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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00018
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: July 24, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00018
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

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*~iated to the ricunltural, Manufacturing and.Industrial Interests of Florida and the South.

Vol. I.-NO. 18. New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla. Price 5 cents.
Monday, July 24, 1882. $1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.


-The orange trees in this section that failed
to form their fruit in the spring, are now in
full bloom. This is rather a strange freak of
nature.-Sumterville Times.
-We have never seen orange trees grow
faster than ours here for the past three weeks.
Everywhere in the city and* county the rapid
growth of the past few weeks is a subject of
mutual gratulation among orange growers.-
Flrida Tgraph.
GUAVAS AND MANGOES.-Col. H. G. Thomas
reports all his oranges trees in bloom again,
and says he has guavas 9* inches in circumfer-
ence one way, and 101 in circumference to
othrr.
Mangoes from Pt. Pinallis have been brought
to market this week. They are as large and of
fin4 flavor as the imported.-Sunland Tribune.
LARGE ORANGE TREEs.-The following are
a few of the large orange trees in Florida:
The Fort Harley tree in Alachua County, sup-
posed to be 72 years old, which has borne
18,000 oranges in one season; another in St.
John'xODounty, yields 15,000; another in Brad-
ford County, over 10,000; and a lemon tree at
Fort Reid 32 years old, has borne over 20,000.
These are only a few of the large orange and
lemon trees in Florida.
BIG PEARS!-Last Saturday Mr. George
Lewis pulled two LeConte pears from a tree
growing in his yard that eclipsed anything we
ever saw in the pear line. When Mr. Lewis
exhibited the smallest pear a gentleman asked
him if he was raising gourds. One measured
ten by ten and a half inches in circumferende,
and the other eleven by eleven and a quarter,
and weighed thirteen ounces.-Floridian.
PINE-APPLES.-The shipment of pine-apples
to New York last week from Belair Grove was
the largest that has ever been made, in point
of-size and weight. One barrel containing
eleven, weighed 113 pounds; the largest
weighing eleven pounds and fourteen ounces.
Three other barrels contained thirty, weighing
270 pounds. These pine-apples are the Trini-
dad, and weigh, when the plants are matured,
from twenty to twenty-five pounds each. They


have been very carefully cared for and fer-
tilized. They were imported by General San-
ford some three years ago, and exceed anything
of the kind in the State.---Sanford Journal.
FLORIDA CATTLE.-The following, from the
Tampa Tribune, will give some idea of the im-
rtance of the South Florida cattle trade:
he steamship Alabama commenced in the cat-
tle trade two months ago, and during that time
has made twelve trips to Havana, carrying
5,783 head of cattle, losing only five head. The
cattle are valued at sixteen dollars per head
put aboard the vessel, making $92,528 which
have been paid out in two months for cattle
for this vessel alone. Several other vessels are
running in the trade, and is estimated that
$100,000 come into South Florida every month
during the cattle season.
PAYING ORANGE GROVE.-The Palatka
Journal's Peniel correspondent writes: "As
an illustration of what can be done here in the
way of making orange culture pay, the follow-
ing instance is given: A young man pur--
chased a five-acre lot of land, paying $50 for
it; then purchased 100 budded, one year old
buds, the cost of which was $25. He fenced
and cleared one acre, and the spring of 1879
transplanted the trees. Since that time one
more acre has been fenced, and this spring
eighty stumps which are intended for budding,
were added. Some of the older trees have or-
anges on this year, and the owner has recently
refused an offer of $400 for the place, the total
cost of which has been $193."
"Resting" the Orange-Date Palms, &c.
GREEN COVE SPRING, FLA., July 12, 1882.
Editor of The Florida Dispatch:
I see in your paper of 3d inst. that orange
trees should have a rest after August 10th.
How long should it be ? Can you give any
information regarding the Date Palm ? Should
they be highly fertilized and well watered ? By
answering the above questions through your
valuable paper, you will confer a favor.
Very truly yours,
A0W.T.
REPLY.-It is not #vell to encourage a late
growth in the Orange tree in any locality near


the northern limit of hardiness, as such sappy
and tender growth is very liable to be nipped
by the first frosts of fall or early winter. There-
fore we generally cease working on young trees
by the 10th or 15th of August, to allow them
to ripen up, before cold weather, the wood al-
ready formed. In South Florida, where the
orange tree grows, with little cessation, during
the whole year, this "resting" process is unneces-
pary. The grower may pile on the manure
and work steadily along, getting all the growth
and size possible from his tree, and the more
the better.
The Date Palm (Phanix dactilifera,) does
best when its "feet can reach the water," though
it will grow thriftily almost anywhere, after it
is once fairly established and started. Only
small trees can safely be transplanted, and
these require skillful handling and great care.
You may apply any amount of vegetable com-
post, such as muck, ashes, &c., to the tree, with
benefit.-Ens. DISPATCH.

Scarcity of Nursery Trees.
The Country Gentleman, commenting upon
the facts brought out at the late Nurserymen's
meeting at Rochester, New York, says:
"From all the preceding reports it appears
that there is nowhere in the country any large
surplus of nursery trees, and that the demand
for coming sales is likely to be on the whole
greater than the supply. It is not probable
that we shall witness or some years to come
the vast piles of dug trees that had become over-
grown, consumed by fire as waste and over-
grown matter, which was so frequently seen a
few years ago."
We may add to the above that the supply of
budded orange, Peen-To peach, Japan persim-
mon, and other desirable trees, at our Florida
nurseries, is not at all sufficient for the rapidly-
increasing demand the coming season; and that
all who desire choice trees should send their
orders early.-EDS.








SiltH FLORIDA DISPATCH .4.


Importance of the California Hay Crop.
The Kern County Californian has this to say
about the haying season on the 4eaaific Coast,
and the enormous quantity to be cut l ay-'
making Will not cotnmence as early this sQOUn-
as usual,. Alfalfa, which ia the grass or forage
plant in the great valley of this country, is of
slow growth in cool weather, and with the ex-
ceptioa of a few warm days, the spring has been
unfavorable to its rapid growth. The beginning
of this month is when haying usually commences
in earnest, but this month it will be deferred
until a month later. The quality of hay that
will be cut and .stacked this year will be .enor-
mous. It has never yet failed to be a profitable
crop. The supply, at paying rates, has never yet
equalled the demand. There is always scarcity
of feed in the fall and forepart .of winter, and
flocks and herds are driven here from long dis-
tances. Last year the demand occasioned in
this way could not be met' Possibly it never
can be, but every year there is an increased
effort, notably this, to do so. Besides, as the
value of alfalfa is better understood, the local
demand for hay and pasture rapidly increases.
Its great productiveness and value for food for
domestic animals is attracting attention more
and more to stock-raising, combined, as that
pursuit is, with the advantage that it cannot be
'cinched' by the railroad. Alfalfa on good
land and well set, will yield sixteen tons of hay
per acre and furnish good winter pasturage.
It is a sure and profitable crop, the best that
can be grown here under the circumstances.
It does not call for hard, continuous labor and
outlay (as with many other crops) that entails
the borrowing of money, heavy store bills and
crop mortgages. As with everything else, it
can best be handled by the man of means ; but
the poor man, with ordinary business tact, can
also manage it to advantage."

The Best Farmer.
There are still some among the masses of our
farmer friends who cling to the idea that the
most perfect farming consists only in aptness
of labor and strength of muscle; that skill in
the use of implements and the amount of labor
a man is able to perform in a given time, is an
evidence of superior farming. That idea is at
variance with good philosophy. The reply
once made to the question, "Who is the most
perfect sailor ?" illustrated the point. Jack Tar,
before the mast splices the rope, steers the ship,
or rows a boat with perfect skill. Precipitated
into the sea, he rides without fear, and is saved,
where a landsman would be lost. Swaying to
and fro on the yardarm in a tempest, he reefs


the sails with imperturbable coolness, and braves
danger in many forms with composure where a
novice would perish, yet he is far from a perfect
sailor. Other men are patiently working in
the national observatories of London and Wash-
ington, preparing the nautical almanac. Maps
and charts, indicating shoals and reefs and
coasts, indicating laws governing the winds and
currents, are prepared with great study and
care. By these aids and appliances which
science has evolved, the mariner can read-
ily reckon almost the precise spot on the ocean
his vessel occupies. But the scientific scholar
whose research has rendered all this possible,
is not an efficient mariner. The man who rep-
resents.the perfect sailor is he who unites the


highest practicable aptness and skill in working
his ship with the comprehension that enables
him to use all the deductions of nautical science.
It is the union of skill and scientific knowledge
that makeA.hihn ar mater of his calling. The
application suggests itself. Jn farming the high-
est and most extensive knowledge of all known
natural laws pertaining to this great pursuit,-
combined with eminent skillU energy, industry
and economy, makes the most perfect farmer.
The evidence is constantly multiplying that
farmers are coming to understand this import-
ant fact. Agriculture as a science is coming
to the front with long strides. It is THE science
of the future, for there is not within the scope
of man's objects and pursuits any calling that
demands more of science for its successful pros-
ecution. In every department of rural economy
science stands at the threshold and invites an
investigation of the processes by which the high-
est success is attained; and he who gains and
employs the most knowledge in his pursuit, in
any branch of rural industry, will realize the
fairest reward for his labor.
The farmer of the future will know more of
the laws which govern in the varied operations
of nature that attach to all departments of his
calling. He will plow with more reasonable
expectation of reaping bountiful harvests, for
he will know more of the nature and condition
of the soils; and will cultivate better and more
effectively, for he will have a clear understand-
ing of what is required. He will know more
of vegetable physiology, or the peculiarities and
habits of different plants, which require his care
and culture, as well as of noxious growths, and,
therefore will possess knowledge which will in-
sure better returns from the former and render
the extermination of the latter more certain.
He will possess valuable information in regard
to insects that prey upon his fields and flocks
and easily distinguish the friendly sorts from
the noxious tribes. He will possess a greater
knowledge of animal physiology, and pathology,
and hence secure comparative immunity from
heavy losses that are now of daily occurrence.
In short, he will walk in the light which science
will shed around his footsteps, and wonder that
the world was so slow to grasp and profit by
facts and truth in nature, which though simple,
were unknown and unappreciated. Let us all-
farmers, agricultural schools and colleges, soci-
eties, clubs and associations of every descrip-
tion pertaining to rural industries, and last,
though not least, the agricultural press-push
on the car of progress and remit no effort to
place this-the greatest and really the noblest
of all human pursuits-on the plane which it
deserves to occupy.- Western Rural.
Draining.
In the report of May, issued by the United
States Department of Agriculture, we find a
return on Draining, from which we take the
following:


The testimony of the increased production
and profits of underdraining is emphatic and
general. It is difficult to give the real average
profit resulting from adequate draining, but the
increase is universal and sufficiently large to
make the expenditure a very profitable invest-
ment. The average opinion is that about 45
per cent. increase of production is obtained as
the result of thorough draining.
As to materials used, tiles are the most gen-
eral, stone is largely employed, plank is more
or less used, poles in some places do good work
and mole-plow drainage is in use to some e.x-
tent.
In Ohio it is claimed that the increase of
the crop in one year will pay for the cost of
draining, and in one county, where tile is


mainly used, farms that were before unproduc-
tive have become the most productive in the
county.
In Bay County, Michigan, drains are mostly
of two-inch plank, idade like the letter V.
Nearly half ofSaginaw County has been drained
with great advantage to the owners. In Liv-
-ingston, most of 'the drained land was before
entirely worthless.


How Cattle are Shipped to England.
Cattle are taken on an under deck in stalls
measuring two feet eight inches on vessels sail-
ing from New York, and two feet six inches on"
those from all other ports of the United States.
These stalls are built under the supervision' of
an insurance inspector. During the summer ship-
pers prefer to ship on deck, as the cattle get
more air and come out fresher at the end ofthe
voyage. On deck the steamships carry between
156 and 175 animals, the under deck about 225
Drinking water is condensed by steam process
on board for their use, the ocean iteudf pr 69WT-
ing a never-failing source of supply. The cat-
tle are generally put on the steamer in the
stream, after it has left the dock, an old ferry-
boat usually being used for the purpose. The
number of cattle to be taken is regulated by
the insurance inspectors, and cattle exporters
must pay the entire freight, according to this
report, even if they do not ship the entire num-
ber.
Sheep and pigs are stowed away in stalls on
deck where there is not enough room for the
cattle. Sometimes in the early spring, when
the sea is liable to disturbances, some of the
cattle get overboard, and then a very lively
time ensues in getting them out. The cattle
are hoisted on board usually and lowered, two
at a time, by a winch into the hold. The allow-
ance of water is from six to ten gallons a day
to each bullock. The amount of fodder aver-
ages one ton to each animal. The rates of in-
surance apparently vary: some shippers give it
at 3 per cent. in summer to 10 per cent. in win-
ter. There is more risk to the cattle from per-
ils of the sea in the latter season, as a heavy
storm may make it necessary to lighten the
ship by throwing the entire deckload of cattle
overboard. The carrying capacity of the vessels,
of course, varies; but the average as given by
an old shipper, may be put safely at 200 head
at a shipment, taking large and small vessels
into account. On some of the large steamers
the number has reached 500, and one Boston
steamer has carried away as many as 841 head.
The largest shipment from New York by one
steamer was 650 head.-Ex.
Cure for Crib-Biting.


A Boston correspondent of the Country
Gentleman relates a bit of his experience, gain-
ed by a horse trade: "I found a cure for my
first attempt in horse flesh. The animal was
warranted, in writing, 'free from all tricks,' &c.
The first ten days no trick was observed. Sub-
sequently my purchase proved to be a deter-
mined cribber. The seller was apparently as-
tonished. Nothing of the kind ever occurred
while he owned the horse. An inspection of the
stable where the horse had been, showed us tra-
ces of chewed wood-work. My brother-in-law,
accustomecfto horses all his life, was sorely puz-
zled. He was convinced there was some game;
and 'game' there was. Convinced that I had
been 'sold,' I retaliated by finding out that the


^
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T HE FLORIDA bISPATC4. f


seller used a paste made of red pepper and
brown soap, lightly applied wherever and
whenever he discovered marks of teeth in the
stall, the paste being masked by dust scattered
on top. Thus it was, the horse thinking my
wood-work was like his late stable, let the tim-
bers alone at first. I tried the remedy. The
horse has not attempted to crib for four months,
and a stranger would never imagine that a
hundred little spots within reach of his head
have bits of the paste. The horse knows it,
however, and lets my stall alone."
Sheep and Dogs.
Since we cannot induce our law-makers to
make dog laws to protect sheep, we must look
around us and see if each farmer cannot pro-
tect his own sheep. We are fully satisfied that
a small investment in sheep bells will do it
effectually. The dogs have never killed any of
our sheep, but we believe more in preventive
than in cures. We have purchased for our little
flock of 100 sheep and lambs fifteen bells, and
we had three bells before, so we will have a dozen
and a half bell ringers to charivari the dogs.
The cost of these bells was $2.33 in New Or-
lerns, or about 16 cents a piece. We will add
to them three or four larger bells, costing 25 or
30 cents each for the strong wethers. These,
with good straps, would make the cost about
$5.00 for fifteen bells. There is no doubt in
our minds that this will render a flock of 100
sheep perfectly secure against sheep-killing
dogs. The loss of a-ingle Merino lamb would
be more than the cost of protecting the whole
flock, not one year, but for ten years or more
-for if the straps are noticed and kept in good
order, the bells may last a great many years.
Why then wait for Legislatures, when we can
protect our sheep at a cost of less than a
dollar a year for the whole flock ? Some very
bad dogs may kill sheep in a flock that is well
belled, but we do not believe the worst of dogs
would trouble such a flock.
It is well known that dogs never bark when
they pursue sheep to kill them. They are
sneaks, and act like other thieves, as though they
are well aware that they are doing a mean and
unlawful act. Nor do they want the sheep to
make any noise while the massacre continues.
Like other midnight murderers, they want no
alarmists near them-no geese or poodle dogs.
When a dog goes to kill a sheep he has to have
a race for it. He may pull out several mouth-
fuls before he strikes mutton. In the mean time
the whole flock is alarmed and in rapid motion
!-convulsive, continued motion-the bells cha-
rivari the dogs and alarm the neighborhood
and the frightened thieves become bewildered,
like the people of a city at the sound of fire-
bells in the midst of a storm, or the people of
the lowlands at the sound of waters rushing


through a new crevasse. Farmers and breeders
give the sheep bells a fair trial, and let us see
if sheep-raising in these States cannot be made
profitable without the aid of our law-makers.
N. 0. Picayune.
The Home of the Horse.
There is no doubt that the original home of
the horse is not Europe, but Central Asia; for,
since the horse in its natural state depends upon
grass for its nourishment and. fleetness for its
weapon, it could not in the beginning have
thriven and multiplied in the thick forest-grown
territory of Europe. Much rather should its
place of propagation be sought in those steppes
where it still roams about in a wild state. Here,
too, arose the first nations of riders of which we


have historic knowledge, the Mongolians and
the Turks, whose existence, even to this day is,
as it were, combined with that of the horse.
From these regions the horse spread in all di-
rections, especially into the steppes of Southern
and Southwestern Russia and into Thrace, until
it finally found entrance into the other parts of
Europe, but not until after the immigration of
the people. This assumption is, at least, strongly
favored by the fact that the farther a district of

Europe is from those Asiat4c steppes, i. e., from
the original home of the horse, the latter does
the tamed horse seem to have made its historic
appearance in it. The supposition is further
confirmed by the fact that horse-raising among
almost every tribe appears as an art derived
from neighboring tribes in the East or North-
east. Even in Homer the ox appears exclu-
sively as the draught-animal in land operations
at home and in the field, while the horse was
used for the purpose of war only. Its employ-
ment in military operations was determined by
swiftness alone. That the value of the horse
must originally have depended upon its fleet-
ness, can easily be inferred from the name
which is repeated in all the branches of the
Indo-European language, and signifies "hast-
ening," "quick." The same fact is exemplified
by the descriptions of the oldest poets, who, next
to its courage speak most of its swiftness.



Milk,-How to Have Pure.
The following rules prescribed by a large
New York company, which owns twenty cream-
eries, are offered for the consideration of all
who desire lure, sweet milk:
RULES.
1. Never, under any circumstances, pour a
pail of milk into your can before straining. One
pail of unstrained milk may spoil a whole can,
and one can of impure milk will certainly in-
jure all milk or cream with which it comes in
contact. In the name of decency, we beg of
every patron to be particular about milking
and properly straining his milk.
2. Cans containing milk should never be
kept in a milking barn during the night. The
scent of the stable (however well kept) will
injure the milk and spoil the nice flavor fresh
butter should have. An open shed a little dis-
tance from your barn, your woodshed or your
kitchen, is the only proper place for keeping
milk overnight.
SUGGESTIONS.
1. Insist that your milking be done in a
cleanly manner. Too much pains cannot be
taken in this particular. Carelessness here will
entail a great loss on the manufacturer and
insult the consumer.
2. Bed your cows with sawdust, if possible;
it will keep your cows clean and the stable
sweet.


3. Do not, under any circumstances, leave
your pails and strainers at the barn overnight.
Please carry these to the house and insist that
they be properly washed both morning and
evening. Much depends on this.
4. Use only tin pails for milking.
5. The tin strainer pails are the best for
straining milk. Some dairymen use strainer
pails and also a cloth stretched over the can--
thus straining the milk twice. We advise this
double straining of milk. It costs you but
little trouble while it will greatly add to the
value of the butter and cheese made from your
milk.
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


A Novel Egg Farm.
The Farallone Islands, says the San Francisco
Call, are about thirty miles from the mouth of
San Francisco Bay, and they are the home of
innumerable sea-fowls. When San iFrancisco
first began to be a city its constant cry was for
eggs. To supply the lack of eggs the project
of stealing those of the gulls and the muhrs of
the Farallone Islands was undertaken, and it
proved successful and has ever since been main-
tained. The birds are too plenty to count or
to estimate, as may be inferred from the fact
that the egg-gatherers bring in often, or used to
gather 500 dozen in a day; a great many of the
nests are inaccessible, a great many others de-
vastated by the rivalry of the birds themselves,
and of course, a large part of the birds at one
time are not laying. The egg season is from
May to August, and if even 400 dozen is the
rule, the harvest would be pretty near 500,000
eggs. The quarreling between the gulls and
muhrs leads to the loss of a good many muhrs'
eggs which the gulls at every chance destroy.
The egg business is conducted by .a company,
which has the right. It pays egg-gatherers five
cents a dozen, and sell them in San Francisco
at a considerable advance.


Announcement of the Premiums of 1882,
For the New Silk Industry.
APRIL, 1882.
The Women's Silk Culture Association of the
United States, at No. 1328 Chestnut-street,
Philadelphia, beg leave to announce that through
the liberality of Messrs. Strawbridge & Cloth-
ier, the dry goods merchants, they are again
enabled to offer to the silk culturists the sum of
five hundred dollars, to be given on such condi-
tions as the association deems most desirable to
forward the object they have in hand.
To this end, the association offers this sum in
ten premiums, as follows :


First Premium.........$100
Second ......... 75
Third ......... 65
Fourth ......... 60
Fifth ......... 50


Sixth Premium.........$45
Seventh ......... 40
Eight ......... 30
Ninth ......... 25
Tenth ......... 10


These premiums extend all over the United
States, and will be given to those who produce
the ten largest amounts of cocoons. From these
quantities one pound will be taken, without
selection, and the test of reeling applied; the
quantity and quality will be the conditions for
premium.
We also take pleasure in publishing that Mr.
John T. Morris, of Philadelphia, has again
offered fifty dollars, in ten premiums:
First.........$25 Second.........$15 Third.........$10
for the best pound raised by colored people-
the conditions that there be ten competitors.
Certificates or letters from some responsible
person must accompany the application for
competition, testifying to the amount of this
year's cocoons raised by the culturist. These
premiums will be awarded early in the new
year, and we invite those competing to send
their stock to us for sale on commission, not
later than December 1, 1882, to enable us to
test and arrange the same. The specimen jar
cocoons placed in competition, to which the
premiums are awarded, become the property of
the association. They will be exhibited in one
pound glass jars, with stopper, as before.


T


~y~;







27n THE FLORIDAIl DISPATCH.


INVESTIGATION OF THE WATERMELON
APHIS,

At Thomasville, Ga., with Brief Descrip-
tions of Her Pear Orchards,
Vineyards, etc., etc.
Accompanied by Col. D. H. ELLIOTT, the
popular agent of the Florida Dispatch Line, we
left Saturday afternoon on the 5:35 train, via Sa-
vannah, Florida and Western Railway, for
Thomasville, Ga., to invest eote the falling-off
in the watermelon crop.
As we glided along over this popular route
for the tourist from Savannah to our "Queen
City" of the St. John's, were it n t for the slight
undulatory motion, the noise, and the rapi 4
vanishing landscape, we could hardly have dis-
tinguished we were not on terra firms. What
a factor in the development of a country is a
railroad! As we glided smoothly over this ad-
mirably-managed road we could not help ment-
ally contrasting it with the broken rails, shabby
cars. and rickety road over which, hardly five
years ago, the Northern tourist was compelled
to go to reach the "Land of Flowers."
The route runs through a very picturesque
country-virgin pine forests, rich hammock,
and marshy lowlands. In the depths of the
forests and hammocks gnarled, twisted and
fallen trees stood out weird-like and ominous;
while creeping and hanging vines, moss and pal-
mettoes,with the lowlands carpeted with a coarse
sedge grass, gave a wonderful tropical luxuri-
ance to the otherwise barren landscape. As we
looked forth on this beautiful scenery the open-
ing lines of Longfellow's Evangeline," came to
our memory:
"This is the forest primeval. The murmuring pines and
the hemlocks
Bearded with moss, and in garments green, indistinct in
the twilight,
Stand like Druids of old, with voices sad and prophetic,
Stand like harper's hoar, with beards that rest on their
bosoms."
and we wondered whether our lamented bard
had not been here, so perfectly do his lines de-
scribe places along our route.
At Waycross, the junction of the Waycross
Short Line with the main line, we took supper.
This is a rising little place, situated on a high
plateau, in the midst of a pine forest. It is be-
ing settled principally by employes of the road.
The depot here is the handsomest on the route.
It is a large, commodious, ornamental frame
building, into which no weary traveler ever
regrets entering. As you enter, a superb "lunch
counter" stretching across the whole side of the
interior meets your eye, filled with choice deli-
cacies, from a sardine to a pate de foi gras
wherewith to refresh the "inner man." The


Colonel and myself were not backward in ap-
propriating what we could lay our hands up6n.
From here we took a sleeper and reached our
destination next morning at 6:30 o'clock.
Thomasville, Ga., is a thriving and go-ahead
town, in the midst of a rich agricultural country.
Her population numbers nearly 4000 souls;
her streets are broad, with many handsome
public and private residences thereon, with
plenty of grounds surrounding them; it has
more the appearance of a large country village
than a town. "The City of Oaks," from the
number of oaks growing in its midst, would
have been a more poetical name for it.
The Mitchell House, where we stopped, is a


first-class hotel in every respect; it is a large,
substantially built brick building with double
piazza in front, ornamented with artistic flower
stands, hanging baskets, etc., filled with choice
plants and flowers. To look up from the side-
walk at these you are at once reminded of the far-
famed "hanging gardens" of Ancient Babylon. It
has become quite celebrated under the popular
management of Dr. power and his estimable
lady, and the cuisine is most excellent. This
quiet city, with her beautiful drives, mild cli-
mate, LeConte pear orchards, etc., is destined
to be a great winter resort and we predict for it
a grand future.
After breakfast we drove out to visit some of
the larger fruit and vegetable growers. We first
visited Mr. H. H. Sanford, but were greatly
disappointed and sorry to find him sick, or
rather, just beginning to recuperate from a se-
vereillness, able to recline on a lounge, but too
weak to show us about. However, he gave us
permission to view his grounds; and his
neighbor, Mr. Blackshear, kindly volun-
teered in his place. We first struck his Le-
Conte pear orchards, these were charm-
ing; tall, symmetrical trees loaded with
fruit, delighted our eyes, made our mouths
water, and filled us with amazement
from the quantities of fruit to be seen on a
single tree. We were led to expect something
fine from what we had read on the subject, but
we must say, imagination in our case failed for
once to do justice to the truth ; we canpt exalt or
praise this superb fruit too highly. Mr. S.
reported he had just shipped a lot which net-
ted him $6 per bushel. Acres and acres of this de-
lectable fruit are now being planted. It is certain
that the LeConte pear "boom" will develop
this section of the country very rapidly-it al-
most equals the orange boom. On the other side
of his orchard Mr. S, has his vineyard laid out
in long rows, consisting principally of the Con-
cord and Delaware varieties, and just ripe ;
shipments, he reports have averaged him 124
cents per pound.
After passing the vineyard we reached his
watermelon patch; the leaves were curled,
withered and dying. Examination soon showed
us the cause-hundreds of yellowish green plant
lice or aphides feeding on their under surface,
sucking the eap-the life-blood of the
vines. No wonder the melon crop is short.
What! exclaimed Mr. Blackshear, can a little
insect like this do so much damage ? Assured-
ly, my dear sir, they can. These "little in-
sects" have done even greater damage to other


crops. Buckton, British Aphides,page 170, says:
"The ravages done by Phorodon humuli in
some seasons to the hop gardens of England
are very ,great. The writer of the article
"Aphis" in the "Penny Cyclopedia" stated,
that as long ago as the year 1802 the excise
duty paid on hops of the previous year fell
from 100,000 to 14,000 (a loss of $430,000.
ED.) and that the deterioration in value was
entirely ascribed to the ravages of "the fly."
Another writer in 1833 stated that the duty
paid for hops when the fly was absent amounted
to half a million of money."
Some figures here, in regard to the damage
done by the "watermelon aphis" will not be


amiss, and will show our planters the necessity
of prompt and united efforts for their destruc-
tion.
In Georgia, the estim'tte yield of the water-
melon crop, this year, for shipment was 903 car
loads or 903,033 m Aln s. Many at the b gin-
ning of the season bring[ $1)3 al $3 pr huti-
dred. However to. keep within a fair valua-
tion and rather below the true amouit, we will
say they bring $25 per hundred which equals
in round numbers for the 1 )t $225,00). Now
what has been the yield? The shipments are
nearly over, and they have n )t yet reached 6)33
car loads, a falling off of 331 per cent., or a
total loss of $75,003, due mainly t ) th ravages
of an insect.
The ab,)ve statistics of loss are founded upon
data of the estimate yield, principally from
tflee counties, Thomas, Brooks and Lowndes,
in Georgia. In Florida the crop has, from the
same cause, met with a loss still greater, and
we are considerably below the estimate when
we say the total loss to the planters of the two
States is over $150,000.
Now as to the remedy. The wash recom-
meAded in our former article and published in
THE DISPATCH (No. 16, page 241,) will
prove efficacious if applied as directed
early in the season on the first appearance of
the evil. Another important help for their
destruction, and to which tA planter's especial
attention is requested, and which is equally
applicable to other crops, for if universally car-
ried it would at once materially assist in the
destruction of all noxious and destructive insect
pests. Never plant watermelons two successive
years in the same field. Plant always in an en-
tirely new field and as far off as possible from
ground in which they were grown the previous
year.. Our reason for recommending this is on
account of the peculiarity in the development
and propagation of the aphididce. The spring
and summer broods with the majority of the
species are viviparous, while the fall brood of
females are oviparous. The last, therefore, lay
eggs which are deposited upon the ground all
winter to hatch with the first warm breath of
spring. Now then, if this field is ploughed up
and other crops planted, the young aphis on
hatching have nothing whereon to feed, conse-
quently they are starved out and die. For it is a
well known fact in the economy of these insects,
that each species confines their attacks with but
few exceptions to one variety of plant. To
illustrate: the rose aphis is found only on


rose-bushes, the orange aphis on orange trees,
the apple aphis on apple trees, etc. Now the
apple aphis will not and cannot live on the
watermelon plant, rose-bush or orange tree;
neither could one of the others live on the ap-
ple.
To support what we have said above in re-
gard to rotation of crops, Mr. Ainsworth, of
Thomasville, told us, that the estimate yield
of his melon crop generally was one car load
of melons to an acre. This year he had ten
acres of melons planted on land which he
had in melons last year, and only got one car
load from the whole ten acres, so badly were
they affected with the aphis. On another acre


I -


752


TH LRIADSPTH






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH


planted this year for the first time in melons,
he got the usual quantity-one car load.
We trust we have sufficiently demonstrated
to the planter the destructiveness of the water-
melon aphis, for, undoubtedly, to it is due the
great falling off in the yield of .this valuable
crop. Those who will follow out hints and in-
structions given above, will assuredly escape
them another year.
LE CONTE PEAR TREES.

From Mr. Sanford's we visited Mr. L. L.
Varnadoe, jvho, unfortunately, was out. He'
was the first one to introduce the LeConte
Pear into Georgia, and we took the liberty
of visiting his orchard. His old trees are
simply grand-by far the most mag-
nificent fruit trees we have ever seen
anywhere. The largest were 13 years 0l,
measured about 45 feet in height by about 25
at base, with lower branches sweeping the
ground and loaded from top to bottom with
the delicious fruit. We were told the LeConte
bore in five or six years from cutting, with an
an averaged yield of several bushels to a treg, in-
creasing with age. A tree 13 years old would bear
about 20 bushels, and this is no exageration,judg-
ing from what we ourselves saw. At the present
price, $5 and $6 per bushel, what an income
the fortunate owner of one of these orchards
would have The average about 70 trees to an
acre; say each trewfter six years bore five bush-
els each, at $5 per bushel, present price, they
would insure the handsome income of $1,650 for
only one acre. Ten acres, therefore, of this fruit
would soon make a man independent of the
world's haps and mishaps." Yea, he might
even find it necessary to go abroad to spend a
superfluous accumulation of the "filthy lucre."
From Mr. V.'s we visited Mr. Blackshear, who
has a handsome residence built amidst some
monarch oaks, from whose umbrageous branches
he secures a grateful shade. Mr. B. is of the
old school before the late unpleasantness," a
perfect gentleman, courteous, and embued with
true Southern hospitality, and at once made us
feel at home. A visit to his melon patch re-
vealed the same state of affairs as elsewhere.
On all his vines we found the aphis. He says
he took the greatest pains in planting, but his
crop was almost a total failure, and he has been
compelled to plow under. He has a splendid
LeConte Pear orchard, containing several acres
just beginning to bear, also several other


younger orchards two and three years old; be-
sides being the President of a company recently
organized for their cultivation on a large scale,
which we clip from a Thomasville paper:
A company has been organized at Thomas-
ville for the purpose of engaging in LeConte
pearl culture on a large scale. The capital
stock was fixed at $10,000, all the shares have
been taken, and a grove of one hundred acres
will be put out at once. The stockholders are
T. E. Blackshear, President; Dr. E. M. Mal-
latte, Secretary and Treasurer; H. H. San-
ford, E. M. Smith, B. F. Walters, John L.
Finn, Withers & Kneller, Dr. P. S. Bower, R.
Thomas & Co., and James Watt.
Minus catching a little of the "pear fever,"
our trip to Thomasville was thoroughly en-
joyable, and we shall always look back to it
with pleasure. W. H. A.


Rice-Hulling Machine.
DUNEDIN, P. 0., FLA., July 11, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
Please inform me if the new rice-hulling
machine, spoken of in the last FLORIDA DIS-
PATCH, does the work claimed for it. Will
there one in this State for this year's crop ?
Where can I get rice hidled nearest to Cedar
Key now, and at what rates ?
Respectfully, SUBSCRIBER.
[We know nothing of the machine beyond
the information given by our correspond-
ent, whom we regard as altogether reliable.
Will JOSEPH VOYLE, Esq., of Gainesville, re-
ply to our "Subscriber's" inquiry in regard to
Cedar Key, rates, etc. ?-EDS.]

Florida Pamphlet.
It will be seen by the following note, th$ our
zealous and efficient State Agent of Immigra-
tion, Hon. C. DREW, is prepared to furnish
copies of the very valuable pamphlet on Flor-
ida, issued from the United States Department
of Agriculture, and noticed in THE DISPATCH
of July 10 and 17 :
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., July 15, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
Will you please state in your journal that, in
compliance with request, I have received at the
Immigration Agency here, copies of the pam-
phlet on Florida lately published by the Agri-
cultural Department at Washington. I will
be happy to supply single copies on applica-
tion, having not sufficient at present to dis-
tribute promiscously. Mailed on receipt of
three-cent post stamp. Respectfully,
C. DREW,
State Agent of Immigration.

Home-Grown LeConte Pear Trees.
Our correspondent, W. H. HASKELL, of
Tallahassee, gives the following reasons, (in the
Floridian,) for preferring Southern or home-
grown LeConte Pear trees:
"My reasons why I would not purchase pear
trees, LeConte and kindred kinds, that are
Northern grown: i t. k
"1st. The common root bl'Wt used by
Northern propagators is not rfipid enough in
its growth to keep pace with our trees, and will
dwarf them in some measure. You would never
know a true LeConte in its healthfulness, vigor
and gigantic size, on any root but its own or
kindred varieties.
"2d. There is a possibility of introducing
disease-those destructive scourges that make
sad havoc with the prospects of the Northern
cultivator of this fruit.


"3d. You can buy all the kind of Chinese and
Japanese origin, home-grown, and nearly 50 per
cent. cheaper, considering freight, etc., and risk
of loss by drying out, of our own home propa-
gators.
"4th. The imported stocks or roots throw up
suckers all around the trees. The LeConte and
other kindred varieties do not produce suck-
ers."



Vegetable Quotations.
FLORIDA DISPATCH LINi, 1
315 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, July 19, 1882.
Receipts at this port via Florida Dispatch Line and
Southern Express Compapy, week ending July 18th:
Vegetables, 200 packages; fruits, 700 packages; water-
melons, 22 car-loads; two refrigerators figs, one refriger-
ator grapes.
Tomatoes coming in bad order, selling: Floridas, 50c.
@$1.25; Charleston, 75c.@1.25; Norfolk. $1.75@2.25.
Watermelons received in large quantities from other
points; selling, $20@40 per hundred. Many in bad order


and unripe lots have been sold as low as $10 per hun-
dred.
LeConte pears received in abundance and meeting
competition of California Bartletts, which are selling
better and in greater demand LeConte pears selling
from $3.50@4 per box, Bartletts o10 $6.
Refrigerators, of figs turn out badly, one entirely
spoiled, another turning out but eight quarts of good
figs; if they could be landed good, would bring 30c. per
quart.
Refrigerator of grapes in good order and sold at 30c.
@35c. per box.
Respectfully,
C. D. OWENS,
____k_ __ General Agent.
Jacksonville Wholesale Prices.
Cobrrected weekly, by JONES & BO WEN, Wholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.
SUGARS-Granulated................................... 1
W hite Ex. C..................................... .. 10
Golden C............................................. 8%
Powdered............................................. 113
Cut Loaf........................................... 11
COFFEE, Rio-Fair............................................. 10
G ood.............................................. 10%
Choice.......................................... .. 11
Best ....................... ....................... 12
Java 0. G............................................. 25
M ocha ............. ................................ 35
Peaberry......................... ..................... .. 18
Maracaibo.................... ................. 18
Any of above grades roasted to order
FLOUR-Snow Drop, best........................................ 9 00
Oreole, 2d best.................................... .. 8 00
Pearl, 3d best........................................ 7 75
M EATS-Bacon..................................................... .. 14
Hams (Merwin & Sons)..... ............ 18
Shoulders............................................. 14
HOMINY-Pearl, per bbl.................................... 5 50
MEAL-per bbl... .............................. 5 50
LARD-Refined in pails................................ 14
BUTTER-Very best, kegs (on ice)............... 29
CHEESE-Full cream.......................................... 15
Half cream...................................... 12%
TOBACCO-We have made arrangements direct with
the manufacturers and offer you to-day as fol-
lows:
Smoking-"the Boss" Durham /s
and. s...................... .............. 32
"The Boss'" Durham 1 lb pkge......... 30
"Sitting Bull" D. (genuine) ss........ 50
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) s s...... ..... 49
"Sitting Bull" (genuine) 1............ 47
"SittingBull" (genuine) Ir 1pkge.. 45
Plug-"Shell Road" 4 plugs to lb., 30
lb boxes...................................... 55
"Florida Boys" 5 plugs to Io., 30 .
boxes............................................. . 36
"Florida Girls"-Bright twist, 14 to
lb., 17 lb boxes........................... 50
Cigars-"Long Branch"a very pop-
ular brand, per thousand........ 25 00
"Our X," choice cigar, easy smok'r 24 00
"Our XX," a very choice smoker.... 26 00
"Florida Boys," (we areState Agt,) 45 00
These are all fresh goods and will compare favora-
bly in price and quality with any goods.
SOAP AND STARCH-Colgate's 8 oz., per box.. 3 50
Peerless, 8 oz., per box......................... .. 3 50
Starch, lump, per lb.......................... ........... 5@6c
HOPS, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS-
Hops, per 1)b............................................... 15@ 22c
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz.......... 60c
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
doz. I b.................................................. 225
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. 1 lb. 2 25
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. lb..... 2 70
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. : ]lb...... 1 50
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl., new.................... 6 00
CHICKENS, each1..................... ...................... 20@40
EGGS-Per doz.................................................... 15@18
HDES---Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lb., first class 13
Country Dry Salted, per lb ..................... 9(11
Butcher Dry Salted, per lbf.................. 9@10
Dam aged Hides..................................... 6
Kip and Calf, 8ibs. and under................ 10
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb...................... 35.
Deer Skins Salted, per lbf..................... 26@30
FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter........................................................ 1 50@ 4 00
Raccoon, each...................................... 5@15
Wild Cat, each..................................... 10@20
Fox, each................................................ 5@ 15
BEESWAx-per lbf............................................... 20
WooL-Free from burs, per lb............................. 17@22
Burry, per lbf............................................ 11@15
GOAT SKINS-Each per lb ................................... 10
Hominy and meal advancing rapidly ;will be worth
10 per cent more in next 30 days.

^ei~~fie^)nris~*


Meteorological Report.
Weather for week ending July 21, 1882.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION
SIGNAL SERVICE, U. S. A., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Therm. '2
\6 ---P-4- i|
-s



Saturday 15... 30.13 8773180.0 72.0 0.00
Sunday. 16...... 30.17 8772 79.7 75.0 0.00
Monday 17...... 30.14 89 72 81.7 67.0 0.00
Tuesday 18...... 30.11 90479 82.0 74.3 0.42
Wednesday 19 30.10 93 77 85.0 68.3 0.00
Thursday 20... 30.14192 741 82.0 72.7 0.16
Friday 21........ 30.17 90 73478.7 83.7 0.04


Wind.





NE 4 Fair
NE 6 Clear.
E 4 Fair.
S 7 Fair
S 3 Clear.
S 4 Fair.
S 3 Fair.


Highest barometer 30.18, lowest 30.07.
Highest temperature 93, lowest 72.
NOTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Obse'rver U. S. A.


2if7


_ I_ X r __





-74: THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


The Travels of Plants.
HENRY STEWART.
When we look into the origin of our most
common plants, both useful and useless, not to
neglect either those which are a nuisance to us,
we are led to perceive the truth of the common
adage that "it is an ill wind which blows nobody
any good," and also that no evil, however bad
it may be, is altogether unmixed with good,
For we learn in our investigation that the most
of our cherished and useful grains and fruits,
and many of our most desirable ornamental
trees and shrubs have been spread abroad and
scattered by means of the most cruel and
* destructive wars. At the same time it is also
true that we owe some of our most noxious and
troublesome weeds to this same source. Next
in importance to the agency of armies in this
respect we owe most to the peaceful enterprises
of travelers-those restless, inquiring men who
are impelled by'their love of change and nov-
elty to explore the furthest ends of the earth,
to penetrate the tangled wilds and deepest re-
cesses of the vast forests; to brave the hard-
ships of scorching deserts, the hostility of cruel
and sanguinary savages, the poisonous atmos-
phere of deadly swamps; to climb the beetling
crags, the towering precipices, and the glitter-
ing glaciers of the highest mountains; to press
through the ice fields and bear with the bitter-
est cold which surrounds the inaccessible poles,
and to force their perilous ways wherever the
foot of man may be able to tread. And in every
such expedition the botanist is the first and
foremost to risk his life in search of some new
plant which may add to our knowledge or to
our enjoyment and. give him a reputation
among his class of students, although outside
of this he may be unknown. In regard to plants
our world was originally very defective, for
many countries were almost devoid of, or very
deficient in, a stock of such varieties as are now
supposed to be indispensable to human life and
comfort. The aborigines of Australia were
forced to feed upon the roots of ferns and other
similar poor plants. The ancient Britons made
their bread of acorns, and roasted beech mast
furnished them a choice side dish, while for
dessert they had nothing better than the bitter
astringent sloe, the whortleberry, blackberry,
and hazel-nut, indeed, it is very true, as the poet
has declared, that it was a very poor subsistence
"The fresh-formed earth, her hapless offspring dealt."
For nearly all our grains, roots, herbs, fruits,
and flowers which we now possess and enjoy


have been newly created, so to speak, by the
intelligent culture of modern races of men, from
out of the poorest and most defective varieties
which came down to us from the aboriginal
races. Yet there were some garden spots from
which we have procured in various ways our
most valuable varieties, and chief among' these
localities favored by soil and climate was Cen-
tral Asia, the cradle, as we believe, of our race.
Here, too, were first developed the arts of agri-
culture, and the fruits of this oldest civilization
in time spread to distant lands as the conqueror
marched here and there and subdued the sav-
age races. *
Still the origin of some of our most useful
plants is enveloped in legends and myths. The


I.__________________________________


vine, which has, perhaps, the most ancient his-
tory of all, was said to have been introduced
into Africa by Osiris and into Europe by Bac-
chus. If we should consider, as we properly
might, that these "gods" were merely embodi-
ments of some human trait or habit, as that
which led our second father, Noah, to plant a
vineyard and to drink the wine thereof, these
legends simply indicate the extreme antiquity
of the vine, which doubtless already bore its
ripened clusters wheft mankind first appeared
upon the face of the earth; and its native tow-
ers no doubt were formed as-it hung in its grace-
ful curves and festoons among the fig, the peach,
the almond, and the apricot trees of Persia.
The golden fruit of the Garden of the Hesperi-
des'was not the orange, but the citron, for the
home of the orange was China. Among other
ancient legends we have the origin of the olive
attributed to Minerva by the Greeks, who also
fancied it was brought.to Greece by Hercules.
Here again we may have the idea of the embodi-
ment of human skill and art in the goddess and
of hianly enterprise in the god of strength.
But to come from the realms of poetry and
fancy to those of hard facts, we know that wheat
was first grown on the banks of the Indus; that
barley first came from Tartary; that rye is na-
tive to the Crimea; that oats was indigenous in
Northern Europe and Britain, and that these
two localities at one period were not yet sepa-
rated by the shallow North Sea, for the flora
of the island of Great Britain and that of Nor-
way, Denmark, and the adjacent European
coasts, is similar in many respects, and sunken
forests are even found buried in the bed of the
dividing sea. The plants of the East were
doubtless brought .westward by colonists and
conquerors, and others native to the conquered
races were returned in the way of tde. Thus,
after the Roman conquest of Britain the apples
of the southern shores of the island were taken
to Tyre by the Phoenicians, who traded in the
tin of Cornwall. These same enterprising mer-
chants carried the uililberry to Western Eu-
rope and planted Carthage, a city whose peo-
ple were the most successful agriculturists of
that age. The merchants of Tyre were then,
doubtless, the first tree peddlers in existence,
and probably were as vigorously abused as
their modern successors in the business now are.
The great Alexander was the means of the dis-
tribution qfpny plants. His armies brought
rice from P a and carried it to Spain, and so
started i ,gmtravels to our own South Caro-
lina. It is probable that we also owe our cot-
ton to this same agency, for it was found in the
Punjaub by Alexander, and through him found
its way into Egypt, where linen was the only
cloth at the period of Herodotus, but in Pliny's
time the Egyptians were clad in cotton.
After the Macedonians came the Romans,
who even exceeded their predecessors in this
distribution of plants. The introduction, of new
and useful plants and their culture were made
a business by the Romans, and they collected


and scattered new kinds with great assiduity.
The Roman gardens were filled with every
choice vegetable, and it was in them that the
cauliflower was developed from a cabbage
brought from Cyprus. Lucullus brought a
cherry tree from Persia and carried it in full
fruit in his triumphal procession. The fig was
introduced into Italy also from Persia. All the
acquisitions made by the Ronians were quickly
distributed among their colonies, and these
people thus became the great benefactors of the
conquered nations. The plane tree, a relative
of our native plane or butterwood, was brought
from Asia and spread over Greece, Italy, and
Southern Europe, and then to Gaul, the Gauls
being taxed to pay for planting it. The cherry,
box, walnut, peach, vine, poplar, pear, ftg, mul-
berry, damson, and medlar were taken to Eng-
land, and in this way the Roman officials sur-
rounded their villas with the trees and shrubs,


and stocked their gardens with the fruits and
vegetables, to which they had been used at home.
The sweet bay and the laurel were also thus
introduced into England.
Then came the Moors who overran Spain
and brought alfalfa or lucern with them. Fol-
lowing these warlike agencies came the religious
agency of the monks and the Crusaders.
The old monks were assiduous cultivators of the
soil, and fruits and vegetables were much im-
roved by their labors, and plants were spread
y means of travelers from place to place and
from garden to garden. Going out of the direct
path of chronology, we might just here refer to
the similar agency of modern missions by which
new seeds and plants have been gathered from
the most distant and savage countries and dis-
tributed over civilized countries. The good
work of Moffat and Livingstone in Africa and
the Catholic missions of China, India, and
Spanish America all tended greatly towards
this valuable result.
But to return, we might notice the influence
of. trade and commerce and the results of pri-
vate or associated travels of enterprise and re-
search. It was in 1453 that the first "Dutch
bulbs" were grown in Holland. The ranuncu-
lus, anemone, crocus, tulip, hyacinth, and nar-
cissus were brought by Dutch traders from'
Persia, and wwre soon scattered over the gar-
dens of Western Europe. We might here
mention the tulip mania which afterward had
such a mad-career through the Western World,
when single roots sold for enormous sums, and
when an unhappy speculator was well-nigh,
ruined by the devouring of a plate of choice
bulbs of enormous value by a hungry visitor,
who took them for onions.Y It was in 1523 that
the English beer-drinkers first enjoyed the fla-
vor of hops, and a few years after this potatoes
were carried to Spain by the Spanish explorers.
of South America, whence they were taken to
Italy and Burgundy, before Sir Walter Raleigh
carried them to Ireland, 24 years later, in 1581.
The Dutch carried the potato to Southern Africa
and India in 1800, and it is now scattered over
the whole world by way of trade. In exchange
for the potato, tobacco and maize, America ob-
tained from the East sugar, coffee, and the
cocoa-nut.
The sugar-cane has an eventful history. It;
was originally brought from China, and passed
into Spain with the Moors, into Mexico with:
the Spaniards, into Brazil with the Portuguese,
and into the West Indies with the English and
French, the latter bringing it into Louisiana.
Our great plant maize was spread all over Amer-
ica, from Chili to the shores of the great lakes,
by the restless movements of colonists or the
natives. It was 50 years after Columbus's first
voyage that it was first grown in Spanish gar-
dens. It then reached the Levant and the grain
became an article of trade with the Venetian
merchants. With them it passed up the Dan-
ube into Hungary, and by the Eastern cara-'
vans which they supplied with merchandise it;
was taken into India, China, aml Japan. The
Venetian merchants also helped to distribute


coffee from Arabia into Turkey, and supplied
Spain and Portugal with the seed with which,
South America was stocked.
But we must hasten to notice the magnificent
services of private travelers, as Humboldt,
Hooker, Fortune, and others too numerous to'
mention; the cultivated officials of various
Governments in foreign countries, and the ar-
dent pursuers .of scientific knowledge of every
kind who, carrying their lives in their hands,
have penetrated unknown lands everywhere in
search of floral treasures. The valuable results
of these labors appear everywhere in our gar-
dens, in our lawns, in our green-houses, and in,
the modest window gardening of the humblest,
cottage, and have added enormously to our:
comfort and gratification as well as to the prof-f
its of agriculture. Time and space fail to re-,





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 2


count all these histories; indeed, volumes would
be required to name t'he services done the world
by these men and others who impelled by love
of the beautiful and the useful, have made up
by art and civilization what the world lacked
by nature, and who have scattered over the
lands which gave them birth, and from which
other lands have procured them, the treasures
of the great globe itself. We thought of men-
tioning the pernicious weeds which have trav-
eled far and wide over the surface of the earth;
but in the more agreeable thoughts of what we
possess that is valuable and beautiful we are
willing to forget and forgive all that may be
disagreeable and hurtful, and take cheerfully
the little bad we may have, in the vast world of
good we owe to the travels of plants-N. Y.
Times.

GEORGIA STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY.

Seventh Annual Session.
The Seventh Annual Session of this Society
will be held in the City of Macon, Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday, August 1st, 2d and
3d, 1882.
It is earnestly hoped that there will be a full
attendance of all the fruit growers and pro-
gressive horticulturalists of Georgia, as the
reunion promises to be one of the most impor-
tant ever held by the society. The work of the
association has been made evident by the great
progress and increased production of fruits
within the past few years, thus rendering its
influence a source of wealth to the country.
To perfect the aimanticipated at the inception
of the organization, the co-operation of all in-
terested in the welfare of the country is ex-
pected, by their contribution of fruits and
vegetables. # 1.,
The discussions will be eminently instructive,
and the information derived from the concen-
trated experience of the most practical and
successful horticulturalists, will be of untold
value to the progressive interests of this branch
of industry.
The headquarters of the society will be at
the National Hotel, whose proprietor, Mr. E.
E. Brown, has agreed to furnish first-class
board to members of the society for $1.50 per
day. The exhibition of Fruits and Vegetables
will be held in the large new store adjoining
the hotel.
The Central and Southwestern Railroads will
make a rate of four cents per mile, pay full
fare going, and upon presentation of certificate
of the officers of the society, the ticket agent
at Macon will issue return tickets at one cent
per mile.
The Macon and Brunswick Railroad will
issue tickets at 4c. per mile for the round trip.
The Savannah, Florida and Western Rail-
i-oad will return free/ upon certificate of the
officers of the society that. delegates paid full


fare going.
The Southern Express Company, ever friend-
ly to all progress, have, as usual, generously
agreed to carry free of charge all packages of
fruits and vegetables intended for the exhi-
bition. Such packages should be addressed
H. S. Peter, for Georgia State Horticultural
Society, Macon, Ga. The name of sender
plainly marked upon the package, and all ar-
ticles sent in time to reach destination not later
than 8 o'clock, August 1st.
Annual membership, $2. For circulars, cop-
pies of reports of past transactions, address the
secretary at Savannah. Full sets of these re-
ports can yet be supplied to new members.
P. J. BERCKMANS, ^President, Augusta, Ga.
T. L. KINSEY, Secretary, Savannah, Ga.
PROGRAMME.
FIRST DAY.-The Convention will assemble
at 10 a. m. Address of Welcome and Response.


Report of Secretary and Treasurer. Reorgan-
ization according to new Charter.
Afternoon Session.-Appointment of Commit-
tees. Reports of District and Standing Com-
mittees. Essays and Discussions.
Night Session.-Discussions of Catalogue.
SECOND DAY.-Report of Special Commit-
tees. Time and place of next Convention.
Discussions on Catalogue continued.
Afternoon Session.-Unfinished and Miscel-
laneous Business. New Business. Discussions
continued to close of session.
The following will be among the questions
proposed for discussion :
1. The chief obstacles to successful Fruit
culture, as regards soil, climate, insects, diseases,
etc., and the best remedies.
2. Best methods of Cultivating, Pruning, etc.
3. Facts connected with the new early vari-
eties of Peaches and other fruits intended for
Northern markets.
4. Best methods of Packing and Shipping
Fruit.,
5. The cultivation of the Japan Persimmon.
6. Grape Culture for market and Wine mak-
ing.
7. Utilization of surplus fruit.
8. Strawberry and other small fruits.
9. Vegetable growing for commercial pur-
poses.
10. Mulching and other methods to counter-
act effects of drought.
11. Best methods to establish city gardens.
12. Improvement of rural homes.

Kill the Weeds.
The loss in American farming resulting from
weeds is incalculable. Every man understands
that weeds in his strawberry-bed in the garden
reduce the yield, *and injure quality, and he
knows also that weeds growing in a hill of corn
prevent full yield of grain. In fact, he knows
that land occupied in large part by weeds can-
not produce satisfactory crops of grain or any-
thing else useful in his farming. He knows
that weeds absorb the profits of his labor, yet
somewhat he submits meekly as to the inevita-
ble. There are thousands of fields on good
farms fairly well managed, that yield no more
than half their possible capacity because weeds
take up the room or absorb fertility. This
proposition will not be disputed by farmers of
ordinary intelligence. But when we come to
talk of farming without weeds, very many will
say, "That is impossible. Weeds will spring
up in spite of every effort made to subjugate
them; they cannot be wholly eradicated." In a
strict sense this may be true. Weed seeds have
wonderful vitality. Some varieties spread, not
only by seeds wafted on the winds, or carried


by animals, but through root propagation as
well. Still it is true that the principal varie-
ties which give most trouble in farming, may
be so nearly eradicated that no ill effects will
be perceived from the, small remainder. The'
trouble is, this work involves cost of time and
effort. There is a very little direct effort in the
way of cleaning lands from weeds. A little
shiftless hoeing in the corn and potato crop, a
little extra harrowing in the preparation for
wheat, and for the rest nothing, weeds permit-
ted to have full sway. What is needed is
systematic design, plans that comprise in their
execution the complete destruction of useless
growth, the redemption of land from occupancy
that renders profitable cultivation doubtful.
How shall this be done ? There may be many
ways but the cheapest that is, withal, efficient,
will be the choice of every farmer who seeks in-
formation upon so great a task. This way is,


plowing and harrowing, plowing and harrowing,
plowing and harrowing until the object is ac-
complished. The stirring of the soil must be
so frequent that no plant can have in the inter-
val time to establish itself or to perfect its seed.
The purpose of all is to cleanse the land, hence
the necessity of destroying all weeds that start,
and also of starting all seeds in order that their
growth ntay be destroyed.-Husbandman.




Profits of Southern Manufactures.
As compared with the cotton manufactures
of New England, the Southern mills show a
wonderful difference in earnings. Mr. Russell,
a Massachusetts member of Congress, said, in a
recent speech in the House of Representatives:
"I have from official sources a statement show-
ing that fifty of the leading corporations in
Lowell, Lawrence, Chicopee and Salem, Mas-
sachusetts; Manchester, Nashua, and Newmar-
ket, New Hampshire; Lewiston and other
points in Maine, representing a capital of $50,-
000,000, engaged in manufacturing the various
grades of cotton and woolen fabrics, have paid:
to their stockholders in the past five years an;
average dividend of a little less than seven per
cent. per annum only."
Here is an authoritative statement that the,
manufacture of cotton goods in New England is
not one-half so profitable as in the South. On;
this $50,000,000 invested in Northern mills the
profits for the past five years have been less than
$17,500,000; while the same amount of capital
in Southern mills, basing our calculations upon
what other mills now pay would have been from"
$4, 000 to $50,000,000, or possibly more.
Such a difference as this is bound to tell. The,
Southern mills save from $2 to $3 a bale in the
matter of freights alone as compared with what
the Northern mills pay. They have lighter
expenses for heating, cheaper raw material, an
abundance of water power, cheap labor, cheap
living, and other advantages which enable them
to pay more than double the profitsthat North-
an -mills can possibly earn, and these things
are already working out a mighty material
development of the South. With natural ad-
vantages for combining agricultural pursuits
and manufactures unsurpassed by any country,
the Southern States will, ere many years, have
passed rank as one of the richest countries in
the world. The march of progress has already
begun, and in the next fifteen or twenty years
the result may be seen in vast manufacturing
industries, in mining for gold, silver, iron and
coal, in stock raising, in cotton, in breadstuffs
and in tropical fruits, to an extent that is scarcely
dreamed of now.- Tradesman.


FRUIT IN THE FIELDs.-Throughout most
of Central Europe fruit trees are planted by the"
farmers and cottagers with judicious care and
discrimination in their fields and gardens. In
an ordinary season they gather an abundance
of luscious'fruit, not only enough to supply their
domestic wants, but also ta send large quanti-
ties to market, from .which they realize an ac-
ceptable addition to their income. This is all
done without losing a square yard of ground
that could be profitably devoted to any other
food crop. The trees are planted along the
roadsides, on the margins of the fields, in the
hedgerows and in other o&d places and corners,
where they occupy ground that cannot be con-
veniently or profitably cultivated.


1 __ 1








P JflOridd Sizytck.

JACKSONVILLE, JULY 24, 1882.
D. REDMOND,
EDITORS: D. H. ELLIOTT,
SW. H. ASHMEAD,
Subscription $1.00 per annsnm, in advance.
RATES OF ADI)ERTtSING.
SQUARES. 1 TIME. 1 MO. 3 MO. 6 MO. 1 YEAR
One..................... $ 100 $ 250 $55 10$00 $ 1850
Two................ 200 500 1000 1800 3400
Three .............. 300 700 14 00 2500 4600
Four...................... 400 900 1750 3000 5800
Five........................ 450 11 00 1900 35 00 65 00
Eight................ 800 1650 3000 5000 100 00
Sixteen....... .... 1600 3000 5000 8000 15000
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words to line) ten cents
per line.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Geotgia, and is by far the best ad-
vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.

Special Club Rates with "The Dispatch."

Read and Subscribe--It Saves Money and
Will Pay Yau.
We have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
following publications, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt of price, for ONE YEAR :
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH AND
Savannah Weekly News...................$2.50
Florida Weekly Union.............................. 2.25
New York Weekly Suni................................ 1.75
New York Weekly Herald............................. 1.75
New York Weekly Tribune...................... 2.50
New York Weekly Times.............................. 1.75
New York Weekly World........................ 1.75
Philadelphia Weekly Times....................... 2.50
American Agriculturist........................ 2.00
Country Gentleman..................................... 2.75
Southern Cultivator............................. 2.00
Atlantic Monthly Magazine......................... 4.00
Harper's Monthly Magazine......................... 4.00
The Century Monthly Magazine (Scribner's).... 4.00
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine................... 3.15
Popular Science Monthly............................ 5.00
North American Review................................ 5.00
Harper's Illustrated Weekly......................... 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Bazar........................... 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Young People ......... .. 2.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly.................. 4.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4.00
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly.................... 3.15
Frank Leslie's Sunday Magazine.................. 3.15
Scientific American................... ..................* 3.75
W averly Magazine...................................... 5.00
Detroit Free Press....................................... 2.35
The above are among the very best publications"
Remittances should be sent by Check, Money Order,
or Registered Letter, addressed to
ASH1MEAD BRO'S,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

FRUIT-GROWERS are again respectfully re-
ferred to THE DISPATCH of July 3, page 232,
for full list of questions propounded by the
officers of the "Florida Fruit-Growers' Associa-


tion." Please send in replies from all quarters
of the State, as speedily as possible.
"So SAD !"-A glowing correspondent of the
St. Augustine Press, writing from and about
Titusville and the Indian River country, re-
marks: "Fishing is first-rate, and many experts
and amateurs find this'lagoon their paradox!"
Dear me! what a sad state of things, to-be-sho'.
THE Florida Pathfinder will shortly be issued
from St. Augustine. The Pathfinder contains a
vast amount of general information concerning
the State, as well as other items of interest. It
enjoys a large and increasing circulation
throughout the Northern, Western and South-
western States.


Budded Orange Trees, vs. Seedlings--
Grapes, etc.
In visiting the very pleasant suburban resi-
dence of our friend, J. H. NORTON-the well-
known Insurance Agent, of this city- and in
looking around among the many beautiful trees,
plants and vines which Mr. Norton has planted
and carefully nurtured, we were most forcibly
struck with the great difference between his
seedling and budded orange trees, of both which
there are many specimens on the grounds. The
seedling trees, ranging from nine to fifteen
years old-moderately well-grown, healthy and
vigorous-presented little or no sign of fruit:
while a number of budded trees, of the Navel,
(and perhaps other varieties,) were well covered
with fruit-several buds of only two years old
showing from 40 to 75 large and handsome
oranges!
Such facts as this (of which thousands might
be adduced,) carry their own significance to
all who desire early bearing trees, and who
shrink from that great bug-bear of orange cul-
ture : the "waiting" for seedling groves tb "come
into bearing." We do not at all condemn, or
advise our readers to discard seedlings. We are
fully aware that perhaps nine-tenths of the
large old bearing orange groves in Florida, to-
day, are composed mainly, if not entirely of
seedling trees; but we do contend that budded
trees are a great advance upon seedlings, and
that they possess so many and obvious advan-
tages over the natural or seedling tree that the
matter has almost passed beyond the bounds of
discussion. As to the comparative vigor, longev-
ity, abundant fecundity, etc., of the two trees, we
shall say nothing at present. We have not,
yet, had sufficient experience with budded trees
to determine all these questions. We only
dwell, now, upon the gratifying precocity of the
budded tree; and the great pleasure, (not to
say profit,) of gathering the "fruits" of our
labors without having to "wait a life-time !"
Mr. Norton has achieved very decided suc-
cess with our leading native grapes, of the La-
brusea type, and makes no complaint of the
Phylloxera or other serious grape enemies;
though he confessed to some mistakes in pruning
and training, which he will avoid hereafter. We
saw his grape frames or trellises well loaded
with very fair and nice Hartford, Ives, Concord,
Diana, etc., and we sampled, freely, both grapes
and the wine therefrom: so that we feel moved
to advise a further trial of our hardy natives,
under favorable circumstances---i. e., proper
pruning, training, culture and fertilizing-of
all which, we shall say more hereafter.
Mr. Norton's orange trees stand in large cir-
cles, cut out of a thickly-covered Bermuda
lawn; and while we would not advocate this
mode of culture, generally, we do not doubt
that when the trees are regularly and gener-
ously manured, as these are, they can be made
quite successful.


Our visit to Mr. Norton was quite enjoyable
and suggestive, and we thank him for many
courteous attentions.

Orange and Lemon Buds.
MANATEE, FLA.
Editors of the Florida Dispatch:
Can you supply me with buds of some of the
choice varieties of oranges and lemons? If not,
can you inform me where I can obtain them of
reliable men! and you will greatly oblige-a
new beginner. Very respectfully,
F. N. H.
REPLY.-YOU can obtain buds from the mana-
ger of Gen. Sanford's Belair Grove, at Sanford
-Rev. Mr. Phelps; or from A. I. Bidwell, of
this city.-EDS.


Lemons and Limes.
ALTOONA, FLA., July 16, 1882.
1. What is the average price for Florida-
raised Lemons, Sicily seed ?
[1. The ordinary Florida Lemon, of fair
quality, brings in this market, at wholesale to
dealers, from $1.25 to $1.75 per hundred. Not
much demand for any but thin-skinned, from
Sicily or California buds.]
2. What distance apart do you plant the
trees?
[2. From 15 to 20 feet each way.]
3. How long does the Lemon take to bear
from the seed, and how long from the bud?
[3. From five to eight years from the seed,
and two years from the bud.]
4. Will Lemons stand the climate without
protection in winter ?
[4. Lemons stand the climate almost anywhere
south of 28P. They are uncertain, and need a
little shelter or protection north of Sanford:
though we have raised excellent Lemons in
Duval County, near Jacksonville, and shall
continue to plant these trees in favorable loca-
tions.]
5. What is the average price for Limes ?
[5. The average price, in this market, to
dealers, is from 40 to 75 cents per hundred.]
6. What distance apart ought the trees to be
planted ?
[6. A little nearer than the Lemon or Orange,
as the tree is smaller-say 12 to 18 feet each
way.]
7 How long from seed to maturity; and what
is a fair yield to a tree?
[7. From seed, about as long as the Lemon
requires. The yield depends, of course, upon
the age and size of the tree.]
8. How is the demand in Northern markets ?
Any danger of overstocking ?
[8. Demand almost unlimited-no danger of
overstocking, until we drive out all foreign,
imported Lemons and Limes.]
9. Will the trees do best from seed or bud ?
and what is the marketable difference in the
fruit, if any. D. L. A.
[9. Plant budded trees, by all means, if ob-
tainable. Lemons are in greater demand than
Limes, but the latter are gaining in popularity,
and should be largely planted throughout the
whole peninsula, south of 29. See article on
"Persian Limes," in present number.-EDs.
DISPATCH.]

The Persian Lime-A Remarkable Yield.
Mr. W. W. HUNT, of Altamonte, Florida,


brought us to-day, a fine specimen of what he
says is the genuine Persian Lime. It is the size
of a good lemon. He says it is one of a pro-
duct of 650 limes raised from a bud, budded
but two years ago on a lemon stock, and for
which he gave 25 cents.; 500 he has with him,
taking North, and 150 are still on the tree.
These he could sell here for $9 per box-300 to
a box-netting $15. This is, indeed, a remark-
able showing in fruit culture. The fruit is
seedless, filled with juice, and by some con-
sidered much superior to the lemon.

A MODEL TowN.--Starke hasn't a single,
solitary loafer that we know of. Those of our
citizens who do not labor constantly and hard
have ample visible means of support.-Florida
Telegraph.


270 THIE FLORIDA ]DISPATCH.





S71


College, Clinton, New York, for a copy of the Sev-
entieth Annual Catalogue of the Officers and Students
of Hamilton College, for the Academic year, 1881-82."
Also the Programme for the Seventieth Commence-
ment of 1882 ;" and we are truly glad to see that this
grand and time-honored old college-the "alma
mater of many of our ripest scholars and best men-
still stands in the foremost rank of our institutions of
learning and presents every evidence of enduring pros-
perity.
Annual Announcement of Shorter College, Rome,
Ga. Address Rev. L. R. Gwaltney, Rome, Ga.
GUINEA Cows.-The subscribers who have
inquired for Guinea Cows, are respectfully re-
ferred to J. A. Dasher, Valdosta, Ga., and W.
Forsyth Bynum, M. D., Live Oak, Fla.
PROLIFIC BUD !--Our friend, Mr. GEO. R.
BENNETT, of Chaseville, Duval County, has a
twenty-months'-old orange bud containing 146
oranges. "Next."


New Publications.
Bright Days in the Old Plantation Time," is the
title of a new Southern book, by Mrs. MARY Ross
BANKS, of Griffin, Ga. The author is a genuine
Southerner-" native and to the manner born." She
grew up among the scenes and people she so inimita-
bly describes, and she has produced a work unique
and sui generis. Her plantation negro dialect is very
copious and racy. It is so full, complete and various
that, like the Creole patois of George Cable, in many
places it must be studied in order to arrive at a perfect
comprehension and understanding of it. We should
be glad to give our readers some specimens of the
quiet humor and tender pathos of the book, but have
only room for the following brief extract. There has
been a fearful time of typhoid or tarryfied fever
among the negroes, and an old story-telling "aunty"
says:
"Dem po' niggers died too; heap uv 'em. De doctor,
Mars Ab, yer cousin Ab, honey, he ain' no 'lidgous man,
but I clarete, he wuz good ter dem niggers. Menny er
time when der wan' nobody ter pray fur 'emhe'd say,
0 Lord, take dis child' right inter yo buzzom!' Den some-
times he'd sen' all de nusses out, an' tell 'em ter go res',
he'd 'ten' ter de sick ones hizse'f; an' ef air one uv 'em
died whiles he wuz de onlies well one dar, he'd say, des
as sollum ez er preacher, Return ye rancid sinner home.'
Dat's in de hym' book, and you know it's er monsous
sollum prayer, honey. I peept fru de crack, an' heerd
him say dem ve'y words over o1' Aun' Riny's Milly."
We had the pleasure of a personal acquaintance
with Mrs. Banks in her earlier years. She has always
been a charming raconteur, or story-teller, and her
sketches of "de good ol' times fo' de wah" are so
graphic and lifelike that her book must become very
popular, especially in the South, where it will be best
understood and appreciated. It is tastefully printed
and illustrated, and may be ordered from the Pub-
lishers, Lee & Shepard, Boston, or from Ashmead
Brothers, of this city. Price, $1 50.
Harper's Monthly, for August, opens with an arti-
cle on "Some Western Resorts," embellished with a
number of very beautiful pictures of the "Dells of
Wisconsin," etc. The other leading aricls are "The
First Americans;" "The Cruise of the Nameless;" a
continuation of "Spanish Vistas ;" "Some Worthies
of old Norwich;" The Haidas ;" "A St. Augustine
Episode;" Shandon Bells," etc., etc. Price, $4
per year; single numbers 35 cents.
The North American Review, for August, has sev-
eral articles of much weight and interest, among which
we particularly enjoyed "Woman's Work and Wo-
man's Wages;" "The Ethics of Gambling ;" "The
Organization of Labor," and "Artesian Wells upon
the Great Plains." $5 per year Single No. 50 cents.
Lippincott's Magazine has "St. Jerome's Day with
the Pueblo Indians," finely illustrated; "Ruth," a
pretty poem ; a continuation of Fairy Gold ;" "An
Adirondack Home;" "Edge-Tools," "Over the
Mountains ;" "Shires and Shire Towns in the South ;"
a sad poem, Closing In," by Paul Hayne, etc., etc.
A very excellent number. $3 per year-i25 cents sin-
gle number.
Frank Leslie's Sunday Magazine, of 115 large,
double-columned pages, profusely illustrated, certainly
Gives a generous return for its small cost. It contains
a great amount and variety of reading, and seems well
suited to the taste of the average magazine reader.
Price only $8 per year-single Nos. 25 cents.
All the above for sale by Ashmead Brothers; and
any book or magazine not on their regular list supplied
at short notice.
We are under obligation to our old and highly-
esteemed friend, Prof. EDWARD NORTH, of Hamilton


the comparative merits-each has marked ad-
vantages as it now seems-my present leanings
are to have a majority of "budded" trees. To
give in full the reasons would exceed the limits
of this paper.
9th to 10th. I have about 600 Japan Per-
simmons on native stalks. A few have fruit on
now and nearly all will fruit next year. The
tree is certainly ornamental whatever the fruit
may be.
1lth. Not cultivating them except for home
use. The four first succeed with reasonable
care.
12th. Not cultivated. 13th Same. 14th Do.
D. W. A.
ARCHER, ALACHUA Co., FLA., July 14,1882.
D. Redmond and D. I. Elliott, President and
Secretary of "Florida Fruit- Growers' Associa-
tion :"
GENTLEMEN: Seeing your circular in THE


FLORIDA FRUIT-GROWERS.
[REPLIES TO QUERIES OF THE ASSOCIATION-
FOR WHICH QUERIES SEE DISPATCH, JULY 3,
PAGE 232.]
TANGERINE, ORANGE Co., July 11, 1882.
Officers Florida Fruit- Growers' Association.
GENTLEMEN: I take occasion in reply to
your circular in THE DISPATCH, (Page 232), to
say: 1st. Few are grown to any extent; 2d,
Small; 3d. Scale is the chief insect plague but
Kerosene Butter (a la Hubbard) settles them;
4th. Soil high, hilly, pine land good quality
trees 75 to 125 feet tall, fine gray sandy soil
with redish yellow subsoil. The fertilizers used
are any kind of animal or vegetable matter
that will decay, supplemented with a little Pot-
ash, Guano and Bone.
5th. Never prune at all unless to accomplish
some specific object that I hope will more than
counterbalance the direct damage that pruning
always does. I have a few trees 10 years Qld
from seed, 33 to 39 inches in circumference in
the smallest part of the trunk. They are in-
nocent of the knife. The branches nearly sweep
the ground. They are models in form; pictures
of health and vigor and several of them gave
me last winter over 1000 oranges each. If peo-
ple would spend for manure the money usually
invested in Horticultural Surgery, you wold
have less complaint about "Die-back," "Scale,"
"Yellows" and Bark-bound. With the same
treatment otherwise, I have never seen a pruned
orange grove but what "gets left" by the un-
pruned one.
[We are inclined to endorse every word of
this. "Pruning" has been shockingly abused
and over done.-EDs. DISPATCH.]
6th. Constant stirring of the surface will
yield splendid results for a few years, but this
constant exposure of the soil soon renders it
barren of all vegetable humus and eventually
it becomes but a barren sand. Such a system
of cultivation can only be maintained by a
liberal application of the elements so lavishly
squandered. I have no doubt a grove can be
made in this way, but certainly it is not good
economy. A liberal use of mulch with an oc-
casional stirring of the surface will give us
rapid growth and constantly improve the
soil. This plan will have hosts offriends when
we come to the "home stretch."
7th. Near the surface and over a large area.
Trees, six years planted, at 33 feet apart, send
their roots together, so manure should be spread
broadcast. Orange trees will extend their roots
three to four feet each way in a year and con-
tinue that for years. Lemons often exceed this.
8th. I have about 20 acres budded and 17
acres seedlings. The six years I have been
growing them is too short a time to decide on


FLORIDA DISPATCH of the 3d inst., requesting
answers to numerous questions that large por-
tions of our citizens are or should be much in-
terested in, without quoting the questions by
number, I will give you my little experience
and observation in a brief way:
Answers to No. I. Peaches, figs, nectarines'
quinces, Japan plums, strawberries, with a few
apan persimmons and LeConte pears.
No. 2. Good for a full average crop.
No. 3. White ants or wood-lice and scale-
though but little of either. Remove the earth
clear from above the crown roots, for the for-
mer, allowing no wood or manure near the body
of the tree. A solution of whale-oil soap and
kerosene oil carefully applied for scale. Re-
sults entirely satisfactory.
No. 4. Good, rolling pine-land soil, sand very
fine and compact, red clay from two to four feet
below the surface. We use both domestic and
commercial fertilizers, the former all we can get;
then finish with the latter; both good.
No. 5. We prune down, or preach and prac-
tice low-headed trees; as all trees tend to grow
tall in Florida. Branches and leaves that en-
tirely cover the trunks of trees, tend to enlarge
and strengthen the bodies, and protect from
severe cold, sun a d heat; give more fruit, etc.
Peach and other deciduous trees need shorten-
ing in of strong-growing branches, and to be
done early.
No. 6. Mulch newly-set trees until the rainy
season sets in, stir the soil occasionally under
the mulch; those not mulched need quite fre-
quent stirring of the soil.
No. 7. By top-dressing and hoe and fork in
well.
No. 8. They are both; we prefer the bud-
ded.
No. 9. It has, and it is fine, causing quite a
sensation, and we think justly so; the indica-
tions are that there will be more money made
from the Leconte PEAR than any other new
fruit. Trees are being planted by the thou-
sands.
No. 10. Our Japan persimmon is fruiting for
the first time, andis looking splendid-Chinese
quince not fruited yet in this neighborhood-
apan plum had a heavy crop the past spring,
and was 'very fine. The Orange and Champion
quince have fruit this season looking well.
No. 11. The fig bears enormous crops, bananas
fruit well, some guavas in the neighborhood.
We know of no pine-apples here, no cocoanuts;
this class of fruits not grown for market.
No. 12. The strawberry is a decided success
here.
No. 13. We grow beside the Peen-To and
Honey peaches, by budding, other varieties of
Southern origin; no Northern variety of peach
have given satisfaction here, and we have tested
many.


THE VILOUIDA DISPATCH*


i


No. 14. On a small scale; testing numerous
varieties, some seem to do well, especially the
Scuppernong. No wine made in this neighbor-
hood, and we hope there never will be.
W. B. LIPSEY.

KINGSLEY, FLA., July 19, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Enclosed find $2.40 for -three yearly sub-
scribers to THE DISPATCH, less my commission.
Will send you more names before long. We
all like your paper very much. It has got to
be a necessity with all here that like a good
paper.
the crops are looking well in this locality.
Plenty of rain lately, and the farmers are
happy with the outlook and plenty to carry
them through the season.
Yours truly,
H. W. STRONG, P. M.


m


I


I











Southern Possibilities.
In considering the heavy and annually in-
creasing drain upon our forests and the possibili-
ty of a virtual exhaustion of the timber supply
in the more or less distant future, no observer
can fail to have his attention arrested by the
enormous bodies of standing timber which re-
main, as yet hardly touched, in our Southern
States. While the white pine districts of
Michigan and t4e Northwes tare being rapidly
stripped of their timber, and many are confi-
dent that the child is already born who shall
see these regions denuded of the last stick of
pine, there are in the South millions of acres of
yellow pine, which is estimated by many quite
as good as the white for most purposes, on which
the woodman's axe has never yet been heard.
While the supply of the furniture woods in the
North is every day growing smaller and the
question of substitutes for the more popular
ones is already being discussed, the South pos-
sesses practically inexhaustible forests of hard-
wood trees, as fine as any in the country. It is
only within a few years that the immensity of
the timber resources of the South has been to
any extent realized, and even yet it is over-
looked by many who might be expected to be
well informed on the subject.
The Lumber World has already devoted
considerable time and space to the presentation
of the facts concerning the Southern timber
supply and there is no occasion for more than
referring to it at this time. The subject to
which we more particularly desire to attract the
attention of our readers is the magnificent op-
portunity afforded by these States for the estab-
lishment of wood-working factories of every
kind. There seems to be no doubt that the
South will ere long be the great lumber-produc-
ing section of the country. Every. year new
timber lands are being opened up, new saw
mills are being erected and a large amount of
lumber produced. Northern lumbermen are
purchasing heavily of Southern timber-lands.
Northern capital and Northern enterprise are
being attracted to the South and the wonderful
resources of that favored region are being rap-
idly developed. With the railroad facilities so
improved as to make transportation cheap and
inter-communication rapid and easy, the tim-
berless States west of the Mississippi will un-
undoubtedly draw from the South a large-share
of the lumber required in their settlement. Not
only building lumber but furniture, vehicles,
tool-handles and a thousand and one other. ar-


ticles must be supplied to those "new localities,"
and the wood for them must come largely from
the South. Leaving out of consideration the
home demand for such goods, which is increas-
ing and must continue to increase as other
Southern industries are developed, a large
wood-working interest might find profitable
employment in manufacturing -to supply the
demand from other parts of the country.
It is universally conceded that it is far better
for a nation, or for any given locality, which
has a surplus of any article which is required
to undergo some process of manufacture before
passing into the hands of the final consumer,
to perform the necessary operations before ship-
ping rather than to send away the raw material,
and allow the profits of manufacture to be won
by other localities. This is exactly the ques-
tion which is now presented to the timber-pro-


during regions of the South. Shall the timber
be sent away unworked or shall large manufac-
turing establishments be erected by means of
which these profits may be kept at home ?
It is hardly necessary, at this late day, to go
into any extended argument to prove the ad-
vantages to any section of manufacturing estab-
lishments. Even where the raw niaterial which
is to be worked up must be brought from a dis-
tance, they contribute to the progress of a town,
a county or a State, quite as much, perhaps, as
any one thing. But when, as in this case, the
raw material can be obtained from the immedi-
ate neighborhood of the factory, in unlimited
quantity, of prime quality and at low expense,
the failure to establish such industries is the
greatest folly. The hardwood lumber which is
cut by the saw-mills of the South must some-
where be manufactured into furniture, carriage
material, handles, or whatever else may be
desired. What better place could be desired
than that where it is produced? Manufactur-
ing establishments not only bring profit to the
proprietors, (indeed, they don't always do that),
but they give employment to laborers whose
earnings go largely towards supporting other
branches of industry. Railroads, schools and
churches, in short, improvements of every kind
come with the factories.
Within tle past few years, to a far greater
extent than ever before, bath native born South-
erners and business iien from the North have
been building up the manufacturing interests of
the South. Every year more -of the cotton,
which before the war gave the South her su-
premacy, is being manufactured atrhome, in-
stead of being shipped in its raw state to be
manufactured elsewhere ,and returned. Mills
and factories of every description have been
erected and are now going up. The" wood-
working business has by no means been ne-
glected in the general advance. Numerous saw-
mills, planing mills, cooper shops, sash, door:
and blind factories, furniture factories and the
like, have been built and have been in success-
ful operation. But the progress thus far made
in this direction is very small compared with
the actual possibilities. The universal pros-
perity of these establishments is sufficient proof
that they are needed and there is little danger
of overdoing the business, at least until the
wood-working factories in these States are far
more numerous and the competition far more
vigorous than at present. Of course energy
and enterprise are required to conduct such
establishments successfully in the South, as well
as the North, but with these qualities combined
with business ability and good judgment, the
establishment of wdod-working factories in the
Southern States can hardly fail to be a remu-
nerative Undertakiiig.--Lumber World.

Sensible Advice.
There is nothing like their own home for
married people, and especially for young mar-
ried people, even if the wife shall have to cook


and sweep the floor and clean the windows. If
she be a healthy girl the exercise will do her
good-and no young man who has to labor for
his living should marry a girl that is not
healthy, strong and willing to'do her own work
while they are too poor to hire a servant.
This thing of marrying a girl that you have
to hire another to take care of is not a wise
thing for a poor young man to do. He should
look out for a girl that is broad shouldered,
strong in muscle, having of course other virtues.
The ideal girl, the corisumptive, 'tight-laced,
party-going, piano-playing, French-talking,
fashionable girl, can be no proper wife for him.
This language.the girl~i mny think unkind, but
it is not. It's better'for girls that are not fitted
to be a poor man's wife to remain with their
parents than become such. It will be better for
their lovers, too, and better forsociety.-Ex.


An Ancient Toast.
It was a grand day in the old chivalric time,
the wine circling around the board in a noble
hall, on the sculptured walls rang with senti-
ment and song. The lady of each knightly
heart was pledged by name, and many a sylla-
ble significant of loveliness had been uttered,
until it came St. Leon's turn, when lifting the
sparkling cup on high:
"I drink to one," he said,
"Whose image never may depart,
Deep graven on the human heart,
-Till memory is dead.
"To one whose love for me shall last
When lighter passions long have passed,
So holy 'tis and true e
To one whose love has longer dwelt,
More deeply fixed, more keenly felt,
Than any pledged by you."
Each guest upstarted at the word,
And laid a hand upon his sword,
With fiery flashing eyes;
And Stanley said, "We crave the name
Proud knight, of the most peerless dame,
Whose love you count so high."
St. Leon paused, as if he would
Not breathe her name in careless mood
Thus lightly to another;
But bent his noble head, as though
To give that word the reverence due,
And gently said, "My mother!"
Shorter College.
While journalists like to sing the praises of!
Peabody, Vanderbilt, Seney, Vassar, Slatuer,.
Tulane and others who have so freely given
their money for educational purposes, we ought
not to forget our own people who have aided
the good cause. Col. Alfred Shorter, of Rome,
Ga., deserves to have his name recorded on the
list of public benefactors. He has erected four
of the most beautiful, complete and well adapted
buildings for educational purposes in the South-
ern States. Shorter College, situated on one of
Rome's highest hills, at once attracts the admir-
ing gaze of the stranger who visits that beauti-,
ful city, and like a vision of loveliness, rests in
his memory when he is far away. The building
occupied by the president, and the boarding
pupils, has all the conveniences of a modern,
hotel. It is warmed by steam, lighted by gas,
has an abundant supply of hot and cold water, i
and all that is needed to make the inmates'
comfortable. The music rooms are ample and
well supplied with needful instruments.
The art room abounds in specimens and
models ; philosophical and chemical rooms have
the most approved apparatus; the study hall is
neat and well supplied with suitable desks,
charts, and maps. The memorial chapel is a
beautiful specimen of architecture, elaborately
adorned, and intended to commemorate the
virtuies of Mrs Shorter, the beloved andlatihent-
ed wife of Col. Shorter, who probably suggested
the plan of the college.
It is said that Col. Shorter has already given


to the college more than $100,000. The faculty
of the college consists of six gentlemen and five
ladies, all selected for the fitness for the stations
they occupy. Dr. Gwaltney has long been;
prominent in the list of our Southern Presidents,
as one most admirably skilled in the manage--
ment of a college for young ladies. He obtained
in the Judson an enviable reputation. Mrs.
Tobey, the esteemed lady principal, and Dr.
Tobey, who fills the chair of Greek, Ancient
History, and Literature, are known to our!
readers as two of the 'most accomplished in-
structors in the South. We who know them
can congratulate Shorter College. on securing
their valuable services.. The pupils of that in-
stitution will be indeed fortunate to have the4
opportunity of drawing knowledge from Dr.
Tobey's fund of varied information, for he is a
scholar in the truest acceptation of the term ;
and it will truly be the means of a liberal edu-.
cation in culture and social refinement fbr any


2178 ..~~_.. ,...,_..1.l~.~....L


_ __ I ~~_~____ .I_







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH,


girl who sustains the relation of pupil to Mrs.
Tobey.-Herald and Times.

"All Eggs in one Basket."
The folly of people tying themselves to any
one product was never better exemplified than
by the present condition of the Charentes and
the little town of Cognac, France. Before the
appearance of the phylloxera in France there
were over 700,000 acres of vineyards in the
Charantes. Of these, three-fourths have been
attacked by the pest; 270,000 acres have been
completely destroyed, and the insect is now
making head at the rate of 93,000 acres annu-
ally. The population of these departments has
fallen off about 10,000 during the last five
years; and thriving, bustling Cognac itself,
whose progress was some years ago exciting
wonder, and where there were 140 brandy firms,
is now on the downward road. All other trades
and callings necessarily suffer; and in this town
of under 13,000 inhabitants there are at present
840 empty houses to be let or sold.- Tradesman.

The Theory of Mulching.
The intelligent horticulturalist mulches his
young trees and plants to keep the soil cool and
moist. With this definite object in view, he is
careful to apply only a slight covering of some
loose material that will admit a circulation of
fresh air to the ground,, and yet prevent the
direct rays of the sun from baking the surface
and retarding the growth of the delicate young
rootlets. When a thick mass of mulching sub-
stance is placed around a tree. or plant, the soil
beneath quickly becomes saturated with mois-
ture, followed by the germs of disease, and this
is why the system is in bad repute with some of
our best cultivators. Bearing in mind that the
object is merely to shade the soil, the material
should be as light and loose as possible, and if
it is removed occasionally, and the surface of
the ground stirred, there cannot be any evil
results.
An objection has been raised to the system,
on account of the harbor it affords for insects,
but we must bear in mind that very few of these
are injurious, and some of them positively ben-
eficial as scavengers. It has been stated that
if we keep the soil constantly stirred, mulching
will be unnecessary. With this I cannot fully
agree, although a strong advocate of frequent
hoeing of the surface. No matter how often or
how thoroughly the soil is stirred, the hot rays
of the sun in midsummer will injure the roots
more or less of a newly planted tree. Loose
soil always attracts moisture, it is true, but
mulching will preserve it cool and moist at the
same time. In winter, the benefit to be derived


from mulch in preserving an even temperature
at the roots is beyond question. It is not to
keep them warm, but to guard against sudden
and injurious changes.-Josiah Hoopes in N. Y.
Tribune.

Agricultural, Horticultural and Pornological
Associations.
Florida Fruit-Growers' Association-Office at Jack-
sonville- ). Redmond, President; W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; W. H. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding Sec-
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee-Dr. C. J. Renworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, O. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official organ-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA STATE GRANGE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICES.-Master, Wm. H. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Wm. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B. F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Field-
ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. H. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate'
Keeper, Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,


Mrs. Wm. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T. W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H.
Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Geo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Umstead, Hous-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville.-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J. C. Greeley, Treasurer.
Directors-J. H. McGfnniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro, P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney. Annual meeting-
Last Friday in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; O. E. Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. 0. Taylor, Secretary and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Florida.-President, A. B. Bartlett; Georgetown; "Vice-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. Hawkins, Lake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George; George H. Thom, Treasurer,
Georgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
mond, Fort Gates.
Picolata Agricultural and Horticultural Society.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, W. N. Parker, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Corresponding Secretary,
N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., Recording Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer. Meets first Saturday in each month.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. Fathers, Second Vice-President; B.
W. Powell, Corresponding Secretary; B1 F. JordanrSec-
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical Fruit Growers' Association of Monroe County,
Florida.-Home office, Myers, Florida; F. A. Hendry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson,
President; Thomas Tillis, First Vice-President; J. B.
Sutton, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary; J. M. Barco, Recording Secretary;
L. W. Hamlin, Assistant Recording Secretary.
SFlorida Agriculttura-r -4i Mechanical Association.-
John Bradford, Presidtent, BRa;ffordville, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida.
Pinellas, Florida, Fruit Growers' Association.-D. W.
Meeker, President; Win. P. Neeld, Secretary.
Central Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida.-Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
Evergreen Horticultural Society Dunedin, Florida.-
J. W. Matchett, President; W. Tate, Vice-President;
Geo. L. Jones, Secretary.
Decatur County Fair Association, Bainbridge, Geor-
gia.-Maston O'Neil President; I. Kwilecki, Secretary.
Lake Wier Agricultural and Pomological Society (of
Marion County, Florida).-Captain J. L. Cainy, Presi-
dent Dr. L. M. Ayer, Corresponding Secretary.
Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Higgins Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Association, Albany,
Georgia.-L. E. Welch, President; T M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
Sumter County Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation.-D. L. Hubbard, President, Leesburg; W. C.
Dodd, Recording Secretary, Leesburg; A. P. Roberts,
Corresponding Secretary, Leesburg.
Florida Central Agricultural Society.-Thos. F. King,
President Gainesville; Secretary,
vi---- W. K. Cessna, Corresponding Secretary, Gaines-
ville.,
Archer Agricultural Association.-W. B. Lipsey,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine Secretary; Dr. J. C. Neal,
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewis, Treasurer, Tallahassee.
Indian River Agricultural and Pomological Society.-
A. P. Cleveland, President; W. H. Sharp, Secretary,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
Association.-R. J. Mays President; Frank W. Pope,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
Orange County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred L. Robertson, Corresponding
Secretary.
Gadsden County Fair Association.-Jesse Wood Pres-
ident; W.H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R. Harris,
Second Vice-President; J. W. Kendricks, Secretary; E.
C. Lou, Treasurer.


South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
which we may have fallen in the naming of officers, &c.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH ?]


HEADQUARTERS LeCONTE PEAR.


-0--000


LbeONTE PEAR TREES FOR SALE.

Grown on their own roots, at the oldest and most
reliable LeConte Pear Nursery in the world. Prices low,
and stock pure as usual. Fair and honest dealing
has always -been our motto.
Being the originator of the LeConte Pear business,
and having grown and sold more trees than any one
we flatter ourselves, we can, as heretofore, give perfect
satisfaction.
L. L. VARiNEDOE & SONS,
THOMASVILLE, GEORGIA.
to July 31.


THE


FLO RIDA


DAIIY TIMES.







THE TIMES is the official paper of the city and the
leading paper of the State. It has the largest circulation
in Florida, and reaches all parts of it. It is not merely
a local newspaper, but aims to advocate the interests
and promote the prosperity of Florida as a whole.
SIts reputation outside the State is very high. It has
taken rank among those journals whose columns are
looked to for news, and whose comments are quoted
with respect throughout the country. ,-
Its editors have had wide and varied experience in
journalism North as well as South; its advertising pa-
tronage is liberal and of the best character; and its re-
sources, financial and other, are ample. It will furnish
Florida with a live, progressive, outspoken, and reada-
ble newspaper, the peer of any.


ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.
THE TIMES has secured by special contract the full
despatches of the ASSOCIATED PRESS. Besides that
its Editor is Agent of the Associated Press for the State
of Florida, which gives him great advantages in obtain-
ing the freshest and most important State news.


SPECIAL DESPATCHES.
With representatives in the leading news centres of
the country, THE TIMES is well served in addition to
the regular Press reports. During the past winter it has.
received a very large number of telegraphic specials."


CORRESPONDENCE.
Its regular correspondence from Washington, New
York and Boston is of noteworthy excellence; and its
State correspondence has attracted much attention.
This feature will be extended and improved; and to
this end correspondence containing news or items of
information of any kind is solicited from all quarters.


"OLD SI."
In addition to his editorial work, Mr. Small will write
regularly for THE TIMES, and in its Sunday issues the
famous "Old Si" will disseminate wisdom in chunks
to the Florida public.
TERM (strictly in advance): One year, $10; Six
months, $5; three months, $2.50; one month, $1. sent
one month on trial for 50 cents.
Remittance should be made by draft or post-office
order, or in a registered letter. Address
JONES & SMALL,
to sept 26,'82 Jacksonville, Fla.


Hickory Blff, 46 acres, 18 acres Hammock, cleared and
enclosed with Picket fence. 200 thrifty young Orange
trees growing on the place. Bold bluff river front of over
a quarter of a mile, and steamer channel close in shore,
and over five miles of water protection to the northwest, giv-
ing perfect security against frost. Nine miles below Jack-
sonville, and one mile from New Berlin. Can come to
city every morning on mail steamer and return in the
afternoon. A choice place for orange growing and truck
farming. Price, $2,500.
Also, two desirable city lots 53x209 feet, and one 70x156
feet covered with thrifty orange trees 6 years old, half
mile from business center. Good neighborhood (all
white). Price of first, $600each. Price ofsecond, a corner,
veryhandsome, $800. Apply to
J. HI. NORTON,
No. 1 West Bay Street, - JACKSONVILLE.
State that you saw this in THE DISPATCH.
July 3, tf



HOMES IN THE SUNNY SOUTH.
---o--
SPLENDID OFFER TO SETTLERS


40 Hours from New York City: 108 Miles
from Sayannah.


So'ittl. 0eorgris ILsandds for
Sele by


June 19-tf


J. M. STICKER,
Glenmore, Ware Co., Ga.


279



--- --.-----~.-- ~---~ _a---.l--- -------i-r-------- -_--___ __.~ ___~ __ _~ _~ __ ___~~__~_ _~~ ~ I~___ ~.~~ _;.___~~ _~_ ~..~_~.~.~..I I.~..~.~~._
-


__~_____________________________________


I






SO TH FLORIDA DISPATCH.


List of Dealers in Fruit and Vegetables on
Line of C. C. C. & I. Railway.
E S Shellhouse, D S Nye, J T Kennard, T W Cheesbro,
Carey, Ohio; C Chandler & Son, Shannon & Clymont,
Geo Davis, Healy & Co, B D Owen, R M Burrows, Connor
& Pitts, W P Southworth & Co, Cleveland Ohio; Wm M
Fisher & Co, M A Pritchard & Co, McCarty & Slabaugh,
John Marzetti, J A Nealy A B Powers, Columbus, Ohio;
J F Needham & CO, Wm kieferaber & Bro, Bradstreei
& Co,E M Roderbaugh, Dayton Ohio; N L Gallegher, J
J Norton, Karr & Gallegher, Mitchell & Voghts, J u Ros-
enthal, Evans Bro's, Delaware Ohio; S C McMannis AT
Achacke, Schwartz & Winders E Totten, F Karst, Find-
lay, Ohio; John F Nye, D W Fitch, C. W Kikoff, John
McCurg, Forest, Ohio; Collins & Wessel David Daily, J
L Day, Geo Snyder, C W'Brown, S Gochenour & Co, M
Cronenwelt, Galion, Ohio; BBlattman, J H Morningstar
Rothman & Rentzler, Westerfield Bro's, W F Setnel, D E
Van Fulburg, Martin & Rauthmus, Helm Bro's, Green-
ville, Ohio; B F Bronson, Chas Widt, Milligan & George,
Ellis & Alter, E G Campbell, Weston Bro's & Co, Ken-
ton, Ohio; A J Thomas, F J Kramer, J H Hidler M Ben-
teebel, London, Ohio; A J Eggart & Co, John Krause &
Sons, J J King, Geo C Wise & Co, Mansfield, Ohio; J Y
Leffer, Chas Eslinger & Co, J L Bell, Boyd Brown, P
Bauer, Coffey & Stone, P B Shew & Son, J L Patten, Tim
Relly, Kirchner and Dormody, Moore Bro's, A D Mat-
thews, Miller & Crouse, N Green, Marion Ohio; Hagin
& Son, S B. Bishore, W C Webster, R M Beck, John Sohn,
Dan Overman, H D Thomas & Co, Marion, Indiana; L
H Harper, Lockwood Bro's, Scott & Hurst C C Jones,
Muncie, Indiana; Robertson & Co, H E O'Hagan & Co,
Hoover & Woodward, G Hart & Son, Whitworth &
Quinn, Ohly Bro's & Co, Fisher & Co, Gehri Bro's, San-
dusky, Ohio; Times Bro's G B Sterine, J Piper, Jr, A
Kline, Sidney, Ohio; DeWitt & Ramsey, W S Straley, P
J Coles & Co, E S Bugby, Springfield, Ohio; P L Morcher,
John Utz, Jake Fraze, P J Wilson, W H Schuler, Tiffin,
Ohio; A A Gerre & Son, J W Russell, Bell Bro's, N L
Reis, Toledo, Ohio; Smallzried & Merry, B O Payne, L
H Tongers, Simon Bro's, Wabash, Indiana; W B Bran-
denburg, Thos Best & Son, J L Poyner, W H Pienheimer,
W Manderbach, L G Preckett, Winchester, Indiana.
(Signed) C. A ELLIOTT,
General Agent, Cincinnati.




THE SUWANNEE



STEAM SAW & PLANING MILLS,

ELL A.VIT LLE, FLORIDA,


DREW & BUCKI,


Proprietors.


-0
------0-------

We respectfully announce to our friends and the pub-
lic generally, that, having secured the services of com-
petent Draughtsmen, Architects and Mechanics, we are
prepared to estimate on and contract for the building of

DWELLINGS,
COTTAGES,
FACTORIES,
HOTELS
PUBLIC EDIFICES,
etc., at any point accessible by the several railroad and
steamboat lines. Possessing the advantage of manufac-
turing our own lumber, we are enabled to offer very lib-
eral inducements as to terms and quality of material.
Draughts, plans, estimates and information furnished
on application.
We have also made extensive additions to our Plan-
ing Mill, and will continue, as heretofore, to manufacu-
ture and keep in stock a full line of Framing and Finish-
ing Lumber, Mouldings, Brackets, Balusters, Pickets,
Laths, etc.


July 17, '82-tf.


IDRI{EW 34 &tBUCKI,
Ellaville, Florida.


LANDS FOR SALE
SUITABLE FOR

Orange Groves,
In lots to suit, in the town of

Satsfma, Pnmam County, Florila,
Send for circular to

WHITNEY, GOLD & HODGES,


June 26-tf


Satsuma, Nashua P. 0.,
FI.OLRI D>A.


PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


FRANK W. MUMBY. JNO. N. C. STOCKTON. RAYMOND D. KNIGHT.

MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
SUCCESSORS TO
1879. 1870.
F. W. MUMBY & CO. JNO. S. DRIGGS & CO.
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE AND RETAIL


Crockery, China, Glass and Earthenware.
We have the largest and most complete stock in the State. All the Latest Novelties in Majolica and Fancy
Goods, Vases, Motto Cups and Saucers, etc. Decorated Tea, Dinner and Chamber Sets in a large Variety. Lamps
and Chandeliers, Fancy Vase Lamps in Majolica Faience Kito, Porcelain and other Wares. Wood and Willow,
Stone and Tinware. The American, Crown and Peerless Ice Cream Freezers, Water Coolers, Filters, etc.
SOLE STATE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED

Monitor Oil Stoves and Little Joker Oil Cans.
THE BEST IN THE WORLD. Send for Price Lists.
The best and only absolutely safe Oil Stove in the World. It is Economical, Ornamental, Convenient, Dura-
ble, Compact and Cheap. Its fuel is Coal Oil. No Dust! No Ashes! No.Smoke! No Trouble! Testimonials
from those using the Stoves given on application.
Fruit Jars and Jelly Tumblers Wine Bottles, Flasks, etc. Special inducements to the trade.
Merchants, Hotels, Boarding Houses and Bars will find it greatly to their advantage to give us a trial. Send
for list of assorted packages.
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD.
MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
to July 5, '83. (Mentionthis paper) 13 WEST BA Y STREET.


NEW CROP TURNIP SEEDS!
Warranted Strictly Firesh and Genuine. Purple Top Flat, White Flat Red Top Globe, White Egg, Golden
Ball, free by mail, postpaid, 75c. per lb. White Globe, Large Cow Horn, Yellow Aberdeen, Amber, Globe, Im-
proved Purple Top Yellow Ruta Baga, White Ruta Baga, &c., 70c. per lb., postpaid. Customers ordering by
freight or express can deduct 16c. per lb. from these prices. Catalogues Free.
Branching Sorghumn Seed, 10c per pound, $3.00 per bushel. Address
JOH NSON & STOKES, Seedsmen, 11.-1S aarkxet St. Philadelplbia
to June 9, '83.


Ocean Steamship


Company.


SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.




The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, Augnst 2d, 8:30 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, August 5th, 11:00 a. m.
GATE CITY Wednesday, August 9th, 3:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, August 12th, 5:00 p. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, August 16th, 8:00 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, August 19th, 10:00 a. m.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, August 23d, 1:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, Augbst 26th, 4:30 p. m.
CITY'OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, August 30th, 7:30 a. m.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
H. YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agent of Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. .


WINTER PARK is a new town in Orange LISTIEr B O.'
WI INT R PARI County, Florida, eighteen
miles south of Sanford, on the South Florida Railroad,
with a frontage of two miles upon three beautiful Lakes
WINTER HOMES in the midst of Orange Groves, for !Soluble Ground Bone,
Northerners, is the main idea. For Pamphlets and
Maps giving particulars, address THE BEST AND CHEAPEST
CHAPMAN & CHASE,
Winter Park, Orange Co., Fla. T inn TP N
to uly 17,'82 FETILIZE FOR ORANGE TEES.
Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
TTURRIP TURNIP SEED PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.

Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
True American Purple Top and White Flat Dutch,
White and Yellow Ruta Baga, and all approved varie- VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
ties of Swede Turnip Seed 50 cents per pound; if sent by
mail, 16 cents added. Warranted fresh and genuine. For sale by
Especial prices quoted for large quantities.
A full assortment of Garden Seeds for the season. FOSTER & BEATN,
Especial attention given to orders per mail. Agents for the State of Florida.
Agents for the State of Florida.


C. IR. ,rOGE-RS, SEEDSMAN,
133 MARKET STREET,
PHILADELPHIA.
to August 3.

50,000


Leoonte Peir Tar anil uulttings
FOR SALE AT
Dixse lTCrsery.
H. H. SANFORD Proprietor,
to Aug 21 THOMASVILLE, GA.


~AiAnalysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


to sept 26, '82


TALLAHASSEE NURSERY.
LeConte and Kieffer Pear Buds, $5 per hundred, by
mail. Also, trees of same for sale.
W. H1. IASKELL,
to july 24 Tallahassee, Florida.
SILi: .A:T:D -:EO3E'Y.

BEST ITALIAN BEES, QUEENS Etc., at greatly
reduced prices. An average profit of $69.63 per colony,
net. A salary of $2,963,00. Also eggs for rearing cocoons
for American silk-a new and important industry.
Send at once.
CHAS. R. MITCHELL
11, 13, 15,17-p. Hawkinsville, Ga.


------


~--~----






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. .28
o


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE.




Rates on WATERMELONS in Car Loads of 20,000 Pounds.


=TO TAI"E E.ECOT V.A- -- 20th., 1SS2.


To-


Fro m Jacksonville,
Callahan and Live
Oank


A tlanta........................................................ ......... ................................ ........................... $ 6000
A ugusta............................................................................................................................. 55 00
Baltim ore................................................................................. ......... ..................................... 100 00
Boston ....... ................ ....................................................................................................... 100 00
Bristol, Tenn....................................................................................................................... 90 00
Charleston, S. C................................................ ................................................................ 36 00
Colum bus, Ga................................................... ...................................... .............................. 60 00
Chattanooga, Tenn.................. .................... .................. ...................................... 70 00
Cincinnati, O.................................................... ................ ......... ....................................... 80 00
Cairo, Ill.............................................................................................................................. 90 00
Colum bus, 0.................... ................................................................................................... 100 00
Cleaveland, 0 ........................................................... ... 100 00
Chicago, Ill................................................ ........................................................................ 11 00
Dalton, Ga............... ........................................ ................................. ................... 70 00
Evansville, Ind................................................................................................................... 80 00
Indianapolis, Ind......... ............................... ........................ ................. ........................ 90 00
K noxville, Tenn..... ......................................................................................................... 84 50
Louisville, K y ................................................................... .............................................. 80 00
M acon, Ga.................................................... ..................................................................... 45 00
M ontgom ery, Ala............................................ ................................................................. 60 00
M obile, A la............................................... ......................................................................... 70 00
M em phis, Tenn........................................................................ ........................................ 80 00
Nashville, Tenn........................................................ ........................ 75 00
New Orleans, La..... ...... ....................................................... ..... .................80 00
N ew York,N Y.................................................................................................................... 100 00
Peoria, Ill............................................ .................................................... .................110 00
Philadelphia, Pa............................................. .................................................................... 100 00
Rom e, Ga.......................................................................................... ..................................... 70 00
Savannah, ................................................................................... .... ................ ....22 00
St. Louis, M o ......... .......................................................................................................... 90 00
Terre H aute, Ind................. ........................... .................................................................... 100 00


From Florida Tran-
sit Railroad, except Florida Transit Rail-
Ocala and Points be- road 0 c a a and
yond. Points beyond.


$ 8500
80 00
125 00
125 00
115 00
61 00
85 00
95 00
105 00
115 00
125 00
125 00
135 00
9500
10500
115 00
109 50
10500
70 00
8500
95 00
10500
100 00
10500
125 00
13500
125 00
95 00
47 00
115 00
125 00


$ 90 00
85 00
130 00
130 00
120 00
6600
9000
10000
110 00
120 00
130 00
130 00
140 00
100 00
110 00
120 00
114 50
110 00
7500
9000
100 00
110 00
105 00
110 00
130 00
14000
13000
100 00
52 00
12000
130 00


Florida Central and
Western Railroad.


i 80 00
7500
119 00
119 00
110 00
56 00
80 00
90 00
100 00
110 00
120 00
120 00
130 00
90 00
100 00
110 00
104 50
100 00
65 00
80 00
9000
10000
9500
100 00
119 00
130 00
119 00
90 00
41 00
110 00
120 00


K Excess of 20,000 pounds will be charged forpro rata, provided the weight loaded does not exceed the capacity of the car, as marked thereon. If cars are not
marked with the capacity thereof, the weight of load must not exceed 20,000 pounds. All excess of load above capacity of the cars will be charged for at double rates.
Melons must be loaded and unloaded by the owners. Shipments of Melons will be receipted for only as "Shipper's Count." This Line will not be responsible
for deficiency in quantity loaded in the cars, nor for damage resulting from improper loading. Shipments via Florida Dispatch Line will not be required guaranteed
or prepaid.
D. H. ELLIOTT, Gen'l Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla. JAS. L. TAYLOR, Gen'l Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE in connection with ATLAN IC COAST LINX


Rates on Watermelons In Car Loads of 20,000 in Cents per 100 lbs.


To take effect May 20tb, 1882.


Florida Transit and
T o From Jacksonville Peninsula Railroad Florida Transit Rail- Florida Central and
Sand Callahan. except Ocala and road, caa and Western Railroad.
Points beyond. Points beyond.

Cts. Cts. Cts. Cts.
B altim ore.. ...... .............................. ....................................................................... .63 .76 .78 .73
B oston .................................................. ............................................................................. .68 .81 .83 .78
New York. .68~.81 .83 .78
Providence ..................... ........................................................................... ............ .68Y .81 .83 .78
P h iladelph ia...........................................................................................................................68 .81 .83 .78
Portsmouth, Va.... .. ..............................48Y2 .61 .63 .58
Petersburg, V a..................................................................................................................... .48Y2 .61 .63 .58
Richmond, Va.........................................................................481 .61 .63 .58
Wilmington, N. C...........................................53
W ilm ington, N C.......................................... ......... ......................................................... .. 38 .51 .5.48
Washington, D. C. (via Portsmouth)........................................................63 .76 .78 __ .73
Shipments via "ATLANTIC COAST LINE" must be prepaid to destination. 20,000 lbs. will be the minimum rate charged for. All excess of capacity of cars
will be charged at double rates.
_.. . .__._". .._.. -


\J~UBBg ~~~ ~i~b""
5~_--~


- 1- - 1-


I


I


i.






THE FLO1fIDA )lSPATC14.


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
---
MERCHANTS & MINERS

TRANSPORTATION COMPANY!






The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail
From BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH
EVERY FIVE DAYS,
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE, as follows:
Monday, July '3d, at 9 a. m.
Saturday, July 8th, at p. m.
Thursday, July 13th, at 5 p. m.
Tuesday, July 18th, at 9:30 p. m.
Monday, July 24th, at 1 p. m.
Saturday, July 29th, at 5 p. m.
Thursday, August 3d, at 10 a. m.
Tuesday, August 8th, at 1 p. m.
Monday, August 14th, at 8 a. m.
Saturday, August 19th, at 10 a. m.
Thursday, August 24th, at 2 p. m.
Tuesday, August 29th, at 8 a. m.
The steamers are first-class in every respect, and every
attention will be giveri to passengers,
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $15,
Including Meals and Stateroom.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Baltimore.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
column.
JAS. B. WEST & CO., Agents.
Savannah, January 8th, 1878. 30-tf

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA




WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, JUNE 4th, 1882, Passen-
ger Trains will run over the Waycross Short Line
as follows;
:Fast Mail. Jack'lle Ex.
Daily. Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at.................. 9:00 a. m. 5:35 p. m.
Arrive Callahan at................ 9:00 p. m ......
Leave Callahan at.......................... 9:45 a. m. 6:45 p. m.
Arrive Waycross at.....................11:45 a. m. 9:15 p. m.
Arrive Jesup at.............................. 1:32 p.m. 11:25 p. m.
Arrive at Brunswick at................. 6:10 p. m. 8:20 a. m.
Arrive Savtknnah at.................... 3:35 p. m. 2:30 a. m.
Arrive Charleston at................. 9:30 p. m. 8:45 a. m.
Arrive at Augusta at.................... 5:20 a. m. 2:30 p. n.
Arrive M acon at......................................... 7:00 a. m.
Arrive Atlanta at. ................. 3:40 a. m. 12:50 p. m.
Arrive Louisville at........ ................... 8:00 a. m.
Arrive Cincinnat ati at...................................... 7:00 a. m.
Airive Washington at ................... 9:40 p.. 7:40 a. m.
Arrive Baltimore at.....................1:45 p.. 8. 9:15 a. m.
Arrive New York (limited express).......... 3:50 p. nm,
Arrive New York P. R. R............. 6:50 a. m. 5:20 p. m.
Arrive S ht. Louis at.......... ......................... 7:00p m.
Arrive Chicago at............ .............................. 7:00 p. m,
Fast mail arrives at Jacksonville daily at...... 6:10 p. m.
Jacksonville express arrives at Jacksonville
daily at ............ ........................ ..8:10 a. m.
TIME.
To Savannah................................... 6:40 hours.
To New York................................... 45:45 hours.
To W ashington............................................. 36:30 hours.
To Chicago.............................. .......... .. 49:00 hours.
To St. Louis............................................... 49:00 hours
THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
t@aDaily Jacksonville to Charleston.
g.l)aily Jacksonville to Cincinnati.


Sleeping car from Jacksonville to Savannah (5:35 p.
m. trains) Tuesdays and Fridays.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers.will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
The morning train from Jacasonville to Savannah,
connects daily with through Pullman sleeper for New
York.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to Montgomery and New Orleans
take the evening train.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jaclusonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. m. and arriving at Savannah at 2:30 a. m., or train
at Jacksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vainah at 3:35 p. m.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, at Depot Ticket
Office. JAS. L. TAYLOR,
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*] Ticket Agent.


HUAU & CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF

FINE KEY WEST CIGARS
-AND-

WHOLESALE LEAF (DE.ALErRS.


Proprietors of Factories Nos. 29, r and81, D''trict
of Florida,
Jacksonville, Florida,
The Most Extensive Manufacturers in the State.
lyr to april 23,'83.

D. G. AMBLER. .T. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as

AMBLER'S BANK.
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bauk, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tif--


Sportman's Emporium.





W. C. PITTMAN,
1No. 3 West lBay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0---
Guns, Pistols, Rifles and Cutlery,
Shooting and Fishing LTacklle.

SHELLS LOADED TO ORDER.
1 yr to April 23, '83



DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,

GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emery Papers, & c.
AGENT FOR


PR ATT'S


MINERAL COLZA


OIL,


3000, FItRE TEST.
Johnson's Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, Martinez and Longman's
Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
to mar25,'83 JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

[4-347.]
I-Totice for 1mLbolioationi-

LAND OFFICE AT GAINESVILLE, FLA., May 3,1882.
OTICE is hereby given that the following named
settler has filed notice of his intention to make final
proof in support of his claim, and that said proof
will be made before T. E. Buckman, Clerk Circuit Court
at Jacksonville, Florida, on Saturday June 24th, 1882,
viz.: Jacob Robinson, Duval County, homestead entry
No. 561, for the Nw i of Nw V, section 6, township 3s,
range 27e.
He names the following witnesses to prove his con-
tinuous residence upon, and cultivation of, said land,
viz.: Calvin Hughes, Samuel Anderson, Andrew Sess-
ions, Lee Clark, all of Jacksonville, Florida.
L. A. BARNES,
May 8 tf Register United States Land Office.


A FEW CHOICE LOTS OF FIFTEEN OR MORE
acres, river fronts, affording attractive and lovely
building sites, and admirably suited to the growth of
oranges, figs and other Florida fruits, may still be ob-
tained on reasonable terms.
"HOLLYWOOD" is south of "Point La Vista," on
the eastern shore of the St. Johns River, four miles from
Jacksonville. For circulars, maps, terms, etc., address
D. REDMOND
apr 3-tf Box 257, Jacksonville, Fla.

W. II. PI3LLOOW'S

STRAWBERRiY 8HIPPIN AQHNGCY
-AND-
FRUiJIT AND VEGETABLE
REPACKING AND
COMMISSION HOUSE,
Has closed till NOVEMBER. Present adUress,
may 12, '83. MWiACON, GA.

ST. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0-
CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOEN'S RIVER.



OPEN THRfOUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
1 yr to April 23, '83


VIEWS OF FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In Book Form, Ogx taininl 1tj
Views Eaih. "
Souvenir of Florida, (small size)......................25c.
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size) ............. ........ ................................ 25c.
Souvenir of Jacksonville,( large size)................. 50c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine,(large size) ...............50c.
Stereoscopic Views, per Doz. $1.50.
Address
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
JACKiSO X NVILLE, I'FLA..


A Good Investment!
----


In the County of Hernando, East of Brooksville, the
county seat, and near the
Tropical lorlcia 1- 1.,
which is now actively building, two tracts of land. The
first contains two hundred and forty (240) acres in a body;
the second contains eighty (80) acres. These tracts both
touch Upon a Lake of about 150 acres area; are
well timbered with pine suitable for lumber; the second
about half a mile southeast of the first; between them
lies a cultivated farm. These lands are well adapted to
Oranges and Other Fruits, being of good
soil, with little underbrush and are easily cleared. They
were selected by I-ion. Walter Gwynn, Ex-
Treasurer of the State of Florida, and they may be relied
upon as being what is represented. These lands are in a
part of the State that is rapidly settling up
and offer a good field either for an investment in Flor-
ida real estate, or for orange groves and the like.
Price and terms will be so arranged as to be satisfac-
tory to the purchaser. Apply to
WALTER B. CLARKSON,
Box 877. Jacksonville, Florida.
In corresponding, please mention this paper.


to August 29, '82.

RICH'D H. MARKS'


ORANGE COUNTY LAND AGENCY,
SANFOIRD, FLORIDA,
Agent in Orange County for

FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMPLY.

BUYS AND SELLS

Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission,
ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
June 12-tf


.- -- .~ i -- -`_ ...-- .-..~~i~...~ iz~-" ----- - ;_i~=.IL-_i~:L __iL.
rUU





1






F. S. CONE, A. H. MANVILLE, E. A. MANVILLE,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer

Lake George, Florida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums
Peaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, androver one thldred varieties of the Citrus.
ORANGE ANID 3LEE1MON T'IREES a specialty.
Catalogue free. to apr 17, '83


ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]

J A.. BARENE & CO.,

FRUIT AND PRODUCE

COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
So'tlhern 'r~uit and. Vegetables a Specialty.
3~60 and 3Z8 North JDelaware A-venue, Philadelphia.
to jan 6, '83

JOrES & BO.WENM


WHOLESALE GROCERS,

AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


ACER'S


DRY HOP


YEAST CAKES,


60c. PER


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE C D


SNOW-DROP PATENT. FLOUR.

First Edandgs on Fcinest Qluality

Best Butter in Tubs at 30 to 3 Cents per Pound,

J %" EPT O IC lOE^a
No. 7 West Bay Street, - Jacksounville, F.oria,
To sept 27, '82


Orange Tree Wash .and Insecticide.


H. D. BOUNETHEAU,


MILLS
-MANUFACTURE-

Freshjrouyd
FEED, GRITS,
MEAL,
S(Bolted or unbolted.)
Pearl Hominy.
GRAIN, HAY, COAL AND
WOOD-YARD.


PROPRIETOR


MANUFACTURER OF
Lukicat~g awd 9iloeitT pop0n40 Canpressed Soaps, Car and
Axle grease.
"L9O0 )LE P FA e best|ran Waslond Ins icide ejfb- 5 '
O'S-ANC^rED TEIEE EV^IT.TL SI0ONT I
made from Whale-Oil Soap combined with other powerful ingredients known
to be most effectual for :destroying the 4' Scale -' and other insect pests and
parasites ofthee Citrits family: It will also put the tree in a healthy and flour-
ishing condition. Prepared for immediate use. Perfectly harmless to the
younger tree or plant. In packages of from 25 to 300 pounds. Price, 10 cents
per pound. Discount to the Trade. W- Full directions for, use accompany
each package. Address
HI. D. BOI.NETIIEAI.*


P. 0. BOX 984, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


to July 31 '82


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
-------0 ---
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
0O----
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers for July are appointed to sail as follows:
JUNIATA, July 1st at 6:00 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANN'AH, July 8th, at 12:00 noon.
JUNIATA, July 15th, at 5:00 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, July 22d, at 11:00 a. m.
JUNIATA, July 29th, at 5:00 p. m.
Days and hours subject to changewithout notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMS, WM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.


-Boston n SYaIIvanhIi o m tl l thiU Line


ONLY DIRECT LINE BETWEEN
SAVANNAH AND BOSTON.
Transhipment and extra handling saved. No danger
of fruit being troaen. -Cars are unloaded at the steam-
ship wharf in Savannah, avoiding drayage.
CABIN PASSAGE, $18.
SAILING FROM SAVANNAH.
Semiiiole, Thursday, July 27th, at 4 p. m.
-- Thturshday, August 3d, at 10:00 a. m.
Seininle, Thursday, August 10th, at 4:50 p. m.
Chas. W. L.ord, Thursday, August 17th, at 9:00 a. in.
Seminole, Thursday, August 24th, at 3:00 p. m.
Chas. V. Lprd Thursday, Agust 31s, at 9:00 a. m.
4 CH1^WCST.a 1". A Agepts,
44-ff Savannah, Ga.

DRI MEDICINES.
The i grest stocsin tle State. Country
buyers l1 cons their own interests
by corresponlF; g with me. All orders
promptlyf/ ed at prices to compete with
any house south of Baltimore. Remem-


DOZ. ber my only Florida address.
GEO. H'UGHES,


to june 26, '82 Cor. Bay and Ocean, Jacksonville, Fla.

PIANOS AND ORGANS

15 East Bay *Jacsonville.
GOLD T No iSTAL FtfT, At LOWn T- PRICES--
o branch of' Ltilei Bates 8a~ani--CXA SAME PRICES AND TERMS, Sheet Music, Strings
and small, inrimnen$s o0 :all kinds. oe id for cata-
logues, prices and terms. TUNING AND REPAIRING
a specialty. My tuner will make regular tours through
the State, and my customers will thus have my repre-
-senttive at their doors, a great advantage to purchasers
of instruments ; to sept 26, '82
M. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the
of the Marshall House. Screven House.
THE HIANETT HOUSE,
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARNETT & GEORGE, Proprietors.
RATS,' $2 PER DAY.
m This favorite family Hotel, under its new manage-
hRent, is recommended for the excellence of its cuisine.
omelike comforts; prompt attention and moderate
rates. to sept 4,'82
0. L; KEENE,
MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,

Laces, Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF


67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, -- FLORIDA.
to feb 20, '82
SENI) $1.50 TO


85 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.,
And get a bottle of Richmond's Samaritan Nervine.
Cures Nervou IDisorderss, Dizziness, Vertigo, Seminal
Weakness. The only 4ure cure for Epileptic Fits.
Address HOLT'S PHARMACY.
to aug 20, '82

RUBBER STAMPS
Are manufactured right in our establishment in the
best manner and at the. shortest notice.
*"Send in your orders.
ASHMEAD BROS.,
'yJACKSONVILLE, FLA.
May 1-tfF


TH'1 9 i t R DA D f PATC r 1


- = Y T -j-





e_- "ITHE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
. ..m n l lnn l


WA ... ~TTE 1D
300 White or Colored girls to do house work.
1,000 men to clear land and work in orange groves
and vegetable gardens in Florida. Write, stating
whether white or colored.
Enclose $1.00 and we will secure you a situation, or if
you desire, give any information in regard to localities
in Florida.
All who need help, please send us orders. We have
some good hands.
J. A. TOCKFORD,:
July 24-lt Florence, St. John's County, Fla.

3' 03E S.A. LE.
THE ALBANY, WILSON, BII)WELL, and other
choice varieties of Strawberries on reasonable terms.
Also Grape Vines and] Fruit Trees.
All cash orders attended to with promptness and dis-
patch. Our stock is choice. Try us.
JF. A.l STOCKI'FOntD,
July 24-It Florence, St. John's County, Fla.


20 EBuheTIElE Conclh Peae for Sale.
STOCKBRIDGE FERTILIZERS for Orange Trees and vegetables, for sale by


to Jan 6f8


3


*J. E. HIA.LC
Jacksonville, Fla.


ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
01 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,


A. N. DOBBINS & BRO., PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS


Gn, Locuitsani StencG ttrs,
24 LAURA STREET,
JACKSON VILLE - FLORIDXA,
unsmithing done in all its branches.
U IRON SAFE WORK.
Special rates on Stencil Cutting, by mail. Address,
to June 12'83, (P. O. Box 833.)


S. B. HUBBARD & CO.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in

HardwarBe StovsB, Doors, Ssh,Bli0s
Paints, Oils, Pumps, Lead and Iron Pipe.
Sugar Mills, Rubber and Leather Belting,
Steam j Gas-Fitting, Plumbing 4 Tinsmithing,
Agricultural Implements of all Kinds,
HAZARD'S POWDER,
BARBED FENCE WIRE.
Agents for S. L. Allen & Co.'s Garden Tools.
4 Send for Price List and Catalogue, WI
tojune 11 '83


100 BEARING ORNHG TRES,
Surrounding a handsome residence in Jacksonville,
halt-mile from the centre of business on Bay Street.
House has seven rooms neatly finished in natural
wood, with kitchen and servants' rooms, store room,
and plenty of closets. Good stable and carriage house,
PURE WATER,
Good neighborhood-(ALL WHITE.) Lot is 210x157 feet,
has
100 Orange Trees,
12 to 16 years old, large and thrifty. Also,
Grapes,


Pecans,


Etc.


Splendid chance for any one desiring a lovely home in
Florida, and a bearing grove.
For price and terms, apply to
J. H. NORTON,
Jacksonville, Florida.
State that you saw this advertisement in THE FLORIDA
DISPATCH. June 12, '82-tf

AT MANDARIN, FLORIDA.
20 FORTY-ACRE TRACTS only. 12 miles from Jack-
sonville; extra good land, well located, between river
and J., St. A. and H. R. R. R. Price, $10 per acre. Will
sell on monthly payments of 812.50. These lands will in-
crease in value, being located in an already prosperous
town, making a payinginvestment at small outlay.
Maps can be seen at No. 41 East Bay Street.
to nov 21 '82. GEO. R. REYNOLDS.
Jack(pnville, Fla.


PRINTERS AND BINDERS,
AND DEALERS IN

TOYS AND FANCY ARTICLES.

NEWSDEALERS.-We keep all the latest Daily and Weekly Papers from Boston, New York, Philadelphia
Baltimore, Chicago, St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, New Orleans, Charleston, Savannah and Jacksonville, and
take subscriptions to all publications at publication price. Orders by mail promptly attended to.

FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, uVALID AD ttE ( r, Ar8 Ray Illustrated) .............. Price $1 50
FLORIDA: ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE AND HISTORY (Laner)...................... ...................................Price 1 50
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paper...................................................................................... ......Price 10
FAIRBANKS' HISTORY OF FLORIDA........................... ...... ................ ....................Price 2 50
GUIDE TO JACKSONVILLE..............................................................................................................................Price 25
TOURISTS AND INVALIDS REFERENCE BOOK OF WINTER TRAVEL..............................................Price 75
SOUTH FLORIDA THE ITALY OF AMERICA.......................................................................................Price 25
DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition)enlarged and improved......................................... ..........Price 50
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edition, enlarged and improved).... ............................... ......Price 1 00
ORANGE INSECTS-Illustrated (Ashmead, ................................................................................ Price 1 00
ORANGE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA by A. T. Garey, (cloth) ........... .. ........Price 1 25
A MANUAL OF GARDENING IN FLOIDA (Whitner............................... ..........................P.. rice 50
COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA...........................................................................................................................Price 75
COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-the best)...............................................Price 1 25
NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF ST. JOHN'S RIVE..................................................Price
McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST OF LAWS OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep, postage extra).........................Price 6 00
INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA.................... .......... ......Price 3 00
NOTES FROM SUNLAND ON THE MANATEE RIVER, GULF COAST OF SOUTH FLORIDA.
Its Climate, Soil, and Productions, (By Samuel C. Upham).....................................................................Paper .25
Any of the above books mailed on receipt of price.
ORANGE WRAPS......... ...........................10xl, 14c.; l1xl, 17c.; 12x12,20c
LAW BLANKS.
WARRANTY DEEDS, per dozen.................. ....................................................................Price 50
QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS, per dozen............................................................................................ ..................Price 50
M ORTGAGES per dozen............... ........................ ...................................................... ............... ........ Price 50
NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, made to order..................................................................................... .............Price $6 00
We publish a full line of Law Blanks for Lawyers and Justices of the Peace. Price-list mailed on application.
Special prices to large buyers. Adddress


feb 12-tf


ASHME AD BROTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


BUY THE BEST AND CHEAPEST
----go---

GOULD & CO. '


FERTILI ZER
-AND-
INSEOT EsaTE.T."AETiOATO"Eo,
Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange Growers and Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, con-
tains potash, lime, phosphoric acid, ammonia and the other essential elements of Plant Food, making a cor
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & Bro.'s, and other high-priced Fertlizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up 'in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $4 per barrel, $32 per
ton.
All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.
Mrssas. GOULD & Co.:
Gentemen--I used one-half ton of your Fertilizer, in connection with the same amount of Baker & Bro.'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gave as good results as the others, which are much higher priced fertilizers--costfng
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $5L50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12,1881.
SLBESBEUG, SUxMTER Co., FLA., March 6,1882.
GOULP & Co.:
Gentlemen-Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed our
agents at this point (Mesrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer,
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its fostering care, I having had the honor
to win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer better and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer kills two birds with one stone," inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies
at one and the same time. I bave been testing it in the field, garden and orange grove for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues.whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For my part, I ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. if I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork.COURT.
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOURT.


to aug 27, '82


GOULD & UO.,
NO. 6 W. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLAME


-ru; -. -i~ ic ~ ~ -;~r ~;.i~;~~.,


'VTPIE FIT E IGESOTNTT BO3"E3, $39.50 per Ton.,
(Gruaranteed Pure.)

COTTOC) SEED3 3:EL, M$38 per Torn,
(100 Pound Bags.)

OOTTOT (Te Bst CL A., $27 per Ton.,
(The Best Potash in Use.)


I-


C


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