. $1.80.
Address
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
JACK SONVILLE, [FLA.


ST. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
0 -
CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.


OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
1 yr to April 23, '83


Straiweorr Plants For Salo!
200,000 Choice pure Beatty's stock........$4.00 per Thousand
100,000 Pure Nunan's.............................. 6.00 per Thousand
50,000 Pure Crescent Seedlings............ 6.00 per Thousand
Terms: Cash with order.
Address. TV. 4E. SCUITlL,
aug 1 to nov 3,'82. Jacksonville, Florida.





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH


F. S. CONE, A. II. MANVILLE, E. A. MANVILLE,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer
S 1Vx NT IT 7 Lr E r- TT e SE :IE:S,
Lake George, iFlorida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums
Peaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, and over one hundred varieties of the Citrus.
OIRA.NGE AN.D LEMON L TlREES a specialty.
Catalogue free. to apr 17, '83


ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]

J. A. 1BABSO S CA.&

FRUIT AND PRODUCE


COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
So'Ltliern 'Frla.it and. "T7egetables a Specialty.
30 6 and 3-2- North Delaw are Avenue, Philadelphia.
to jan 6, '83





WHOLESALE GROCERS,

AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


DRY HOP


YEAST CAKES,


6c,. PER


DOZ.


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND


SOW-mDROP PA.T NT OUR.

Flrrst I=ands on cFinest Qluality

Best Butter in Tubs at 30 to 31 Cents per Pound,



No. 7 WVest Bay Street, - - Jaclsonville, Floridna.
To sept 27, '82



Orange Tree Wash and Inseticide.

H. D. BOUNETHEAU, PROPRIETOR

N 0 R D Y K E LORIDA CHEMICAL OIL AND SOAP WORKS,


MILLS
-MANUFACTURE-

FreshGround

FEED, GRITS,
MEAL,
(Bolted or unbolted.)
Pearl Hominy.
GRAIN, HAY, COAL AND
WOOD-YARD.


MANUFACTURER O)F
Lubricating and Boiler Compounds, Compressed Soaps, Car and
Axle grease.
ALSO SOLE MANUFACTURER
of the best Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide extant-

made from Whale-Oil Soap, combined with other powerful ingredients known
to be most effectual for destroying the Scale and other insect pests and
parasites of the Citrus family. It will also put the tree in a healthy and flour-
ishing condition. Prepared for immediate use. Perfectly harmless to the
youngest tree or plant. In packages of from 25 to 300 pounds. Price, 10 cents
per pound. Discount to the Trade. -Full directions for use accompany
each package. Address

H D. MEI. DISAU--N


P. O. BOX 984, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


to july 31 '82


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
-0

A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
-0
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers for August are appointed to sail as follows:
CITY OF SAVANNAH, August 5th, at 11:00 a. m.
JUNIATA, August 12th, at 5:00 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, August 19th, at 10:00 a. nm.
JUNIATA, August 26th, at 4:30 p. m.-
Days and hours subject to change, without notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, WM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.


Boston anR Q IavaInnah 8tmllshiO ine'






ONLY DIRECT LINE BETWEEN
SAVANNAH AND BOS.TON.
Transhipment and extra handling saved. No danger
of fruit being Irozen. Cars are unloaded at thle steam-
ship wharf in Savannah, avoiding drayage.
CABIN PASSAGE, $18.
SAILING FROM SAVANNAH.
Seminole, Thursday, July 27th, at 4 p. m.
--- ---, Th11ursday, August 3d, at 10:00 a. m.
Seminole, Thursday, August 10th, at 4:50 p. m.
Clhas. W. Lord, Thursday, August 17th, at 9:00 a. m.
Seminole, Thursday, August 24th, at 3:00 p. m.
.Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, Auwust 31st, at 9:00 a. m.
RICHARDSON & BARNAtRD, Agents,
44-tf Savannah, Ga.





Merchants' iLine,


CARRYING THE U. S. MAIL.


ELEGANT SIDE-WHEEL STEAMERS.


FR1I1DERICKX DE BARY, Capt. Leo. Vogel.
II. B. PLANT, ('apt. J. W. Fitzgerald.
ANITA, Capt. C. H. Brock.
One of the above-named steamers will leave De Bary
Wharf, foot of Laura Street, daily except Sunday, at 3
p. i., for PALATKA, SANFORD, ENIERPRtSE, and
all intermediate landings.
ROSA, Capt. J. L. Amazeen.
GEO. M. BIRD, Capt. G. J. Mercier.
Steamer ROSA leaves De Bary Wharf every Sunday
at I p. m., and every Wednesday at 5 p. m. for above-
named landings.
Steamer GEO. M. BIED leaves D)e ary iWharf every
Tuesday and Friday at 5 p. i. for same landings.
C('onlc'lts at Palatka with Florida Southern Railroad
for Gainesvilie and Ocala.
connectss at Astor wiLh St. John's and Lake Eustis
Railroad for Ft. Mason, Yalaha, Leesburg and all points
on the Upper O)cklawala.
Connects at Volusia with coaches for Ormond and
Daytona.
C(onneets at Sanford with South Florida Railroad for
Longwood, Maitland, Apopka City, Altemonte, Orlando,
Kissimmee, and with steamers for Lake Jessup, Salt
Lake and Rlock Ledge and Indian River.
Connects at Enterprise with coaches for Daytona and
New SmQyrna.
Returning, Mail Steamers leave Enterprise every
morning at 7 a. m., and Sanford on arrival of train.
Steamer (Geo. M. Bird will leave Enterprise every
Thursday and Sunday at 5 a. m.
Steamer Rosa leaves Enterprise exery Friday at 5 p. m.
F,'IThrough bills of lading given to all points.
The steamers of this line are all first-class in every
respect.
For further information, apply at General Ticket
Office, corner Bay and Laura Streets, Leve & Alden,
corner Bay and Ocean Streets, or on board.
W. B. W ATSO)N, Manager.
C. B. FENW\ICK, Gen. Pass. Agent. Aug. 7-tf.


TRAWBRRY PLANTS FOR SALE,


Several thousand Nunan Variety. Also, Crescent
Seedling, price *1.00 per 1,000, packed and shipped in
good condition. Money must accompany each order.
Address, M111S. A. 13lEA'fTI'Y,
Aug. 7 to Nov. 6. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Iickory Blglff 46 acres, 18 acres IIanmmock, cleared and
enclosed with Picket fence. 200 thrifty young Orange
frees growing on the place. Bold bluff river front of over
a quarter of a mile, and steamer channel close in shores
and over five miles of water protection to the northwest, giv-
ing perfect security against frost. Nine miles below Jack-
sonville, and one mile from ;,New Berlin. Can come to
city every morning on mail teamer and return in the
afternoon. A choice place for orange growing and truck
farming. Price, $2,500.
Also, two desirable city lots 53x209 feet, and one 70x156
feet covered with thrifty orange trees 6 years old, half
mile from business center. Good neighborhood (all
white). Price offirst, $600each. Price ofsecond, a corner,
very handsome, $800. Apply to
J. H. 1NO1RTIN,
No. 1 West Bay Street, JACKSONVILLE.
State that you saw this in THE DISPATCH.
July 3, tf


ACER'S


_ I I I _


I


r
--






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


A. N. DOBBINS & BRO., P EFI -T E VRO -TD BO-TE, $38.50 per Ton,


C~*5. C

t v :3
a
"r"
.-.
; "
a
L~U`
r
~;i ~~
,,
5:rlII
,r~.~


rIn, Lncksmiths andl Stncil Puttors,
24 LAURA STREET,
.JAC1LSON VIL.TE - FIOl1Il)>A,
Gunsmithing done in all its branches.
IRON SAFE WORK.
Special rates on Stencil Cutting, by mail. Address,
to june 12'83, (P. 0. Box 833.)


RICH'D H. MARKS'


ORANGE O ONTY LAND AGENCY,
SANFORD, FLORIDA,


COTTON~ SEED VI:EIAL, $38 per Ton,
(100 Pound Bags.)

COTTO- T S'EE.D -IEULL SIS., $27 per Torn,
(The Best Potash in Use.)

20 'u-S.els Corch. Peas for Sale.
STOCKBRIDGE FERTILIZERS for Orange Trees and vegetables, for sale by
4I.. E. LIATl',
to jan 6, '83 Jacksonville, Fla.


ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,

PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS

PRINTERS AND BINDERS,
AND DEALERS IN

TOYS AND FANCY ARTICLES.


Agent in Orange County for NEWSDEALERS.-We keep all the latest Daily and Weekly Papers from Boston, New York, Philadelphia,
Baltimore, Chicago, St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, New Orleans, Charleston, Savannah and Jacksonville, and
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMP'Y. take subscriptions to all publications at publication price. Orders by mail promptly attended to.


BUYS AND SELLS

Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission,
ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
june 12-tf

I...1STER B: O.'S

Soluble Ground Bone,
THE BEST AND CHEAPEST


FERTILIZER FOR ORANGE ThiES.
Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.
Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
eFOSTERL & BEAN,
Agents for the State of Florida.


AI-Analysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


to sept 26, '82


ROUND-TRIP TICKETS TO

New York and Return.

OVER THE

Savannah, Florida & Western Railway,
Via
Waycross Short Line and Ocean Steamship Company.


Close connection with the magnificently appointed
steamships
SAILING FROM SAVANNAH
every Wednesday and Saturday.
Passengers via this route will find every comfort and
convenience in this fleet of elegantly equipped steam-
ships, rivaling in construction and appointments the
finest ocean-going vessels of the day. The mixtures of
rail and water transportation-both of the best charac-
ter-combine the attractions of a first-class Summer
Excursion Route.
For tickets, engagement of staterooms and other in-
formation, apply to the office of the Savannah, Florida
& Western Railway Company, 84 West Bay Street (Astor
Building), or at the ticket office at the Waycross Short
Line Passenger Station.
JAS. L. TAYLOR,
General Pass. Agent.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent, Jacksonville.
Aug. 7 to Oct. 2.


LIST QF BOOKS ON FLORIDA.
FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, INVALIDS AND SETTLERS (Barbour, Profusely Illustrated)...............Price $1 50
FLORIDA: ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE AND HISTORY (Lanler)................................................................Price 1 50
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paper.................................................................................................Price 10
FA IRBAN K S' H ISTORY OF FLORIDA ...........................................................................................................Price 2 50
G U ID E TO JA CK SON V ILLE...............................................................................................................................Price 25
TOURISTS AND INVALIDS REFERENCE BOOK OF WINTER TRAVEL......... ...............................Price 75
SOUTH FLORIDA, THE ITALY OF AMERICA........................................................................................... Price 25
DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition)enlarged and improved...............................................................Price 50
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edition, enlarged and improved).........................................................Price 1 00
ORANGE INSECTS--Illustrated (Ashmead, .................................................................................... Price 1 00
ORANGE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA, by A. T. Garey, (cloth)...................................... ..........................Price 1 25
A MANUAL OF GARDENING IN FLORIDA (Whitner)...................................................................................Price 50
COLTON 'S M A P OF FLOR IDA ....................................................................................................*.................. Price 75
COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-the best)................................................................. ......................Price 1 25
NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF ST. JOHN'S RIVER...............................................................................Price 25
McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST OF LAWS OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep, postage extra).................................Price 6 00
INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA................. ........................... Price 3 00
NOTES FROM SUNLAND, ON THE MANATEE RIVER, GULF COAST OF SOUTH FLORIDA.
Its Climate, Soil, and Productions, (By Samuel C. Upham)..............................................................Paper .25
Any of the above books mailed on receipt of price.
N G E W R A P S ...................................... .............................................10x 0, 14c.; xl, 17c.; 12x12,20c.
LAW BLANKS.
WARRANTY DEEDS, per dozen................... ..................................................................Price 50
Q U IT-CLA IM D E E D S, per dozen..........................................................................................................................Price 50
M ORTGA GES, per dozen................................................................................................................................ ....Price 50
NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, made to order..............................................................................................Price 5 00
We publish a full line of Law Blanks for Lawyers and Justices of the Peace. Price-list mailed on application.
Special prices to large buyers. Adddress


feb 12-tf


ASH-1MlEAD BROTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


BUY THE BEST A.ND CHEAPEST

-------o------

GOULD & CO.'S


FERTILIZER
-AND-


Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange Growers and Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, con-
tains potash, lime, phosphoric acid, ammonia and the other essential elements of Plant Food, making a com
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & Bro.'s,.and other high-priced Fertilizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity, and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $4 per barrel, $32 per
ton.
All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.
MESSRS. GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-I used one-half ton of your Fertilizer, in connection with the same amount of Baker & Bro.'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gave as good results as the others, which are much higher priced fertilizers-costing
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $51.50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12, 1881.
LEESBURG, SUMTER CO., FLA., March 6,1882.
GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed your
agents at this point (Messrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer,
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its fostering care, I having had the honor
to win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer better and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer kills two birds with one stone," inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies,
at one and the same time. I bave been testing it in the field, garden and orange grove for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For my part, I ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. if I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork.
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOURT.


to aug 27, '82


GOULD & CO.,
NO. 6 W. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


332


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S\ II CJL~V L ILLXI .7-)