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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00019
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: July 31, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00019
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

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bvijotitd toi the Aeqicultural, ,nanufa-dring and Industrial ntiovpsts of Florida and thk e, udh


Vol. 1.--No. 19.


New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville,- Fla.


Price 5 cents.


Monday, July 31, 1882.

Northern Ramblings.
BY WANDERER.
One of our leading ponmologists and horticul-
turists-a long-time resident of Florida-now
on a short vacation at the North, gives us these
interesting "notes by the way :"
FRIEND R.: After several years of constant
application and strict attention to orange cul-
ture in Florida, my old disposition to wander
returned, and I am once more among the beau-
tiful lakes, fertile vales and rolling hills, of my
native Western New York.
You requested me to note for THE DISPATCH
such observations as occurred to me in my ram-
bles Northward, and I now proceed to comply
with your wishes.
I left Jacksonville by the "Waycross Short
Line," Coast Line, and Old Dominion Line, to
New York. The aspect of the country and the
settlements along the line from Jacksonville to
Waycross are-well, let us hope for a little
more progress and improvement hereafter.
At Waycross and vicinity, there appears to
be a general awakening, and the neat appeal-
ance of the buildings, clean yards and sur-
roundings, give evidence of thrift and enter-
prise. The surrounding country of this portion
of Georgia would seem well adapted to general
farming and the cultivation of fruits. As we
journey northward toward Savannah, corn and
rice appear to be the principal crops raised;
and the corn looks sickly and sorrowful, and
many fields will hardly furnish sufficient forage
for the coons, let alone the hogs and other inhab-
itants. Of rice, the acreage is larger; and
many fields, of large and small extent, look fine
and give promise of an abundant yield.' The
rice fields of South Carolina, along the line of'
the road, present a much better appearance
than those in Georgia.
Througlhmiddle North Carolina, crops of all
kinds seem abundant, especially fruit. Large,


$1.00 per Year, in advance,- postage free.

luscious peaches and apples were hawked about in this section, and producers must make the
by thejuvenile darkies at a dime a dozen. Great most of it.
quantities of peaches are being shipped to the Our trip to New York by the Old Dominion
North from Goldsborough, Wilson and other Line was very enjoyable; the weather fine, and
places near, but as you: proceed northward from the ocean calm as a summer sea. The steamers
Wilson to Weldon and down the Sea-board of the line are large, the passenger appoint-
route till you reach the lowlands, the country ments first-class, and it makes a pleasant break
has suffered much from drouth, and conse- in the Coast Line to the North. More anon.
quently nearly all crops, except the pea-nut, _-
are light. About Suffolk, and the low country Crop Report,
about Norfolk and Portsmouth, there has been JONESVILLE, FLA., July 24, 1882.
plenty of rain, and the truck farmers, although E s of Te F
the season is late, are sending forward immense Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
quantities of produce to the Northern markets. Cotton looking fine. Plenty corn made by
The Old Dominion Line to New York run four the most of our farmers to make out on, and
large steamers from Norfolk, and at this season some to sell. Sugar cane, peas and rice very
all are taxed to their utmost capacity to accom- promi We are in much dread of the pest
zodate the trade. -promising. We are in much dread of the pest
odate the trade. known as the cotton-worm. Prospect for hog
I was grieved to see the manner in which and hominy, at home, good. Yours,
much of the freight was handled on board the FLORIDA BOY.
steamships. Not much care is exercised in ___ ___
stowage, but everything is thrown and tumbled Useless "Deodorizers."
into the hold or on deck and disposed of in the "Great harm has been done by the popular
quickest' way possible.bee done b the p
quickest way possib e. resources to so-called 'disinfectants,' which are,
I took passage on the new steamship Roa-
noke, on the evening of the 12th of July. Be- in fact, only stink destroyers or disguisers.
sides a heavy freight and full complement of Nothing is gained by making the odor of sewer
human beings, we had four horses for passen- gas less offensive than it would otherwise be.
gers, and for want of proper berths for the It is not the 'smell' that does harm, though it
horses, stables were improvised on the main
deck, forward. Each horse was partitioned off may nauseate; this is a small matter. Poison-
from the others, and surrounded by a wall ing by sewer gas which has been disguised or
made up off boxes of cucumbers, tomatoes, deprived of its characteristic smell is, we be-
squashes, etc. Boxes of fruit and vegetables lieve, the cause of many unrecognized maladies.
are very convenient to construct horse stables The evil influence.against which we need to
on shipboard, and then the perfumery imparted
to the fruit from the near proximity of the ani- protect ourselves is a gas or vapor laden with
mals must be quite refreshing! The occurrence the products of disease, which are nearly al-
reminded me forcibly of the lines of the poet, ways, if the late William Budd was right, des-
which say: "iccated ova or seeds, requiring only a warm and
"You may break, you may shatter the vase if you will moist place in some living" body to vitalize and
But the scent of the roses will hang 'round it still." fructify. It4s a benificent provision of Nature
We leave it to those interested, to draw their that poisonous or poison-carrying gases or va-
own inferences, in regard to the careless manner porsgenerally have an offensive smell. We de-
this Line pursues in the carrying trade. A stroy the warning odor, without destroying the
great portion of the deck load of produce, on poison it denotes. We take the rattle off the
its arrival at destination, will, very likely, be tail of the snake that he may better bite us
reported "arrived in bad condition" and sold for with impunity. Deodorizers, which are not
"what it will bring," and the producer likely also destroyers of all organic material, are mis-
be assessed, to pay freight! But there seems chievons, and their use, militates against the
to be no redress, as there are no competing lines health of the people."-London Lancet.






.S- THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


THE BANANA:

Its History, Uses, Varieties, Propagation,
Culture, &c.
No. 1.
FEDERAL POINT, FLA., July, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Among all known plants that produce a
wholesome and agreeable food, the genus Musa
stands pre-eminent as offering the maximum of
yield to the minimum of labor. Life being so
easily sustained by its bounty, in those favored
regions where it flourishes, one of the chief in-
centives.to exertion is removed, and .people are
content to sit down in idleness, knowing that
when hungry a never-failing supply of bread
hangs over them ready to be plucked and eaten.
For which reason it is a debatable question
whether the Banana and the Plantain are not
to be considered a curse rather than a blessing
to mankind, and as encouraging inactivity and
sloth instead of industry and progress.
For mere elegance of shape combined with
brilliant and iridescent color, nothing can sur-
pass it. In some shade or other, nearly all tints
may be found. From birth to fruition, when
the great crimson and purple bud unfolds,
disclosing tier after tier of incipient fruit,
dripping with nectar, it is a thing of beauty,
and an object fraught with more than common
interest, whether considered aesthetically, botan-
ically, economically, or gastronomically.
The eye of the Northern traveler, on his first
visit to the tropics, is at once arrested by the
airy and graceful foliage of the Banana and the
Palm, so different from the forms of vegetation
with which he has been familiar, and so typical
of the luxuriant growth of a land where heat
and moisture urge forward the accretive process
with ceaseless energy. That ardent admirer
of nature, amd eloquent describer of tropical
scenery, Charles Kingsley, must have been pro-
foundly impressed when, standing in a forest of
Jagua palms at Trinidad, and gazing aloft at
their drooping leaves and quivering leaflets, he
pronounced them the most beautiful plants he
had ever beheld, excepting always the Musa
ensete, or great Abyssinian Banana, in the palm
house at Kew.
The time when the Banana began to be used
as food is so remote as to be lost in the mists of
antiquity. It is not impossible that it furnished
the identical fig leaves with which our first
parents clothed themselves in the Garden of
Eden. So long has it been in cultivation that


seed is rarely met with in the fruit. It occurs
in a wild state, and freely producing seed, in
the Philippine Islands, the Andaman Islands in
the bay of Bengal, and in parts of India, but is
undoubtedly an importation into the Western
Hemisphere. The stalk and leaf-stems contain
a large quantity of excellent fiber, but as no
process for thoroughly and economically clean-
ing it has hitherto been devised, it has not been
used to any great extent. The British colonial
government, aware of its value, has offered
large rewards for the inventiono.of machinery
adequate to the purpose. One closely allied
species, Musa textilis, growing in the Philippine
Islands, furnishes the well known Manilla hemp,
so largely employed in rope-making.
The Plantain is longer and thinner than the
Banana, and fewer in number on the bunch.
It is usually cooked before being eaten, but is
very palatable when allowed to hang till fully


ripe-resembling in flavor a mellow apple, and
far better than the common Orinoko Banana
so generally seen in central Florida.
There are many varieties of the Banana
known under various local names in the coun-
tries where they grow. For our markets, how-
ever, only a few kinds of superior excellence
are chosen; chiefly the Red or Baracoa, the
yellow Martinique, the Cavendishii and the
Fig Banana. The red skinned varieties require a
much longer season, and therefore cannot be suc-
cessfully raised in this latitude. The Martinique
or Jamaica, one of the finest, also requires a long
season, besides being severely injured by even
light frosts. The Cavendishii and Fig, although
promising better results than the first two, are
still very precarious in central Florida, where
light frosts may be expected almost every win-
ter. In the tropics and in Florida, from Lake
Worth and the Caloosahatchee River south-
ward, little need be said about the different
varieties, for all grow finely and yield a most
generous return to even the most superficial
culture. Plants of the dwarf are set out in
spring and ripen enormous clusters of fruit by
the middle of the following winter,a result which,
with us, under the most favorable circumstances,
could hardly be attained short of two years.
Should many engage in their cultivation in a
climate and soil so congenial, the production
must soon become too large to be marketed in a
fresh state. But cured like figs in the improv-
ed evaporators, and put up in attractive packa-
ges, they would no doubt soon be highly appre-
ciated and eagerly called for. I have been as-
sured by those who have eaten Banana cakes
thus prepared, that of all the dried fruits, not
even excepting figs and dates, they were the
most delicious. The unripe Plantain may be
dessicated and reduced to a fragrant and nour-
ishing flour, useful for a variety of dishes. It
can also be made into starch and wine. So we
see that some day the Plantain and Banana may
form the basis of a number of branches of man-
ufacture in Southern Florida:-dried fruit,
starch, wine, flour, fibre and paper stock.
The Banana is increased by offsets which
spring up around its base. As soon as these
have become two or three feet high, and have
made sufficient roots for their own support, they
may be severed from the parent stock with a
narrow spade or broad chisel and transplanted.
Eight or ten feet apart is a good distance for the
tall growing kinds, and a little closer for the
dwarfs, and five or six inches deep, more or less,
according to the dryness or wetness of the
ground. The suckers not wanted for planting
should be pruned away, and only two or three
stalks allowed to grow in a hill if tle best re-
sults are desired. It delights in a rich, moist
soil, and as the feeding roots run near the sur-
face, the working should be shallow. It thrives
admirably anywhere in the low, flat pine woods,
but not in swampy hammocks. It may be plant-
ed to advantage in the open spaces of a young
orange grove, where its shade will benefit the
growig trees, and where it will produce several
crops of fruit before needing removal. Indeed


it does not always need removal, but sometimes
goes to the wall and dies as the matted roots of
the hungry orange close in around it- It is a
rank feeder, and a liberal application of ashes
or stable manure will vastly enhance the yield.
The best commercial fertilizer for Bananas
that I have tried is the Ash Element made in
Charleston by several companies. This is largely
composed of ground phosphate rock, and in-
creases the size of fruit, and adds to the vigor
of growth, in a very marked degree. After
cutting thebunch, the stalk should be chopped
off near the ground, split up with a sharp spade,
and allowed to remain on the spot. When the
leaves and stem are thus left to dccay on the
ground, and nothing carried off but the fruit,
it may be considered as one, of the least exhaust-
ing crops; indeed some' planters affirm that


under this treatment the soil improves instead
of deteriorating.
Many Floridians say that they prefer the
Banana ripened on the tree. They are proba-
bly right as regards the Orinoko or "Horse
Banana," the most inferior of all varieties,
which if picked too green, has a "bone in the
middle," like Paddy's potato. But the finer
kinds must be cut when full grown, as soon as
the skin begins to split open, otherwise they
would be ruined. Experienced growers declare
that like pears they are really better flavored
to be taken off at this stage and hung up to
ripen. In some parts of South America where
monkeys abound, these sagacious bipeds know
to a dot the precise time when a bunch will
ripen nicely off the free. Consequently the
planter must watch his fruit closely and remove
it just before that time, or else the maurauders
will make a mighty descent upon the plantation,
and tearing loose the clusters with their teeth,
pass them from hand to hand to a. safe hiding
place in the forest. From which depredator
the Florida planter is happily free; but if left
too long the 'possum and the coon will scent the
aromatic fragrance over head, and climbing up,
be rewarded with a luscious feast.
My next will treat of the kinds that may be
grown in central Florida, and different methods
of protection in writer. E. H. HART.

Pampas Grass.
Why is not this beautiful and profitable
grass more widely cultivated in Florida? An
exchange paper says: "The sales of pampas-
grass plumes in all of our principal cities are
very large, and is growing larger every year.
The plumes make an excellent ornament for
rooms in the winter time, and in all houses of
any pretension in cities the plumes may be met
with. In the latitude of Philadelphia the plant
will not live out in winter unless well protected,
but in California the cultivation of the plant
for its plumes has become an industry of some
importance. Three-quarters of an acre planted
to pampas grass, yielded, at two and a half cents
a head, $500. Another grower sold all that he
could raise at seven and a half cents per head.
Last year 10,000 heads or plumes of this grass
were sold from that region. The plumes retail
in Philadelphia at from 25 to 50 cents each.
As with all other American productions a large
trade has sprung up with Europe for these
plumes, many large lots finding their way to
England, France and Germany. The plumes,
when cut and placed in the house will last for
years, losing hardly any of their value after
several years of use.'
.
Melons--"Pinching," and "Stopping."
A practical gardener makes the following
statement :


"Last year, as a test of a frequent practice
among growers of melons and squashes, I
pinched the ends of the long main shoots of the
melons, squashes and cucumbers, and left some
to run at their own will. One squash plant
sent out a single stem reaching more than forty
feet, but did not bear any fruit. Another plant
was pinched until it formed a compact mass of
intermingling side shoots eight feet square and
it bore sixteen squashes. The present year a
muskmelon plant thus pinched in, covered the
space allotted to it, and it set 23 specimens of
fruit; the most of them were pinched off. The
pinching causes many lateral branches, which
latter produce the female or fertile blossoms,
while the main vines produce only the male
blossoms. The difference in favor of the yield
of an acre of melons treated by this pinching
process may easily amount to 100 barrels."








THiE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Live Stock and People in Sumter.
A correspondent of the (Advance, ALBERTUS
VOGT,) writes :
"Stock are plenty and cheap; on one planta-
tion of 1,000 acres, about 300 of which are cul-
tivated, we found 60 mares and colts, among
them one of the best horses in the State, raised
on the prairies thereabout. The same planter
owns near 1,000 sheep, and we found one farmer
and stockman who had recently sold 3,000 head
of stock cattle to Cuba shippers at $5 per head.
Hogs are plenty; improved breeds are being
introduced, and the country has an air of pros-
perity. The people are generally hospitable and
industrious, such as we find in all remote or
newly-settled countries, and even in the most
civilized communities, trying to push forward
their institutions of learning and civilization."'
RAISING GOOD STOCK.-"If you want good
stock" (says a good authority,) "you must use
the best for breeding. Only good stock pays. A
thoroughbred animal does not eat any more, if
as much, as a scrub." Then the looks and the
satisfaction to be got out of a blooded animal
pay a large percentage. To pay large prices
for breeders is not extravagant; the dearest is
the cheapest, the rarest is the most valuable.
Improve your stock in every way that is possi-
ble. This can only be done by judicious selec-
tions, by the infusion of new blood, by the elimi-
nation of undesirable qualities, by the increas-
ing of good points.



Florida State Fair.
The following correspondence between the
Secretary of State Park Association and Secre-
tary of the Florida Fruit-Growers' Association,
will explain itself:
OFFICE OF
STATE PARK ASSOCIATION,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., July 10, 1882.
Col. D. H. Elliott, Secretary Florida Fruit-
Growers' Association, and Agricultural and
Mechanical Association :
DEAR SIR: I am instructed by the State
Park Association, to offer a guarantee of
$3,000 for the payment of premiums and all
current expenses of the next regular Annual
State Fair, if held at this place and under the
management of our Association. We invite
you to inspect our newly prepared and very
large premium list, and especially to examine
its inducements to growers of improved stock
within the State, and growers of grain and
fibre-producing plants.
Your early compliance will greatly oblige,
yours truly, A. J. RUSSELL,
Sec. State Park Associazlon.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., July 13, 1882.
Major A. J. Russell, Secretary, State Park As-
sociation :


DEAR SIR: Your favor of 10th inst., received.
In reply we would say that the next, being the
Eighth Annual State Fair of Florida; will be
held at Jacksonville, under the management of
your Association. Your guarantee is ample
and safe. Your premiums are large, varied and
liberal, and we heartily commend your lauda-
ble efforts to the people of the State, especially
in those departments of live stock and products
referred to.
We take pleasure in attesting to the satisfac-
tory manner in which your Association has
managed previous Fairs and trust the next will
meet with that success it so justly merits.
Yours truly,
D. H. ELLIOTT,
Sec. Florida Fruit Growers' Association.


Florida Coast Line Canal and Transporta-
tion Company.
Editors of the Florida Dispatch:
An extensive work of public improvement
and one that will have wonderful effects on the
settlement of a vast productive region of our
State, has been begun and it is expected will
be carried to completion in time to move the
crop during the coming winter. We take
.great pleasure in giving some facts to the read-
ers of THE DISPATCH.
The Florida Coast Line Canal and Trans-
portation Company" have a charter and con-
tract with the State of Florida, extending from
the St. John's River on the north to Biscayne
Bay on the south, a'distance of about 370 miles.
They take advantage of the lagoons and rivers
that lie contiguous to the east coast by connect-
ing them by short cuts or canals. "Pablo
Creek running north into the St. John's River
at Mayport near its mouth, will by a cut of a
few miles be connected with the North
River," which runs south and enters the
Matanzas River at St. Augustine. At the south
end of the Matanzas, 25 miles south of St. Au-
gustine, advantage is taken of a creek running
north and emptying into the Matanzas, which
creek heads within three miles of Smith's creek,
which runs south and empties into the Halifax
River. This sheet of water (the Halifax) is
about fifty miles in length and known at differ-
ent points as Halifax River. Hillsboro River
and Mosquito Lagoon is really one sheet of
water, over which has now a tortuous channel,
but by the removal of oyster bars and banks
at various points will be made straight. This
effected, it brings the canal to what is known
as the Haulover," a narrow piece of land
separating the Halifax from Indian River,
through which the next cut will be made (and
the deepening of the approaches to it,) in all
probability one mile, connects the improve-
ment with Indian River, over one hundred and
fifty miles in length. The efforts of the com-
pany will be directed for the present season to
the cuts or canals from the Matanzas to the
"Halifax" and the cut at the Haulover,"
connecting Indian River, in order that steam-
boats can be placed on this portion of the
route the coming winter. The connection with
Lake Worith and thence to Biscayne Bay on
the south to be work for the coming year. St.
Augustine will be the terminus for the present,
on the north, and the two railroads centering
in that city bbeutilized in the carrying of both
freight and passengers until the outlet to the


St. John's via North River and Pablo Creek
may be made.
The work is to be performed almost entirely
by steam dredges, which are ftow being built at
St. Augustine and in a forward condition, ex-
pected to be finished and placed on the work
within the next sixty days. The hull is well
advanced and when launched within the next
thirty days, and the dredging machinery placed,
which is now being built in New Orleans, and
driving engine and boiler at the Erie Iron
Works, Erie, Penn., (contracted to be deliv-
ered here in all of August,) it is expected that
by thl first of October the machinery will be
placed and the work in successful operation.
All the cuts excepting that at the "Haulover"
will be through marsh mud. At the "Haul-


over coquina rock will be encountered. The
parties at the head of this enterprise have all
the essentials for driving the work before them;
first, the capital necessary, and, secondly, the
" vim to push it to an early completion.
This steamboat canal will cause a rush of im-
migration to the very rich and desirable lands
along the whole east coast that heretofore, in
consequence of the entire absence of transpor-
tation of products to and from, has prevented
its development. Tropical Florida will now
be reached where the pine apple, cocoanut and
other tropical fruits grow to perfection; where
the sugar-cane matures and tassels and rattoons
for eight to ten years; where all kinds of vege-
tables or garden truck can be raised and sent
to the Northern market in the month of De-
cember. The inducements to immigration to
this section of the State, will, in the completion
of the steamboat canal line, cause a rush to this
rich tropical region which has only been wait-
ing the means of an outlet and inlet for trans-
porting supplies and products. It is the pur-
pose of the company to place upon this route
steamers of the first-class for the accommoda-
"tion of tourists, and we cannot question but the
East Coast and "Indian River" country will
present attractions that will cause a heavy pas-
senger business during the winter months.
Water transportation for fruits and vegetables
is very desirable, and this steamboat route
gives it. The establishment of five life-saving
stations on the East Coast will be made more
effective by this improvement, and makes it a
National as well as a State benefit. There is no
improvement in the State of Florida which
gives us more pleasure to notice. We can see
in it a future that cannot prevent it being re-
munerative to its enterprising builders and to
the State speedy sale of lands, which, without
it, would remain unsettled and of no value.
We shall take pains to watch the progress of
this work and report the same in THE DIS-
PATCH, for, as before said, the results that fol-
low must be very great to both State and im-
migration. _PROGRESS.
0.0
Rio Carrabelle.
DUVAL COUNTY, FLA., July 13, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
In what part of the State of Florida is Car-
rabelle ? I see the name frequently, and would
like to know just where the place is.
Yours, A.
REPLY.-"Carrabelle" is on James' Island, in
the Gulf, between Apalachicola and St. Mark's.
We find the following in regard to this promis-
ing new settlement in a late number of the
Land of Flowers:
Col. O. H. Kelly, President of the Republic
of Carrabelle, came up to St. Mark's on the
"Curtis" and spent Thursday in our city. He
has recently returned from New York, where
he had a conference with the projectors of the
Thomasville, Tallahassee and Gulf Railroad,


and is very enthusiastic over its prospects. The
old gentleman looks as wise as an owl and as-
serts with emphasis that suggests that he is into
the secret plans of the company: "The railroad
from Thomasville to Carrabelle via Tallahassee,
will be built soon." We hope his assertions
are well founded.
A HERNANDO LEMON.-Dr. STRINGER laid
on our table last Tuesday a monster lemon. It
was a bedded Sicily, weighed one and a half
pounds, measured sixteen inches one way and
thirteen the other. If we are not mistaken, the
lemons from this tree took the premium at the
State Fair several years ago. If they did not
they should, for they are the finest lemons we
know of. The Doctor also has seedling Sicily
lemons as large as the budded.-Brooksville
.Crescent.


I _
I I 1


-0-1








Silk Culture in the South. water covered about an eighth of an acre, and As my occupation has called me over the land,
OFFICE OF TME SOUTHERN AGENT OF TE ) there are, possibly, 200 roots of the same kind an in contact with sheep-raisers, I have, with-
MO iL .SJuly M1AN82 of grass, and others somewhat similar, butnone o any trouble, gained much information on
lMOBILE, AJLA., July 21, 1882. of the common kinds that I am familiar with t any trouble, gained much infct.rmation on
Editors of The Florida Dispatch: as wire, cane, etc. You would confer a favor the subject.
DEAR SIRS: To'the undersigned has been by naming it. Is it a native wild grass of The first question raised would be, have you
particularly committed the development of Silk Florida ? Would it not make a good pasture good sheep pastures, and how much? Volusia
Culture in the Suthern States, by the Mississ- grass on the pine land ? County has a little m,)re than 500,000 acres of
Culture in te uthernE DISPATC comes regularly, and woe o t These
ippi Silk Company, a chartered organization enjoy it much. Respectfully, flat woods, including the prairie these
with headquarters at Aberdeen, Miss. H. S. ALLYN. flat woods lie mostly in the central portion of
The astonishing progress of Silk Manufac- REPLY.-The sample of grass was too much the county, running the entire length, From
ture in this country within the last few years; withered for identification, when it reached us. half to two-thirds of this 500,000 acres would be
the amply-demonstrated adaptation of the cli- We should hardly regard it as of any special considered good grazing land. Much of it, in
mate of the Southern States to sericulture; the value as a pasture grass, as there seems to be an a very wet season, would be inundated, but to
cheap lands of the South ; most especially the over proportion of stalk to leaf. It may prove no great depth, usually from one to six inches,
grand opening given by silk culture to the un- valuable for hay, on low, wet places; though, when inundated at all. There are a number of
employed ladies of the South ; the cbnunenda- for such localities, the Para grass can hardly be head of sheep now in our county, all of which
tiou of this industry by unbiased, studious, corn- excelled. We would suggest that our friend are doing well, and all, as far as I am aware,
patent, experimentalists and investigators ; the give the new grass a full and fair trial for hay are on the flat woods. The average increase
S i of the stock here is one-third, and the average
crowning proof of its practicability and profit- and pasturage, and report results--EDs. about of wool per head is three pounds per
ableness, in the fact that one of the most emi- year. I have been informed butchers and
nent silk houses in Europe will soon have- a Dwarf Oranges--0taheite Stocks, etc. other competent judges, that the mutton is ex-
business connection with the Compaany in ques- WILD WOOD, SUMTER Co., FLA., l called by none in the South, which accounts for
tion, all point to silk culture as a lucrative pur- July 17, 1882. the highest market price offered for the
suit and most eligible for Southern ladies; at Editors of The Florida Dispatch : mutton raised in this section of the State. Once
once easy, fascinating and readily learned. We have been reading several of your pa- more, as to the pasturage, that can be greatly
The remunerative aspect and the new field it pers, taken by our neighbor, Gen. J. J. Dicki- improved. There are many large fertile prai-
opens to the intelligent and unemployed among ries in this section that are susceptible of being
Southern ladies, commend the enterprise, most son. We are much pleased with it, and anxious drained by ploughing (which there is no dif
especially to the good will of the public; and- to subscribe. In your DISPATCH of May 29, we faculty of doing) into "lands" about four rods
some of the advanced thinkers and most public read a description of the "Dwarf Orange." Can wide, then by collecting the surface water in a
spirited men and women at the South, from you not inform us where we can obtain one or body into the land furrows, so that it is readily
philanthropic motives alone, are devoting their more of the "Otaheite" shrubs ? We think they carried off. There are many of these prairies
efforts to induce Southern ladies to engage would be very beautiful for the yard. that seem perfectly level, but when tested with
in the business; and their efforts are meeting Mr. C., of Alabama, is visiting us at present; an instrument they are usually found to have
with most gratifying success; several prominent expects to make his home near us in the future ample fall to carry offthe water. These prairies
organizations of ladies having been already -will subscribe for your paper as soon as he could be ploughed, drained, and seeded* down
formed in various Southern cities. becomes settled. to Bermuda grass, which does remarkably well
The undersigned desires to visit as many of Very respectfully yours, etc., on these lands; and there is no grass that grows
the leading cities and towns of the South as B.H. D. in the South that sheep or cattle like better. It
possible, between the fall and spring. To do so, REPLY.-No Otaheites for sale here, at pres- is not easily eradicated. In fact, one should
it can readily be seen that no visit must be made ent. Nurserymen who can supply these little seed it down with care, as it will soon take pos-
at random, or in the dark; but that he must trees, will do well to advertise them in THE session when once set and left toitself. Drouth,
visit only those places where considerable in- DSPATH, as there is much inquiry for them. and our long hot summers, seem to leave no
terest in the matter is already felt, or may be SEDs. impression on it.
aroused by his visit. -EDS. The stock here is being improved. There is
Being unacquainted with any one in you city Strawberry Plants Wanted. no stock sheep for sale in the county at any
with whom to correspond, he asks from your VO FLA 1 price. Most of the stock is brought from the
courtesy the favor of a publication of this letter, VOLS, FL., July 2, 1882. Northern portion of the State of Georgia, and
in the hope that it may lead to a correspondence Editors of The Florida Dispatch : further north.
with one or several influential persons in your It is getting time to prepare for setting out IfI have not given you the desired informa-
city, so that the way may be opened for a visit strawberry plants. I see none advertised for tion let me know, and I will endeavor to.
and a lecture on silk culture, and to lay the sale in THE DISPATCH. We will want quite a I am, very truly yours,
basis for an organization to develop silk culture quantity in this vicinity. Can you tell us, D. D. ROGERS
in your community. If there should be suffi- through THE DISPATCH, who has them for sale,
cient interest felt to effect an organization, a and at what price-also, which are the best *Bermuda grass is propagated by pieces of the root-
cocoonery can be established, and the basis laid varieties, both for market and home use-and not seed. We have never seen any ripe and perfect seed
for a development that may lead to very sub- about the best time to plant for an early crop? -_
stantial results. Not only will the community You, who have plants forsale, advertise in THE Give Your Names and Localities.
be educated on silk culture; but a filature or DISPATCH. Respectfully, etc., .


reeling establishment may be built to purchase HERMAN NEDD. TANGERINE, ORANGE COUNTY, 'LA.,
the cocoons, and even a silk manufactory may REPLY.-The Crescent Seedling, Nunan, Fed- July 17, 18.
result. i Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
eral Point, and Captain Jack, are all good va-
Hoping the warm interest the press takes, C J a a g Your correspondent makes a suggestion that
generally, in development, and particularly in rieties. Plant in September or October. for an the value and interest of articles is often de-
this industry, so peculiarly adapted to the early spring crop. We cannot advertise forth
South, may induce you to regard the request as growers of and dealers in plants, unless wehave creased because the author fails to give the
not too exacting, their orders to doso. The suggestion in ourlocality. Yot pronounce the suggestion a good
notortooThe suggestion in our
I am very respectfully yours, one, and it certainly is. Now, is it not equally
M. B. HILLYARD. correspondent's closing sentence seems to "fillone, and it certainly is. No t ot
P..-Partie esiri to co-operate i the bill."-EDdesirable to know who and where the author is
P. S.-Parties desiring to co-operate in an Speaking for myself I say that, having a large
organization for their communities, should ad- .
drss me promptly at Mobile, Alabama. Sheep-Raising in Florida. number ofpapers and onlylimited time, I rarely
----- -- DAYTONA, FLA., July 17, 1882. read an article at all unless I know who and
Sample of Grass. Ho C. Drew, State Agent of Immigration, where the writer is It is interesting to know
ORANGE CITY, FLA., July 22, 1882. Jacksonville: a subject is received and treated by known
Editors of the Florida Dispatch: DEAR SIR: Your favor of June 15th, re- authors. It is of no consequence whatever about
GENTLEMEN: By to-day's mail I send you a questing information respecting sheep-raising, the opinions of those concerning whom you
spear of grass that I picked from a low place .i
in our pine woods, where th. ~atf t,, etc., is received. I p s'h~vF t, .,"and wh sk'. ilk behind a nom de plume so
but not long enough to kill the pines. The give you a few practical points on the subject. you cannot know. I can think of but two rea-


29a


THE FLORIDA DI SPATCH.





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH 2S.
~.-il. -i"-'------- ---- ------ ------ili')'iZ --_.~.- ---- IL .e ~ -' .....,-- .I~ii-~l l ~ i .---LPLrr- .~j- -~-~iyj -j-.-


sons why an author should withhold his true
name: First, that he is ashamed of his work
and does not want to father it; or, second, that
he is so supremely vain as to think his article'of
such phenomenal interest that he will be del-
uged with an onerous correspondence or illum-
inated by such a blaze of literary glory as to
shock his modest (?) sensibilities.
What would we think of a speaker at an
agricultural or horticultural meeting who wore
a mask ? What should we think of an agricul-
tural or horticultural writer who does the same?
You have heard of the fellow who was kicked
by a mule. Before taking action he "consid-
ered the source." In our reading and making
the selections therefore we very properly do the
same and consider the source. "Northern,"
"Myrtle," "Agricola," etc., may be very repu-
table persons, but we can hardly feel at home
with them without an introduction.
Respectfully yours,
DUDLEY W. ADAMS.

PICKLING LIMES.-In response to our request
for a receipt for pickling Limes, we have receiv-
ed the following card:
57 CIIATHAM-ST., BOSTON, July 24, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
We are large dealers in Limes, both fresh
or green and pickled; and we can give full
directions for pickling.
We solicit consignments of all we can get.
Please notice this in your esteemed paper.
Yours truly,
CROKER & BLAKE,
Headquarters Florida Oranges and Honey.
We have asked these gentlemen for the Lime
pickling receipt for publication in THE Dis-
PATCH, and hope they will send it.-EDs.




METEOROLOGICAL REPORT.
Weather for week ending July 28, 1882.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION,
SIGNAL SERVICE, U. S. A., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Therm. Wind. i


DATE. 0O ; S
S--- E < --: Cf.
--- 11 I -1-- -I ^ -1----

Saturday 22...... 30.159374 82.7 75.7 1.61 S 4|Fair
Sunday.23...... 30.11 8373 77.7 84.0 0.77 NE 6FCloudy.
Monday 24...... 29.99184 73 70.0 87.3 0.06 NE 51 Cloudy.
Tuesday 25...... 30.06 89 75 80.0 79.7 0.00 SE 7 Fair.
Wednesday 261 30.20 90 76 82.0 82.7 0.03 S 8 Clear.
Thursday 27... 30.19 90178! 83.7 72.7 0.00 E 4 Clear.
Friday 28.......I 30.13 94174j 81.0' 75.3 0.24 SE 6 Fair.
Highest barometer 30.24, lowest 29.98.
Highest'temperature 94, lowest 73.
NOTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Observer U. S. A.

DAYTONA, VOLUSIA CO., FLA., July 11,,1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
SIRS: Since reading your article on "White


Ants," I found the inclosed in an old Agricul-
tural Report, and thinking it might be of inter-
est to those whose groves are infested by the
ants, I have copied it for your paper.
Respectfully,
AMELIA S. WILKINSON.
WHITE ANTS; OR, "WOOD LICE."
( Termes flavipes Kohlar.)
Order Neuroptera; family Termitidce. Gird-
ling the bark of orange trees and guava bushes
near the surface of the ground, or eating out
the interior of sugar-cane and other plants;
numerous small white insects, resembling ants
in form and size.
These insects, which are common throughout
our territory, from Massachusetts to Florida,
are usually found living in communities in logs,


sticks and stumps. Decaying pine wood is
especially liable to be attacked by them.
Sometimes they are very destructive to wooden
structures, as houses, bridges, and fences, and
especially to such parts as are near the ground.
This season we have learned that they do not
confine their attacks to dead vegetable matter,
but they frequently infest and destroy living
plants. We received speciriens from Mr. B.
F. WEEMS, of Houston, Texas, that were in-
festing pampas grass and orange trees; and I
found them common throughout Florida, in-
festing orange trees, guava bushes, and sugar-
cane. In the last named State they are recog-
nized as important pests. They are known as
"wood lice," a name whose use is to be depre-
cated, as it tends to create confusion. When
white ants infest living plants, they attack that
part which is at or just below the surface of the
ground. With woody plants, as orange trees
and guava bushes, the bark of the base of the
trunk is eaten and frequently the tree is com-
pletely girdled; with sugar-cane, the most seri-
ous injury is the destruction of the seed cane.
The white ants may be destroyed by water heat-
ed sufficiently to kill the insects without injury
to the infested plants. In the case of orange
trees, much can be done to prevent the attacks
of these insects. It is those trees about the
crown of whose roots the soil has been heaped,
that are most liable to become infested. It fol-
lows that care should be taken to remove such
soil immediately after each cultivation of the
grove, leaving the crown of the roots exposed.
It is also important to remove all old wood,
especially pine, from near the trees, as such
wood is liable to become infested and the white
ants to spread from it to the orange trees.-
Prof. J. Henry Comstock in Report of the Com-
missioner of Agriculture for 1879, page 207.
DAYTONA, FLA., July 10, 1882.
SIRS: In your DISPATCH of July 2d, page
229, commenting on "Trees Girdled by Wood
Ants," you state, "when the tree is completely
or almost girdled, there is no remedy; the tree
must die." I have known apple and pear trees
at the North completely girdled by mice, to
recover, by taking twigs of another tree and
inserting one end in the root and the other above
the girdled part. If the tree was quite large we
used a half-dozen twigs around the tree, to keep
up a better flow of sap, and they soon healed
over. Could not the orange tree be treated in
the same way ? E. N. WALDRON.

The LeConte Pear--More About It.
The South Georgia papers are keeping up
the LeConte boom vigorously. Hear the
Americus Republican :
W. W. Thompson of Lee County, is making
the cultivation of the LeConte pear a source of
great revenue to him. He has a two-third in-
terest in 1,882 trees in Thomasville, and has
800 trees in Florida, besides he has at Smith-


ville 1,700 trees. He is shipping these pears to
the various markets of the North, realizing $6
a crate. (A crate holds about a bushel.) A
tree of this variety of pear eleven years old will
produce 125 bushels of these pears (!) From the
nursery at Smithville he has sold 500 trees to
various parties. Mr. Thompson kindly left
with us a quantity of these pairs, and in their
lusciousness are unequalled. In one of our
fruit establishments this pear can be found for
sale. This enterprise shows what can be done
and what is doing in the matter of fruit-raising
in this section, and it is only a question of time
when the rich developments of this most fa-
vored land will be known far and near.
To which the Thomasville Enterprise replies:
"There is certainly a big mistake in this in
the number of bushels on that eleven-year-old
tree. Divide it by five and it will be about
right."


The Enterpris.e, then continues:
The shipment of LeConte pears has continued
quite lively since our last issue, although the
latest returns from the markets North show
that the prices are not quite so good as they
were.
We see by Mr. G. S. Palmer's daily prices
current, from New York, that the only LeConte
pears reported, are from Florida, and in half-
bushel crates. We were at a loss to understand
this. While Liberty County is, properly speak-
ing, the home of this pear, this county is strictly
headquarters for it. There are, perhaps, as
many trees in Thomas County as in all the out-
side world, and certainly more bearing trees.
Very few crates, if any, are shipped from Flor-
ida, and none of our shippers ever packed
them, or knew them to be packed in half-bushel
crates. Then, too, these half-bushel crates are
reported very nearly as high as the bushel crates
that go from here sell for. Our pear growers
are not only anxious to obtain the highest
prices, but are jealous of any honor that may
justly belong to them. We are fully satisfied
of Mr. Palmer's integrity and fair dealing, and
think he must be mistaken about the Florida
DeContes and the size of the crates.



racksoaville Wholesale Prices.
Corrected weekly, by JONES & BO WEN, Wholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.
SUGARS-Granulated................... ............... 10
W white Ex. C........................... ......... 10
G olden C............................................ 8y;
Pow dered .................................... ...... 11%
Cut Loaf.............................................. l
COFFEE, Rio-Fair........................................ 10
Good ............................ ... ........ 10
Choice .......................................... 11
B est ...................................... ..... 12
Java O. G....................................... 25
M ocha ................................ .................. 35
Peaberry........................................ ........ 18
M aracaibo............................................. 18
Any of above grades roasted to order
FLOUR-Snow Drop, best.................................. 9 00
Oreole, 2d best .................................... 8 00
Pearl, 3d best..................................... 7 75
M EATS-Bacon................................. ... 14
Hams (Merwin & Sons) ...................... IS
Shoulders................. ............................ 14
HoiINY--Pearl, per bbl.............................. 5 60
M EAL-per bbl................................. ........... 5 60
LARD-Itefined in pails.................................. 1412
BUTTER-Very best, kegs (on ice)................. 30
CHEESE-Full cream ............. .................... 14
H alf cream ........................ ............. 12
TOBACCO-We have made arrangements direct with
the manufacturers" and offer you to-day as fol-
lows:
Smoking-"the Boss" Durham 1s
and 4s......... ........................... .. 32
"The Boss" Durham 1 lb pkge......... 30
"Sitting Bull" D. (genuine)s........ 50
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) 1s........... 49
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) s ............ 47
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) 1 lb pkge.. 45
Plug-"Shell Road" 4 plugs to lb., 30
lb boxes.... ............................... 55
"Florida Boys" 5 plugs to lb., 30 lb
boxes.... ...................... ........ 36
"Florida Girls"-Bright twist, 14 to
lb., 17 lb boxes............................. 50
Cigars-"Long Branch"a very pop-
ular brand, per thousand......... 25 00
"Our X choice cigar, easy smok'r 24 00
"Our XX," a very choice smoker.... 26 00
"Florida Boys," (we are State Agt,) 45 00
These are all fresh goods and will compare favora-
bly in price and quality with any goods.
SOAP AND STARCH-Colgate's 8 oz., per box.. 3 50
Peerless, 8 oz., per box......................... 3 50
Starch, lump, per lbt...... .................. 5@6c
HOPS, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS--


Hops, per lb.................................... ...... 15@,22c
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz.......... 60c
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
doz. 1 ....................................... ............. 2 25
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. 1 lb. 2 25
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. ..... 270
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. lb...... 1 50
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl., new......................... 5 00
CHICKENS, each..................... ............................. 20@40
EGGs-Per doz.................................................... 15@18
HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lb.; first class 13
Country Dry Salted, per b................ 9911
Butcher Dry Salted, per lb.................... 9@10
Dam aged Hides..................................... 6
Kipo and Calf, 8fbs. and under................ 10
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb....... ................. 35
Deer Skins Salted, per b...... ........... 26@30
FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter.................. ...................................... 1 50@ 4 00
Raccoon, each..................................... 515
Wild Cat, each................................ 10@20
Fox, each.............................. ......... 5@15
BEESWAX-per lb............................................... 20
WOOL-Free from burs, per b ....................... 17@22
Burry, per lb............................................ 11@15
GOAT SXINs-Each per b................................. 10
Hominy and meal advancing rapidly ; will be worth
10 per cent more in next 30 days.







290 TH LRD IPTH


THE LATE JAMES VICK.
The Prince of Florists."
A regular contributor of the American
Grocer, Mrs. McConaughy, wrote the following
for that excellent journal, just before the death
of Mr. Vick:
Nearly fifty years ago there came to this
country a young English lad, who began life
as a printer boy in a New York office. After
three years' of most faithful application he went
to Rochester and was employed as a printer in
the office of an agricultural paper.
His intense interest in every thing that
grows from the soil, his accurate information
and graceful mode of expressing his thoughts,
soon made him a favorite contributor to the
columns of the paper on which he worked.
After a time he was made its editor, and the
energy and ability the young man brought to
bear upon it largely increased its subscription
list. All his spare time was given to a little
Z4,^. TJu Vi^.IjI ilix^ Lc U11V 1iunj L n NVUYlb v\tfiutj
cultivated with the most marvelous success.
At length he purchased another journal,
which he conducted as ably as he had all his
other enterprises, and at the same time gave
much attention to a little business he had
started in the way of seed growing. It was the
germ of what proved to be one of the great in-
dustries of the land, and so grew upon his
hands that he laid aside all other pursuits to
devote himself wholly to it. His whole life
training fitted him to carry on such a business
successfully. He had studied the subject of
flower culture with enthusiasm, had experi-
mented patiently, had toiled early and late
with untiring industry and well deserved the
success he gained. The business grew so ex-
tended and complicated, it required a master
mind for system and executive ability to hold
it in hand, but James Vick was equal to the
task. The little city flower plot has grown to
a hundred acres of beautiful blossoms. The
great flower store is the pride of the city, and
a spot to be visited by all strangers. It is
something of a task to open and answer its
daily mail of two or three thousand letters.
All departments are under the constant super-
vision of the owner, who rejoices in labor and
whose kindly, inspiring words infuse a similar
spirit into all about him. His name is known
by every flower lover in the land and his fame
has spread far in foreign lands, where he has
extensively traveled and where his works have
been largely read, and he has received high
honors as one of the leading horticulturists of
the world. Perhaps no person has done more
to infuse a spirit of admiration for the beauty
of the floral world than Mr. Vick. Honest to
the heart's core in his own love of flowers, sim-
ple thoughts glowing and polished in his style
of writing, he carries the reader away with
him unawares. It is said that Evelyn's works


on forest trees, and his enthusiastic example in
planting them, led all England to engage with
zeal in the work, until millions of oaks alone,
besides myriads of other trees were planted by
his instigation. What a record it would make
if we could enroll the names of all those who
have been led to beautify their homes with
flowers by the writings and the facilities offered
by this great florist. Here is an example of
the true esthetics. It is not of the maudlin
kind that poses and attitudinizes in the draw-
ing-room and weakly waves a sunflower and
gazes on a lily. It is of a kind that rolls back
its cuffs and works. This is one of the distin-
guishing marks by which you may know the
false prophet from the true.*


Mr. Vick is a man beloved and honored in
the city which has so long been his home. He
is the strong man of his church, and over and
over again is elected superintendent of its Sun-
day School, in which he is a most efficient
worker. His habit of watching the growth of
young plants leads him to look with earnest in-
terest on the possibilities before even the hum-
blest child in its classes. His benefactions are
as liberal as they are unostentatious.
Surely such a man has won a right to the
serene enjoyment he takes in the luxury and
refinement which surround him.
*The death of the estimable man described has taken
place since the above was written. We prefer to print
the article unaltered-a spontaneous proof that the late
Mr. Vick was not one of those who dying have attribu-
ted to them virtues not recognized during lifetime.
Life Insurance.
We copy the following from a recent number
of the Pall-Mall Gazette. It indicates that Brit-
ish Life Insurance Companies are much like
our own, and contains food for reflection:
"Why should stoppage of benefits, cancel-
ment of policies, or at the best, imposition of
fines, vexatious formulas and infinite delays, be-
set a man's interest in a life policy which he
may have been t eynnorarilvinab.le to nmv t ie
premium upon thorough adversity Is ife in-
surance a thing to benefit the insured, or only
an organized system of plunder? These som-
nolent companies must look to it, else they will
find a growing section of the intelligent classes
disposed to regard it in the latter light. For
the dealings of the companies 'surrendered'
policies is, as a rule, just as bad. They can tell
to a shilling what the true 'surrender value' of
a policy is, but they take good care not to com-
municate that knowledge in the shape of a
check for the cash to a holder who wants to
surrender. On the whole, while abuses of that
sort remain, it is, perhaps, as well for the peo-
ple that they do not insure. For a large pro-
portion of those who do, the premiums are sim-
ply money wasted, unless it be considered prof-
itable to contribute to other people's wealth,
getting nothing again. The successful life in-
surance of the future must be based upon no
mysteries, have no traps for the unweary, deal
mercifully-or at least justly-by the unfortu-
nate, and make an end of claptrap and chicane
as well. If it be not of this kind, then there
will be no deep grief felt should the English
and other companies, old and new, show no ac-
cession of business, but go on peacefully dwind-
ling year by year till at last 'oblivion goes
home with her harvesting.' "

Power of Braving the Unpleasant.
Of all the powers which men and women need
for their permanent well-being, there is, perhaps,
no one more universally essential than that
which enables them to do what is for any reason
unpleasant. In the natural reaction against
Puritanical sternness of discipline and con-
demnation of pleasure, there is some danger of


overlooking this necessity. While it is true
that happiness- is the best soil for virtue, it is
also true that the virtue which can flourish in
no other soil is unworthy of its name. Indeed,
even a true idea of the highest happiness itself
always implies the frequent sweeping away of
present gratification that interferes with nobler
aims. Those who cannot do this firmly, wil-
lingly and continuously, will never be of much
value either to themselves or to others.
We often make rough divisions of men into
the educated and the ignorant, the rich and the
poor, the young and the old, the famous and
the unknown, but a division more marked than
any other might be made between the strong


and the weak in this respect. We meet them
both in'every walk of life. Their birth or edu-
cation, or general surroundings, may be the same,
but a sharp line divides those who govern their
inclinations from those whose inclinations gov-
ern them. On the one side we see strength,
accomplishment and value; on the other weak-
ness, spasmodic and ill-directed effort and ineffi-
ciency. Two youths, for instance, may have
equal intellectual ability and advantages; one
makes the most of them one by one, putting
forth his energy alike on the studies that he
prefers and on those that are distasteful;
the other devotes his time mainly to such
branches as please his taste. Now the differ-
ence between them as they enter life will not
be chiefly in the kind or amount of their knowl-
edge, or even the degree of their mental power,
but in the strength of will and character they
have laid up. The one has learned the lesson of
patient effort, the other has not; the one is able
to put forth whatever of his powers are needed,
the other can only put forth such as are in
UuILUtUCiiuc vvWIL11 116 IIIciaUiion ; ,1; e one will
be felt as a living force in the community, the
other will fail to leave an impression,
Two children are alike lymphatic in their
dispositions, but one is taught by wise parents
to arouse himself, is trained to labor and study
and play actively at proper seasons, however
disagreeable the effort may be; the other is
allowed to indulge his love of ease until exer-
tion of any kind becomes well nigh impossible.
The future lives of these children will in all
probability show, on the one hand, the devel-
opment of strength and value; on the other, a
gradual enfeeblement of natural power. This
difference is seen in all life's occupations, and
reveals the secret of much of the success or the
failure that attends them, In every case the
thoroughly successful man, that is, he whose
labor is of real value to the community, has
formed the habit of doing what is before him,
unhesitatingly and manfully, quite independ-
ently of whether he likes it or not. He has
chosen his work, and takes it just as it comes;
if it chance to be agreeable, so much the better ;
but if 'not, his energies do not swerve. His
question is not, "How much shall I enjoy doing
this piece of work, or carrying out this new
plan in my business ?" but, "Is this work neces-
sary ?" "Is this plan wise ?" If so, no ques-
tion of like or dislike comes in to interfere. But
he who suffers his personal predilection to gov-
ern his plans, and postpones or shrinks from
such parts of his labor as involve self-denial,


lacks the main element of success.
So in home and social life, we all need the
power of doing promptly and energetically hard
and disagreeable things-things that interfere
with our ease and comfort, that balk our de-
sires, that trouble our sensibilities, that are
hostile to our tastes. That such things are
often needful, wise and best, is admitted by all,
but the strength of character that can do them
quietly and firmly, is not so universal. The
intellectual power to discover the best path or
the right course is far more commonly pos-
sessed than the practical power to follow it. Yet
no man or woman ever rose to full moral stature
without it. It has often been noted with surprise
how many of our eminent men have risen
from a youth of the most limited intellectual
advantages. As a general thing, however, their


I -


290


THE FLORIDA DISPATCH,





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 292


lives, when studied closely, will reveal that in
some way, from their youth up, this power of
hearty, energetic effort, apart from any consid-
eration of pleasure, has been exercised. It may
have been in the hard labor and restraints
which poverty has enforced, or in the strict
discipline and wise guidance of honorable pa-
rents, or in the early responsibilities which cir-
cumstances have placed upon them. Whatever
be its source, they have thoroughly learned to
control their wishes, to conquer-their passions,
to put their heart and soul into whatever comes
to them as the best thing, without pausing to
consider whether it would yield them pleasure
or pain. In this lies one grand secret of their
present eminence. It is the key which unlocks
many doors.
How then shall we acquire this invaluable
power, and how shall we cultivate it in the
young? Like all other faculties it grows with
exercise. Each time we actually perform what
is disagreeable, because it is the wise or the right
thing to do, we are a little stronger to do the
same again. Yet it does not follow that there
is anything specially meritorious in choosing
what is disagreeable for its own sake, still less
in compelling the young to do so. Asceticism
is as far removed from right principle as weak
indulgence. There is no need for seeking dif-
ficulties or making artificial occasions for self-
sacrifice. Enough if we take hold of those that
life itself presents, one by one as they occur, and
dispose of each as our intelligence and moral
sense suggest. Thus may we, without any harsh
or unnatural means, accumulate this power,
which lies at the very foundation of- our value
to society and our highest welfare.-Phila-
delphia Ledger.

Work and Idleness.
Between working at low wages and idleness,
no young man or young woman should hesitate
for a moment. Some do not hesitate, but de-
cide wrongly in favor of no employment and
living on their parents as long as possible. To
a person of industrious habits there is real en-
joyment in labor, while idle habits make the
necessity for labor a terrible burden. The boy
or girl who, after leaving school, loafs and
lounges for a few years, will hardly be a profit-
able or pleasant hand to hire afterward. They
are the kind of employes who get to their busi-
ness late and quit early, besides shirking all
day, so that the vexation they cause is greater
than the service they render. There is another
habit which it is excellent to form early, and
that is the habit of economy. It is better to
start in life with moderate pay, ahd learn the
worth of money and how to spend it wisely. So
work at low wages may prove a blessing.-
Watchman.
Wine from the Sour Orange.
An enthusiastic correspondent of the Sumter
County Advance thus rhapsodizes over a glass of
sour orange wine bestowed upon him by a fair
Hebe near Lake Astatula :


"Directly the hostess says from the dining-
room: 'Gentlemen, will you taste some wine I
have made from the sour orange?' (Among
my New Year's resolutions, one reads like this:
If anybody says 'take something ?' be polite
and say 'thanks.') The invitation was simply
irresistible; we entered a dining-room so quiet,
so cool and tidy, it looked like a sacrilege to
drink there. It was a part of my duty to scrape
off the wax and draw the cork. I know I did
it bunglingly, not being used to such work, but
I got it into the glasses-and such wine it was!
I've drank Mumm's, Mort's, and all the crack
vintages, but none like that. I wish I could be
an aqueduct through which to draw an Ama-
zon of such. For delicacy of flavor and bou-
quet it surpasses all; I can scent it on my mus-
tache even to this day." (!)


"Dat's W'y I 'spises a Mulel"
In the Ohio Farmier, John M. Stall, (appro-
priate name!) thus ventilates his opinion on "de
mule :"
"Two good, decent mules make the best farm
team under the sun; two mean mules make the
worse team that ever kicked. A mule very
rarely, if ever, gets sick; is. always ready for
work; is as tough as sole leather and as strong
as Limburger cheese; eats much less than a
horse; and there is no danger of overfeeding or
overheating it. But a mean mule, (and there
are a great many mean mules in this world of
sin and sorrow,) is the doggondest meanest thing
outside or inside of Hades. It won't eat when
it ought to or drink when you want it to. It will
kick forty kicks a minute and hit an object
forty feet away; and it is no respecter of per-
sons, kicking its best friend or a parson as soon
as a woman. It will run away whenever it
wants to and run till it gets tired, but never
hurts itself. It will live till the memory of
man runneth to the contrary and get worse
every blessed century it exists. It will keep
warm when it is cold enough to freeze the
tail off a rabbit and be cool when the mercury
boils. A mule is as full of surprises as a hor-
net's nest. If you get an upright, moral mule
you ought to sing anthems all. your days; if
you get one of only ordinary cussedness the best
thing you can do is to go off and kill yourself.
This is my opinion of mules."
Mule of Texas, ere we part,
Tell me why you will not start;
Or if really you must balk,
Pray excuse my wicked talk,
Here my vow before I go--
I'll be even with you, though.
By your long tail unconfined,
Wooed by every passing wind,
By those heels so wondrous swift,
Which can men o'er tree-tops lift,
By those ears that droop so low,
I'll be even with you, though.
By those ribs I long to baste,
By your show of d. b. taste,
By your melancholy bray
That alarms folksmiles away,
By your stern resolve to whoa,
I'll get even with you, though.
Mule of Texas, I am gone;
Think of me, sweet, when alone,
For I fly to get a club,
Then your blamed old back I'll drub,
If I cannot make you go,
I'll be even with you, though.
-Pontotoc (Miss.) Democrat.

Whitewashing Trees.
During the session of the Nurserymen's
meeting, lately, at Rochester, New York, says
the Country Gentleman, Professor MEEHAN gave
a full lecture on "the bark of trees and its func-
tions," illustrated with specimens of the bark of
different trees. He alluded to the disputed
question whether whitewashing the stems of
trees assisted or injured growth. Those who
objected to whitewashing maintained that it
closed the pores and thus did harm. Prof. M.,
on the contrary, insisted that the only office of
the bark was to encase and bind together the


bundles of cells and vessels which constitute
the woody stem, and as the tree increases in size,
its efforts are to throw off this useless portion-
some by upright excrescences, as in .the oak,
and many other trees; others horizontally, as
in the beech, birch and cherry; others again in
flat scales, as in the button-wood; all are at-
tempts of nature to throw off useless matter.
The lesson to be derived from these facts is to
help nature, by slitting the bark of hide-bound
trees, and whitewashing to destroy insects, and
this application would not close pores which did
not exist.
FIGS !-The Land of Flowers says: "Talla-
hassee can beat the world on figs, they are
plentiful in our market at five cents per quart."


Value of Lemons.
The Country Gentleman reminds that "lem-
ons are a most valuable fruit, not only for
cooking, but also for medicinal purposes and
the toilet. If the juice of a lemon is taken
every morning before breakfast, for two or three
weeks, in the spring-time, it will prevent the
disagreeable feeling of weakness and want of
energy peculiar to the season. Lemon juice
made thick with sugar, and a little salt, will
relieve hoarseness and heal a hacking cough. A
piece of lemon-peel with pulp attached, if
bound upon a corn, will relieve it in a few days.
It is also an excellent remedy for chills and
fever, and, if a teaspoonful of sugar and a large
pinch of salt is stirred up with the pulp and
eaten with a spoon every morning it will break
up malarial troubles. As a cosmetic, it is of
great service in removing freckles and sun-
burn. Apply the pulp and juice at night to
the face and hands, and wash off with water in
the morning. It is also valuable for its power
to detect any dangerous ingredients in cosmet-
ics, powders or liquids. Place a teaspoonful of
the cosmetic in a wine-glass, and squeeze some
lemon juice upon it; if it effervesces, it is a sure
proof that the cosmetic is dangerous, and would
utterly ruin the complexion. For small-pox
lemon juice is also highly recommended, the
patient being allowed to drink freely of lemon-
ade, and to suck the clear juice if palatable. In
all fevers the juice of lemons is of decided as-
istance."
China Tree vs. Weevils.
Rev. J. E. DODD, one of the most successful
planters in this county, furnishes us with the
following recipe for preserving corn. He used
it for many years with gratifying results, none
of his corn ever being damaged by weevil or
other insect. He says: Sweep out crib thor-
oughly, lay a carpet of China or Pride of India
tree leaves, and after placing thereon each load
of corn, sprinkle with a bucket of tea made
from the leaves, or berries, if you choose.
We suggest that our farmers, and all others
throughout the State give this simple, preven-
tive a trial.;-Gainesville Bee.
[We have a good deal of faith in the above.
For many years, we have successfully used
China tree leaves and small branches as a pre-
ventive of moths in woolen clothing, and we have
killed and driven away the cut-worm by drench-
ing the ground around the plants with a strong
tea or decoction of the leaves of this very beau-
tiful and valuable tree.-EDS. DISPATCH.]

FISH AND FERTILIZERS.-Messrs. P. Hous-
ton, B. M. Burroughs, A. E. Willard and E.
W. Blair have organized the Florida Fish Oil
and Fertilizer Company, with a capital of


$25,000 in shares of $250 each. The objects
and purposes of the company, as set forth in
articles of incorporation, filed June 27th, are
the manufacture and sale of fish oil, fish ferti-
lizer, fish scraps, and the buying, catching and
sale of fish, and all other things incidental to
and necessary to fully and successfully carry
out the objects of the company. We learn that
the incorporators propose to buy a suitable
steamer and establish their enterprise at a point
on the Gulf coast where the business can be
most successfully and profitably conducted.
This is an enterprise that will certainly yield
very satisfactory returns, and we hope these
gentlemen will make a grand success of it.-
Floridian.
-
-Compound Tincture of Benzoin, or "Fri-
ar's Balsam," is said to be a good remedy for
toothache.


I
....
dn ;~-





92 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH
..... ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ .... .. . . . . .. ....'. ... . . . .. . . ... .. .


fhe 41vria Rispalh.

JACKSONVILLE, JULY 31, 1882.
D. REDMOND,
EDITORS: D. H. ELLIOTT,
W. H. ASHMEAD,

Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.

RATES OF ADV ERTISING.
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One ......................... $100 2 50 $ 5 50 $1000 $18 50
Two..................... 2 00 5 00 10 00 18 00 34 00
Three ..................... 300 7 00 14 00 25 00 4600
Four..................... 4 00 9 00 17 50 3000 5800
Five ........................ 4 50 1100 19 00 35 00 65 00
Eight ..................... 8 00 16 50 30 00 50 00 10000
Sixteen ................ 16 00 30 00 50 00 80 00 150 00
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words to line) ten cents
per line.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the best ad-
vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.

Special Club Rates with "The Dispatch."

Read and Subscribe--It Saves Money and
Will Pay You.
We have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
following publications, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt of price, for ONE YEAR :
TIHE FLORIDA DISPATCH AND
Savannah Weekly News...............................$2.50
Florida Weekly Union................................. 2.25
New York Weekly Sun............................ 1.75
New York Weekly Herald.......................... 1.75
New York Weekly Tribune.................... 2.50
New York Weekly Times............................. 1.75
New York Weekly World............................ 1.75
Philadelphia Weekly Times....................... 2.50
American Agriculturist....................... 2.00
Country Gentleman..................... ..... 2.75
Southern Cultivator........... ... ......... ....... 2.00
Atlantic Monthly Magazine........................... 4.00
Harper's Monthly Magazine......................... 4.00
The Century Monthly Magazine (Scribner's).... 4.00
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine.................... 3.15
Popular Science Monthly........................... 5.00
North American Review.............................. 5.00
Harper's Illustrated Weekly........................ 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Bazar............................ 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Young People................. 2.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly............... 4.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4.00
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly...................... 3.15
Frank Leslie's Sunday Magazine.............. 3.15
Scientific American............................ 3.75
W overly Magazine.................................... 5.00
Detroit Free Press....... ..................... 2.35
The above are among the very best publications"
Remittances should be sent by Check, Money Order,
or Registered Letter, addressed to
ASIHMEAD BIE3O'S,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Work for August.
With the close of July, in this climate, we
may consider the "heart of summer" well nigh


broken. We shall, of course, have plenty of
warm weather, yet; especially during the mid-
dle hours of the day; but the cool mornings
and evenings, and a certain crispness in the air
foretells the coming on of autumn.
The prompt and energetic farmer and gardener
has, by this time, "laid by" most of his summer
crops; and, taking a short respite from his hard,
pushing work, is beginning to look forward to
another season of activity. There are, still,
however, some raveled ends of summer work to
gather up, and these we shall indicate briefly.
SSweet Potatoes-cut vines-may be planted
in well-pulverized and manured land, up to the
10th of August. After that time-except in


South Florida, for "stand-overs,"-it will be too
late to plant for a good table crop.
Upland Rice, planted in June, if not too rank,
may have one more working, to finish up, or
"lay by."
Turnips should be sown now, every ten days,
until a good stand is secured. The land for
this crop cannot be too clean, too finely worked,
or too heavily manured. (See "Work for July,"
page 232.)
Okra may be planted for a late crop-but
the young plants must be shaded from the sun.
Plant Beans, both pole and bush. Shade
these, also, when young, and mulch the ground
as the plants grow larger.
Cabbages, Cauliflower and Celery should be
sown in partly shaded beds, early this month.
Give the plants plenty of room in the seed-bed,
so that they will grow "stocky" and strong.
Spinach for fall use, may be sown any time
this month-using plenty of manure.
Onion seed may be sown the last of August,
or early in September. "As rich as an onion-
bed" is a suggestive saying. See that the idea
is properly carried out before wasting your seed
and labor. The land for onions must be deep,
fine and rich, or no crop. Sow thickly in the
drill, and transplant the thinnings of the rows
in October and November.
Forage crops may still be grown for fall feed-
ing and for hay. Among the plants that will
yield satisfactory returns are, Cow-Peas, Egyp-
tian, or "Pearl" Millet, common Corn sown
thickly in the drill, and Sorghum. To deter
caterpillars and other worms, often injurious to
late forage crops, we have used, with much suc-
cess, Gould's Carbolated Fertilizer, scattered
pretty freely over the drilled seed, after cover-
ing with earth.
Grass for Hay should now be cut and saved,
in large quantities. The best time to cut is
just as the grass is coming into bloom : and be
careful not to expose your hay too much to the
sun. Cure rapidly-haul in before rain falls-
and, in stacking away, sprinkle a little coarse
salt over each layer of the hay. It will "pay"
to do this, for the benefit of your stock next
winter; which (Vennor predicts] is going to be
cold, stormy and inclement.
Orange trees may still be budded with the
choicest well-known market sorts, and a few
"fancy" and "new" kinds, for trial. Bud low
down, and let your tree start as near the ground
as possible. If the branches are too low, they
can easily be cut off at any time: but if you
commence with a broom-shaped tree, you never


can get it right. We mention a few choice
market varieties of the Orange, as a guide for
beginners: Magnum Bonum, Homosassa, Non-
pareil, Hart's Tardive, Mediterranean Sweet,
thornlesss;) Navel; Satsuma, to resist cold;
Maltese Blood; St. Michael's; Mandarin, (Chi-
nese;) Dancy's Tangierine.
Lemon buds, of the finer sorts, such as Genoa,
Lamb, etc., should, also, be put into young aind
vigorous sour stocks. The new "Persian Lime"
may, also, be worthy of extensive propagation,
but our Fruit Committees have not yet pro-
nounced on its merits.
Toward the end of August, rake away and
clear off all the accumulated trash of your sum-


mer work, and begin to collect manure and get
all things ready for fall crops.

New Publications.
American Silk and Fruit Culturist.-A neat
little magazine of 32 pages, monthly, at $1 per
year. Campbell & Pepper, publishers, 1328
Chestnut-st., Philadelphia, Pa.
Alachua County, '(Florida;) her Attractive
Features and Public Improvements. By O. A.
Myers, Editor Advocate. Combined with a Corm-
plete County Business Directory, compiled and
published by Cannon & McCreary, Gainesville,
Fla. 1882. A very interesting and valuable
pamphlet of about 40 pages, devoted to our
attractive neighboring county, and giving a
great deal of information on location, health,
population and society; education; miscellane-
ous products; rail and water-ways; peculiari-
ties of soil; settlement, etc. Send for it, to
Cannon & McCreaiy, Gainesville, Fla., enclos-
ing stamp for return postage.
Amnerican Poultry Journal, monthly-$1.25
per year. C. J. Ward, Chicago, Ill.
The Poultry World, monthly-$1.25 per
year; and the Poultry Yard, weekly-$1.50
per. year. Address: H. H. Stoddard, Hart-
ford, Conn.
The Poultry Bulletin, monthly-$1.25 per
year. New York: 62 Courtlandt-st., Charles
R. Harker.
All four excellent publications; and worth
five times their cost to the poultry-raiser or
fancier.
The Orange-Growers' Gazette, Vol. 1--No.
1., comes to us from Micanopy, Fla. It is a four-
columed, eight-page sheet, devoted to "the or-
ange and horticultural interests of this (Alachua)
locality and ofthe State at large." A very good
little journal, which we hope, may live long and
prosper, and grow bigger.
The Century for August-" Midsummer
Holiday Number." This magazine, always good
and attractive, has surpassed itself in this issue.
It opens with a fine portrait of Richard Wag-
ner, the great musical composer ; followed by
"The Borderlands of Surrey," exquisitely illus-
trated; then we have "The Personal History of
Garibaldi," with a portrait; "The New North-
west;" "The American Museum of Natural
History;" The Lambs; a Tragedy;" "A
Snow Storm ;" "Some English Artists and their
Studios," profusely illustrated; The continua-
tion of "A Modern Instance," by W. D. How-
ells; "Steam Yachting in America," with illus-
trations; "Through One Administration," the


new story by Frances Hodgson Burnett; Top-
ics of the Times; Home and Society Litera-
ture; The World's Work, etc. A remarkably
attractive and valuable number. Four dollars
per year-35 cents per number. (See clubbing
terms with THE DISPATCH.)
The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature
is the standard re-print of all that is new and
valuable in trans-Atlantic literature. The
August number contains "The Faiths of the
World," from Blackmood's Magazine; "Peel
and Cobden;" "Thought Reading" "Ele-
phants';" "Sergeant Ballantyne's Experience;"
"A French Assize;" "The Dying Heroes;" a
continuation of "Lady Maud," a capital story,


--





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 2I


No HORSE RACING or "Agricultural Trots"
at our next Florida Fair! Only the harmless
and amusing Tournaments.. "0. K."

To CORRESPONDENTS.-We ask, as a special
favor, that our correspondents follow publish-
ers' rules, and write on only one side of their
paper.
LARGE SALE OF LARGE TREES.-Our friend,
Col. HARDEE, of "Honey-Moon Nurseries," has
had a regular "boom" in the sale of orange
trees lately. He has sold several thousand
four to six-year-old seedling trees; and has
orders now so far ahead that he cannot promise
any more trees during August.


by the author of "The Wreck of the Grosve-
nor;" "Names of Flowers;" "Newton and Dar-
win;" "An Eton Boy '" Literary Notices; For-
eign Literary Notes; Science and Art; Mis-
cellany, etc. Five dollars per year-single
numbers 45 cents.
Both the above, and all the current litera-
ture of the day-cheap publications, etc., for
sale by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, of this city.

Arabian Jessamine.
We return our sincere thanks to Mr. M. I.
PHILLIPS, for a queenly blossom of an Arabian
Jessamine, the size of an ordinary fuill-blown
rose. The bloom was perfect, measured two
and one-quarter inches in diameter by six and
one-eight inches in circumference, and was more
than double the usual size. Can it be beaten ?
We doubt it.
The Arabian Jessamine has a profilse but deli-
cate fragrance-much stronger than, but similar
to the tube rose. Mr. Phillips has demonstrated
its susceptibility of being cultivated in a very
high degree, and no flower garden should be
without it. It blossoms throughout the sum-
mer, and for scenting a drawing-room or parlor
with a delicate, refreshing perfume is par ex-
cellence.
Florida State Fair I
By the correspondence between Secretary
ELLIOTT and Manager RUSSELL, (printed in
this issue,) it will be seen that the next Florida
State Fair will be held in this city. We are
assured by those who have the matter in charge
that every effort will be put forth to make the
coming Fair broader and more comprehensive
than ever before-a true exponent of the great
and varied resources of our wonderful State-
and to that end they invoke the hearty co-op-
eration of every progressive man and woman
throughout the length and breadth of the Pen-
insula. Premium list and further pauticulars
hereafter.
MANY valuable and interesting replies from
Fruit-Groswers, in our next.

S'TRAWBERRY PLANTS for sale. See adver-
tisement of W. E. SCULL.

MANY COMMUNICATIONS of value and inter-
est, received too late for this number, shall
appear in our next issue.

ANSWERS to many correspondents -and no-
tices of new publications crowded out of this,
but will appear in our next number.


tears are divided by a very thin partition. I
know of few stories more touchingly sad and
pathetic than that related by old Bet "bout
po' little Chip wat got drownedd' I cannot
trust my voice to read it aloud, and a strange
dimness comes. over my-glasses, blurring and
hiding the page."

Useful Herbs for the Garden.
"S. O. J.," in Country Gentleman,says: "In
every vegetable garden there should be planted
a bed of useful herbs which are so often needed
in the kitchen, nursery and sick room during
the year. Their culture is very simple, after
the seeds are planted, the only labor needed
being to keep out the weeds and thin out the
plants so that they will grow stout and strong.
The leaves of some herbs are used for seasoning
and dressings for meats, and others for making


TIE BANANA article of our friend, E. H.
HART, Esq., on page 286 of present issue, is
one of the best papers on the subject that we
have ever read, and is worth five times the yearly
cost of THE DISPATCH to any resident of Flor-
ida. Part 2, in conclusion, shall appear next
week.
--- .... .
GEORGIA HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY.-Ou r
fruit-growing readers in South Georgia and
Northern and Middle Florida should attend
the "Seventh Annual Session of the Georgia
State Horticultural Society," to be held in the
city of of Macon on the 1st, 2d and 3d of Au-
gust. See notice in DISPATCH of July 24, page
275.
Obituary.
We regret to learn of the death, at High-
lands, North Carolina, on June 15, 1882, of
FRANKL. DIMICK, aged 39 years, eldest son
of M. W. Dimick, of Lake Worth, Fla. He
leaves a wife and three small children to mourn
his departure. Our kindest sympathies are
extended to those who mourn.

"Bright Days 1"
An old friend and school-companion of Mrs.
MARY Ross BANKs, author of "Bright Days"
-(see DISPATCH of July 24, page 277,) thus
speaks of the book and writer:
"I am quite delighted with 'Bright Days,'
and think it merit seven more praise than you
gave it. While it reminds me of 'Uncle Remus,'
it is in no sense an imitation of that delectable
'story-book,' nor does it especially resemble it,
only that it is equally droll and perfect in the
plantation-negro dialect. Mrs Banks's version
of 'De Wolf; de Rabbit, an' de Tar Baby,'
(page 204,) is, in many respects, superior to
the same legend as related to 'the little boy' by
'Uncle Remus; and this is no 'faint praise.'
'Bright Days' differs from 'Uncle Remus' in
dealing entirely with home and plantation life
as it existed in Georgia before the war; bring-
ing us into closer contact with masters and
mistresses, children, domestic servants and
'field hands,' than any book I have ever read.
For me and thousands of others, (I doubt not,)
it possesses a rare and priceless value as a rem-
iniscence and record of the 'good old times,'
which 'come not back again.' *
Dear, genial, buoyant MARY Ross !-how well
do I remember her, in her sunny and happy girl-
hood! She was the life and moving spirit of
every circle, and one of her pet sayings--ftten
quoted by her companions since-was-'Giris !
there's lots of fun in America!' She has put
not a little of this 'fun' into her 'Bright Days;'
but, as it is in actual life, her laughter and


it in large quantities from the juices of various
plants, more particularly the sugar beet.
By the recent French process referred to in
the Scieutific American, the nitrogen of tie air
and the hydrogen of water are liberated by the
simultaneous action of calorically liquefied
metal, and by fitiu-Ler manipulation caused to
combine in proper proportion to form ammonia.
This newly formed ammonia, combined with
carbonic acid by employment of charcoal,
forms the carbonate of ammonia of commerce.
The carbonate of ammonia has become of
such general and popular use, more particu-
larly as a leavening agent for baking and
cooking purposes, and its employment in quan-
tities in all the more carefully compounded and
wholesome baking powders as well as by bakers
and professional cooks, has become so universal
that this discovery is of much importance as
tending to enlarge and cheapen its production.


herb teas, therefore they should be gathered be-
fore the plants flower. .Unless it is desired to
raise seeds from them it is better to cut off the
flowering shoots as soon as they appear, and
throw all the strength of the roots into the
leaves and cut two or three crops from them.
"Balm is a perennial plant, and its leaves have
an agreeable aromatic taste and a lemon-like
door, and are usefill for soups and dressings.
They are also used for tea to be taken for
coughs and colds. Basil is also much used for
seasonings; its leaves, when dried and pow-
dered anll cliopped fine while fresh, having the
flavor and odor of cloves. Caraway, a peren-
nial, is valuable for its seeds, which are used in
cakes, and an oil is distilled from them for
medical purposes. Coriander is annual, culti-
vated chiefly for its seeds, which arejsed by
druggists and distillers, but the young leaves
make a highly flavored salad, and are some-
times used as a seasoning for soups. Lavender
is a shrubby plant, valuable for the pleasing
perfume of its foliage, from which comes the
distilled water that is so popular for the toilet.
"Sweet marjoram is an annual ; its leaves are
very aromatic, and highly esteemed for flavor-
ing soups, dressings and sausages. Sage is also
much employed for these purposes. It also
makes an excellent febrifuge. A tea made
from its dried leaves is considered a specific for
colds and coughs. As a hair restorative it is
also in repute. A strong decoction of the leaves,
with rusty nails added to it to supply iron, will,
it is said, prevent the hair from turning grey.
Thyme is a species of marjoram, witl much
smaller leaves. It is used for flavoring. Tansy
is useful in the sick room, and many women
hold it in higl esteem. Rue possesses very hit-
ter properties, and is considered a specific for
some complaints. Its leaves are gathered and
steeped in alcohol while green, or else dried for
winter use. Wormlwood is also used in the
same way as rue, and it is thought to be highly
beneficial to dyspeptics. It is said to lie used
for making absinthe, a favorite stomacic em-
ployed by the French."

Ammonia from the Air.
The Scientific )iierican publishes a new for-
mnla for producing, ammonia, recently discov-
ered by a French chemist. Numerous methods
have from time to time been devised to utilize
the atmospheric nitrogen for making amnionia,
with more or less success. Since its discovery
by Eunckel in 1677, and the determination of
its relative parts by Dr. BLACK a century later,
it has been p)rodluced from various organic sub-
stances. At present the ammonia use(l in com-
merce in this c )untry is principally the product
of a mineral di tiiation. Its presence in large
quantities in the vegetable kindgom has led to
the establishment of works which also produce


r






9H .* THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Stirring the Soil--Its Benefits.
HAMILTON COUNTY, OHIO.
I am a young farmer, and would be obliged
if you would tell me (1) what you think the
best and cheapest way of making a good crop
of corn and potatoes ? I have no manure made
and no money to buy fertilizers with. (2) What
ought the landlord do to help to fertilize the
crops raised on the shares ? RENTER.
1. This is a difficult question to answer, not
knowing the character of the soil, or how it has
been treated. In general, we would say that
frequent stirring of the soil is the cheapest and
best method of raising such crops. We will
give an example. We once put out a vineyard
of two acres, on a thin clay hillside, on which
corn or tSbacco had been grown for 42
years. It was poor as poverty, and we had no
manure nearer than St. Louis, 12 miles away;
yet we hoped vines would do well there, if well
cultivated. To insure frequent cultivation of
the vines, we planted two rows of potatoes be-
tween the vine rows. On the same day we
planted our potatoes, we sent the man and horse
and what seed was left to the next neighbor's
to help him put out his potatoes. He had a
piece of what he called new ground, separated
from ours by a small ravine-his land sloping
to the north and ours to the south. Our neigh-
bor was a retired physician of more than three
score and ten, and was a successful horticultu-
rist.
After potatoes were planted he said: "Well,
now, Professor, let us see who will raise the best
crop of potatoes." We at once declined to
compete, as he had new ground and plenty of
money and fertilizers, and we were as poor as
our worn-out tobacco land. Nevertheless, on
returning home with our hired man, we told
him it would never do to let the Doctor beat us
much on the potato crop; so our potatoes must
be cultivated every week until they put out
blooms, and the work was done and two hoe-
ings extra given by us, one early in the season
and the other at the close.
We worked the soil not to kill weeds, for
there were none, but to make potatoes.
The Doctor had faith in his new ground, and
cultivated but twice. Now for the result. His
crop was hardly worth digging. Our crop was
the best crop in the village, and netted up in
St. Louis more than $100 per acre,
The best crop of corn we ever raised was
plowed five times after planting, before the
shoots put out. We broke the land thoroughly,


rolled and harrowed before planting. The
average on thirty acres without manure was 92
bushels. Some old style farmers said we in-
jured the crop by cultivating so often. If so,
we can't tell what the crop might have been if
we had stirred the ground less frequently.
When the corn crop is planted do not wait
for the weeds to start before you start cultiva-
tion. Remember the good farmer does not cul-
tivate to kill weeds, but to make a good crop,
and in the making of the crop the weeds will be
destroyed.
If the tenant is to stay on the farm but one
year, he cannot afford to do much toward ferti-
lizing as he could if le were to remain five or


ten years. We cannot say what per cent. of
the fertilizer remains in the soil after a crop.
So much depends on the kind of crop and kind
of soil, kind of fertilizer and cultivation. We
do not know of any established custom in regard
to it in this country. We should say that if
the landlord is to have half the crop, he should
furnish half the fertilizer used, or in that pro-
portion, and it should be of a kind, too, that
will cause the promptest growth of the crop,
and not that which longest benefits the land.-
L. N. B., Agricultural Editor Cincinnati Com-
mercial.
Ten Years' Agricultural Progress.
A special census statement contains the fol-
lowing agricultural aggregates : The value of
the products of agriculture had not been com-
puted, nor the value of the hay crop for 1879
(the census year's crop). The wool statement
does not include that grown on public lands
and ranches, nor that in hands of butchers, etc.,
100,000,000 pounds:

1880. 1870.
Land in farms in acres........... 539,351,713 407,735,041
Improved land in acres......... 287,220,321 188,921,099
Value of farms...................... $10,197,161,905 $9,262,803,861
Value of farm implements...... $406,522,414 .$336,878,429
Value of farm animals........ $1,500,503,807 $1,525,276,457
Value of farm products............................. 2,447,538,655
H orses .................................... 10,357,981 7,145,370
Mules and asses ................... 1,812,932 1,125,415
Working oxen....................... 993,970 1,319,271
Milch cows.............................. 12,443,593 8,935,332
Other cattle....... ...................... 22,488,590 13,566,005
Sheep........................................ 35,191,656 28,477,951
Swine..................................... 47,683,951 25,134,569
Corn in bushels....................... 1,754,861,535 760,944,549
W heat ..................... 459,479,505 287,745,626
Oats .............. 407,858,999 282,107,157
Rye ................... 19,831,595 16,918,795
Barley .................. 44,113,495 29,761,305
Buckwheat ..................... 11,817,327 9,821,721
Cotton in bales ............. ........ 5,746,414 3,011996
Hay in tons ...... ......................... 27,316,048
Wool in pounds .................... 155,685,750 100,102,387
Butter ..................... 777,204,471 514,092,683

Cotton, this Yeaie.
The Cincinnati Price Current figures the cot-
ton acreage this year at 16,590,000, or nearly
two per cent. less than a year ago. It then
summarizes the prospect as follows:
"The average yield of cotton per acre during
the past nine years, from 1872 to 1880 inclu-
sive, was 172 pounds; the lowest was in 1874,
when it was 151 pounds, and the highest in 1880,
when it was 198c pounds. The accurate yield
of last year per acre is not yet known, but it
was approximately 153 pounds per acre. The
possibilities of the crop this year, therefore,
upon the basis of the yield of 1880-that is
198l pounds per acre-and the acreage given
above-are 6,792,000 bales or 485 pounds each.
With the yield of 1874 of 151 pounds per acre,
the crop would amount to 5,352,000 bales of
468 pounds, which was the average weight of
bales that year, and with the average of 172
pounds per acre, the yield would amount to
6,000,000 bales of 475 pounds each, which is


about the average weight of bales for a series
of years."
0.0
"SEA-ISLAND COTTON.-The Southern
States and Egypt, are the only two countries
which give the supply of long-staple cotton.
Attempts have been made by the British Gov-
ernment to stimulate the cultivation in the
West Indies and other possessions which will
produce it, but with little or no success. The
cultivaiton of this particular staple is falling off
in the United States, owing to the high price of
labor, which gives Egypt so much the advan-
tage. The latter country is now in a very un-
happy position and there is likelihood of a civil
war, in which case long-staple cotton will com-


mand high prices. Those who have planted
this year may reap the benefit.
--
EXPORTING CALIFORNIA WHEAT AT NEW
ORLEANS.-California wheat exports by way of
New Orleans were made first June 15 last, when
about 84,000 bushels were shipped from that
port in two vessels. This grain was carried by
the Southern Pacific, the Texas and Pacific,
the Houston and Texas Central, the Texas and
New Orleans, and Morgan's Louisiana and
Texas road, the distance being as follows:
SMiles.
South Pacific, San Francisco to Sierra Blanca........... 1,377
Texas and Pacific, Sierra Blanca to Dallas............. 557
Texas Central, Dallas to Houston.............................. 265
Texas and New Orleans and Morgan's road, Hous-
ton to New Orleans................................................ 362
T otal.................. ............ .. .................................. 2,561

The LeConte Pear,
Of Southern Georgia, has a far brighter prospect
than is indicated by the following from a late
number of the Country Gentleman:
"PEARS IN INDIANA.-In your issue of June
22, I see a request for information concerning
the pear crop. I have on my farm about four
hundred bearing pear trees, and I will have
perhaps half a bushel of pears. Trees which
have not failed in this climate for years are en-
tirely barren. This is all on account of the
freeze of April 14. W. R. H., Terre Haute, Ind."




Cotton-Seed Fat as an Adulterant for Lard.
This fat is in some respects peculiar. It is, as
you see, not at all unlike lard, being similar in
consistence and general appearance. Accord-
ing to my analyses of several samples which I
have had submitted to me by firms in the lard
trade, anxious to know what it is, I find on an
average the following result: (1.) It has an ac-
tual density at 1000 F. of .911.5 to .912. (2.)
It yields on saponification 95.5 per cent. of fatty
acids, all insoluble. (3.) It is completely solu-
ble in ether and in hot absolute alcohol. (4.)
When melted and treated by my modification
of Chateau's course, it gives reactions for cotton
oil. It is, therefore, evidently the "stearine"
separated out during the rectification of that
oil. A most striking fact is that, although
nicely made to almost the exact consistence of
lard at ordinary temperature, and not becoming
perfectly fluid under 900 F., yet, after melting,
it does not again solidify, but remains a yellow
oil, until it has been kept at 40 F. for some
time, when it again resumes its original appear-
ance. Its detection in lard is happily rendered
simple by its high density and by the article
not setting so solid as it was at first, after hav-
ing been kept melted for the purpose of taking
gravity. If added to "butterine" it makes the
article softer and better looking in winter, and
increases the density, but the high insoluble


acids then serve to distinguish such a "butter-
ine" from a mixture of fat and butter. Many
recent "butterines," which on the density actu-
ally show a considerable amount of pure butter,
have not a trace, but the error is due to the
presence of this cotton "stearine."-John Muter,
Ph. D., F. L C., in Analyst. v

-A fence 200 miles long is being built in
Texas-the longest continuous fence in the
world. It will be of wire, and iron posts, and
will extend over the Panhandle, and thirty
miles into New Mexico, so as to entirely en-
close the property of a cattle company.
-An English horticulturist, who is a careful
observer of insect life, has noticed that honey
bees rarely go near those flowers which bumble-
bees seem to like best.






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 2


Florida Fruit-Growers' Association-Office at Jack-
sonville-D. Redmond, President.; W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; W. H. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding Sec-
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee--Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, O. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official, organ-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA STATE GRANGE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICES.-Master, Wm. H. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Wm. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B. F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Field-
ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. H. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate
Keeper, Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Wm. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T. W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H.
Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Geo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Umstead, Hous-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville.-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J. C. Greeley, Treasurer.
Directors-J. H. McGinniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro, P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney. Annual meeting-
Last Friday in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; 0. E: Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. 0. Taylor, Secretary and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Florida.-President, A. B. Bartlett, Georgetown; Vice-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. Hawkins, Lake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George; George H. Thom, Treasurer,


True American Purple Top and White Flat Dutch,
White and Yellow Ruta Baga, and all approved varie-
ties of Swede Turnip Seed, 50 cents per pound; if sent by
mail, 16 cents added. Warranted fresh and genuine.
Especial prices quoted for large quantities.
A full assortment of Garden Seeds for the season.
Especial attention given to orders per mail.
C.. B. ROGrE1MeS, SEEDSMAN,
133 MARKET STREET,

PHILADELPHIA.
to August 3.

S50,000


LeConto Pear Tre6s Oand Cuings
FOR SALE AT

3is:ie 2-Tursery.

H. H. SANFORD Proprietor,
to Aug 21 THOMASVILLE, GA.


ONIONS FOR INSOMNIA.-I venture to sug-
gest a new but simple remedy for want of sleep,
says a man who has had experience. Opiates,
in any form, even the liquor opii sedat and
chloroform, will leave traces of their influence
next morning. I, therefore, prescribe for my-
self-and have frequently done so for others-
onions; simply common onions, raw, but Span-
ish onions stewed will do. All know the taste
of onions; this is due to a peculiar essential oil
contained in this most valuable and healthy
root. The oil has, I am sure, highly soporific
powers. In my own case they never fail. If
I am much pressed with work and feel that I
shall not sleep, I eat two or three small onions,
and the effect is magical. Onions are also ex-
cellent things to eat when much exposed to in-
tense cold. Finally, if a person cannot sleep,
it is because the blood is in the brain, and not
in the stomach. The remedy, therefore, is ob-
vious. Call the blood down from the brain to
the stomach. This is to be done by eating a
biscuit, a hard-boiled egg, a bit of bread and
cheese, or something. Follow this up with a
glass of milk, or even water, and you will fall
asleep, and will, I trust, bless the name of the
writer.

AN EXCELLENT WHITEWASH-Published by
Request.-Take a half bushel of unslacked
lime; slake it with boiling water, keeping it
covered to retain the heat; strain through a
coarse wire strainer; dissolve a peck of clean
salt in water; add the liquid only; boil three
pounds of ground rice to a thin paste; stir this
in, boiling hot; dissolve a half pound of clear
glue by soaking it well and suspending it in a
small vessel inside of another vessel containing
boiling water; add this. Now add four or five
gallons of hot water to the mixture; stir it
well; set it aside for four or five days, care-
fully covering to exclude dust and dirt. When
ready for use, heat; if too thick, add boiling
water; it will not be apt to be too thin; it
should be applied hot. Different shades may
be secured by the addition of Spanish brown,
lampblack, yellow ochre, Venetian red, etc.;
anything but green, which will not work with
lime.
Aa
Agricultural, Horticultural and JIPonological
Associations.


State that you saw this in THE DISPATCH.
July 3, tf



HOMES IN-THE SUNNY SOUTH.


SPLENDID OFFER TO SETTLERS


40 Hours from New York City: 108 Miles
from Savannah.


SoutlI Gb eorgia Iisixds for
Sale by

J. M. STICKER,

Jue Glenmore, Ware Co., Ga.


Georgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
mond, Fort Gates.
Picolata Agricultural and Horticultural Society.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, W. N. ParKer, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugn, Corresponding Secretary,
N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., Recording Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer. Meets first Saturday in each month.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. Mathers, Second Vice-President; B.
W. Powell, Corresponding Secretary; B. F. Jordan, Sec-
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical Fruit Growers' Association of Monroe County,
Florida.-Home office, Myers, Florida; F. A.. Hendry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Soqiety.-J. M. Jackson,
President; Thomas Tillis, First Vice-President; J. B.
Sutton, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary; J. M. Barco, Recording Secretary;
L. W. Hamlin, Assistant Recording Secretary.
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Association.-
John Bradford, President, Bradfordville, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida.
Pinellas, Florida, Fruit Growers' Association.-D. W.
Meeker, President; Wm. P. Neeld, Secretary.
Central Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida.-Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
Evergreen Horticultural Society, Dunedin, Florida.-
J. W. Matchlt, President; W. Tate, Vice-President;
Geo. L. Jones, Secretary.
Decatur County Fair Association Bainbridge, Geor-
gia.-Maston O'Neil President, I. Kwilecki, Secretary.
Lake Wier Agricultural and Pomological Society (of
Marion County, Florida).-Captain J. L. Cainy, Presi-
dent; Dr. L. M. Ayer, Corresponding Secretary.
Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Higgins Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Association, Albany,
Georgia.-L. E. Welch, President; T. M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
Sumter County Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation.-D. L. Hubbard, President, Leesburg; W. C.
Dodd, Recording Secretary, Leesburg; A. P. Roberts,
Corresponding Secretary, Leesburg.
Florida Central Agricultural Society.-Thos. F. King,
President Gainesville; Secretary,
--- ; W. K. Cessna, Corresponding Secretary, Gaines-
ville.
Archer Agricultural Association.-W. B. Lipsey,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine Secretary; Dr. J. C. Neal,
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewis, Treasurer, Tallahassee.
Indian River Agricultural and Pomological Society.--
A. P. Cleveland, President; W. H. Sharp, Secretary,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
Association.-R. J. Mays, President; Franlk W. Pope,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
Orange County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred L. Robertson, Corresponding
Secretary.
Gadsden County Fair Association.-Jesse Wood Pres-
ident; W. H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R. Harris,
Second Vice-President; J. W. Kendricks, Secretary; E.
C. Lou, Treasurer.
South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
which we may have fallen in the naming of officers, &c.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH ?]


PIANOS AND ORCGANS
.A.- ". C.A. C B'E ,
15 East Bay Jacksonville.
SOLD ON INSTALLMENTS, AT LOWEST PRICES-
branch of Ludden & Bates, Savannah-EXACTLY
SAME PRICES AND TERMS, Sheet Music, Strings
and small instruments of all kinds. Send for cata-
logues, prices and terms. TUNING AND REPAIRING
a specialty. My tuner will make regular tours through
the State, and my customers will thus have my repre-
sentative at their doors, a great advantage to purchasers
of instruments, to sept 26, '82

URIP TURNIP SEED!
SEEI D .


M


m


I
-' i-
.z


I


THE

FLORIDA*



DAILY TIMES.







THE TIMES is the official paper of the city and the
leading paper of the State. It has the largest circulation
in Florida, and reaches all parts of it. It is not merely
a local newspaper, but aims to advocate the interests
and promote the prosperity of Florida as a whole.
Its reputation outside the State is very high. It has
taken rank among those journals whose columns are
looked to for news, and whose comments are quoted
with respect throughout the country.
Its editors have had wide and varied experience in
journalism North as well as South; its advertising pa-
tronage is liberal and of the best character; and its re-
sources, financial and other, are ample. It will furnish
Florida with a live, progressive, outspoken, and reada-
ble newspaper, the peer of any.


ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.
THE TIMES has secured by special contract the full
despatches of the ASSOCIATED PRESS. Besides that
its Editor is Agent of the Associated Press for the State
of Florida, which gives him great advantages in obtain-
ing the freshest and most important State news.


SPECIAL DESPATCHES.
With representatives in the leading news centres of
the country, THE TIMES is well served in addition to
the regular Press reports. During the past winter it has
received a very large number of telegraphic specials."


CORRESPONDENCE.
Its regular correspondence from Washington, New
York and Boston is of noteworthy excellence; and its
State correspondence has attracted much attention.
This feature will be extended and improved; and to
this end correspondence containing news or items of
information of any kind is solicited from all quarters.


"OLD SI. "
In addition to his editorial work, Mr. Small will write
regularly for THE TIMES, and in its Sunday issues the
famous "Old Si" will disseminate wisdom in chunks
to the Florida public.
TERM (strictly in advance): One year, $10; Six
months, $5; three months, $2.50; one month, $1. sent
one month on trial for 50 cents.
Remittance should be made by draft or post-office
order, or in a registered letter. Address
JONES & SMALL,
to sept 26,'82 Jacksonville, Fla.

lFO:R S A.-,-..
Hickory Bluff, 46 acres, 18 acres Hammock, cleared and
enclosed with Picket fence. 200 thrifty young Orange
trees growing on the place. Bold bluff river front of over
a quarter of a mile, and steamer channel close in shore,
and over five miles of water protection to the northwest, giv-
ing perfect security against frost. Nine miles below Jack-
sonville, and one mile from New Berlin. Can come to
city every morning oh mail steamer and return in the
afternoon. A choice place for orange growing and truck
farming. Price, $2,500.
Also, two desirable city lots 53x209 feet, and one 70x156
feet covered with thrifty orange trees 6 years old half
mile from business center. Good neighborhood (all
white). Price of first, $600each. Price ofsecond, a corner,
very handsome, $800. Apply to
J. H. NORTOWN,
No. 1 West Bay Street, JACKSONVILLE.


tj LLIqu JU LI






TI THE FLORIDA DISPATCH


THE SUWANNEE



STEAM SAW & PLAIN HILLS,

ELLAVIILLE, F1'LOUIDA,

DREW & BUCKI, Proprietors.

---"---)--

We respectfully announce to our friends and the pub-
lic generally, that, having secured the services of con-
petent Draughtsmen, Architects and Mechanics, we are
prepared to estimate on and contract for the building of

DWELLINGS,
COTTAGES,
FACTORIES,
HOTELS
PUBLIC EDIFICES,
etc., at any point accessible by the several railroad and
steamboat lines. Possessing the advantage of manufac-
turing our own lumber, we are enabled to offer very lib-
eral inducements as to terms and quality of material.
)raughts, plans, estimates and information furnished
on application.
We have also made extensive additions to our Plan-
ing Mill, and will continue, as heretofore, to manufacu-
ture and keep in stock a full line of Framing and Finish-
ing Lumber, Mouldings, Brackets, Balusters, Pickets,
Laths, etc.


July17, '82-tf.


DREwV & BiUCIe FI,
Ellaville, Florida.


LANDS FOR SALE
SUITABLE FOR

Orange Groves,
1-1 IUL' LU 5L, LI 111 UIIU L11U Vi Ul

Satsuma, Pnnam GCoRty, Floriia,
Send for circular to

WHITNEY, GOLD & HODGES,


Satsuma, Nashua P. O.,
FLORI])A.A


june 26-tf


DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,

GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emnery Papers, &ce.
AGENT FOR
PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIRE TEST.
Johnson's IPrepared iKalsomine. IWads-
woorth, ~Martinez and Longman's
'Trepaired Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE O [L
FOR ORANGE TREES.
-No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
to mar25,'83 JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


tlawlirry Plants For Sale!
200,000 Choice pure Beatty's stock........$4.00 per Thousand
100,000 Pure Nunan's.............................. 6.00 per Thousand
50,000 Pure Crescent Seedlings............ 6.00 per Thousand
Terms: Cash with order.
Address. XV. El. SCUIjL L,
aug 1 to nov 3, '82. Jacksonville, Florida.


"Fmarifa as a Prmanilnt Homo."
A 32-PAGE PAMPHLET. PRICE, 10C.
Address,
TE L3 FAIR STOC'KTON,
july 24 to 'ct 23. Jacksonville, Fla.


FRANK W. MUMBY. JNO. N. C. STOCKTON.. RAYMOND D. KNIGHT.

MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,


1879.
F. W. MUMBY & CO.


SSUCCESSORS TO --

IMPORTERS AND WH LESALE AND RETAIL


1870.
JNO. S. DRIGGS & CO.


Crockery, China, Glass and Earthenware.
We have the largest and most complete stock in the State. All the Latest Novelties in Majolica and Fancy
Goods, Vases, Motto Cups and Saucers, etc. Decorated Tea, Dinner and Chamber Sets in a large Variety. Lamps
and Chandeliers, Fancy Vase Lamps in Majolica, Faience, Kito, Porcelain and other Wares. Wood and Willow,
Stone and Tinware. The American, Crown and Peerless Ice Cream Freezers, Water Coolers, Filters, etc.
SOLE STATE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED

Monitor Oil Stoves and Little Joker Oil Cans.
THE BEST IN THE WORLD. Send for Price Lists.
The best and only absolutely safe Oil Stove in the World. It is Economical, Ornamental, Convenient, Dura-
ble, Compact and Cheap. Its fuel is Coal Oil. No Dust! No Ashes! No Smoke! No Trouble! Testimonials
from those using the Stoves given on application.
Fruit Jars and Jelly Tumblers, Wine Bottles, Flasks, etc. Special inducements to the trade.
Merchants, Hotels, Boarding Houses and Bars will find it greatly to their advantage to give us a trial. Send
for list of assorted packages.
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD.
MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
to July 5, '83. (Mention this paper) 13 WEST BAY STIREET.


NEW CROP TURNIPSEED'S!
Warranted Strictly F reshl and Genuine. Purple Top Flat, White Flat, Red Top Globe, White Egg, Golden
Ball, free by mail, postpaid, 75c. per lb. White Globe, Large Cow Horn, Yellow Aberdeen, Amber,- Globe, Im-
proved Purple Top Yellow Ruta Baga, White Ruta Baga, &c., 70c. per lb., postpaid. Customers ordering by
freight or express can deduct 16c. per lb. from these prices. Catalogues Free.
Branchig Sorighli/ Seed, 10c per pound, $3.00 per bushel. Address
JOHNSON & STOKES, Seedsmen, 1114 l market St. hilad.elpl.ia
to June 9,'83.

Ocean Steamship Company.

SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.



The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, Augnst 2d, 8:30 a. m.
CITY CF AUGUSTA, Saturday, August 5th, 11:00 a. m.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, August 9th, 3:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, August 12th, 5:00 p. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, August 16th, 8:00 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, August 19th, 10:00 a. m.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, August 23d, 1:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, August 26th, 4:30 p. m.
CITY, OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday. August 30th, 7:30 a. m.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
II. YON GE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agentof Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
WV. H. HETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
II. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS,
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. Y.


TALLAHASSEE NURSERY.
LeConte and Kieffer Pear Buds, $5 per hundred, by
mail. Also, trees of same for sale.
W. II. 11ASIKiEJ .L,
to july 24 Tallahassee, Florida.

SEND $1.50 TO

=TO1i'rT'S 3F 4S- .zl= a.C'

35 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.,
And get a bottle of Richmond's Samaritan Nervine.
Cures Nervous Disorders, Dizziness, Vertigo, Seminal
Weakness. The only sure cure for Epileptic Fits.
Address IIOLT'S PHARMACY.
to aug 20, '82

HEADQUARTERS LeCONTE PEAR.




LCONTE PAR R THEES FOR SALE

Grown on their own roots, at the oldest and most
reliable LeConte Pear Nursery in the world. Prices low,
and stock pure as usual. Fair and honest dealing
has always been our motto.
Being the originator of the LeConte Pear business,
and having grown and sold more trees than any one,
we fatter ourselves, we can, as heretofore, give perfect
satisfaction.
L. L. VARNEDOE & SONS,
THOMASVILLE, GEORGIA.
to July 31.


VIEWS OF FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In Book IForn, Containining 1
Views Each.
Souvenir of Florida, (small size)....................25c.
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size)....... . ........ ..................................... 25c.
Souvenir of Jacksonville,( large size).................50c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine,(large size)..............50c.
Stereoscopic Views, per Doz. $1.50.
Address
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
JACI. SONVILLE, FLA.

ST. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
~--o0-----
CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.


OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
1 yr to April 23, '83
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


I I _ ...~ __ _.~ ,








TIIE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 29'





* .-,.T


FLORIDA DISPATCH H LINE.




Rates on WATERMELONS in Car Loads of 20,000 Pounds.


TO T.A.IZME F PECT 0VC C .A.n 4Y 20th, 18is82.


To-


A tlanta .............................................................................................................................
A u g u sta .................................................................................................................................
Baltim ore............................................................................................... ...............................
Boston .......................................... ..............................................
Bristol, Tenn.................................................................. ................................................
Charleston, S. C...................................... ......................................................................
Colum bus, Ga....................................................................... ............................................
Chattanooga, Tenn..... ........................................... ......................................................
Cincinnati, .......................... .. .. .......................................................
Cairo, Ill............. .......................... .................... ......................................
Colum bus, O.................................................................................................... ..................
Cleaveland, .................................................................................................................................
Chicago, Ill........................................................................................................................
Dalton, Ga..........................................................................................................................
Evansville, Ind......................................................................................................................
Indianapolis, Ind........................................................................ .........................................
K noxville, Tenn..............................................................................................................
Louisville, K y.......................................................................................................................
M acon, Ga.............................................................................................................................
M ontgom ery, Ala..................................................................................................................
M obile, Ala.................................................................................. ............... ........ .........
Memphis, Tenn............................................................
N ashville, Tenn............................................................... .......................
New Orleans, La..................................... ..........................................................................
N ew York, N Y.........................................................................................
Peoria, Ill................................................................................... .........................
Philadelphia, Pa........................................................ ..................................................
Rom e, Ga................................................................................................................................
Savannah, Ga.............................................................................. .............
St. Louis, M o....................... ....................................................................................... ......... ..
Terre H aute, Ind....................... .................... ......... ..........................................................


From Florida Tran-i
Fr o m Jacksonville, sit nR ofi<, except Florida Transit Rail- Florida Central and
allahan and Live Ocala and Points be- road, Ocala and Western Railroad.
Oak. yond. Points beyond.


$ 60 00
55
100
100
90
36-
60
70
80
90
100
100
110
70
80
90
84 50
80
45
60
70
80
75
80
100
110
100
70
22
90
100


$ 85 00
80
125
125
115
61
85
95
105
115
125
125
135
95
105
115
109 50
105
70
85
95
105
100
105
125
135
125
95
47
115
125


$ 90 00
85
130
130
120
66
90
100
110
120
130
130
140
100
110
120
114 50
110
75
90
100
110
105
110
130
140
-130
100
52
120
130


$ 80 00
75
119
119
110
56
80
90
100
110
120
120
130
90
100
110
104 50
100
65
80
90
100
95
100
119
130
119
90
41
110
120


Excess of 20,000 pounds will be charged for pro rata, provided the weight loaded does not exceed the capacity of the car, as marked thereon. If cars are not
marked with the capacity thereof, the weight of load must not exceed 20,000 pounds. All excess of load above capacity of the cars will be charged for at double rates.
Melons must be loaded and unloaded by the owners. Shipments of Melons will be receipted for only as "Shipper's Count." This Line will not be responsible
for deficiency in quantity loaded in the cars, nor for damage resulting from improper loading. Shipments via Florida Dispatch Line will not be required guaranteed
or prepaid.


D. H. ELLIOTT, Gen' Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.


JAS. L. TAYLOR, Gen'l Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE in connection with AT -iANTI -OA&ST 3lX.
IRates on Watermelons in Car Loads of 20,000 in Cents per 100 Ibs. To take effect May 20th, 1882.


To-



B a ltim o re................................................................................................................................
B o sto n .... .... ............................................... ................. ............ ........................... .............
New York....
Providence.......... ..
P h iladelp h ia ....................................... .................................................
P o rtsm o u th V a......................................................................................................................
Petersburg, Va...................... ......................................... ....
R ichm ond, V a......................... .............................. .......... ..... .
Wilmington, N. C....................................................................
Washington, D. C. (via Portsmouth)..............................................................................
Shipments via "ATLANTIC COAST LINE" must be prepaid to destination.
will be charged at double rates.


ro
ar


Florida Transit and
m Jacksonville Peninsula Railroad, Florida Transit Rail- Florida Central and
4d Callahan. except Ocala and road, cala and Western Railroad.
Points beyond. Points beyond.

Cts. Cts. Cts. Ots.
.632 .76 .78% .73
.68% .81 .83Y .78
.68V .81 .83 .78
.681 .81 .83% .78
.681 .81 .832 .78
.48Y .61 .63, .58
.48Y .61 .63% .58
.48 .61 .63 .58
.38% .51 .53% .48
.63% .76 .78% .73
20,000 lbs. will be the minimum rate charged for. All excess of capacity of cars


~SAClc~---- -i~L15 CCI~ ~5_
-----~---
F-~-~---- ------


~-.-- --- -- - -- - --- ---------------- ----;s~ I





29Q THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
I ,-----------


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
0-,
MERCHANTS & MINERS



WcAl r


The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail
From BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH
EVERY FIVE DAYS,
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE, as follows:
Monday, July 3d, at 9 a. m.
Sat urday, July 8th, at 1 p. m.
Thursday, July 13th, at 5 p. m.
Tuesday, July 18th, at 9:30 p. m.
Monday, July 24th, at 1 p. m.
Saturday, July 29th, at 5 p. m.
Thursday, August 3d, at 10 a. m.
Tuesday, August 8th, at 1 p. m.
Monday, August 14th, at 8 a. m.
Saturday, August 19th,'at 10 a. m.
Thursday, August 24th, at 2 p. m.
Tuesday, August 29th, at 8 a. m.
The steamers are first-class in every respect, and every
attention will be given to passengers.
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $15,
Including Meals and Stateroom.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Baltimore.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quickdispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
column.
JAS. B. WEST & CO., Agents.
Savannah, January 8th, 1878. 30-tf

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA




WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, JUNE 4th, 1882, Passen-
Sger Trains will run over the Waycross Short Line
as follows;
as olows;,Fast Mail. Jack'lle Ex.
Daily. Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at................. 9:00 a. m. 5:35 p. m.
Arrive Callahan at .................... 9:00 p. m.
Leave Callahan at .......................... 9:45 a. 6:45 p. m.
Arrive Waycross at.......................11:45 a. m. 9:15 p. m.
Arrive Jesup at................... ... 1:32 p. m. 11:25 p. m.
Arrive at Brunswick at............. 6:10 p. m. 8:20 a. m.
Arrive Savannah at................ 3:35 p.m. 2:30 a. m.
ArriveCharleston at............. 9:30 p. m. 8:45 a. m.
Arrive at Augusta at...................... 5:20 a. m. 2:30 p. m.
Arrive Macon at....................................... 7:00 a. m.
Arrive Atlanta at.......................... 3:40 a. m. 12:50 p. m.
Arrive Louisville at.......................... ... 8:00 a. m.
Arrive Cincinnati at...................................... 7:00 a. m.
Arrive Washington at.................. 9:40 p. n. 7:40 a. m.
Arrive Baltimore at....................1:45 p. 9:15 a.m.
Arrive New York (limited express)........... 3:50 p. m,
Arrive New York P. R. R............. 0:50 a. inm. 5:20 p. m.
Arrive St. Louis at................................ 7:00 p m.
Arrive Chicago at..................................... 7:00 p. m,
Fast mail arrives at Jacksonville daily at...... 6:10 p. m.
Jacksonville express arrives at Jacksonville
daily at........... ......... ................ .... 8:10 a. nm.
TIME.
To Savannah ................(......... ......... ........... 6:40 hours.
To New York............................... ................. 45:45 hours.
To Washington .................................. 36:30 hours
To Chicago......... ....... ............................. 49:00 hours
To St. Louis................................. .............. 49:00 hours*
THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
i.Daily Jacksonville to Charleston.
il ,.Daily Jacksonville to Cincinnati.
Sleeping car from Jacksonville to Savannah (5:35 p.
inm. trains) Tuesdays and Fridays.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter lias been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
The morning train from JacKsonville to Savannah,
connects daily with through Pullman sleeper for New
York.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to Montgomery and New Orleans
take the evening train.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving


2 p. ni. and arriving at Savannah at 2:30 a. m., or train
atJacksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
van nah at 3:35 p. m.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, at Depot Ticket
Office. JAS. L. TAYLOR,
Gen'l Freight and Pass. Ag't.
GEeO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*]


HUAU & CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF
FINE KEY WEST CIGARS
-AND-

WHOLES.ALE LEAF r0E.ALERSS.

Proprietors of Factories Nos. 29, r and 81, D'vtrict
of Florida,
Jacksonville, Florida,
The Most Extensive Manufacturers in the State.
lyr to april 23, '83.

D. G. AMBLER. T. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as

AMBLER'S BANS.
SRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf

Sportman's Emporium.





W. C. PITTMAN,
No. 3 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0-
Guns, Pistols, Rifles and Cutlery,
Shooting and Fishingl 'Tackle.

SHELLS LOADED TO ORDER.
1 yr to April 23, '83


DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,

GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
GOLNDAND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, COPPEIRAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emery Papers, &c.
AGENT FOR
PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIRE TEST.
Johnson's Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, Martinez and Longrman's
Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.


No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
to mar 25,'83 JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

HEADQUARTERS LeCONTE PEAR.

30,000


LGOaNTE PEAR TREES FOR SALEb

Grown on their own roots, at the oldest and most
reliable LeConte Pear Nursery in the world. Prices low,
and stock pure as usual. Fair and honest dealing
has always been our motto.
Being the originator of the LeConte Pear business,
and having grown and sold more trees than any one,
we flatter ourselves, we can, as heretofore, give perfect
satisfaction.
L. L. VAR1NEDOE & SONS,
THOMASVILLE, GEORGIA.
to July 31.


A FEW CHOICE LOTS OF FIFTEEN OR MORE
acres, river fronts, affording attractive and lovely
building sites, and admirably suited to the growth of
oranges, figs and other Florida fruits, may still be ob-
tained on reasonable terms.
"HOLLYWOOD" is south of "Point La Vista," on
the eastern shore of the St. Johns River, four miles from
Jacksonville. For circulars, maps, terms, etc., address
D. REDMOND,
apr 3-tf Box 257, Jacksonville, Fla.

W. H. PILLOW'S

8TR BI VRYRfP G AGENCY
FRUIT AND VE^GETAB13LE
REPACKING AND

CUNMM 4 pOSE,
Has closed till NOVEMBER. Present address,
may 12, '83. 1 MACON, GA.

STM aiRK'SHOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
--O--

CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.


OPEN T THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
1 yr to April 23, '83


VIEWS OF FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In Book For*n, ContainingU 12
Views Each.
Souvenir of Florida, (small size)......................25c.
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size)............ .................. ....................... 25c.
Souvenir of Jaoksonville,( large size)................50c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine,(large size) .........50c.
Stereoscopic Views, per Doz. $1.50.
Address

ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
JACKSONVILLE, 3FLA.


A Good Investment!
----


In the County of Hernando, East of Brooksville, the
county seat, and near the
.Tropoical :PloricLd I-. M.,
which is now actively building, two tracts of land. The
first contains two hundred and forty (240) acres in a body;
the second contains eighty (80) acres. These tracts both
touch ]Upon a Lake of about 150 acres area; are
well timbered with pine suitable for lumber; the second
about half a mile southeast of the first; between them
lies a cultivated farm. These lands are well adapted to
Oranges and Other Fruits, being of good
soil, with little underbrush, and are easily cleared. They
were selected by Hton. Walter Gwynn, Ex-
Treasurer of the State of Florida, and they may be relied
upon as being what is represented. These lands are in a
part of the State that is rapidly settling iop
and offer a good field either for an investment in Flor-
ida real estate, or for orange groves and the like.
Price and terms will be so arranged as to be satisfac-
tory to the purchaser. Apply to
WALTER B. CLARKSON,


Box 877. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
In corresponding, please mention this paper.
to August 29, '82.

RICH'D H. MARKS'


ORANGE aOUINY LAND AEhNCY,
SANFOIRD, FLORIDA,
Agent in Orange County for

FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMP'Y.

BUYS AND SELLS

Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission,
ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
june 12-tf


I





TIfE FLO IDA DISPATCi ti


F. S. CONE,
President and Business Manager.


A. I. MANVILLE,
Secretary and Superintendent.


E. A. MANVILLE,
Treasurer


vI:I.A.T "rI TV IL -L 2E :T T7 S E M 33 S,
Lake George, Florida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums
Peaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, and over one hundred varieties of the Citrus.
OR3LANGBE LANw D LIE1TMON '' TREES a specialty.
Catalogue free. to apr 17, '83

ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]
J. A. BARNES & CO.,

FRUIT AND PRODUCE


COMMISSION


MERCHANTS.


South-ern I:ruit axid. clegetabbles a Specialty.
3S2 and 328 North Delaware Aveiie, Philadelphia.
to jan 6, '83

JONBJvlES <3 55Ot BOWEIN


WHOLESALE GROCERS,

AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


ACER'S


DRY HOP YEAST CAKES,


60c. PER


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND

SNOW-DROP PATENT E6IaOU.

First I-a~lds orn 0 inest Q-uality

Best Butter in Tubs at 30 to 31 Cents per Pound,


No. 7 West Bay Street, - - Jacksonville, Florida.
To sept 27, '82


Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide.

H. D. BOUNETHEAU, PROPRIETOR

N O R D Y K E FLORIDA CHEMICAL OIL AND SOAP WORKS,


MILLS
-MANUFACTURE-

FreshGround
FEED, GRITS,
MEAL,
(Bolted or unbolted.)
Pearl lHominy.
GRAIN, HAY, COAL AND
WOOD-YARD.


MANUFACTURER OF
Lubricating and Boiler Compounds, Compressed Soaps, Car and
Axle grease.
ALSO SOLE MANUFACTURER
of the best Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide extant-
OmA. IC+-I E TIEE E1 0VIT.TLrSIONT i
made from Whale-Oil Soap, combined with other powerful ingredients known
to be most effectual for destroying the Scale "*and other insect pests and
parasites of the Citrus family. It will also put the tree in a healthy and flour-
ishing condition. Prepared for immediate use. Perfectly harmless to the
youngest tree or plant. In packages of from 25 to 300 pounds. Price, 10 cents
per pound. Discount to the Trade. "- Full directions for use accompany
each package. Address
1. D. BOUNWETIIEA IU.


P. 0. BOX 984, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


to july 31 '82


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
-0
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
-0-
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY TIE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers for August are appointed to sail as follows:
CITY OF SAVANNAH, August 5th, at 11:00 a. m.
JUNIATA, August 12th, at 5:00 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, August 19th, at 10:00 a. m.
JUNIATA, August 26th, at 4:30 p. im.
Days and hours subject to change, without notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, WM. HUNTEt & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.


Boston asa vomannah Steamshim Lin





ONLY DIRECT LINE BETWEEN
SAVANNAH AND BOSTON.
Transhipment and extra handling saved. No danger
of fruit being frozen. Cars are unloaded at the steam-
ship wharf in Savannah, avoiding drayage.
CABIN PASSAGE, -$18.
SAILING FROM SAVANNAH.
Seminole, Thursday, July 27th, at 4 p. m.
----- Thursday, August 3d, at 10:00 a. m.
Seminole, Thursday, August 10th, at 4:50 p. m.
Chas. W. i.ord, Thursday, August 17th, at 9:00 a. m.
Seminole, Thursday, August 24th, at 3:00 p. m.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, August 31st, at 9:00 a. m.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
44-tf Savannah, Ga.

DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
The largest stock in the State. Country
buyers will consult their own interests
by corresponding with me. All orders
promptly filled at prices to compete with
any house south of Baltimore. Remem-


DOZ. 1er my only Florida address.


GEO. HUGHES,
to june 26, '82 Cor. Bay and Ocean, Jackson-ville, Fla.

"-iST I s :B:Eo0.'S


Soluble


Ground Bone,


THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

FERTILIZER FOR ORAN1E TREES.
Will PERtMANENT'ILY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.
Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTER & BEAN,
.Agents for the State of Florida.


A-Analysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


to sept 26, '82


M. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the
of the Marshall House. Screven House.
THEE HAR1NETT HOUSE,
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARNETT & GEORGE, Proprietors.
RATIIS, $2 PER DAY.
This favorite family IHotel, under its new manage-
menit, is recommlnclecdi for the excellence of its cuisine.
homelike com forts, prompt attention and moderate
rates, to sept 4,'82

O. L. KEENE,
MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,

Laces, Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF


67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,


JACKSONVILLE,
to feb 20, '82


- FLORIDA.


RUBBER STAMPS
Are manufactured right in our establishment in the
best manner and at the shortest notice.
OZ-Send in your orders.
ASHMEAD BROS.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
May 1-tf


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