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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00020
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: August 7, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00020
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

Full Text




~~\ -E3~ 2
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tievoted to tMhe Tgricultural, manufacturing and Industrial Interests of Florida and the South.


Vol. 1.--No. 20.


New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.


Price 5 cents.


Monday, August 7, 1882.


Northern Ramblings.
BY WANDERER.

No. 2.
SENECA FALLS, N. Y., July 20, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
We left New York at 9 p. m., and took pas-
sage in a Pullman sleeper on the Central-Hud-
son, for the North and West ; consequently the
rare beauties of the picturesque Hudson which
greet the eye on every hand during a daylight
trip, were shut out from my gaze.
The early morning light found us speeding
along at a rapid rate on the banks of the classic
and storied Mohawk. These romantic streams,
the Hudson and Mohawk, have been made
famous by poets, and by the wild, weird stories
and legends of Irving and Cooper. Here was
the home of
"The bonny, blue- eyed Eloise,
The pride of the Mohawk vale."
The contrast, from the burning sands, piney
woods and wire-grass regions of Florida, Geor-
gia, and the Carolinas, to the rich, cultivated
and productive farms of the Mohawk Valley, is
something wonderful. Away to the right, on
the northern verge of the valley are located
the celebrated Saratoga Springs, where our mu-
tual friend, Bidwell, with his family, are whil-
ing away the heated term, amid the shady dells,
and drinking in health and strength from the
famous springs, preparatory to a grand cam-
paign in the nursery business next fall.
The rich bottom lands of the Mohawk-made
and kept rich by the almost annual winter over-
flow-are still devoted, as they have been for
the last one hundred years, to the cultivation
of broom-corn, tobacco, maize, and hay; while
the rolling and table lands are devoted to grain-
growing, grazing and the dairy. Vast fields of
broom-corn and tobacco are to be seen along
the river bottoms; 'while extensive fields of
wheat, oats and grass, waving with every


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.

breeze in the morning sun, adorn the distant Central and Western New York are noted for
hillsides. The picture is beautiful, and especi- the growth of nearly all the cereals, fruits, and
ally so to one who has not, for years gazed on root crops which can be successfully cultivated
these green fields and swelling uplands: in the temperate climate of the United States,
"0 Christ! it is a goodly sight to see, and as is the crop there, so is it likely to be in
What heaven hath done for this delightful land, the same belt of country throughout the Union.
What flowers of fragrance bloom on every tree, This being an admitted fact, the abundant yield
What glorious prospects o'er the hills expand."
As you go westward; and enter the rolling of almost everything indicates graneries and
country of the Onondaga lime-stone group, the cellars full to overflowing the .iing winter.
crops are more diversified, and fruit of almost The indications are that the pr! the uch arti-
every kind which will grow in the temperate cles as hay, grain, butter, fruit, d of which we
zone is to be found growing here in abundance. need in Florida, will be much lower than last
The finest apples and pears that are raised in year. So mote it be.
the States are grown on this peculiar soil.
On alighting from the cars at Syracuse, the A VERY successful farmer once reirarked
first object that we encountered was the stal- that "he fed his land before it was hungry,
wart form of our friend, Alderman Crolly, of rested it before it was weary, and weeded it be-
Jacksonville, Florida. He gazed at us in a sort fore it was foul."
of dazed manner, as much as to say: "Are you
lost, strayed, or stolen; or have you escaped FLORIDA HOMES.-The Lake City Reporter
from the custody of your friends who were de- truly says: "There is nothing to prevent young
tailed to watch you ?" We shook, and when I
told him I stood upon my native heath; that I men in this part of Florida from owning homes.
belonged to the tribe of Onondagas; was na- Lands are cheap, yes, very cheap compared
tive and to the manner born, and that I knew with their value; timber for building and fenc-
every nook and corner within a radius of 50 ing is too abundant; new land will almost pay
miles, he gave it up, and we went in and drank for its fencing the first year. Land owners
a bumper to our friends in our adopted sunny g a
land, and to the "girls we'd left behind us." generally are willing to sell off portions of their
As you go westward from Syracuse, the possessions, giving time on part payments. Im-
rolling lands of the counties of Onondaga, Ca- proved places will rent for more money than
yuga, and Seneca are better adapted to the the interest on their cost, while fruits planted
growth of cereals, and as this has been a favor- thereon is increasing capital."
able season, the crops of wheat, oats and barley ___
are enormous. This being the harvest time,r
the noise of the mower and reaper are heard in THECITRON.-The Floridian says: "There
the land; the hands for gathering the h esarvest e several citron trees in this city, where they
are scarce, commanding $3 per day. The hay are thrifty and vigorous growers and very pro-
crop this year will be immense, and the price of lific bearers. Mr. W. R. Wilson a few days
the best Timothy has already fallen to $6 per agoshowed us a good-sized citron from a tree
ton. The area planted to Irish potatoes is much g
greater than ever before, and the prospects for growing in his yard. It has some very large
an abundant yield of this important esculent is ones on it, and numbers of them of all sizes, and
very encouraging. Corn, owing to the wet, cool, it is still blooming and fruiting. The fruit makes
backward spring, has not done so well, but now a splendid preserve, and there is no reason why
the hot weather and favorable moisture has our people should not grow and preserve cit-
caused it to grow rapidly and its appearance rons, for domestic use, at least; and, as the tree
indicates a fair yield. From the same causes, thrives and bears with very little attention and
wet, cool spring weather, the fruit crop will not care, the preparation of the fruit for market
yield so much, but the fruit will be larger and might prove a very profitable business in this
firmer, and the yield promises to be average, section."


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3O2 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
,^___________ ____l______i__i _________________i ____ ___\ i -;___Y. --- I-- - --- ... -...- ^ .-~ .~i_.. ,.__ .^ .-_- _^.^.,_ ^ _


THE BANANA:

Its History, Uses, Varieties, Propagation,
Culture, &c.
No. 2.
FEDERAL POINT, FLA., July, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
The stalk and leaf-stems of the Banana plant
are built up of a light, elastic frame-work,
honey-combed with cells and containing an
abundance of sap. Wherever cut or punctured,
this sap exudes, or rather pours out freely. Like
fresh apple juice, it has the property of cleans-
ing oxydized metal. A rusty stove washed with
it will soon be in condition to receive the pol-
ish, and a section of leaf-stem makes the best
knife-scourer known.
The spongy and succulent stalk is liable to be
ruptured upon the occurrence of frost, and to a
greater degree in some varieties than others.
The Orinoko or common "Florida," also styled
the "Hog" or "Horse" Banana, or by the Span-
iards, El Bobo, or "The Fool," will bear the
most freezing of any with the least injury.
Therefore, it is on the principle of the survival
of the toughest, that this, the meanest of all sorts,
is everywhere seen in Northern Florida-the
others have been frozen out, while it has "pulled
through." The fruit is yellow, of good size, tri-
angular in shape, of a mild sweet, devoid of
aroma, and unpleasantly slimy to the taste. The
Cavendishii, called also the "Dwarf Jamaica,"
bears heavy bul s of very superior fruit, and
its low, sturdynroutrth makes it a favorite in
situations exptates to heavy gales. It is capable
of withstanding some little frost, but in central
Florida can hardly be depended upon to make
a return short of two or three years from the
time of setting out. Several varieties of the
small, sweet and delicious Fig Banana can
also be grown with about the same chance of
success.
Upwards of a dozen years ago, when I began
planting orange trees, I found it convenient and
profitable to set Banana plants between, while
the former were young. There was no difficulty
in growing the Orinoko or common "Florida"
to any extent, but aiming at something better,
I imported plants of many of the high-flavored
kinds for experiment. It was, however, a dis-
appointment to find them too tender to be of
any use. Among a lot of Martiniques from
Nassau, I noticed a plant of a different kind,
that grew off finely and soon bore a cluster of
delicious fruit. Afterwards, when tried by a
freezing winter, it came forth from the ordeal


with as little injury as the Orinoko. Here, then,
appeared a decided acquisition-a Banana of
finest quality, possessing a hardy constitution.
Being my choice above all the varieties tested,
I called it "Hart's Choice," and began planting
it largely. After a more extended trial, it has
proved remarkable also for earliness, a most
essential requisite in central Florida, where
early blooming and rapid maturity, combined
with a fair degree of hardiness, alone can secure
satisfactory results between one frosty winter
and another.
The fruit has been submitted to judges from


Brazil, East and West Indies, and other parts
of the tropics, and pronounced unsurpassed.
It resembles the Dacca, but does not answer
the description of that sort as laid down in the
books, and isquite different from those hitherto
sold under that name in this State. In warm,
growing weather the bunch may be cut in 90
days from the opening of the bud. Many plants
set in September are now (July 8th) blooming,
and others with fruit half grown, and yet these
not only made little or no progress during the
four cooler months, but were severely nipped
on the night of January 2d(, when thin ice
formed. Up to the present date, none of my
common Floridas have ripened, while we
have been eating the others for nearly two
months.
The stalk is short and able to bear the neces-
sary weight without breaking. Fifty to up-
wards of a hundred is the usual number of fruits
on a cluster, in this section. The fruit is four or
five inches long and an inch to one inch and a
half in diameter, of a clear, golden yellow; skin
soft and thin as a kid glove, but without that
excess of musky aroma which, in some of the
finest varieties, is too overpowering to suit a
sensitive palate.
The subject of guarding the Banana from
frost, is one in which little encouragement
can be given; indeed, to do so on an extensive
scale is hardly practicable. When indications
of the formation of ice are unmistakable, all the
clusters full-grown or nearly so, should be cut
and housed. Those half or two-thirds grown may
be taken off and buried in a dry, sunny place,
where they will all become mellow in time,
though some of the greenest may, perhaps, re-
quire two months. Instead of this, it has been
recommended to sever the stalk near the ground
and carry it in-the sap which it contains keep-
ing the fruit plump till the ripening process is
complete. Those in bloom or young fruit must
be abandoned to the blighting breath of Jack
Frost, whose tender mercies, like those of the
wicked, are cruel.
And, finally, we come to plants of good size
which have not yet bloomed. Those who have
cultivated Bananas know that, if the upper
part of a large stalk is lopped off, the blooming
period is merely retarded and the plant itself
not materially injured. In fact, slender, weakly
stalks are sometimes thus treated to render
them more hardy. Our object, therefore, is to
insure several feet of the lower trunk against
freezing, in which case, when cold weather is
over, the renewing growth will start at that
height instead of from the ground. This may
be accomplished by building up around it with
earth and sods, which, of course, are to be re-


moved when spring opens. The plan of cutting
the roots on one side, bending the whole plant
prostrate, and covering, which some have re-
commended, is not always effictual, for the
double reason that not only is it weakened by
dividing the roots, but sometimes utterly ruined
by decay during the many weeks of cool weather
through which it must lie buried.
To sum up, there is n, good reason why every
family in Florida possessing a garden should
not grow the Banana, except, perhaps, those
who live in the comparatively hypeborean
northern tier. Even if not a success every year,
it is far more certain than many fruits, which,
in colder latitudes, receive assiduous attention.
As an article of food, it is eminently nutritious
and wholesome, and for a dessert nothing can
be more easily prepared or attractive. Sliced,
sprinkled with sugar, and smothered in cream,


milk or wine, like strawberries, it needs but a
trial to be appreciated. The older people relish
them, and like Mrs. Winslow's soothing syrup,
"children cry for them." Indeed, the quantity
the little folks will surround and carry off with-
out ill-consequences is astonishing, and proves
the absurdity of being content with a paltry
half-dozen plants for a family supply. I know
an urchin who devoured upwards of a score in
one day and then left angry with his mother for
refusing him more. "Poor, but honest" heads of
families who hear with dismay the ominous
scraping on the bottom of the flour tub, may
extend their food supply and Banana patch at
the same time. Historians tell us of the happy
days of the golden age, when mankind sat, each
under his own vine and fig tree and lived upon
fruit, but the modern Floridian has no occasion
to look back with envious regrets, for he can in
addition repose beneath the shade of his Banana
and Palm, without being compelled by the scar-
city of textile fabrics to clothe himself with
aprons from the one, or a girdle of shred leaves
from the other. E. H. HART.
Native Flowers for Gardens.
There are many real lovers of flowers who
have the first requisite for a garden-the land
-who let the surroundings of the house fall
into neglect, merely because they cannot afford
to buy plants with which to ornament them. It
is possible in most parts of the country to make
beautiful gardens without the outlay of a dollar
for plants. Could the persons referred to visit
European gardens or even see European cata-
logues they would find that the common plants
around them are elsewhere highly valued. Aside
from the trees, there are many shrubs that may
find a place in the garden and a host of herba-
ceous plants from which a proper selection will
keep the garden gay the whole growing season.
Take our common lillies for example. Aside
from the far West, there are three common in
the States east of the Mississippi; two of them
are low, not over three feet high, and common
in meadows, while the taller, "Superb Lilly," in
rich, swampy places, is six or eight feet high
and bears a pyramid of ten to thirty or more
flowers. If one should make a collection of
these native lillies he would be surprised at the
great variety they present among themselves,
not only in the size and number of the flowers,
but especially in their coloring. So with many
other native plants, which will amply repay the
care. that may be given them, and one can
easily stock a garden from the woods and fields.
--Aloer'iic.,o A agriculturist.



The Seed and The Sowers.
Ever so little the seed may be,
Ever so little the hand,
But when it is sown it must grow you see,
And develop its nature, weed, flower or tree;
The sunshiru, the air, and the dew are free
At its commloand.


If the seed be good, we rejoice in hope
Of the harvest it will yield ;
We wait and watch for its springing up,
Admire its growth and count on the crop
That will come from the little seed we drop
In the great, wide field.
But if we heedlessly scatter wide
Seeds we may happen to find,
We care not for culture or what may betide,
We so;where and there on the highway side,
Whether they've lived or whether they've died
We never mind.
Yet every sower must one day reap
Fruit from the seed he has sown,
How carefully then, it becomes us to keep
A watchful eye on the seed, and see
To sow what is good, that we may not weep
To receive our own.
Farmers I Improve 1
A pungent and sensible writer in the Lake
City Reporter, says :
On the natural land several tons of pea


I








vines can be grown on an acre; by the applica-
tion of a little fertilizer the quantity can be
doubled-instead of two tons we can have four
tons. The pea vine of the South is a quick
renovator and supplies the surface with potash
from the sub-soil and nitrogen from the atmos-
phere. The deeper the root of the vine pene-
trates the sub-soil the more efficient are the
benefits. Instead of fertilizing our crops, put
it upon the land planted in peas-we would re-
ceive a much greater remuneration for our labor
and expense of obtaining the fertilizer.
The uncertainty of labor in the South will
soon compel our farmers to put more brains into
their crops. The average profit of the farm is
three per cent. This is a basis from which
every farmer should work. No farmer can buy
his supplies and succeed; neither can a farmer
succeed who is run by another party; he is,
above all others, necessarily compelled to live
at home to succeed ; he must diminish his wants
until his means are adequate to meet them.
I have always noticed too much petty differ-
ences among our farmers; communities cannot
agree; individuals differ; two farmers will
dispute about a cow while lawyers milk her;
and while this is being the case schools are neg-
lected, agricultural societies go to nothing, and
all other matters of vital consequence are lost
sight of. The result is poor crops and ignorant
children.
While our legislators compel the citizens to
pay a school tax, they should compel the parent
or guardian to send their children to school.
Where a compulsory education exists the citi-
zens always manifest an interest in the schools;
they are all looking ahead to the time, and ar-
rangements are perfected with some system.
Tennessee and some other States have made it
a law that the rudiments of scientific agricul-
ture shall be taught in their public schools.
Twelve thousand farmers in Holland are ar-
ranging through an agent to settle in the
United States; each one has plenty of money.
These and thousands of others are constantly
coming among us to feed and clothe. The
times demand that our farmers be better edu-
cated, farm more scientifically, co-operate judi-
ciously, and diversify their industry.
Too many of our young farmers get married
before they accumulate any of this world's
goods; they commence life poor, and often be-
come discouraged; hard times presents itself
on every hand and life becomes a burden. One
or two years' saving will enable a young man to
commence life even-handed; then he will find
love and happiness in a little farm well tilled,
a little home well filled, a little wife well willed.
In 1880 we had in the United States 1,942
establishments engaged in manufacturing agri-
cultural implements; from these the best and
most labor-saving are made that is used in the
world.
In making compost heaps, farmers will re-
member that potash, nitrogen and phosphoric
acid are the great fertilizers.


Florida Fruit Notes.
Another shipment of the monster Trinidad
pine-apples has been made from the "Belair
Grove."
The greatest curiosity in the fruit line we
have seen in a long time, was shown us by Mr.
C. H. Ferris this week. It consists of five dis-
tinct, fully matured pine-apples, on one stem,
touching each other at the sides, and spread out
in the.shape of a fan, and around the top of the
fan, like a handsome fringe, are nineteen crown-
lets, which will each make a distinct plant.
This freak of nature grew in the garden of Mr.


W. G. Ferris in this place.- Gulf Coast Prog-
ress.
FRUIT IN PENSACOLA.-The Advance Ga-
zette says that, "in a single yard in West End,
on the hill, where to all appearances the sand is
without bottom, can be found almond, English
walnut, the justly celebrated LeConte pears,
pecans, oranges, lemons and Peen-To peaches,
besides other fruit trees and grapes. All evince
the greatest vigor, and the lemon as well astlhe
orange trees, withstood the cold of winter before
last, being now twice the size they were then.

Who dares say ours is not an especially favored
land."
BELAIR GROVE.-The Orlando Reporter,
speaking of this celebrated grove, says, "In
this grove General Sanford has put a large
amount of money and the best skill he could
command. It has been his aim to thoroughly
test all of the tropical fruits which could be ob-
tained, and ascertain to what extent they could
be grown in South Florida. Much intelligent
experimenting has been done, and the result
has been such that the General should feel
greatly encouraged. He has had opportunities
for obtaining rare trees and plants, which are
denied to most men. He is and for years has
been an extensive foreign traveler, and in his
travels has picked up a fund of valuable infor-
mation, while adding constantly to his collec-
tion. There is not in all the United States
to-day, probably, a garden which has so large
and varied a collection of plants and fruits as
Gen. Sanford's place at Belair.
THE WATERLOO PEACH.-The editors of the
Country Gentleman received on the 10th of
July a box of peaches raised by J. H. Parnell,
of West Point, Ga., of which they say:
"The specimens were of Waterloo and Alex-
ander, the former fully ripe, of a rich brilliant
crimson color, juicy and melting in texture, and
of fine flavor. The specimens of the Alexan-
der were green, with a dull red cheek, unripe
when picked, but partly softened by the few
days since they were gathered. Both kinds
were the same in size, and measured fully two
inches in diameter. These specimens show con-
clusively the superior earliness of the Water-
loo, and how well they endured the long convey-
ance and re-shipment, as they were received in
perfect order. West Point, where they grew,
is southwest from Atlanta, 330 latitude, and
nearly 700 miles south of Rochester, making
nearly two months' difference in the ripening
of fruits (with some variations), allowing eleven
miles' difference in latitude for one day in time.
The season is about two weeks later than usual
this year."



SANITARY COLUMN.
(Edited by Dr. A. S. Baldwin.)


The Sanitary News says that a case is reported
at Oberlin, Ohio, where a cat took diptheria
and then conveyed it to five children. A few
months later, the physician who had attended
these cases, was called to attend a young lady
afflicted with diptheria, who died the third day
of her illness. She and her sisters had a few
days previously been charitably engaged in re-
moving some obstruction from the throat of
their pet cat, subsequent investigation revealing
the fact, that the obstruction in question was
diptheritin membrane. In these instances, the
cats were made the carriers of the contagion
by contracting the disease, either from some
pre-existing cause, among animals of their own


kind, or among people who petted them, or it
may be from some un-sanitary surroundings.
Dr. J. A. Octerlong, of Louisville, has an
article on Scarlatina, in the July number of
the American Journal of the Medical Sciences,
in which he.confirms the discovery previously
announced by Dr. Ekland, of Stockholm, of a
minute organism, which appears peculiar to this
disease. This consists of minute flat, round or
oval colored cells, having a distinct cell wall
and nucleus.
These cells are aggregated together in masses
to which Ekland gives the name ofplax-sciendens.
They are found in the blood and urine of per-
sons affected with scarlet fever, and according
to Dr. Octerlong, are not found in these. fluids
in other diseases. The statement of Dr. Ekland
had come to our notice several months ago, but
the claims put forward as to the nature of the
supposed organism and its real connection with
the disease seemed to us so very doubtful that
it was hardly worth while to notice them. Noth-
ing is easier than to see minute cells in the
blood and urine. The real difficulty is to isolate
and determine their nature and there is no evi-
dence that Dr. Ekland has done this.
Especially absurd is the statement of Ekland
that the plax.-.cie lndens is among the most com-
mon vegetable parasites found in the soil, in
water, in mouldy paper, etc., and his report that
he found masses of this parasite in the soil of
excavations dug for the purpose of laying
water pipes. Such assertions at once throw
discredit upon the whole paper, for if they were
correct, scarlatina would prevail everywhere.
These assertions are by no means the only ones
made by Ekland which are in need of verifica-
tion, and it is prudent to look with great dis-
trust on announcements of remarkable discov-
eries made by any one who discovers too much.
but Dr. Octerlong's confirmation as to the plax-
sciendens should induce careful study as to the
organism.
THE NATIONAL BOARD OF HEALTH.
The action of the House of Congress, in
greatly reducing the appropriations for the
National Board of Health, in limiting its ope-
rations to cholera, yellow-fever and small- pox,
and putting a stop to the investigations on dip-
theria, malaria, typhoid-fever, in stopping the
publication of the Bulletin amfd the collecting
of vital statistics, meets with general disap-
proval throughout the country, as indicated by
the comments of the press.
The charge that the Board has interfered


with the work of the State and Local Boards,
has not a shadow of foundation; in fact, the
greater part of its work has been done through
these Boards and with their cordial co-opera-
tion, and the most vigorous protests come from
these same local Boards. So far from having
been extravagant, the National Board has never
expended, in any year, the funds allowed for
the period; it has never had a deficiency or
made any contracts in advance of appropria-
tions, and there has not been even a hint of dis-
honesty, or mis-appropriation of funds in any
of its transactions.
Its investigations into the causes of the pre-
ventable diseases have been placed in the hands
of the most eminent chemists, engineers and


A t i~i Rf~A 'Hie


I


---,






30 A THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


physiologists of the country, and the testimony
is unanimous as to the value of the work. In
short, there is every reason for continuing the
work of the Board, and increasing rather
than diminishing its scope, and we sincerely
hope the Senate will insist upon the correction
of the excessively short-sighted and foolish leg-
islation proposed on this subject by the House.

MEfTEOROLOGICAL REPORT.
Weather for week ending August 4, 1882.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION,
SIGNAL SERVICE, U. S. A., JACKSONVILLE, FLA. _f
Therm. Wind. i


DATE.

Se' .j Pe ir-
Saturday 29...... 30.12 93 73; 81.3 78.71 1.05 SE 5 Fair
Sunday. 30...... 30.10 90,76 82.7 76.31 0.00 SE IFair.
Monday 31...... 30.11 90 77 81.7 77.3i 0.04 SE 4 Clear.
Tuesday 1........ 30.07 88 76! 81.7, 74.0' 0.00 SE 3;Clear.
Wednesday 2. 30.01 91 77 83.3 70.3 0.00 S 9Fair.
Thursday 3..... 29.96 8977 80.0 83.0 065 SW 10 Clear.
Friday 4..........: 30.03 88 78 82.7 72.7 0.00 SV 17 Clear.
Highest barometer 30.17, lowest 29.93.
Highest temperature 93, lowest 73.
NOTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Observer U. S. A.

MIeteorolo/ical Siimntnar'y for Julay, 1882.
SIGNAL OFFICE,
PENSACOLA, FLA., August 1, 1882.
Average barometer for month, 30.082.
Highest barometer for month, 30.182.
Lowest barometer for month, 29.835.
Range of barometer for month, 0.347.
Average temperature for month, 78.5:
Highest temperature formonth, 93.4.
Lowest temperature for month, 64.2.
Variation temperature for month, 29.20.
Greatest daily variation of temperature, 20.5.
Least daily variation of temperature, 5.5.
Average daily maximum of temperature, 86.0"
Average of daily minimum of temperature,72.70.
Average daily variation of temperature, 13.3.
Average temperature of warmest day, 84.5.
Average temperature of coolest day, 72.00.
Average temperature of dew point, 71.4.
Highest temperature of dew point, 77.
Lowest temperature of dew point, 54.
Average humidity, per cent., saturation, 100, 80.3.
Average humidity of moistest day, 95.0.
Average humidity of driest day, 56.3.
Total rainfall for month, inches, 7.02.
Greatest rainfall in a day, inches, 2.33.
Prevailing direction of wind for month, south.
Total movement of wind, miles, 4,511.
Greatest day of movement, miles, 260.
Least day of movement, miles, 86.
Maximum hourly velocity of wind, miles, 21.
Average cloudiness, per c ent., observation 100, 62.
Number of cloudy days, no rain fell, 1.
Number of fair days, no rain fell, 6.
Total number of days rain fell, 20.
Number of clear days, 4.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICS. 1 880 181 1882LY.
Average barom eter........................ ...... 3 ,7i i 3i.007 3:1 ..S2
Average temperature.................. ...... !80.9 82.9 78.5
Highest temperature......................... 2 97 93.
Lowest temperature........'................... 69 71 '6.2
Total wind movement, miles.................. 4,967 5,100 4,511
Highest hourly veloctiy, miles..............'22 30) 24
Prevailing wind direction .................. iSW. SW. S.
Total rainfall, inches............ ................2.77 5.59 7.02
Number of days rain fell..................1... 17 12 _20
M. MnCGAURAN,
Observer S. C., U. S. A.

Orange-Scale Exterminator Gratis.
DUNEDIN, HILLSBOROUGH CO., FLA.,
July 14, 1882. i
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:


After repeated experiments I have discov-
ered a cheap and effectual remedy for the above
destructive pest; and I offer it gratis in order
that the heart of many a poor and discouraged
orange-grower may be made glad.
DIRECTIONS: Heat two gallons of very strong
soft-soap; take it from the fire, and add to it
one gallon of kerosene oil; to this compound
add fifteen gallons of warm water. Stir fre-
quently while using it, and apply it by means of
a pump-I use Whiting's Fountain Pump-to
your affected trees. It is best to saturate the
whole tree even if a part only is affected.
I have destroyed with this preparation the
long, hard scale; the round, soft scale; and the
round, white, pearl-like scale; all will be dead
on the next day. Respectfully,
SUBSCRIBER.


BRoNsoN, July 13, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
I send you a specimen of insect that has com-
pletely destroyed my Callas and so-me other
pot plants. I would like to know through your
paper, what it is, and how to exterminate them ?
Respectfully,
AV. H.SI1';1N(.
REPLY.-Thle 11ugs you send, are the well
known "Mealy Bug," Dactylopius. adonidl1m.
Syringe your plants with the Kerosene Em ul-
sion reci)p, for which was 1pulislsl~t in TIHE
DISPATCI some weeks ago, or with the wash
recommended by "Subscriber," in present issue.
We give a greatly enlarged clngraovinag of the.
insect for the benefit of those of our readers
who are unacquainted with it.


LAWTEY, FLA., July 15, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
Can you tell me what kind of an animal this
is? I have not noticed it in your book.
Yours truly,
V. J. SIIIPMAN.
REPLY.-The "animal" you send is the larva
of the Hag-moth (Limacodes pithicium,)which is
sometimes found feeding on orange leaves. It
feeds on a variety of trees, but is seldom met
with. The moth producing it, is of a brownish
color, variegated, with light, yellowish brown
markings.

NEW SMYRNA, FLA., July 18, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I take the liberty to send with this a por-
tion of a limb of an orange tree. covered as you
see, with a kind of rust. It forms first at the
crotch, with a sort of fungus of a dove-color,
and soon changes and spreads all up and down
the limb with the rusty appearance, as you see;
it does not yield to soap or strong alkali. A neigh-
bor has it very bad and finds no cure for it; he
is cutting down to the roots, and in a few cases
destroying the tree altogether. Will you tell us,
in THE DISPATCH, what it is, its cause and
its cure? By so doing, you will oblige many,
besides, yours truly,
R. D. SMITH.
REPLY.-The fungoid on your orange trees
is entirely new to us. Not having made a study
of these cryptogamic growths we cannot speak
with authority. It is probably a species be-
longing to the Puccinice family, or rust fungi.
The washes you have been using will do no
good ; instead, use a strong carbolic wash, which
will surely kill and prevent spores from germi-
nating.

WILDWOOD, ST. JOHN'S CO., July 20, 1882.


Editors of the Florida Dispatch :
I read your answer to Mr. Dewhurst, of St.
Augustine, in reference to the diseased orange
trees, of which he sent samples of the roots to
you. Mr. Dewhurst kindly displayed to me
the grove in which the diseased roots were.
Quite a number of the trees were affected, and
from seven to ten inches in diameter. They
were completely dug up, (roots and all) and
gave one a chance to see all the roots affected.
In laying the trouble to the "wood-lice," you
mistake. I am familiar with the ravages of
the "wood-lice," as my people have lost in the
past four years, 30 or 40 trees, and I studied
them carefully. There is no similarity in the
two except the dead bark and dead tree. The
tree girdled by the "wood-lice," will some-
times heal over, but rarely, but this disease is


"sure death." I have saved trees affected by
"wood-lice," by planting a small tree near the
girdled tree and grafting it into the good bark
of the big tree, and the small tree took the sap
of the big tree, until it had healed over the
girdled, and now the tree is all right. Mr.
Lyle, of San Matco, has lost quite a number of
large (10 or 12-year-old buds) bearing trees by
the same disease that Mr. Dewhurst refers to.
He is anxious to have a remedy discovered and
has made a good) offer for a remedy, (so says
runor.) Mr. Dewhurst's trees have a red pow-
dered deposit on portions of the roots, and the
point that strikes me as suggestive, is, that all
the root below the depth of three or four feet
seem to have been completely rotted off. Yet
the trees are much above water level, and there
is noindication of "hnird-pain" or any thing of
that nature.
There were several of us, your subscribers,
that knew that Mr. Dewhurst was going to ask
you to investigate this disease, and were much
disappointed on your not doing so. If it is not
too late, we think you owe it to your attentive
readers, to give the subject your most careful
consideration.
Yours,
F. M. STANSBROUGH.
REPLY.-By referring to our article, you will
see we do not attribute the cause to the common
wood ant Termes flavifrous, but to a species of
wood eating ant. We may be mistaken in diag-
nosing the trouble, but must say we have met
with gentlemen here, just as obstinate in their
belief that these were not the cause, as' our
correspondent, but who have since been convinc-
ed we were right and have carried out our sug-
gestions and thus saved their trees.




Reports of the Florida Fruit-Growers.
In order that the replies of our correspond-
ents may be clearly understood, we reprint the
questions addressed to Florida Fruit-Growers,
in THE DISPATCH of July 3:
1. What varieties of Fruit are most successfully and
extensively grown in your neighborhood, in addition to
the Orange, Lemon, etc. ?
2. What are your prospects, now, for a large, medium
or small crop of Oranges ?
3. What diseases, insects, etc., have, thus far, proved
most destructive and troublesome? And what remedies
have been tested-with results of test ?
4. What is the natural character or quality of your soil,
and what fertilizers-domestic or commercial-have
proved most efficient and economical ?
5. What is your style of pruning? Do you "trim UP"
or "trim ;DOWN," and why ?
6. Do yiou favor mulching and infrequent stirring of
the surface, or constant cultivation and no mulching ?
7. How do you apply fertilizers ?
8. Are yo>ur trees budded or seedlings ? And which do
you prefer ?
9. Has the LeConte Pear borne fruit with you, or in
your immediate neighborhood ?
10. Do you cultivate the Japan Persimmon, (Diospyros
kaki,) or the Chinese Quince, (Cydonia,'inensis),?
11. State your experience with the "'ig, the Banana,
the Guava, the Pine-apple and the Cocoanut. Do you


raise any of these fruits for market ?
12. Is the Strawberry a success with you? What sorts
do you cultivate, and what is your system ?
13. Can you raise any other varieties of the Peach,
(budded,) except the "Peen-To" and "Honey ?"
14. Are you cultivating the Grape ? What varieties ?
Do you make wine for home use, or market?
REPLIES :
WALDO, ALACHUA CO., FLA.
Florida Fruit- Growers' Association :
1. Apples, peaches, pears, Japan plums, grapes,
bananas and strawberries.
2. Orange crop small this year.
3. Laziness has been the most destructive dis-
ease affecting the orange tree. The most sat-
isfactory remedies have been proper pruning
and thorough cultivation. Lime and potash
have been used on insects.
4. Character of soil is sandy loam, with clay
sub-soil three to five feet deep. Best fertilizer,
muck and clay, and green crops plowed in.
Buckwheat early in spring, then corn, then peas,
then rye or oats, to remain in all winter.


Elm


I






TH FLRIADSAC Q


5. I trim with low heads and only cut oat the
surplus wood and keep the heads open to sun
and air.
6. Constant cultivation till about August,
then mulch with the green crop growing be-
tween the trees-trees set 15 by 30 feet.
7. On top, at the ends of the roots, slightly
stirring the soil.
8. I bud everything as soon as large enough,
and get fruit in one-third the time I can from
seedlings.
9. LeConte pear pro,,lises well here, and has
fruited a little.
10. Japan persimmon has fruited well, and is
being planted more generally.
11. Figs do well; Bananas some years get
the cold too soon in the fall; they require a
rich, moist soil; the Guava is grown some, also
the Pine-apple.
12. Strawberries are a success, we have them
from December to July; Wilson's Albany, rows
four feet, with plants one foot in the row, flat
culture.
13. The Alexander has fruited here, and
some others are being tested ; "Honey" and
"Peen-To" do well.
14. Delaware, Hartford, Concord, Isabella,
Diana and Seupplernong are grown quite ex-
tensively ; not much wine made.
NED E. FARRELL.

ROCK LEDGE, BREVARD, CO., FLA.
Florida Fruit Groaver '' Association :.
As one among the first settlers on Indian
River, a resident of the State for over 20 years,
familiar with almost every part of it, from the
North boundary to Manatee County, on the Gulf'
side ; its counties, rivers and great Lakes of the
interior ; and as County Surveyor, with every
hammock and settlement from the head of Hal-
ifax River North, for 200 miles South to Jupi-
ter, and a cursory visit to Biscayne Bay,
Key Largo ("the pine-apple Bonanza, from
which Col. S. S. Lowe has sold $30,000 of
pines") and on down to Key West, I respond
to your queries and will endeavor to represent
the advantages of our Inlian River country,
extending 140 miles on the coast.
1. We consider the Citrus family the great
desideratum, and on account of freedom from
frost, believe the lemon would prove the great-
est monied crop, could we but obtain the
proper variety for market. Orange stocks bud-
ded 'with lemons grow large and are prolific
bearers. Limes commence to bear the third
year from the seed and yield heavily. We have
budded trees six years old yielding 200 to 600
oranges, eight years old, 1000 per tree, inspiring
a hope that groves properly managed can be
made to yield, at ten years old, $1,000 per acre.
2. This being the off year, our crop is me-
dium, but fruit large and promising.
3. In a few groves the scale insects have per-
petrated damage; they appear upon trees that
have been neglected and in a few instances have


spread in the groves; when they are taken in
time they are controled by the use of kerosine,
whale oil soap, &c. A few years ago the mealy
bug was introduced here from a nursery on the
St. John's River, which created excitement.
Trees were taken up and burned. Kerosene
and other washes were freely used, which pretty
much exterminated them. I am sorry to say a
few laggards still have them in their groves.
In some groves there are trees affected with the
die-back. We know not the cause, but find
wood ashes, lime and salt, and salt alone, a
remedy. I find salt water from the river very
effective.
4. A few pine-land groves are fertilized by
cattle. I am told that the Duke Castellucia,
who purchased the Dummet grove two years
since, pruned heavily, fertilized and tilled
deeply, and has recently sold out for $100,000.
5. We prune where limbs cross and interfere,


and keep off water sprouts, so as to leave the
body and large limbs free and open for air, the
trees being sprayed with solutions by hydrant,
for guarding against insects.
6. A diversity of opinion. Constant, deep
clean culture, is condemned; non-culture is
ruinous; some resort to the hoe exclusively;
others plow in December and January and
again in May, and sow down in peas to shade
through summer and be plowed in in Deceim-
ber as fertilizer. Low marl lands should be
mulched and hoed.
7. One or two pine-land groves have been
fertilized by cattle. We have never fertilized
our hammock groves, yet are advocates of the
intense system of culture, and ask advice and
information relative to the best fertilizers and
mode of applying them. Every grove ten years
old should be paying $1000 an acre annual
income and at twenty years old, $2,000.
8. We have both budded and seedling trees.
We much prefer buds from our finest varieties
of orange (Madam's Sweet and Madam's Vi-
nous,) upon nursery stocks three to four years
old. We have an occasional seedling in bear-
ing at six years old-buds of the same age have
from 200 to 600 oranges per tree.
9. Our LeConte pears grow nicely and prom-
ise well.
10. No Japan Persimmon or Quince. In lieu
we have the Mango, Sapodilla, Cherimoya,
Avocado Pear, etc.
11. Bananas, upon selected spots, yield in 14
to 20 months from 50 to 200 pods per bunch.
Guavas yield the third year from the seed ;
trees six to twelve years old, yield ;i great
abundance. Pine-apple plants, set 10,000 to
acre, bear the second year, 40 to 80 per cent.,
6,000 apples an acre. and this year they sell at
12. to 20cts., each, paying $400 to $1200.
There are five boats running, shipping plants
from Key Cay-Largo, to Indian River. Hun-
dreds of thousands will be added to the present
plantations this season.
.Maj. McCrary, Jacob Feaster, Capt. Vann
and others claim that Onion seed planted in
September, will yield 300 to 600 bushels the
next May, paying $400 to $900 an acre. They
pit onions against pine-apples as a paying crop.
Sugar-cane yields six to twelve barrels per acre,
allowing three-fifths ofthe crop for making up,
with one horse mill and fixtures, leaves a clear
profit of $40 to $90 an acre, $200 to $300 to
the hand. Tomatoes, okra, beans, other veg-
etables and vines all grow luxuriantly upon
land properly selected and suited to them.
These are auxiliaries to establishing an orange
grove, which, when once established, insures
independence and contentment. e c ai i uts
were killed here in 1835 and again in 1868.
But 100 miles South of this, at Jupiter, and 15
miles below there, at Lake Worth, they do well
and are prized even above an orange- grove
as a permanent investment. There are lands
upon Jupiter Island, 30 to 35 feet above water,


rich hammock, with the Tropical Mastic, Gum-
limbo and India rubber trees, two feet and more
in diameter, and other lands, low, rich ham-
mock, where the roots will soon strike the
water. From the experience at Lake Worth
and the Keys, all of these lands are admirably
suited to the growth of the cocoanut, pine-apple,
Maumee apple, &c.; and their splendid location
between the Ocean and Hope Sound, Indian
River, insures them perfectly from frost. The
pure sea air insures perfect health, with the
luxuries of fish, oysters and turtle from the
Sound, and surf bathing on the Ocean. Prep-
arations are now being made, clearing etc., for
setting out thousands of pine-apple, cocoanut
and other fruits.
Must respectfully submitted, by the
COUNTY SURVEYOR,
Bretard' Co., Fla.


TANGERINE, ORANGE CO., FLA.,
July 22, 1882.
Florida Fruit- Growers' Association:
Having seen your circular in THE FLORIDA
DISPATCH, and being in full accord with the
object and the manner proposed for obtaining
reliable information, I, with pleasure, submit
answers to such questions as have come under
my observation in my three years' experience
in orange culture on my grove of 2,000 trees:
1. The pine-apple, banana and guava are
grown here successfully, the frost sometimes
slightly injuring the outside leaves, but all fruit
the following summer, and find ready sale in
our town market, at good prices.
2. I have no trees in bearing.
3. The "scale insect" has given us the most
trouble. The "long scale" (M. Gloverii,) "broad
scale" (M. Citricola,) "chaff scale" (P. Pugun-
da,) are the most numerous, but I think we
have them under control. I have used many
remedies, which helped some, but were more or
less injurious to the trees. I have finally set-
tled down to "Hubbard's Florida Butter,"
which, I believe, if used properly, will destroy
the "scale" without any injury to the trees. I
used it on about 1,500 trees, and know whereof
I speak.
4. Soil is mostly high pine land. Of the
commercial fertilizers, I think Forrester's and
Mapes's are the kinds most used, and with best
results.
5. I trim my trees when and where they
seem to need it. I prefer trees grown low, but
shapely and not spreading on the ground.
6. I prefer mulchling and frequent stirring of
the ground ; both are good.
7. I suppose you mean: do I apply fertiliz-
ers broadcast or more immediately to the tree.
I apply to the tree and prefer the ground wet,
then slightly hoed or raked in.
8. Mostly seedlings ; it is an open question
with me which will prove the most profitable
in the future.
9. Don't know of any LeConte pears in bear-
ing in this vicinity.
10. The Japan persimmon is getting a start
here, but not old enough to decide either quality
or profitableness.
11. Answered under No. 1.
12. Have not much experience with the
strawberry; from what I have seen, I am led to
think that they would be very profitable.
13. Have no experience with peaches; "Peen-
To" seem to be a success with those that have
them.
14. I have a few Scuppernong grapes; they
are thrifty and free from insects and disease.
Very respectfully yours,
R. J. WRIGHT.

SARASOTA, MANATEE CO., FLA., )
July 16, 1882. 5
Florida Fruit- Growers' As octfion :


In looking over THE DISPATCH of July 3d, I
noticed an article asking for information in re-
gard to the cultivation of the orange, lemon,
lime, pine-apple, guava, banana, and any other
tropical fruits that can be grown in Florida.
Commencing with the land around Sarasota,
it is mostly flat pine land with the exception of
Crumlynn, Ridley Park and Eddystone orange
groves. The above groves are high and rolling,
and are owned by Northern and Western men.
We are cultivating the budded and seedling
orange tree, fnd of the two the budded is the
best and grows fast, and are the Nonpareil, St.
Michael, Tardiff, Navel, and all of the choice
varieties. The mode of culture is to mulch
and keep the soil loose around the body of the
tree. The fertilizer used is hen manure, which
is applied in the following way: Take a hoe and
haul the soil away from the tree as. far out as
the fibrous roots go, the farther away from the
COtil (1m on page 309.


, I I I Ari1CI-


305





306 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


THE BEE PASTURES OF THE GULF COAST.
A Mine of Undeveloped Wealth.
CEDAR KEY, FLA., July 25, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Allow me, through your columns, to bring
to the notice of those interested in bee cul-
ture, a few pertinent facts, going to show the
value of the bee pastures of this coast.
About three years ago, Mr. John H. Hen-
drick and family, originally from Maine, re-
moved from Clinton, Illinois, to Gainesville,
Florida, and shortly after to Rosewood, in this
county. Having been engaged for about 10 or
12 years in the study of bees, and the improve-
ment of hives, Mr. Hendrick entered at once on
his favorite pursuit, but found, to his great dis-
appointment, that neither of those localities
were well suited to insure success. In July,
1880, he removed to Cedar Key, and com-
menced again with about 30 swarms. The first
year he had no success, which, after much
thought and investigation, he ascribed to the
fact that the unusual cold of the previous win-
ter had killed the mangroves, which plant he
has since learned to be almost unequalled as
a honey plant. Mr. Hendrick started this
year with 31 hives, and now has 44 nearly pure
Italians, with a few hybrids. He finds the hy-
brids to be equal as workers to the pure Ital-
ians, but less docile and manageable, and con-
sequently more trouble to handle. The native
bee he finds altogether inferior and very frac-
tious. Mr. Hendrick uses the "Hendrick" hive,
which he regards as the best in use. It is a
movable-frame hive, costing about $3, when
made by hand. Commencing, as I have said,
with 31 swarms, increasing to 44, Mr. Hendrick
has already taken 2,460 pounds of extracted
honey and 225 pounds of comb. He will get next
week about 800 pounds of extracted honey
and 400 pounds of comb. Allowing this to end
the season, we have a total of 3,885 pounds of
honey from about 40 hives, an average of a lit-
tle more than 99 pounds of honey per hive.
The principal honey plant on these islands is
the mangrove, but the different species of pal-
metto are also valuable. The mangrove blooms
from May till July, about three months. The
honey made from these plants is peculiar for its
great purity and beauty, being almost purely
transparent or a very light straw color, and free
from all poisonous properties.
Mr, Hendrick has no trouble with the bee


moth which is so destructive in other localities.
He thinks he prevents their ravages by always
keeping his swarms in full vigor, as it is only
the weak swarms which are attacked.
The principal cause of a swarm becoming
weak he considers to be the loss of the queen,
which he tries to discover as early as possible,
and at once take necessary steps to' supply the
loss. This he does as follows:
From a hive in full vigor he removes the
queen and shuts her up in a wire cage. As soon
as the workers discover their loss they go to
work to raise a new supply of royalty, by the
following means: Selecting four or five cells, in
which eggs have just been laid, they proceed to


enlarge and remodel them to accommodate
queens, and then by a supply of proper pabu-
lum the young larva develops into a.queen in-
stead of a subject. In a few days the young
queens are ready to leave the cells; those not
needed are to be destroyed, else we should have
fearful battles, ending in the destruction of all
but one. As it is a well-known fact that the
queen bee cannot endure a rival, as soon as the
young queen leaves the cell she is to be care-
fully removed to the hive that has suffered the
loss of its sovereign mother, and soon it is rein-
stated in its pristine health and vigor.
The habits of bees, and especially of the
queens, is a study of great interest. As I have
said, a queen will endure no rival; as soon as
one is discovered, a fight ensues, which ends in
the destruction of one, sometimes both. It is a
curious fact that the queens may be handled
with impunity, never having been known to use
the sting except in a battle with a rival queen.
Mr. Hendrick considers the bee pastures of
the Gulf Coast as the best of which he has any
knowledge. One cause of the superiority is the
fact that neither the mangrove nor palmetto is
subject to injury from drouth. The only casu-
alty which ever befalls the former is to be killed
by cold, and this does not occur below Tampa
Bay, and not more than once in 20 years in
this latitude.
Mr. Hendrick considers that he and his son
could tend properly about 150 hives, and that
200 would be enough for this locality, but of
course, this is somewhat conjectural. He thinks
that putting the hives on a large lighter and
starting early in the spring about Cape Sable
and moving up as the heavy plants come into
bloom, would have the effect to double the an-
unal honey crop.
A consideration of importance in estimating
the value of bee pastures on this coast, is the
fact of the great abundance of both mangrove
and palmetto, particularly the cabbage tree,
which lines the coast from Cape Sable to Pen-
sacola, and which no change of season or tem-
perature ever injures.
Mr. Hendrick considers that a million dol-'
lars of undeveloped wealth lies dormant in these
bee pastures. R. H. M.



The Equity of Wealth.
About thirty years ago I called frequently
on a very intelligent and a very good New
Churchman, who was suffering from a disease
from which he knew he should riot recover, and
had many interesting conversations with him.
These conversations'related mostly to the New
Church, and to its history and its prospects for
the future. But we often spoke of the state of
society generally, and of the problems involved


in its present condition and its future improve-
inent. One of the topics to which he reverted
several times, was the acquisition of wealth and
the various ways in which it is effected. He
was then living on a farm; and I think he had
lived there most of the time from his childhood.
It was a good farm, and I think he owned it,
and was in very comfortable circumstances, but
not at all what would be called a man of wealth.
Speaking one day of this fact and of the temp-
tation to leave the farm and engage in some
business more lucrative (for which he did not
appear at all to lack the capacity), he said that
he had thought a great deal about the question
how it is right to gain wealth; and that he
doubted very much whether there is any way


of doing it honestly to any great extent in one
man's lifetime. Men who acquire wealth rap-
idly, he thought, do so either by taking advan-
tage of others in ways which are really dishon-
est, even if not illegal, or else by devoting an
amount of time and energy to that pursuit
which no man can do, without neglecting his
more important and higher duties as a man.
The views which he expressed on the subject,
although not in the main substantially new to
me, came to me from him with new force; and
I have reflected on them with continued inter-
est since his departure to the world above. But
this reflection, though it always brings this New
Church brother before me afresh as one of the
most sincere and one of the best men, does not
lead me, in all things, to accept his view of the
subject. And yet there is more ground in jus-
tice for such a view than would be admitted, as
I suppose, by most of the money-makers of our
day.
There is, as I fully believe (this good man's
view of the matter to the contrary notwith-
standing), good and sufficient reason, both
naturally and spiritually, why some men should
have wealth, while others (and the greater num-
ber) should not. And if this be so, there must
be such a thing as the honest and justifiable
acquisition of wealth. But let us looking to the
principle of the thing a little more particularly.
And in the first place, why, in the economy
of the divine government, is wealth given to
those to whom it is given ? It cannot be for the
purpose of conferring benefit on those who have
the wealth, more than upon others; for the di-
vine providence is impartial and not a respecter
of persons. It must be, in some way, for the
common good. It must be, in some way, that
some uses are to be performed in society, which
persons without wealth cannot perform, or can-
not perform in the best and most useful man-
ner. And may we not fairly assume that this
truth is, in some way, the key to the solution of
the whole problem. And may we not find a
still further clue to the solution of the problem,
by considering on what principle wealth is ac-
tually acquired, when it is done in the orderly
prosecution of useful industry ?
Useful employment may be divided, for the
purposes of this inquiry, into two classes ; first,
those which are immediately productive; and
second, those which are not productive but con-
servative in their immediate use. Thus, for


example, manual labor, as a general rule, is
immediately productive. It results in the pro-
duction of food from the soil; or of houses;
or clothing; or of some other useful supply to
the calls of nature or of elevated human life and
society. But those uses which we have desig-
nased as conservative, are such as are found to
be needful for the preservation, or for the ap-
plication to use, of that which has already
been produced. The civil ruler, for example,
is needed as a preserver, to secure us in the pos-
session and free use of that which we already
have, or have in prospect. The trader, though
he does not produce the commodities in which
he deals, preserves them, or rather prevents
them from failing to be of service, by trans-
porting them from places where they are not


~~~~~~~"~I"YI`~-^PYIl--"~PIIIII~--~llll






TH FLRD IPTH 0


needed, or are less needed, to other places where
they are needed or may be more useful.
Another kind of conservative use (although it
may not, at first sight, so appear) is that of large
manufactories, in which labor itself is conserved,
rather than the fruit of labor after it is pro-
duced. The machinery applied on a large
scale, and the advantages taken, in other ways,
of doing the work on a large scale, makes avail-
able an amount of labor which otherwise would
'be wholly insufficient. At all events, whether
we call the use in this case conservative, or
whatever we call it, it will properly class with
conservative uses in reference to the present
inquiry.
Now what is the principal on which wealth is
gained, or can be gained, in the performance of
this class of uses ? Is it not simply this: name-
ly, that one man, in these uses, can serve many
persons at the same time or by the same pro-
visions and arrangements? A man attends to
the business of enabling me to receive and have
for use a product of a foreign country. Of
course he is fairly entitled to some remunera-
tion for the service. If lie did it by main
strength, so to speak, he would be paid as any
other laborer is paid. But that is not the way.
He can serve many others while he is serving
me. And, indeed, up to a certain point, the
more persons he serves, the better he well serve
each and every one of them. But, you say, he
only does a certain limited amount of actual
work; and why should he not be paid, like other
laborers, for just that work and nothing more ?
Is not the real reason this: namely, because he
must have money, and not his hands alone to
work with ?
The man of wealth cannot use his wealth, to
any great extent, for the supply of his own
needs, nor even for the gratification of his own
pleasures. Practically, he makes use of it, so
far as he himself is concerned, as the means of
gaining more. But in reference to others, the
surplus goes to sustain uses which, without it,
he could not perform. It assumes the form of
capital in business, by means of which the busi-
ness is carried on, and without which it would
either cease entirely or be carried on at greater
or less disadvantage.
The trader, if he accommodates only one
man in his business, or only a very few, does
not receive any, or not great profit for himself.
His profit comes from the serving of many at
the same time. But, in order thus to serve
many, he must have capital. Thus in the very
doing of the use (namely, serving many, instead
of a few only) he gains the means of serving
more. And this is of real and very great use
to the community. For it gives the service
more cheaply and in better quality, to each and
every one, than would be possible in any other
way.
The case of civil rulers is another in point,
to illustrate the same general principle. In or-
der to perform his functions efficiently and well,
the ruler must be in a condition to command


means, to command the services of others in aid
,of his work, and to command attention and
respect. To ensure all this, lie must have more
of wealth than is needed by those in the com-
mon spheres of life below him. And so the
wealth which he possesses, or which he conm-
manids and uses on account of his office, really
goes into the public service. The man in the
office enjoys advantage from it, it is true; but
not nearly so great advantage as most persons
imagine. But the whole community enjoys
very great, and indeed indispensable advantage
from it.
And we may say the same, in principle, of
all the conservative uses of human society, and
of all uses which have regard to many at a
time, in their application, and require special
ability in their performance. In proportion as


the use to be performed has a direct regard to
many at the same time, and also in proportion
as it is, in other respects, of great importance,
the preparation for it and the performance of it,
as a general rule, is dependent on wealth as a
means of doing the work to be done, or as a
means of making the work effective when it is
done, or for both of these reasons together.
Hence it is not wise to look on wealth as the
private property of those who have possession
of it. They cannot use it for their own
private advantage to nearly so great an extent
as most persons appear to think. If they them-
selves are wise, they will regard themselves as
public servants in virtue of the wealth in their
hands. And even if they are not wise, they
are compelled, in the main, to use their wealth
for the common good and not for their own.
Thus if we view the subject in a comprehensive
and a true way, we may discover that the dis-
tribution of wealth in the divine providence is
really equitable, although to a short-sighted
view it may seem otherwise. J. P. P.
Polar vs. Florida Mosquitoes.
Some late traveler in high latitudes gives an
account of mosquitoes, which beats any Indian
River yarn on this subject which we remember:
"The one bitter drop in our cup of joy was
the monstrous but inseparable curse of arctic
summer life-the mosquito," says this writer in
the "Land of the North Wind." "He abound-
ed, flourished, luxuriated, surpassed himself,
out-mosquitoed himself on the Kulio River.
We were at his mercy. Our veils, gauntlets,
handkerchiefs, flappers, all were a vanity and
a vexation. To kill was wanton, for to destroy
sufficient was impossible. We had foreseen all
this, and had even thought of taking, among
other things, a woodpecker from home with us
to protect our faces while we slept; but one
woodpecker would have been a solemn mockery ;
we should have wanted a fresh woodpecker
every five minutes. We are becoming connois-
seurs in mosquitoes; we watch them traverse
our veils like figures on the slides of a magic
lantern. There is the yellow-striped mosquito,
with a triple fang to his probosis ; there is the
brown hump-backed or camel mosquito, with
legs of gossamer, who appears to our vindictive
eyes to be from two to three inches in length ;
finally there is, the scorpion mosquito, very
searching and business-like. We dislike him
greatly for he wastes no time. We know now
that leather is a hollow delusion, and armour-
plated gauntlets are alone of avail.
,
Country Roads.
A. B. ALLEN, writing to the Country Gen-
tleman, from Ocean County, New Jersey, says:
"The surface of a road should always be of
pure gravel or finely broken stone, laid on from
two to six inches thick, according to the nature
of the natural road soil. The more angular


the shape of this gravel and stone, the better,
because these can be most firmly compacked by a
very heavy roller passing over them after being
spread, and by the subsequent travel.
"Smooth, roundish gravel, such as is found
on the seashore, and in layers cropping out from
sandy lands, answers a pretty good purpose
when laid on the surface of sandy roads, especi-
ally if the sand is quite coarse; for more or
less of this sand gradually rises-or, rather, the
gravel sinks into it-and the two mixed together
in due proportion form quite a solid road. This
may be seen all along the sea coast.
"In forming such roads, it is best to put on
only two to three inches of gravel to begin with,
and then add another inch or two from time to
time as needed. This divides the cost of the road
over several years, instead of having it all come
in a single year, as when four to six inches
depth of gravel is spread at once upon the sur-
face.


"Tolerably fair roads are made in sandy por-
tions of New Jersey, and probably elsewhere,
by spreading a coat of a couple of inches or so
of the red clay soil over the sandy surface. These
two kinds of soil are often found running close
together, and where this is the case, the expense
of spreading the clay is cheaply done.
"Wealthy men, for some years past, have been
building handsome cottages all along the sea-
shore from Sandy Hook to Long Branch. The
soil here is a pure white coarse sand, incapable
of growing anything but a few species of the
hardiest trees and shrubs, and worthless coarse
grass and rushes. In order to make passable
roads, a4l a garden soil for vegetables and
small fruits, and a lawn for evergreen and flow-
ing shrubbery, red clay soil is sought for on the
opposite side of the Shrewsberry River. Mixed
with the sand and well manured, this in time
forms a productive loam."

FUTURE OF THE SOUTH.-An enthusiastic
believer in the great future of the South
says, that ere long the discontented people of
Europe will discover the immense advantages
offered them in the Sunny South, and that the
tide of immigration will turn that way, "mak-
ing the desert blossom as the rose." Sparsely
settled and comparatively uncultivated tracts
of enormous extent beckon to all who wish to
own the soil they cultivate to enter in and pos-
sess the land. The Atlantic is only-another Jor-
dan and the South a "promised land."
*
TRAVELING BIDDIES.-The Council Bluffs
(Iowa) Nonpareil says: "Recently, a family
arrived in Council Bluffs, from Texas, having
made the trip by wagon. The journey was
made in six weeks. The day before starting a
matronly hen, owned by the family, hatched
out thirteen promising chicks. The lady, not
desiring to leave the brood behind, loaded the
hen and chickens on the wagon and started for
this city. The family arrived all right, not a
single chicken having been lost on the journey.
The chickens are now pretty well grown and
have every appearance of having stood the trip
admirably."
'
ENGLISH LANGUAGE.-A curious proof of
the prevalence ofthe English language through-
out the globe is afforded by a statement in the
"Newspaper and Bank Directory of the World,"
that out of 34,274 newspapers and periodicals
which were published in 1880, no fewer than
16,500 were printed in our own tongue. Nearly
half the remainder were in German, a quarter
in French, and the greater bulk of the rest in
Spanish. Daily papers numbered 4,020, and
the gross circulation of the whole periodical
press is estimated at 10,592,000,000.

THE OAKS OF MADISON.-Rev. W. P. Love-
joy, writing of Madison, Fla., in the Methodist,


says: "Nature has made it the most lovely town
in one particular, I have ever seen. Her shade
trees are a marvel of grandeur. Bro. Richard
Turnbull, of Monticello, has two magnificent
live oaks in his yard. Possibly no two trees in
Madison, or anywhere else in Florida, are
comparable to these. But Madison is filled with
splendid water oaks; which attracts the eye
and delight both the eye and the heart of the
lover of the beautiful in nature. The people
of Madison are, as far as I had opportunity to
judge, as beautiful in their cleverness as those
oaks are lovely in their grandeur."
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO,
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


-~--
I. ~---P~L ------a3FP-M1-9~ Y -_*_ -2___?_ li-~--s~-.~ I ----I~LIII _~ __ _I -_ _Cls~ ~____-~~-C I _._I L- __-ICli-~~I ~-~~-*L1-ill ~------ I--- 4if--=-~-_1-- --~1 -~-~_. ~~~~_ __111~ _


IL


THE FL*OR IDI DA DISPATC TC:H.


307






308 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


fhe glorida jispath.

JACKSONVILLE, AUGUST 7, 1882.
SD. REDMOND,
EDITORS: D. H. ELLIOTT,
1 W. H. ASHMEAD,

Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.

RATES OF ADVERTISING.
SQUARES. 1 TIME. I 1 MO. 3 MO. 6 MO. 1 YEAR
One....................... $ 1 00 $ 2 50 $ 5 50 $10 00 $ 18 50
Two...................... 2 00 5 00 10 00 1800 34 00
Three .............. 3 00 7 00 1400 25 00 46 00
Four.............. 4 00 9 00 17 50 30 00 58 00
Five..................... 4 50 11 00 19 00 35 00 65 00
Eight 8.... ... 800 1650 30 00 5000 10000
Sixteen............... 16 00 30 00 5000 80 00 15000
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words to line) ten cents
per line.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the best ad-
vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.

Special Club Rates with "The Dispatch."

Read and Subscribe--It Saves Money and
Will Pay You.
We have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
following publications, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt of price, for ONE YEAR :
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH AND
Savannah Weekly News .............................. $2.50
Florida Weekly Union............................... 2.25
New York Weekly Sun.............................. 1.75
New York Weekly Herald............................ 1.75
New York Weekly Tribune..................... 2.50
New York Weekly Times............................ 1.75
New York Weekly World.......................... 1.75
Philadelphia Weekly Times............................ 2.50
American Agriculturist................................ 2.00
Country Gentleman................................. 2.75
Southern Cultivator....................... 2.00
Atlantic Monthly Magazine........................... 4.00
Harper's Monthly Magazine........................... 4.00
The Century Monthly Magazine (Scribner's).... 4.00
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine...................... 3.15
Popular Science Monthly............................. 5.00
North American Review................................. 5.00
Harper's Illustrated Weekly..................... 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Bazar.......................... 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Young People................ 2.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly................. 4.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4.00
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly.................... 3.15
Frank Leslie's Sunday Magazine........ .......... 3.15
Scientific American................................... 3.75
W averly Magazine ...................................... 5.00
Detroit Free Press...................................... 2.35
Nebraska Farmer...................................... 2.00
The above are among the very best publications-
Remittances should be sent by Check, Money Order,
or Registered Letter, addressed to
ASHIMIEAD BRCLO'S,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

THE Madison Recorder says, Messrs. DREW
& BUCKI are using a machine for sawing down
trees. It is the first of the kind ever in use,


and propels itself through the wood.
Hon. MARSHALL P. WILDER, President of
the American Pomological Society, will please
accept our best thanks for a copy of the "Pro-
ceedings of the Eighteenth Session of the Amer-
ican Pomological Society, held in Boston, Mass.,
Sept. 14th, 15th, and 16th, 1881."

CocOANUTs.-The Key West Democrat says:
"Messrs. PETER WILLIAMS, D. T. SWEENY and
L. W. PIERCE expect to plant 20,000 cocoanuts
on Matecombie Key, which they have lately
bought. There is over 900 acres of very fine
land there, and they surely have a fortune if
they set about improving it."


Cutting Away Trees.
HOMEWOLD, August 2, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I am preparing to settle in what is here called
a "dry hammock," densely covered with hard
woods, such as oak of different kinds, hickory,
etc. Shall I best secure the health of my fam-
ily, by clearing off all this timber, allowing full
and free access of sun and air, or would you
advise a partial thinning out of the timber, re-
serving enough for shade, and protection from
the high winds ?
How near a dwelling-house may shade trees
safely stand. W.
REPLY.-A judicious thinning out of your
grove-cutting away spindling, crooked, stunt-
ed, partially decayed, and unsightly trees, is
what we should advise. Let the sun in freely
between the clumps and groups of trees, but do
not "clear off" the land, unless you are obliged
to have it for cultivation. It is believed by the
best authorities that there is nothing so effica-
cious against malaria as a belt of forest. It has
been shown to be so in our Western country,
and it is historically true in many of the coun-
tries of the Old World. It is related that the
unhealthiness of Rome was greatly increased in
the time of Pope Gregory, XIII, by the destruc-
tion of a forest that gave shelter to brig-
ands. The pestilential emanations from marshes
are counteracted in Algeria by planting euca-
lyptus trees, which partly absorb the moisture
from the soil and partly throw off from their
leaves the compound exhalations. It is well
understood that trees exercise a purifying effect
on the atmosphere, and hence that the planting
of them is a strictly sanitary measure. The
movement for beautifying homes by tree plant-
ing has, therefore, quite as much do with the
future health as the beauty of them.
Small trees may stand within a few feet of
your dwelling, and those of larger growth near
enough to throw their pleasant and cooling
shadows around you. But do not leave them so
close as to create dampness and moisture, and
never train climbing vines on the walls of your
dwelling. A wire or wooden trellis, set out three
or four feet from the walls or piazza, forms the
best support for climbing roses, ivy, honey-
suckles, etc.-EDs. DISPATCH.

High Potato Ridges.
A Hilksborough County correspondent of the
Union asks:
"Is the practice of making high ridges in
which the vines are set, so that there can be no
more earth hauled to the growing potatoes, the
best method of planting? The sweet potato
growers in Maryland and New Jersey, on their


sandy soils, plant in almost flat hills, and then
afterwards draw up in cultivation, and they
make large crops by that practice."
As we have often stated, we are in favor of
starting with a deep and wide double-furrow,
into which we scatter a liberal sprinkling of a
compost containing ashes or potash in some
form. Upon this we throw up a broad, mellow
bed, raking off the top level at least a foot wide
before planting. We keep these ridges lightly
scraped and free from weeds, for a week or two,
bedding up with the turning-plow as the vines be-
gin to run, and after they reach the middles,
we have no more trouble with them, except 4o
pull them loose where they are disposed to layer
themselves and take root. Cnltivated in this


simple manner, we do not know any crop of
the same value that can be raised as surely and
cheaply as the sweet potato.-EDs,

Guinea Cows.
MOUNT PLEASANT, WESTMORELAND CO. PA.
July 28,1882. j
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I noticed in THE FLORIDA DISPATCH an
advertisement for Guinea Cows. Please inform
me through your valuable paper (THE FLOR-
IDA DISPATCH) what a Guinea Cow is, her good
and bad qualities, iher weight, &c., and much
oblige a constant reader of your valuable pa-
per. J. J. Fox.
The Floridian aids us in replying to the
above query, thus:
GUINEA Cows.-This is the name given to a
breed of very small cows, supposed to have
been introduced by Greeks and Minorcans,
who first settled New Smyrna, Florida. They
have found their way to Brooks and Thomas
Counties, in Georgia, and prominent farmers
there are now breeding them for the market.
They are remarkably hardy and rival the best
milkers.
A New Nursery.
We are glad to learn from Mr. Wim. Dale
that he has started a nursery, on Panama
road, 12 miles from Jacksonville, and hopes to
be able to supply a portion of the home demand for
tropical plants, vines, rose bushes, orange and
lemon trees, &c. Mr. D. tells us he has nearly
two acres in roses alone, consisting of a great
many varieties, and will be able to supply good
plants shortly. Those desiring to buy should
write to him for prices. We can speak very
highly of the varieties offered, having been
presented this week with a "huge" bouquet of
them, which for this season of the year, cannot
be surpassed anywhere.

THE ROSE grows luxuriantly everywhere in
Florida; and, by a proper selection of varie-
ties, we may have an abundance of blooms every
day in the year. The rose requires a deep soil,
well drained, and if not naturally rich in loam,
this should be provided with well-rotted ma-
nure. If the soil be too sandy, mix fresh loam
from an old pasture field; if it is too clayey,
mix sand with it:
Dear flower of heaven and love thou glorious thing
That lookest out the garden nooks among,
Rose, that art ever fair and ever young,
Was it some angel on invisible wing
Hover'd around thy fragrant sleep to fling
His glowing mantle of warm sunset hues
O'er thy unfolding petals, wet with dews,
Such as the flower-fays to Titania brings ?
Oh, flower of thousand memories and dreams,
That take the heart with faintness, while we gaze
On the rich depths of thy inwoven maze,
From the green banks of Eden's blessed streams
I dream'd thee brought, of brighter days to tell,
Long passed, but promised yet with us to dwell.
WE call the especial attention of our readers


to the advertisement of Messrs. ELLIS & Mc-
CLURE, Architects and Civil Engineers. These
gentlemen are personally known to us ; they are
thoroughly skilled in their calling, and are pre-
pared to furnish plans and estimates for build-
ings of all kinds. If you contemplate building,
write to them for plans and estimates. We
hope, before long, to commence publishing in
THE DISPATCH a series of illustrated articles
on suburban and country houses, furnished by
these gentlemen.
-The true test of civilization is not the census
nor the size of the cities nor the crops-no, but
the kind of man the country turns out.-Emer-
son.


I


I


I I






'JTHER FLORIDA DISPATCH.


LeConte Pear-"Go Slow."
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I have watched the rapidly increasing "boom"
of the LeConte Pear for the past four or five
years, with much interest. I have observed the
beautiful, clean, upright, vigorous growth of the
tree, wherever it has been properly cultivated.
I have read all the marvellous accounts of its
wonderful productiveness; freedom from dis-
ease; luscious quality of the fruit; high price
in New York ; hundred acre field to be planted
by a stock-company at Thomasville. etc., etc.
But-I have eaten of the fruit several times
the present season-and I have seen the price
in New York suddenly drop from $6 to $1.75
per bushel, when confronted by the splendid
Bartlett of California, and the Jargonelle and
Doyenne d'Ete, of the North.
I am no "croaker" or alarmist. I have strong-
ly believed in the LeConte, and advocated its
extensive culture; but, in the face of the unde-
niable fact that it is not a really good fruit,
when compared with the fine pears of the North
and West; and (worse still) that it does not
ripen early enough to "take the market" far in
advance of the finer sorts, I merely wish to say
to the many now suffering from the Le Conte
mania-"go slow !"
Respectfully,
X. T.

"Send Me a Leaf."
"Send me a leaf ere the summer dies,
Kissed by the light of my native skies ;
Send me a leaf from our trystring tree,
Over the sea, love, over the sea."
"Sing me the old songs," says one who be-
lieves that no songs are as sweet as the old ones.
But here we may have, from our great South-
ern Music Publishing House, a new song that
will hold its own with the best of the old
ones. The beautiful words are by FANNY
CROSBY, the blind Poetess, and the music by
DANKS, the great song writer of America, and
author of "Silver Threads Among the Gold,"
which was so immensely popular. "Send Me a
Leaf" is quite as good a song, and will-be every
bit as popular. Easy accompaniment for piano
or organ. Sold by all music dealers. Or remit
the price direct to the publishers, LUDDEN &
BATES, Savannah, Ga. Price, 40 cents.

THE very excellent essay on the Banana is
concluded in this number of THE DISPATCH.
WE have several interesting replies from
Fruit-Growers in different parts of the State,
awaiting their turn for insertion. These reports
possess great practical value for all present and
prospective Floridians.
"PUCK ON WHEELS."-No. 3, of this mirth-
provoking serial, is overflowing witil fun, and
has more laugh to the square inch than any
late publication we have seen. 120 pages. Illus-


treated. Price, 25 cents. Ashmead Brothers.
0-0
TONIC FOR. FOWLS.-Common Tincture of
Iron, a few drops daily, mixed with fresh water,
is excellent. Where this cannot be obtained,
put half a dozen rusty nails in the bottom of
the drinking pan. A bit of assafoetida tied up
in a piece of mosquito netting and suspended
in the vessel the fowls drink from, is good.
0-0
THE "LABOR QUESTION."-H. J. S.-Your
article has many good points and some cogent,
though not many new arguments. But there is
too much of it! We have only a limited space
in THE DISPATCH, and we cannot, with any re-
gard for variety, accord so much space to one
article or the discussion of one subject. We


want short, pithy, pungent, practical articles
on topics of leading writers, and hope some of
our correspondents will study the art of con-
densation :
"When writing an article for the press,
Whether prose or verse, just try
To settle your thoughts in the fewest words
And let them be crisp and dry;
And when it is finished and you suppose
It is done exactly brown,
Just look it over again and then-
Boil it down.
"For editors do not like to print
An article lazily long,
And the general reader does not care
For a couple of yards of song;
So gather your wits in the smallest space
If you want a little renown,
And every time you write, my friend--
Boil it down."
FLORIDA TEA.-Col. Finley, of the Lake
City Reporter says:
"We have been drinking for a week past, tea
raised by Rev. Mr. Fife, of our county. It was
prepared by that gentleman from this season's
growth. To say that the beverage is delicious,
and very different from the stuff we buy for tea,
is stating a simple fact. There is no comparison
between the two ; those using the house tea will
never desire to draw tea from the manipulated
mass we purchase for that article. Mr. Fife has
been a resident of this county for six years, and
is fast surrounding himself with all the com-
forts of life. It has been demonstrated by sev-
eral parties that an excellent article of tea can
be grown in our county with no effort."

A Small Farm.
THOMASVILLE, Aug. 1, 1882.
Editor. of The Florida Dispatch:
Inclosed is P. O. order for $1.50 for THE
FLORIDA DISPATCH. Return thebill receipted.
I was one of the earliest subscribers to TIHE
DISPATCH, and while it was always a good
paper, and gave much useful information, yet
I must say, it lias been vastly improved in use-
fulness and dress, and I welcome its weekly
appearance with much pleasure.
If I had known you were here with friend
Elliott, spying out the land, I would have found
you out, and taken you to my little fifteen acre
farm, and shown you my corn crop of twelve
acres. I think you would have concluded that
corn can be raised upon pine lands, with ease
and profit, and in as large quantity as the rich-
est bottoms will produce. I was the pioneer of
the "Intensive System," of farming in the South,
and have kept it up continually, since 1866,
with great success and pleasure. My fifteen
acres produces, with easy culture, about as
much as the average three-horse, good farms, of
one hundred acres. I have made oats enough
this year, to feed my horse twelve months, have


a good sweet potato crop, also peas, pumpkins
and cushaws, in abundance, and after reserving
an ample supply of corn to feed my horse, cows
and hogs, and foir family use, 1 hope to have to
sell five hundred bushels of corn, and ten
thousand pounds of fodder, besides having
plenty of old corn to last me until October and
old fodder to carry me through a whole year.
So you see an industrious man can easily support
a large family from fifteen acres of land, and
pay his taxes, and school his children, by using
economy. I intended sometime since, to write
an article for THE DISPATCH, about the im-
provement of poor pine lands, by planting peas,
but my time was taken up with my little farm,
and lately my health has been a little impaired.
There are provisions enough made in this county,
this year, to last two years, if properly used.
Truly yours,
R. H. HARDAWAY.


30!


LUMBER SIIl' I[:INTs.-During the month
of July there were 4,299,151 feet of -yellow
pine lumber shipped from Jacksonville; 4,-
162,400 feet to domestic ports, and 130,751 feet
toforeign ports. During July, 1881, there were
6,375,093 feet shipped from this port, and 2,-
666,000 feet in July, 1880. Besides the luem-
her, there were 11,000 cross-ties shipped from
this city last month.- Union.
VENNOR'S AUGUST PREDICTIONS.-Vennor
makes the following predictions for August:
"I cannot but think that August will be another
month of storms and unusual rainfall, with one
or two remarkably low curves of temperature.
I expect snowfalls will be recorded in extreme
western and northwestern sections, and cold
rains at more southerly sections shortly after
the middle of the month. October will be very
similar, but of course colder."


~` - I I


Continued from page 305.
tree the deeper, spread the manure all around
the tree and haul the soil back again, and the
work is done; that is the way we get the best
results from fertilizing. Some plow in cow-
peas, but of the two the hen Imanureis the best.
Of the insects, we have three kinds of scale,
the red, white and black ; of the three the red
or rusty is the worst. The treatment for all is
pure kerosene; the way to apply it is to make
a swab and wash the tree with it, being careful
not to let any of the oil go to the roots as it is
sure death to tile tree if it does ; kept away
from the roots it is sure death to all kinds of
scale.
ff the lemon, lime and guava, we cultivate
the same as oranges, and have the budded
Lamb and Neopolitan lemon. Thereisno prun-
ing done, only to cut the dead wood from the
tree, if there be any, and keep the suckers down,
the tree doing best in that way. All of the
groves here are young groves, only five years
old from the seed, and looking fine.
The LeConte pear, Japan persimmon or Chi-
nese quince have not got this far south yet.
Figs do well in a wet season; the best are
the white and blue figs.
Baananas do well on rich spots of land,
and bear from 30 to 50 bananas on a bunch,
and take from 12 to 18 months to bear.
The pine-apple does well. Robert Greer, A.
B. Bidwell and John Liddell ofthis place have,
set out 400 apiece this last week, and that is
only to start on. A. B. Bidwell is the boss pine
grower, and R. Greer next.
A. B. Bidwell has got the first oranges raised
in the settlement of Sarasota, and .by next year
will have many more. WVe do not raise any of
the above fruits for market; the settlement is not
old enough, but will be ill two or three years.
One winter ago() we raised to)latoes and cu-
cumbers for thee Northern market, and made
the merchants rich, ourselves poor, and caiue
to the conclusion to make ourselves rich and
merchants poor, for the time to come ; so much
for fruit-growing in and around Sarasota.
Now, a little about Sarasota and vicinity:
Saras )ta is situated on Sarasota Bay, 15 miles
from Manatee by land and 30 miles by water;
there is one post-office, one store, one school-
house, one fishery and 25 or 30 inhabitants, all
from the North and West, and every winter
swells the number to nearly 100, but they are
only here for the winter, and all that comes to
Sarasota one-winter is sure to come again. If
we had a hotel in Sarasota it would be the
place of South Florida,
Yours, with respect,
J. L.,
of Sarasota, Manatee Co., South Fla.
The Levy Enterprise, is a new 8-page paper
published at Bronson, Levy County, Florida.
It is edited with unusual ability, and bids fair
to be a success. Terms: $2 per aninum. I. B.
Mitchell & Son, Publishers.


__ C
III






310 THE FLRD DISPATCH._ I _ __~IL


each time. Absolute cleanliness about every
vessel used about the milk, from milk pail to
pan or stone crock, which must be kept sweet
by heating in the sun and air. I prefer the
old-fashioned strainer with cloth and hoop.
Use a double cloth, have plenty of them, and
use but a few times until they go into the
weekly wash to be rubbed and boiled. Wash
as soon as used, in warm water, rinse and dry.
Keep perfectly sweet. All these little things
are the beginning of good butter.
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


Horses Without Shoes.
A Connecticut correspondent of the New
York Herald writes : Over three years ago ar-
ticles appeared in the Boston Journal and sev-
eral other papers, advising the working of
horses without shoes, and at the same time giv-
ing the experience of several persons who had
used them without shoes with complete success.
I was so impressed with the statements that I
was induced to have the shoes of one of my
horses taken off. I turned him out to grass for
about a month, and then put him to work,
lightly at first, and I must confess, with fear and
trembling; but after a trial I was so pleased
with the result that I took the shoes off my
other two horses, and I have worked them
without shoes ever since, now about three years.
I find they work better, more sure-footed, and
are far less liable to lameness than when shod,
and I am well satisfied that horses' feet, as na-
ture made them, are all sufficient for ordinary
work, and, I believe, for extraordinary work.
After my long experience, I should now as
soon think of going to a farrier myself to be
shod as to send my horses for that purpose.
What surprised me most was that one of my
horses was continually falling lame, and we
never could discover the cause, but since she
has been worked without shoes, she has never
shown the least symptoms df lameness and never
stumbled, which she did very much when shod,
from which I infer that the paring the soles
when shoeing made her feet very tender and
was the cause of all the trouble.
Our roads are rough, hilly, and stony, much
more so than the average roads, so that my
success cannot be attributed to superiority
in this respect. Equestrians would find it far
safer to use horses without shoes, as the sole
becomes so hard as to be non-sensitive to small
stones, and the animals are thus far less liable
to stumble. To prevent the hoofs from chipping,
the toes should be kept slightly rounded by a
coarse file, such as is used by farriers, and as
the feet should always be looked to when the
horse is groomed, the time required to do this
is very trifling.




How to Make Good Butter.
An Ohio farmer's wife writes as follows on
an important subject : "I find it is the many lit-
tle things that make good butter or spoil the
butter. Good feed and plenty of it; good, pure
water whenever nature demands it; quiet, kind
treatment, no excitement or worrying at any
time; clean, airy stables, no foul odors; clean
udders and teats, if they have to be washed
thoroughly to make them so. The milk drawn
gently and quickly, and the last drop taken


Planting Oysters.
The following, from the Baltimore Sun, may
contain a hint for some of our Florida fisher-
men :
The oyster business in these waters is now
very active, and has reached an interesting
Stage, the "planting." A description of the
Smodus operandi will perhaps be new to the
readers of the Sun. There are at least thirty
vessels engaged in the business, and the oyster
"plants" growing in the mouth of the James
River, some eighty miles from this place, it
takes about five days for a good schooner
with favorable winds to make the trip,
load and return. Every morning a fleet leaves
this harbor for Hampton Roads, the schooners
having a capacity of from 350 to 1,500 bushels
each, the average being 800 bushels. The beds
of plants, which are known in the trade as "cul-
lentines," are rich in the natural growth of the
Roads, and a hand can, with his tongs, take up
one hundred bushels a day of the young oysters.
They are about the size of a half of an English
walnut, and he gets six cents per bushel, mak-
ing wages at from $5 to $6 per day. A favor-
able trip of from twelve to fifteen hours puts the
vessel in the Chincoteague Bay, when they are
mostly planted in the Maryland waters, from
fifteen to twenty miles above this point. The
planting consists it scattering them in the bay
so that they will lie thickly at the bottom of
the water, and not more than touching each
other. The whole cost to the owner who hires
the vessel and the work will reach 20 cents a
bushel. He has his ground, or his water rather,
staked off, and in two years the oysters are large
enough to be taken up and sent to market.
They command 50 cents a bushel here, or $1.10
in Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York, and
the finest $5 per barrel of three bushels.

Harness-How to Oil, etc.
Harness is more rapidly injured in summer
than in winter. It is sometimes soaked with
rain, and again subjected to heat and drying,
and the perspiration of horses does it no good.
If kept well oiled, all these influences will cause
little injury. There are many different appli-
cations used, and different modes are adopted
for employing them. A common way is first to
wash thoroughly with soap and warm water,
and then to apply neats-foot oil, as the best oil
for the purpose. But a different course is adopted
by others. One team manager informs us that
the first thing to do is always to apply one or
two coats of castor oil with enough lamp-black
to give proper color. By thus saturating the
leather with oil first, the soap and water applied
afterwards do not penetrate it, and when leather
is permitted to absorb water it hardens it, and


Marion County, Florida).-Captain J. L. Cainy, Presi-
dent; Dr. L. M. Ayer, Corresponding Secretary.
Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Higgins, Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Association, Albany,
Georgia.-L. E. Welch, President; T. M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
Sumter County Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation.-D. L. Hubbard, President, Leesburg- W. C.
Dodd, Recording Secretary, Leesburg; A. P. Roberts,
Corresponding Secretary, Leesburg.
Florida Central Agricultural Society.-Thos. F. King,
President Gainesville; Secretary, --
-- ; W. K. Cessna, Corresponding Secretary, Gaines-
ville.
Archer Agricultural Association.-W. B. Lipsey,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine, Secretary; Dr. J. C. Neal,
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President; John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewis, Treasurer, Tallahassee.
Indian River Agricultural and Pomological Society.-
A. P. Cleveland, President; W. H. Sharp, Secretary,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
Association.-R. J. Mays, President; Frank W. Pope,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
Orange County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred L. Robertson, Corresponding


THE* FLORIDA DISPsATCH.e


___ II .--- --- L- --- --- -- --- --`---~-- -----`
c-.---I I-t~- I -- I---~ -t Ib.r ~-- ~rw I ~-ICC I II I
. . _..-----


horses, and to prevent the needless wear and
tear of leather. Blinders are not needed, belly
bands nor cruppers. Simple harness for the
farm, kept always in good order, not liable to
breakage, will be a thing of economy in more
ways than one, and sometimes prevent costly
delays in the most busy days ot the year.-
Country Gentleman.
Af/ticultuvial, IIorticultural and I'oJioloJLical
Associations.
Florida Fruit-Growers' Association-O ice at Jack-
sonville-D. Redmond, President; W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; W. HI. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding Sec-
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee-Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, 0. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official organ-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH,
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA STATE GRANGE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICES.-Master, Wn H. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Win. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B. F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Field-
ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. H. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate
Keeper, Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Wm. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T. W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H.
Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Goo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Umstead, Hous-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville.-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J. C. Greeley, Treasurer.
Directors-J. H. McGinniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro, P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney. Annual meeting-
Last Friday in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; 0. E. Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. 0. Taylor, Secretary and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Florida.-President, A. B. Bartlett, Georgetown; Vice-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. Hawkins, Lake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George; George H. Thom, Treasurer,
Georgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
mond, Fort Gates.
Picolata Agricultural and Horticultural Society.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, W. N. ParKer, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Corresponding Secretary,
N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., Recording Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer. Meets first Saturday in each month.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. Mathers, Second Vice-President; B.
W. Powell, Corresponding Secretary; B. F. Jordan, Sec-
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical Fruit Growers' Association of Monroe County,
Florida.-Home office, Myers, Florida; F. A. Hendry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson,
President; Thomas Tillis, First Vice-President; J. B.
Sutton, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary; J. M. Barco, Recording Secretary;
L. W. Hamlin, Assistant Recording Secretary.
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Association.-
John Bradford, President, Bradfordville, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida.
Pinellas, Florida, Fruit Growers' Association.-D. WV.
Meeker, President; Win. P. Neeld, Secretary.
Central Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida.--Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
Evergreen Horticultural Society, Dunedin, Florida.-
J. W. Matchett, President; W. Tate, Vice-President;
Geo. L. Jones, Secretary.
Decatur County Fair Association, Bainbridge, Geor-
gia.-Maston O'Neil, President. I. Kwilecki, Secretary.
Lake Wier Agricultural and Pomological Society (of


*


excludes the oil. By oiling first, the dirt is
softened so that it is easily washed off, and this
obviates much of the scraping otherwise requir-
ed, and the whole operation may be performed
at once. After being oiled, wash it with a sponge
and soap suds, and when dry,, rub* over it a
mixture of oil and tallow, colored with lamp-
black, and a small portion of Prussian blue.
This is substantially the process recommended,
and we shall be glad to hear from those who
have tried different methods, as to their com-
parative value, and of the benefit of applying
the oil first, and the fitness of castor oil as com-
pared with other applications.
While on the subject of using harness in farm
work in summer, it is well to recommend for
any field work the simplest harness that will
answer the purpose, both for the comfort of the


310







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 311


Secretary.
Gadsden County Fair Association.-Jesse Wood Pres-
ident; W. H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R. Harris,
Second Vice-President; J. W. Kendricks, Secretary; E.
C. Lou, Treasurer.
South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
which we may have fallen in the naming of officers, &c.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH ?]



STRAWBERRY PLANTS FOR SALE.


Several thousand Nunan Variety. Also, Crescent
Seedling, price $1.00 per 1,000, packed and shipped in
good condition. Money must accompany each order.
Address, MRIS. A. B3EArTTY,
Aug. 7 to Nov. 6. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

MSO T, 4.M
Fine Nunan Strawberry Plants. The best known
variety for shipment.
100 Plants. .............................. .............. ...........$ .75
500 Plants... ....... ........ ............... .............. 2.00
1000 Plants........................................................... 3.00
Terms cash delivered at Express Office or Railroad,
Charleston. Address,


Aug. 7 to Oct. 7.


JAMES PRICE,
112 Broad Street,
CHARLESTON, S. C.


Merchants9 Line,



CARRYING THE U. S. MAIL.



ELEGANT SIDE-WHEEL STEAMERS.



FREDERICK DE BARY, Capt. Leo. Vogel.
II. B. PLANT, Capt. J. W. Fitzgerald.
ANITA, Capt. C. H. Brock.
One of the above-named steamers will leave De Bary
Wharf, foot of Laura Street, daily except Sunday, at 3
p. m., for PALATKA, SANFORD, ENTERPRISE, and
all intermediate landings.
ROSA, Capt. J. L. Amazeen.
ru. 1U IKtD, Capt. (. J. Mercier.
Steamer ROSA leaves De Bary Wharf every Sunday
at 1 p. m., and every Wednesday at 5 p. m. for above-
named landings.
Steamer GEO. M. BIRD leaves De Bary Wharf every
Tuesday and Friday at 5 p. m. for same landings.
Connects at Palatka with Florida Southern Railroad
for Gainesville and Ocala.
Connects at Astor with St. John's and Lake Eustis
Railroad for Ft. Mason, Yalaha, Leesburg and all points
on the Upper Ocklawaha.
Connects at Volusia with coaches for Ormond and
Daytona.
Connects at Sanford with South Florida Railroad for
Longwood, Maitland, Apopka City, Altemonte, Orlando,
Kissimmee, and with steamers for Lake Jessup, Salt
Lake and Rock Ledge and Indian River.
Connects at Enterprise with coaches for Daytona and
New Smyrna.
Returning, Mail Steamers leave Enterprise every
morning at 7 a. m., and Sanford on arrival of train.
Steamer Geo. M. Bird will leave Enterprise every
Thursday and Sunday at 5 a. m.
Steamer Rosa leaves Enterprise exery Friday at 5 p. m.
AW-Through bills of lading given to all points.
'The steamers of this line are all first-class in every
respect.
For further information, apply at General Ticket
Office, corner Bay and Laura Streets, Leve & Alden,
corner Bay and Ocean Streets, or on board.
W. B. WATSON, Manager.
C. B. FENWICK, Gen. Pass. Agent. Aug. 7-tf.

ELLIS & MeCLUIRE,


Arclhitcts anl Miv Enfinfors.


Plans, Specifications and Estimates for Buildings of
all kinds, Water Supply, Drainage, Sewerage, Bridges,
Roofs, Etc. P. O, Box 784. Room No. 12 Palmetto Block
Bay Street, Aug. 7 to Feb. 7.


"Foria as a Pormannt Homa."
A 32-PAGE PAMPHLET. PRICE, 10C.
Address,
TELFA9IR STOCKTO9N,
July 24 to oct 23. Jacksonville, Fla.


PIANOSANDORGANS
.A- B:. O.A-I:h/PBE'L iI.j,
15 East Bay Jacksonville.
SOLD ON INSTALLMENTS, AT LOWEST PRICES-
branch of Ludden & Bates, Savannah-EXACTLY
SAME PRICES AND TERMS, Sheet Music, Strings
and small instruments of all kinds. Send for cata-
logues, prices and terms. TUNING AND REPAIRING
a specialty. My tuner will make regular tours through
the State, and my customers will thus have my repre-
sentative at their doors, a great advantage to purchasers
of instruments, to sept 26, '82

RTIN TURNIP SEED!

True American Purple Top and White Flat Dutch,
White and Yellow Ruta Baga, and all approved varie-
ties of Swede Turnip Seed, 50 cents per pound; if sent by
mail, 16 cents added. Warranted fresh and genuine.
Especial prices quoted for large quantities.
A full assortment of Garden Seeds for the season.
Especial attention given to orders per mail.
C. B CC. M RO 'Cr:E S, SEEDSMAN,
133 MARKET STREET,
PHILADELPHIA.
to August 3.

:50,000


LTConto PPr TTP6 anSi unttinAs

FOR SALE AT

=Dixie I"STi'rsery.


to Aug 21


H. H. SANFORD Proprietor,
THOMASVILLE, GA.


THE SUWANNEE



STEAI SAW & PLANING MILLS,

ELLAAVILLE, FILORIDA,


DREW & BUCKI,


Proprietors.


-0-


lic"de'erilanyftHtct,n htvihg 8sdiured ftle s lserv'ies'f comh-
petent Draughtsmen, Architects and Mechanics, we are
prepared to estimate on and contract for the building of

DWELLINGS,
COTTAGES,
FACTORIES,
HOTELS
PUBLIC EDIFICES,

etc., at any point accessible by the several railroad and
steamboat lines. Possessing the advantage of manufac-
turing our own lumber, we are enabled to offer very lib-
eral inducements as to terms and quality of material.
Draughts, plans, estimates and information furnished
on application.
We have also made extensive additions to our Plan-
ing Mill, and will continue, as heretofore, to manufacu-
ture and keep in stock a full line of Framing and Finish-
ing Lumber, Mouldings, Brackets, Balusters, Pickets,
Laths, etc.
DREW & I BUCIKI,
July 17, '82-tf. Ellaville, Florida.


HEADQUARTERS LeCONTE PEAR.

40,000


LboONTE PEAR TREES FOR SALE.

Grown on their own roots, at the oldest and most
reliable LeConte Pear Nursery in the world. Prices low,
and stock pure as usual. Fair and honest dealing
has always been our motto.
Being toe originator of the LeConte Pear business,
and having grown and sold more trees than any one,
we flatter ourselves, we can, as heretofore, give perfect
satisfaction.
L. L. VARNEDOE & SONS,
THOMASVILLE, GEORGIA.
to July 31.


THE





DAITY TIMES.


---- ,




THE TIMES is the official paper of the city and the
leading paper of the State. It has the largest circulation
in Florida, and reaches all parts of it. It is not merely
a local newspaper, but aims to advocate the interests
and promote the prosperity of Florida as a whole.
Its reputation outside the State is very high. It has
taken rank among those journals whose columns are
looked to for news, and whose comments are quoted
with respect throughout the country.
Its editors have had wide and varied experience in
journalism North as well as South; its advertising pa-
tronage is liberal and of the best character; and its re-
sources, financial and other, are ample. It will furnish
Florida with a live, progressive, outspoken, and reada-
ble newspaper, the peer of any.


ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.
THE TIMES has secured by special contract the full
despatches of the ASSOCIATED PRESS. Besides that
its Editor is Agent of the Associated Press for the State
of Florida, which gives him great advantages in obtain-
ing the freshest and most important State news,


SPECIAL DESPATCHES.
With representatives in the leading news centres of
the country, THE TIMES is well served in addition to
the regular Press reports. During the past winter it has
received a very large number of telegraphic specials."


CORRESPONDENCE.
Its regular correspondence from Washington, New
York and Boston, is of noteworthy excellence; and its
State correspondence has attracted much attention.
This feature will be extended and improved; and to
this end correspondence containing news or items of
information of any kind is solicited from all quarters.


"OLD SI."
In addition to his editorial work Mr. Small will write
regularly for THE TIMES, and in its Sunday issues the
famous "Old Si" will disseminate wisdom in chunks
to the Florida public.
TERM (strictly in advance): One year, $10; Six
months, $5; three months, $2.50; one month, $1. sent
oldtUAQZtht tfkiTkQ aQH-10t uoy urauL or posL-omnce
order, or in a registered letter. Address
JONES & SMALL,
to sept 26,'82 Jacksonville, Fla.

F=0:R S..A.LiE-.
Hickory Bluff, 46 acres, 18 acres Hammock, cleared and
enclosed with Picket fence. 200 thrifty young Orange
trees growing on the place. Bold bluff river front of over
a quarter of a mile, and steamer channel close in shore,
and over five miles of water protection to the northwest, giv-
ing perfect security against frost. Nine miles below Jack-
sonville, and one mile from New Berlin. Can come to
city every morning on mail steamer and return in the
afternoon. A choice place for orange growing and truck
farming. Price, $2,500.
Also, two desirable city lots 53x209 feet, and one 70x156
feet covered with thrifty orange trees 6 years old half
mile from business center. Good neighborhood (all
white). Price of first, $600 each. Price ofsecond, a corner,
very handsome, $800. Apply to
J. II. Nt-Ol KTON,
No. 1 West Bay Street, JACKSONVILLE.


State that you saw this in THE DISPATCH.
July 3, tf



HOMES IN THE SUNNY SOUTH,
0
SPLENDID OFFER TO SETTLERS


40 Hours from New York City: 108 Miles
from Savannah.


Soutl Ceorgla Iands for
Ssale "by


June 19-tf


J. M. STICER,
Glenmore, Ware Co., Ga.


IIIY aC~eI~IYYP' I.-. -I - -- 1 Ik errah .0-k--r- Y p







31T2 TiHE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
___ 'a


Vegetable Quotations.
FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE, (
315 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, July 26, 1882.
Receipts via Florida Dispatch Line and Southern Ex-
press Company, week ending July 25th: Vegetables,
100 packages; fruit, 500 packages; watermelons, five
iar-lbads.
Egg-Plants--Florida, $1.25@1.50 per crate; Delaware,
$7(@9 per barrel.
Watermelons-Georgia, 5-"20( 10); South Carolina, $15(@
$30; North Carolina, $15a),25 per hundred.
Peaches-Gdorgia, $1l(1.5); North Carolina, .1.25, ':
per crate.
Pears-Bartlett, Georgina, '<3 1; Bartlett, Vi rginiia, -2.-. 5;
C. Favorite, rirginia, 12''i5; le(Conte, Georgia, 81.75,,,
per crate; Jargonelle, Maryland, $5.5@OCi"; Bell, Maryland,
$40, 5; Cooking, $1.50@2) per barrel.
Grtpes-Delaware, Georgia& 20c.( 25 per pound.
Respectfully,
C. D. OWENS,
SGener l Agent.
,Jackso'nville liholesale Prices.
Corrected weekly, by JONES & BO WEN, Wholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.
SUGARS-Granulated .............. ..................... 10
White Ex. C.................................. 10
Golden C ....................................
Powdered .......... .......................... 11
Cut Loaf .................................. ......... 11/4
COFFEE, R io- Fair.............................................. 10
G ood ...................... .......... ... ......... 0
Choice .......................................... 11
B est ..................................... ...... 12
Java 0. G...................................... ............ 25
Mocha ............................... .................. 35
Peaberry......................... ............ 18
M aracaibo .......................................... 1
Any of above grades roasted to order
FLOUR--Snow Drop, best.................................... 9 09
Oreole, 2d best ............. .................. ........ 8 00
Pearl, 3d best............................ ... 7 75
M EATS- Bacon ................. ............................ 14
Hams (Merwin & Sons) ............... .... i
Shoulders.......... ... ....... .......................... 14
IItoXINY-Pearl, per bbl ................................... 5 75
M EAL- per bbl .................................................. 5 7
LARD-Refined in pails.................................... 141_
BUTTER-Very best, kegs (on ice)...................... 3
CIHEESE-Ful1 creamt...................................... 14/
H alf cream ................ ........ ............ 12'
TOBACCo- We have made arrangements direct with i
the manufacturers and offer you to-day as fol-
lows:
Smoking-"the Boss" Durham 1s
and V s..... ................................32
"The Boss" Durham 1 lb pkge......... 30
"Sitting Bull" D. (genuine) s........ 50
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) V4s...... ..... 4
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) 17s........... 47
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) 1 lb ge.. -5
Plug-"Shell Road" 4 plugs to lb., 30
lb boxes........................... ......... 5
"Florida Boys" 5 plugs to lb., 31 lIb
b o x es.............. ................................. 36(
"Florida Girls"-Bright twist, 14 to
lb., 17 Ib boxes.................... ..... 50
Cigars-"Long Branch"a very pop-
ular brand, per thousand......... 25 00
"Our X," choice cigar, easy smok'r 24 00
"Our XX," a very choice smoker.... 26 00(
"Florida Boys," (we are State Agt,) 45 00
These are all fresh goods and will compare iavora-
bly in price and quality with any goods.
SOAP AND STARCHI-(olgate's 8 oz., per box.. 3 50
Peerless, 8 oz., per box.......................... 3 50
Starch, lump, per t............. ............... 5a@(Ac
HOIPs, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POW)DERS--
H ops, per tb............................................. 15(%22c
Ager's Fresh Yeast ('akes, per doz......... 60c
Grant's 3-Dime Baking- Powder, per
doz. 1 Ibt..................................... ......... 25
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. lb. 2 25
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. lbt..,.. 2 70
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. V, lb...... 1 50
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl., new.......................... 4 50
CHICKENS, each....................................... ........ 2' 40
EGGs -Per doz.......................... ........................... 15( s
IIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per Ib., first class 13
Country Dry Salted, per lb..................... 9@11
Butcher Dry Salted, per lb...................... @10
Damaged Hides.................................
Kip and Calf, 8Ibs. and under................ 10
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb........ .................. 35
Deer Skins Salted, per lb-...... ............... 2630
I irRS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter.................. ................... ............. 1 50@ 4 00
Raccoon, each......................... ....... 5@15
W ild Cat, each ....................................... 20i
Fox, each................................................ 5
BEESW AX- per lb................................................... 20


W ooL-Free from burs, per lb............................. 1i7@22
Buriy, per lb............................................ 11@ 15
GOAT SKINS-Each per lb.................................. 10
Hominy and meal advancing rapidly ; will be worth
10 per cent more in next 30 days.


DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
The largest stock in the State. Country

lbyers will consult their own interests

by corresponding with me. All orders

promptly filled at prices to compete with

any house south of Baltimore. Remem-

her my only Florida address.

GEO. HUGHES,


FRANK W. MUMBY. JNO. N. C. STOCKTON. RAYMOND D. KNIGHT.

MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,


1879.
F. W. MUMBY & CO.


--- SUCCE'ISSORlS TO -

IMPORTERS AND WH LESALE AND RETAIL


1870.
JNO. S. DRIGGS & CO.


Crockery, China, Glass and Earthenware.

We have the largest and most complete stock in the State. All the Latest Novelties in Majolica and Fancy
Goods, Vae.;, Motto i(' Ul aid Saucers, etc. Decorated Tea, Dinner and Chamber Sets in a large Variety. Lamps
and (Cli;ti licrs, Fa;Ic\ Vase Lamps in Majolica, Faience, Kito, Porcelain and other Wares. Wood and Willow,
Stone and Tinware. lThe American, Croiwn and Peerless Ice Cream Freezers, Water Coolers, Filters, etc.
SOLE STATE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED

Monitor Oil Stoves and Little Joker Oil Cans.
THE BEST IN THE WORLD. Send for Price Lists.
The best and only absolutely safe Oil Stove in the World. It is Economical, Ornamental, Convenient, Dura-
ble, compactt and Cheap. Its fuel is Coal Oil. No Dust! No Ashes! No ISmoke! No Trouble! Testimonials
From those using the Stoves given on application.
Fruit Jars and Jelly Tumblers, Wine Bottles, Flasks, etc. Special inducements to the trade.
Merchants, Hotels, Boarding Houses and Bars will find it greatly to their advantage to give us a trial. Send
for list of assorted packages.
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD.

MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
to July 5, '83. (MIentionthis .paur) 13 WVES TIA VY 8ITREETIT.



NEW CROP TURNIP SEEDS!
W1'arrainted Strictlyj Fresh and Gen uine. Purple Top Flat, White Flat Red Top Globe, White Egg, Golden
Ball, free by mail, postpaid, 75e. per lb. White Globe, Large Cow Horn, Yellow,-Aberdeen, Amber, Globe, Im-
proved Purple Top Yellow Ruta Baga, White Ruta B'aga, &c., 70c. per lb., postpaid. Customers ordering by
freight or express can deduct l6c. per lb. from tiese prices. Catalogues Free.
Brianching Sorlhtumn Seed, 10c per pound, $3.00 per bushel. Address

JOHNSON & STOKES, Seedsmen, 1114 ~Evarsket St. lliladCellhia
to June 9, '83.

Ocean Steamship Company.


SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.





The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, August 2d, 8:30 a. m.
CITY F AUGUSTA, Saturday, August 5th, 11:00 a. m.
(GATE (ITY, Wednesday, August 9th, 3:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, August 12th, 5:00 p. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, August 16th, 8:00 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, August 19th, 10:00 a. m.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, August 23d, 1:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, August 2ith, 4:30 p. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday. August 30th, 7:30 a. m.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight received every day from 7 a. m. to f p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
II. YOINGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Ageit of' Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
I. It. CHRISTIAN, Gen'I Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS,
S12-2m Gen'l Ag'tSav'li, Florida & Western Rly. Co, 315 Broadlway. N. Y.


n -BUlf I T OUR ENGINE IS
COTTONisKINGKINGof COTTON!
Invaluable patented improvements found in no other
EJ/'GIJVES in the world. For Pamphlets and Price
List. (also for SAW MILLS), address
THE AULTMAN & TAYLOR CO.. Mansfield. Ohio.


ROUND-TRIP TICKETS TO


New York and Return.


R OVER THE

TO N OR I RN 4S0. savannah, Florida & Western Railway,

Via

GO OD TO NOV1 IIB3ELR 1st. Waycross Short Line and Ocean Steamship Company.
---o--

Close connection with the magnificently appointed
Via all Rail to Portsmouth, Virginia, and steamships
CQ A HT T T L 1 t- A C A A r A \T A T-T


thence by the elegant steamships of the
old Dominion Line to New York.



Persons leaving Jacksonville by the fast mail on Sun-
day, Monday, Tuesday and Friday, at 9 a. in., arrive at
Portsmouth the following afternoon, making close con-
nection with sleamships, and arrive in' New York the
next evening thereafter.
The appointments of this line, and elegant steamship
accommodations, the absence of delays, whether going
or returning, together with the low rate of fare, make it
a most desirable summer excursion route.
For tickets and other information, apply to office of
the S., F. & V. Railway, 84 West Bay Street (Astor
building), or the Ticket Office at the Waycross Short
Line passenger station.
JAS. L. TAYLOR,
Gen. Pass. Agent.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent, Jacksonville.


to june 26, '82 Cor. Bay and Ocean, Jacksonville, Fla. Aug. 7 to Oct. 2.


t.A -LL -i-Ll(^ J 1 -CXt JLCl. 0-1 V ALIN LI .A-I
every Wednesday and Saturday.
Passengers via this route will find every comfort and
convenience in this fleet of elegantly equipped steam-
ships, rivaling in construction and appointments the
finest ocean-going vessels of the day. The mixtures of
rail and water transportation-both of the best charac-
ter-combine the attractions of a first-class Summer
Excursion Route.
For tickets, engagement of staterooms and other in-
formation, apply to the office of the Savannah, Florida
&.Western Railway Company, 84 West Bay Street (Astor
Building), or at the ticket office at the Waycross Short
Line Passenger Station.
JAS. L. TAYLOR,
General Pass. Agent.
GEO. W. IIAINES, Agent, Jacksonville.
Aug. 7 to Oct. 2.

PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


--- I






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


313


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE.




Rates on WATERMELONS in Car Loads of 20,000 Pounds.


0TO T A:=E E 4, E1CT 8IVJ2-A" 2tl_, .882.
.From Florida Tran-
Fr ao Tuk*n ~le.Tvte Railoroa,, e...xcept Florida Transit Rail- Florida Central and
ST o Callahan and Live Ocala and Points be- road, a a and Western Railroad.
Oak. I yond. Points beyond.

A tlan ta ................................................................................................................................... $ 60 00 $ 85 00 $ 90 00 $ 80 00
A u g u sta .................................................... ............................................................................ 55 80 85 75
B altim ore..................................................................................... ....................... ......... 100 125 130 119
B oston ................................................. ............... ............................................................... 100 125 130 119
B ristol, T enn........ ............................................................................................................ 90 115 120 110
C h arleston S C ..................................................................................................................... 36 61 66 56
C olum bus, G a ..................................................................................................................... 60 85 90 80
C hattanooga, T en n ............................................................................................................. 70 95 100 90
C in cin n ati, 0 .................................................... ..................................................................... 80 105 110 100
C a iro Ill................................................................................................................................. 90 115 120 110
Colum bus, 0 .................. ............................................................ ....................................... 100 125 130 120
Cleaveland, 0 ...................................................................................................................... 100 125 130 120
C h icago, Ill.......................................................................................................................... 110 135 140 130
D a lto n G a .............................................................................................................................. 70 95 100 90
E vansville, In dl................................................................................................................... 80 105 110 100
Indianapolis, Ind ............ ............................ ................................................................... 90 115 120 110
Knoxville, Tenn................... .................................................................... 84 50 109 50 114 50 104 50
L ou isville, K y ........................................................................................................................ 80 105 110 100
M acon G a .............................................................................................................................. 45 70 75 65
M ontgom ery A la..................................................................................................................60 85 90 80
M ob ile, A la.............................................................. .................................................. ......... 70 95 100 90
M em ph is, T en n ..................................................................................................................... 80 105 110 100
N ash ville, T en n ............................................................................................ ........................ 75 100 105 95
N ew O rleans, L a..................................... ............................................................................ 80 105 110 100
N ew Y ork, N Y .................................................................................................................. 100 125 130 119
P eoria, Ill............................................................................................................................. 110 135 140 130
P hiladelphia, P a................................................................................................................. 100 125 130 119
R o m e, G a................................................................................................................................70 95 100 90
Savan nah, G a................................................................................. ...................... ...........22 47 52 41
St. Louis, M o........................ ..................................................................... 90 115 120 110
T erre H a te, Ind.................100 125 130 120.................................................................................................100125 130
Excess of 20,000 pounds will be charged for pro rata, provided the weight loaded does not exceed the capacity of the car, as marked thereon. If cars are not
marked with the capacity thereof, the weight of load must not exceed 20,000 pounds. All excess of load above capacity of the cars will be charged for at double rates.
Melons must be loaded and unloaded by the owners. Shipments of Melons will be receipted for only as "Shipper's Count." This Line will not be responsible
for deficiency in quantity loaded in the cars, nor for damage resulting from improper loading. Shipments via Florida Dispatch Line will not be required guaranteed
or prepaid.
D. H. ELLIOTT, Gen'l Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla. JAS. L. TAYLOR, Gen't Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE in connection with AT AN- T O COAST -, a.


Rates on Watermelons in Car Loads of 20,000 in Cents per 100 lbs.


To take effect May 20th, 1882.


To-


From Jacksonville
and Callahan.


Baltim ore.............. ..................................................................................
Boston.... ...... .........................................
New York...........
PrNew Yorkvidence..................................................................................................... .......................
Providence.... ...... .............................................
P hiladelphia.................................... ................................................
P o rtsm o u th V a .....................................................................................................................
P etersb u rg, V a................................................... ................................................
R ich m ond, V a...............................................................................
Wilmington, N. C............
Washington, D. C. (via Portsmouth)............................................. .............. ....
Shipments via "ATLANTIC COAST LINE" must be prepaid to destination.
will be charged at double rates.


Cts.
.63%Y
.68Y2
.68
.68% "
.68Y
.4812
.48Y
.48
.38%
.63!


Florida Transit and
Peninsula Railroad,
except Ocala and
Points beyond.

Cts.
.76
.81
.81
.81
.81
.61
.61
.61
.51
.76


Florida Transit Rail- Florida Central and
road, 0 c a 1 a and Western Railroad.
Points beyond.


Cts.
.78%2
.831
.831
.83%
.63Q
.631
.632
.532
.78% Y


Cts.
.73
.78
.78
.78
.78
.58
.58
.58
.48
.73


20,000 lbs. will be the minimum rate charged for. All excess of capacity of cars


:oz-


I






LA TI HE iELORID A DISPA'1'CHi.


Sleeping car from Jacksonville to Savannah (5:35 p.
m. trains) Tuesdays and Fridays.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
The morning train from JacKsonville to Savannah,
connects daily with through Pullman sleeper for New
York.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to Montgomery and New Orleans
take the evening train.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. m. and arriving at Savannah at 2:30 a. m., or train
at Jacksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vannah at 3:35 p. m.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street,at Depot Ticket
Office. JAS. L. TAYLOR,
Gen'l Freight and Pass. Ag't.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent, []


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
---
MERCHANTS & MINERS

TRANSPORTATION COMPANY!






The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail
From BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH
EVERY FIVE DAYS,
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE, as follows:
Monday, July 3d, at 9 a. m.
Saturday, July 8th, at 1 p. m.
Thursday, July 13th, at 5 p. m.
Tuesday, July 18th, at 9:30 p. m.
Monday, July 24th, at 1 p. m.
-Saturday, July 29th, at 5 p. m.
Thursday, August 3d, at 10 a. m.
Tuesday, August 8th, at 1 p. m.
Monday, August 14th, at 8 a. m.
Saturday, August 19th, at 10 a. in.
Thursday, August 24th, at 2 p. m.
Tuesday, August 29th, at 8 a. im.
The steamers are first-class in every respect, and every
attention will be given to passengers.
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $15,
Including Meals and Stateroom.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freilgit is transpored to the principal
points in the WEOT and SOUTHWEST by rail frolll
lailtln:ore.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found ill another
column.
JAS. B. WEST & CO., Agents.
Savannah, Jan ary 8th, 1878. 30-tf

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA




WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, JUNE 4th, 1882, Passen-
ger Trains will run over the Waycross Short Line
as fol lows;
as flows; 'Fast Mail. Jack'lle Ex.
Daily. Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at.................. 9:00 a. 5:35 p. n.
Arrive Callahan at..... ............. 9:00 p. ...........
Leave Callahan at........................ 9:45 a. m. 6:15 p. im.
Arrive Waycross at..................... 11:45 a. m. 9:15 p. m.
Arrive Jesup at.......................... 1:32 p. 11:25 p. nm.
Arrive at Brunswick -at.............. 6:10 p. i. 8:20 a. nm.
Arrive Savannah at................... 3:35 p.. 2:30 a. lm.
ArriveCharleston at..................... 9:30 p. m. 8:15 a. im.
Arrive at Augusta at.................. 5:20 a. i. 2:30 p. im.
Arrive Macon at ..................................... 7:00 a. m.
Arrive Atlanta at................. 3:40 a. in. 12:50 m.
Arrive Louisville at. .................. ......... .. 8:0 a. m.
Arrive Cincinnati at................................ 7:00 a. m.
Arrive Washington at............. 9:40 p. m. 7:40 a. m.
Arrive Baltilmore at............... 11:45 p. m. 9:15 a. m.
Arrive New York (limited express).......... 3:50 p. nm,
Arrive New York P. t. It............ 6:50 a. m. 5:20 p. m.
Arrive St. Louis at..................................... 7:00 p nm.
Arrive Chicago at........................................ 7:00 p. m,
Fast mail arrives at Jacksonville daily at...... 0:10 p. inm.

Jacksonville express arrives at Jacksonville
daily at............. .............. .. ..... .. 8:10 a. m .
TIME. a
To Savannah..................... ..... ................... G:40 ho u.,
To New York.................... ............................. 45:45 hours
To W ashington ................... ........................ 36:30 hours"
To Chicago...................................................... 49:00 hours"
To St. Louis..................................................... 49:00 hours'
THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
H@^Daily Jacksonville to Charleston.
~1),Daily Jacksonville to Cincinnati.


Satsuma, Nashua P. 0.,


june 26-tf


FLORIIDA.


TALLAHASSEE NURSERY.
LeConte and Kieffer Pear Buds, $5 per hundred, by
mail. Also, trees of same for sale.


to july 24


. llahassee, Florida.
Tallahassee, Florida.


SEND $S1.50 TO


35 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.,

And get a bottle of Richmond's Samaritan Nervine.
Cures Nervous Disorders, Dizziness, Vertigo, Seminal
Weakness. The only sure cure for Epileptic Fits.
Address HOLT'S PHARMACY.
to aug 20, '82


D. G. AMBLER. .T. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON
MaM T =MTEES.
Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as

AMBLER'S BANK.
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
T Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf

Sportman's Emporium.





W. C. PITTIMAN,
No. 3 WVest Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0
Giins, Pistols, Rifles and Cutlery,
Sliootin aalil 17isliing Tackle.

SHELLS LOADED TO ORDER.
1 yr to April 2:3, '83


DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,
GLUES, BRUSHES,

Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Em ery Papers, &ce.
AGENT FOR
PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIRvE T]EST.
John8on's Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
wZorth, imartinez and Longman's
repair i ed Jaiints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
to mar25,'8i JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


LANDS FOR SALE
SUITABLE FOR

Orange dGroves,
In lots to suit, in the town of


Satsuma, Putnam Connt, lmoria ,
Send for circular to
WHITNEY, GOLD & HODGES,


S. B.HUBBARD & CO.,
JACKISONnVILLE, PFILA.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in

Hardware, Stovos, Doors, 8ash, Blils
PAINTS, OILS, PUMPS, LEAD AND IRON PIPE.
Sugar Mills, Rubber and Leather Belting,
Steam 4- Gas-Fitting, Plumbing 4 Tinsmithing,

Agricultural Implements of all linds,
HAZARD'S POWDER,
BARBED FENCE WIRE.
AGENTS FOR S. L. ALLEN & CO.'S GARDEN TOOLS.
AW- Send for Price List and Catalogue, 4
to june 11 '83


~,


W. IH. PILLO0 'S

STRAWBERRY SHIPPING AGENCY
-AND-
FRUZJIT AND VEGETABLE
REPACKING AND
COMMISSION HOUSE,
Has closed till NOVEMBER. Present address,
imay 12, '83. MA.ACON, GA.

VIEWS OF FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In Book IForm, Containing 1,
Views Each.
Souvenir of Florida, (small size)....................25c.
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size)......... ...........................................25c.
Souvenir of Jacksonville,( large size)................50c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine,(large size)...............50c.
Stereoscopic Views, per Doz. $1.50.
Address
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
JACKISONVILLE, FLA.


ST. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0-

CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.


OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
1 yr to April 23, '83


traw1ery Plants For Sae!
200,000 Choice pure Beatty's stock........$4.00 per Thousand
100,000 Pure Nunan's.................... 6.00 per Thousand
50,000 Pure Crescent Seedlings............ 6.00 per Thousand
Terms: Cash with order.
Address. W. E. SCUITL,
aug 1 to nov 3,'82. Jacksonville, Florida.


A Good Investment!
oo
0
IFOIR S-0-n----

In the County of Hernando, East of Brooksville, the
county seat, and near the
rTPropicsl Ploridai M. E.-,
which is now actively building, two tracts of land. The
first contains two hundred and forty (210) acres in a body;
the second contains eighty (80) acres. These tracts both
touch U -pon a Lake of about 150 acres area; are
well timbered with pine suitable for lumber; the second
about half a mile southeast of the first; between them
lies a cultivated farm. These lands are well adapted to
Oranges and Other I'ruits, being of good
soil, with little underbrush and are easily cleared. They
were selected by I-Ion. Walter Gwvynn, Ex-
Treasurer of the State of Florida, and they may be relied
upon as being what is represented. Theselands are in a
part of the State that is rapidly settling up
and offer a good field either for an investment in Flor-
ida real estate, or for orange groves and the like.
Price and terms will be so arranged as to be satisfac-
tory to the purchaser. Apply to
WALTER B. CLARKSON,
Box 877. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
In corresponding, please mention this paper.
to August 29, '82.






THE FLORIDA D> DISPATCH l


F. S. CONE,
President and Busines Mannarer.


A. II. MANVILLE,
Secretary and Superintendent.


E. A. MANVILLE,
Treasurer


1VI .A.NT VILLE M 2TT TETmSE m 1EM3
Lake George,. FIlorida.
FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums
Peaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, and over one hundred varieties of the Citrus.
ORANGE lANw D TLEMO~lOW TREES a specialty.
Catalogue free, to apr 17, '83

ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]

S. AA. AIm S3 CO.

FRUIT AND PRODUCE

COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Sou.tl.ern. -Pr'.Uit anrd "Vegetableas a Specialty-.
3 ~i a lad 3~2S 8 Northl Delaware Aveimnie, 3hliladelphiia.
to jan 6, 'T83





WHOLESALE GROCERS,

AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


ACER'S DRY HOP


YEAST CAKES, 60c. PER


DOZ.


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND

SNOW-DROP PATENT FLOUR.

First IaSndLs o2a Finzest Q4allity

Best Butter in Tubs at 3o to 31 Cents per Pound,

e -s: E an r C 0 -

No. 7 WVest Bay Street, - Jacksonville, Florida.
To sept 27, '82



Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide.

H. D. BOUNETHEAU, PROPRIETOR

N o R DY K EI FLORIDA CEfIIIAL OIL AND SOAP WORK,


MILLS
-MANUFACTURE-

FreshGround
FEED, GRITS,
MEAL,
(Bolted or unbolted.)
Pearl Hominy.
GRAIN, HAY, COAL AND
WOOD-YARD).


MANUFACTURER OF
Lubricating and Boiler Compounds, Compressed Soaps, Car and
Axle grease.
ALSO SOLE MANUFACTURER
of the best Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide extant-
OE.A.N-3S-E T-EEE E1VITL^e- SION I
made from Whale-Oil Soap, combined with other powerful ingredients known
to be most effectual, for destroying the Scale and other insect pests and
parasites of the Citrus family. It will also put the tree in a healthy and flour-
ishing condition. Prepared for immediate use. Perfectly harmless to the
youngest tree or plant. In packages of from 25 to 300 pounds. Price, 10 cents
per pound. Discount to the Trade. : 4 Full directions for use accompany
each package. Address
]M ei "TO~fc^TT^'^W'lfB ^'T


P. 0. BOX 984, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


to july 31 '82


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
-0
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
-0--
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers for August are appointed to sail as follows:
CITY OF SAVANNAH, August 5th, at 11:00 a. m.
JUNIATA, August 12th, at 5:00 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, August 19th, at 10:00 a. m.
JUNIATA, August 26th, at 4:30 p. im.
Days and hours subject to change, without notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, WM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.


Bostoln ani Snan alh StIamshii Lio





ONLY DIRECT LINE BETWEEN
SAVANNAH AND BOSTON.
Transhipment and extra handling saved. No danger
of fruit being Irozen. Cars are unloaded at the steam-
ship wharf in Savannah, avoiding drayage.
CABIN PASSAGE, $18.
SAILING FROM SAVANNAH.
Semiitole, Thursday, July 27th, at 4 p. in.
------, Thursday, August 3d, at 10:00 a. m.
Seminole, Thursday, Augnst 10th. at 4:50 p. m.
Chas. WV. Lord, Thursday, August 17th, at 9:00 a. n.
Seminole, Thursday, August 21th, at 3:00 p. in.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, August 31st, at 9:00 a. m.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
41-tf Savannah, Ga.

DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
The largest stock in tihe State. Country
buyers will consult their own interests
by corresponding with me. All orders
promptly filled at prices to compete witl
any house south of Baltiinore. Remem-
ber my only Florida address.
GEO. HUGHES,
to june 26, '82 Cor. Bay and Ocean, Jacksonville, Fla.



Soluble Ground Bone,
THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

FERTILIZER FOR ORANGE TRHEE
Will PE',MANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.
Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTER & B1EA1N,
Agents for the State of Florida.


-PAnalysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


to sept 26, '82


31. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the
of the Marshall House. Screven House.
THE -AIRNETT HLOTUSE,
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARNETT & GEORGE, Proprietors.
RATS, $2 PER DAY.
This favorite family Hotel, under its new manage-
met, is recommended for the excellence of its cuisine.
homelike comforts, prompt attention and moderate
rates, to sept 1,'82

O. L. KEENE,

MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS.
NOTIONS,

Laces, Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF

HIDJL C!"LOEEAI S J=*
67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to feb 20, '82

RUBBER STAMPS
Are manufactured right in dur establishment in the
best manner and at the shortest notice.
4ZSend in your orders.
ASHMEAD BROS.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
May 1-tf


--
I- I __ I ,, __ _I





316 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.

A. N. DOBBINS & BRO., PT.rE FI 'E 0rOT.7T,3D BOMNE, $38.50 per To.,
(Guiaranteed Plure.)


COTTTON SEE2D 1=.EE 3Ly, $38 per Ton ,
(100 Pound Bags.)

CO~TTO2IT SEE D zET-.7-I, aS61, $27 per Ton.,
(The Best Potash in Use.)
20 BxuslIels Conc_ L. eas for Sale.
STOCKBRIDGE FERTILIZERS for Orange Trees and vegetables, for sale by
J. E. ITA ItTi',
to jan6,'83 Jaclsonvill-, 'la.

ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,

PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS
PRINTERS AND BINDERS,
AND DEALERS IN

TOYS AND FANCY ARTICLES.


Agent in Orange County for
NEWSDEALERS.-We keep all the latest Daily and Weekly Papers from Boston, New York, Philadelphia
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMP'Y. Baltimore, Chicago, St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, New Orleans, Charleston, Savannah and Jacksonville, and
take subscriptions to all publications at publication price. Orders by mail promptly attended to.


BUYS AND SELLS
Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission,
ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
june 12-tf

AT MANDARIN, FLORIDA.
0O FORTY-ACRE TRACTS only 12 miles from Jack-
sonville; extra good land, well located, between river
and J., St. A. and H. R. R. R. Price, $10 per acre. Will
sell on monthly payments of $12.50.. These lands will in-
crease in value, being located in an already prosperous
town, making a paying investment at small outlay.
Maps can be seen at No. 41 East Bay Street.
to nov 21, '82. GEO. R. REYNOLDS.
Jacksonville, Fla.
iISTE^' ^B O 'S -

Soluble Ground Bone,
THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

FERTILIZER FOR ORANGE TREES.
Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.
Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTER & BEA-N,
Agents for the State of Florida.


AGiAnalysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


to sept 26, '8!


M. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the
of the Marshall House. Screven House.
THE IHATRNETT HOUSE,
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARNETT & GEORGE, Proprietors.
RATi S, $2 PER DAY.
This favorite family Hotel, under its new manage-
ment, is recommended for the excellence of its cuisine.
homelike comforts, prompt attention and moderate
rates. to sept 4,'82

O. L. KEENE,
MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,

Laces, Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF
HID GrLOVES
67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to feb 20, '82


LIST OF BOOKS ON FLORIDA.
FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, INVALIDS AND SETTLERS (Barbour, Profusely Illustrated)...............Price $1 50
FLORIDA : ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE AND HISTORY (Lanier)............................ ............................Price1 50
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paper............................................. .............................................Price 10
FAIRBANKS' HISTORY OF FLORIDA................................................................................................. Price 2 50
G U ID E TO JA CK SO N V ILLE ..............................................................................................................................Price 25
TOURISTS AND INVALIDS REFERENCE BOOK OF WINTER TRAVEL........................................Price 75
SOUTH FLORIDA, THE ITALY OF AM ERICA ...........................................................................................Price 25
DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition)enlarged and improved.................................................................Price 50
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edition, enlarged and improved)........................................................Price 1 00
ORANGE INSECTS-Illustrated (Ashmead, .......................................... .....................................................Price 1 00
ORANGE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA, by A. T. Garey, (cloth).................................................................Price 1 25
A MANUAL OF GARDENING IN FLORIDA (Whitner)................................................................................Price 50
COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA.................... ......................................... ......... .......... ..................Price 75
COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-the best).................................................Price 1 25
NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF ST. JOHN'S RIVER..............................................................................Price 25
McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST OF LAWS OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep postage extra)................................ Price 6 00
INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA...............................................Price 3 00
NOTES FROM SUNLAND, ON THE MANATEE RIVER, GULF COAST OF SOUTH FLORIDA.
Its Climate, Soil, and Productions, (By Samuel C. Upham)........................ .................................... Paper .25
Any of the above books mailed on receipt of price.
OIRANG:E VRAIPS ........................................................ .........10x10, 14c.; 11xl, 17c.; 12x12, 20c.
LAW BLANKS.
W ARRANTY DEEDS, per dozen.............. ...................................... .......................... ......... ................. Price 50
Q U IT-CLA IM D EEDS, per dozen ...................................................................................... .............. .............Price 50
M OR TGA G ES, per dozen........................................................................ .. .................................... ...........Price 50
NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, m ade to order....... ................................... ....................................................... Price $5 00
We publish a full line of Law Blanks for Lawyers and Justices of the Peace. Price-list mailed on application.
Special prices to large buyers. Adddress
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
feb 12-tf 21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

BUY THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

----o----

GOULD & CO.'S


FERTILIZER
-AND-
IiTSrECT E" C"".:v.I' r r'A'TO: ,
Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange Growers and Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, con-
tains potash, lime, phosphoric acid, ammonia and the other essential elements of Plant Food, making a com
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & Bro.'s, and other high-priced Fertilizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity, and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $4 per barrel, $32 per
ton.
All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.
MESSRS. GOULD & CO.:
Gentlemen-I used one-half ton of your Fertilizer, in connection with the same amount of Baker & Bro.'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gave as good results as the others, which are much higher priced fertilizers-costing
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $51.50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12, 1881.
LEESBURG, SUMTER CO., FLA., March 6, 1882.
GOULD & CO.:
Gentlemen-Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed your
agents at this point (Messrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer,
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its fostering care, I having had the honor
to win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer better and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer "kills two birds with one stone," inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies
at one and the same time. I bave been testing it in the field, garden and orange grave for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues, whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For my part, I ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. if I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork.
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOURT.
GOULD & CO.,
to aug 27, '82 NO. 6 W. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Gln, LocTksmiths anil Stencil 6ittors,
24 LAURA STREET,
JACIKSON VIL.TL E - FI1LO1 I1II3A,
Gunsmithing done in all its branches.
IRON SAFE WORK.
Special rates on Stencil Cutting, by mail. Address,
tojune 12'83, (1P. 0. tBox 833.)

RICH'D H. MARKS'

ORANGE COUNTY LAND AGENCY,
SA1NFOR-D, FLORIDA,


1 ~_ _


C_ __I_ _ _ __ __ __ __


I