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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00017
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: July 17, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00017
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

Full Text































Deoted to the Agricultural, Mtanufacturing and .Industrial Interests of Flarida and the Sauth.

Vol. 1.--No. 17. New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla. Price 5 cents.


Monday, July 17, 1882.


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.


New York and Boston Markets. attractive appearance of Boston lettuce which
W. D. PHILBRICK, in the N. E. Farmer, has been transported in boxes.
gives us the followingeas in New York are carried in sacks of 1
bushels each, and rhubarb is sold by count in
"I had the opportunity on the 22d of June, small bunches of about two pounds, with the
of visiting the New York vegetable market on leaves on-a result of the mistaken belief that
Washington street, at the foot of 13th street, it will not wilt so quickly with the leaves on ;
and finding many interesting points of differ- the leaves evaporate the sap and draw upon
ence between the customs of the two cities, will the stocks causing them to wilt much quicker
give some account of what was most noticeable. than they would if trimmed off, besides rhubarb
stems are heavy enough when trimmed, without
The farmers' wagons in New York stand in loading them with nearly half their weight of
an open square which is divided by several worthless trash. The Boston method of trim-
walks raised eight inches from the wagon ways; ming off the leaves and tying up the stems in
e w s ae eh a t sx ft w ad te bunches of about forty pounds to be sold by
the walks are each about six feet wide, and the weight, is in every way far more neat and sat-
road ways about forty feet. The farmers' teams, isfactory. Rhubarb is called "pie plant," and
mostly with horses in harness, stand in a single lettuce is known as "salad" in New York. The
row alongside the curbstone, giving the buyers most noticeable difference between the two
a chance to approach every wagon either on cities, is in the way asparagus is handled.
e o c r w e o In New York there is a demand for what is
foot on the raised walks, or with teams upon known as "white grass," an article unknown in
the roadway. This arrangement is convenient Boston. This is produced by ridging up the
enough, since the New York wagons are not earth over the rows very highly in spring with
unloaded at the tail board, as in Boston, but a large plough, after which the cutting is
over the rail at the side. The New York mar- done with a large knife, eight inches under
ground, and must be done twice or three times
ket wagons are mostly two-horse teams, and are every day, before the buds rise an inch over
built much like a New England express wagon, ground. Asparagus handled thus is white to
with wings over the wheels, but with no deck thle very tip, and is said to be tender to the
boards; they are well adapted to the system of bulbe, and to have a peculiar flavor not pos-
carrying everything in bulk, or in sacks, which sessed by the "green grass." "White grass"
carrying everything bulk, or insells in New York for nearly double the price
prevails in New York, but are not so well of common or "green grass ;" they tie it in
adapted to the carrying of boxes and barrels bunches about one-half as large again as those
which prevails in Boston. Probably the New of Boston market. In Boston, it is well under-
York plan had its origin in the prevalent prac- stood that asparagus with green tops and white
twice of loading the market wagons with mature butts is only about one-half eatable, and when
gtice of loading the market wagons with manure gen for its entire length, it is all tender and
upon the return trip. It is convenient on this eatable, and for this reason, good "green grass"
account, but the vegetables are delivered in commands the highest price in Boston. The
New York in much inferior condition to the sale of asparagus in New York is very large
Boston market, owing to the dispensing with indeed.
The yellow radish has a large sale in New
boxes. York, among the Germans-I have never seen
Lettuce is piled up four of five feet deep in it in Boston.
T, he season in New York is ten or fifteen days
bulk, without washing, and after handling over earlier this year than Boston. Early peas were
in market two or three times before it reaches a glut in New York on the 20th, and bunch
the consumer, does not present the clean and beets were as large as silver dollars. The New


York gardeners, however, do not seem to prac-
tice the forcing of cucumbers to any great ex-
tent, under thin, hot-bed glass. The only cu-
cumbers in any quantity to be seen were South-
ern ones. The majority of the gardeners are of
German extraction, some are French and Irish,
comparatively few Yankees. The New York
market, on the whole, does not look so clean
and attractive as the Boston market. Much of
the produce is coarse and carelessly put up,
but nevertheless seems to meet a ready sale.
Green clover is sold in New York market in
considerable quantities in bundles of about
twenty pounds ; the city teamsters feed it to
their horses in small rations-they relish it
mightily, but teamsters here would shrug their
shoulders, and call it "too soft" for a working
horse.

Hedging, and Berberries.
DUNEDIN, FLA., July 5, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
Please hurry up that promised article on
"Hedging," in THE DISPATCH, and tell us
something about Berberry as a hedge plant. I
see it highly recommended in some seed cata-
logues.
Success to THE DISPATCH, the best paper in
the South. Yours truly,
L. W. ALLEN.
REPLY.-You can do little or nothing in the
way of hedging before October or November;
and we shall tell you what we know about it
long before that time. The Berberry is a North-
ern plant- pretty, thorny, valuable for its fruit,
and sometimes used for hedging. It is not
vigorous enough for a real, good defensive
hedge, even at the North, and we do not think
it could be made to grow at all iAi Florida. Have
any of our readers in the Gulf States, a Ber-
berry bush ? If so, please let us know.-EDs.

-The Charleston News and Courier says
that information collected from various parts in
South Carolina in regard to the growing crops,
shows a splendid outlook for oats, wheat and
corn, and excellent prospects for cotton.


C


~g~L~:






5 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


no seeds in the lint. Each boll produces about
two pounds of very fine long stap!e cotton, supe-
rior to the sea island, and at the bottom of the
boll there are from four to six seeds, resembling
persimmon seed. This new cotton, therefore,
needs no ginning. [Of course not!]

From the Farm to Ruin.
It is not our purpose to raise an indiscrimi-
nate cry against leaving the farm for the purpose
of engaging in more congenial pursuits in the
.city. There are thousands of country boys
whose minds, tastes, habits and inclinations unfit
them for farmer's lives, but would qualify them
for great success in the professions or in busi-


Farmers of the Olden Time.
Farmers like those of "olden time" can only now be
seen
Amid the forests of the West, or on the prairies green.
All antiquated notions have nearly passed away,
And views more modern seem to be the order of the
day.
The antique owners of the soil could never understand
Why folks should learn to read who only tilled the land;
And an educated man they deemed almost a fool
For their fathers "made a living" and they never went
to school.
The mothers and their daughters once were taught to
churn and spin
They didn't have to rack their brains to let "book larn-
in" in;
Their clothing all was'home-made, and whatever was
wanted more
They could get with eggs and butter, when at the village
store.
Then at the dawn of day, when the birds began to sing,
The music of the farmer's voice throughout the house
would ring;
"There's farming work enough," said he, "for all of us
to do:
Sojust get oxt of bed, my boys, quick, every one of you."
But reader, times have changed; now, education rules,
And farmers' boys must have the very best of schools;
And farmers' girls, we know, can never make good
wives
If doomed to kitchen service as drudges all their lives.
-Sylvester .I. Clarke, of Wayne County, N. Y., in Country
Gentleman.

Wonderful Cotton I--In Georgia.
We are not prepared, at present to take any
great amount of "stock" in this new Okra-Cotton
described in a sensational dispatch from At-
lanta to the New York Sun; but we give it for
"all it's worth :"
ATLANTA. June 30.-Attention is now di-
rected to a new sort of cotton plant which bids
fair to prove immensely valuable. For many
years Mr. A. A. Subers, of Macon, has been
carefully experimenting to hybridize the cotton
plant that grows wild in Florida with the com-
mon okra. The cotton plant used is of that
species which is found on the lowlands of the
Caloosahatchee River. The new plant retains
the okra stalk and the foliage of the cotton. Its
flower and fruit, however, is strikingly unlike
either cotton or okra. The plant has an aver-
age height of two feet, and each plant has only
one bloom. This is a magnificent flower, very
much like the great magnolia in fragrance and
equally as large. Like the cotton bloom, the
flower is white for several days after it opens,
after which it is first pale pink, and generally
assumes darker shades of this color until it be-
comes red, when it droops, disclosing a wonder-
ful boll. For about 10 days this boll resembles the
cotten boll,and then its growth suddenly increases
as if by magic until it finally reaches the size of
a big cocoanut. (!) Not until it reaches this
size does the lint appear. Then the snowy
threads begin to burst from the boll, but are
held securely in place by the okra-like thorns
or points that line the boll.
One inexperienced picker can gather 800
pounds a day (!) and fast hands, much more.
Were the only saving that of labor in gathering
the lint, the result of Mr. Suber's experiment
would entitle him to the lasting gratitude of the
Southern farmer. But this is not all-there are


Farming-In Print.
The Griffin (Ga.) News says: "Many ungra-
cious words have been said about editors giving
advice to farmers as to how they should man-
age their business, and many a joke has been
perpetrated at the expense of editors who ad-
vised their readers that now is the time to dig
corn and thresh out potatoes. While much of
this censure and ridicule has been deserved,
yet the fact remains that agriculture owes much
of its development and progress to the news-
papers. While many editors, no doubt, would
prove a failure in conducting the details of a
farm, yet there are many who, by their reading
and comparison of methods of farming are able
and do give much general advice that is whole-
some and practical. Last fall, the newspapers


ness. But while this is true,.many thousands
leave country homes where they should always
remain, and go to the city, where, even if they
do escape the many snares and temptations by
which they are sure to be surrounded, they
never will rise above mediocrity and never do
more than eke out a bare living. Too many
have not sufficient strength of character to re-
sist the city which is to them the road to ruin.
But why do farmer's boys leave homes where
they should be contented, happy and independ-
ent ?
Plainly answered, they are driven away. No't
necessarily by harsh treatment, by a lack of
affection, or parsimonious usage, but by parents
not recognizing the growing men in growing
boys. There is nothing dearer to a boy's heart
than a little responsibility. He likes to own a
colt, raise a pet calf, cultivate a particular
piece of ground in his own way and with the
full assurance that the crop shall be his own
private property. He aosen't like to be set to
work day after day and be fed and housed just
as the horses and cattle are. He wants the man
that is in him recognized. He may be pleased
if his father brings him home a new pair of
boots, but how much more gratifying it would
be to him if he had earned the money and bought
the boots himself.
There is too much monotony, too much
drudgery in the ordinary life of the farm boy
A man absorbed in the struggle for gain may
find in his work all the recreation he needs, but
the boy has only the work without the incent-
ive.
Farmers, if you would keep your boys with
you, recognize them as little men. Give them
a purpose; place responsibilities upon them ;
give them a start in life by allowing them to
earn property and to keep it. Give them good
books to read ; let them take good papers, rea-
son with them rather than dictate; don't inter-
fere with their plans if you can possibly help it;
even if they are going to make a failure at
something, experience at the end will often be
worth more than advice or commands at the
beginning.
Another important point, supply your farm
with first-class implements. Cheap tools and an
inferior style of living go together. If your
boy wants a certain implement, get him one.
He can do a man's work tor you and will be
getting a good knowledge of machinery. Just
so with other implements, get those which are
first-class and try hard to get the best. Make
the farm so attractive that your boy wants
nothing better, and although they may in time
leave you, they will stick to the farm.- Griffin
(Ia.) News.


phosphates, and lime. These are all usually
considered as minerals, with the exception of
guano, and some persons insist that this is really
of mineral origin, and not, as has been believed,
the accumulated dung of sea-fowl which has
gathered during many centuries upon some
islands and coasts of the South Pacific, where
rain is unknown. But it is pretty certain that
all these valuable fertilizing substances are of
organic origin, being the product of animal life
which has had an eventful history in extremely
distant ages, or at least far beyond the age of
mankind. Guano is the most valuable of all
these substances. 'It is now probably nearly
exhausted, and, indeed, the earliest discovered
deposits are exhausted. Its history as a ferti-
0


of Georgia weekly called attention to the neces-
sity of raising more grain and less cotton. This
constant iteration had its effect, for it was backed
up by forcible arguments, and to-day Georgia
is reaping the benefit of editorial farming in a
large grain crop, which bids fair to put our
people on a solid financial basis. The man who
looks over the whole country and notes cause
and effect may not be acquainted with all the
details, but he fully comprehends the value of
the results, and it is in calling the attention of
the people to general principles, in placing be-
fore them for comparison different methods,
that he does a good work-a work that is ap-
preciated by few."

How Nutmegs Grow.
Nutmegs grow on little trees which look
like pear trees, and are generally not over
twenty feet high. The flowers are very much
like the lily-of-the-valley. They are pale and
very fragrant. The nutmeg is the seed of the
fruit, mace is the thin covering over the seed.
The fruit is about as large as a peach. When
ripe it breaks open and shows a little nut inside.
The trees grow on the islands of Asia and trop-
ical America. They bear fruit for 70 or 80
years, having ripe fruit upon them all the sea-
sons. A fine tree in Jamaica has over 4,000
nutmegs on it every year. The Dutch used to
have all this nutmeg trade, as they owned the
Banda Islands and conquered all the other
traders and destroyed the trees. To keep the
price up they once burned three piles of nut-
megs, each of which was as big as a church.
Nature did not sympathize with such mean-
ness. The nutmeg pigeon, found in all the
Indian Islands, did for the world what the
Dutch determined should not be done-carried
those nuts, which are their food, into all the
surrounding countries, and trees grew again,
and the world had the benefit.-Frank Leslie's
Weekly.




Natural Fertilizers.
By natural fertilizers may be understood
those valuable products of natural agencies of
organic life which are gathered from the soil or
from the rocks, and are prepared and sold for
farmers' use. All of these are of much inter-
est, both for their history and their uses. Promi-
nent among them and in 'the order of their
value are guano, nitrate of soda, the Charleston


I







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH INNO


lizer, however, is a matter of tradition, for on
the first discovery of Peru by the Spaniards
guano had been used for ages by the Peruvians
for fertilizing their fields and gardens. It was
only in 1842 that any foreign supply was ex-
ported. This was taken from the Chincha
Islands, where the enormous quantity of more
than 7,000,000 tons was heaped up in moun-
tain masses 150 feet high. This deposit was
discovered by the Captain of an English ship,
who brought home a sample cargo of 182 tons.
In 10 years the export had grown to 450,000
tons yearly, and all of this went to England.
These islands yielded the richest guano that has
been discovered. The ammonia in it reached
18 or 20 per cent., or even more in some sam-
ples, while it is rare that 10 per cent. is found
in the best qualities at the present time. After
the exhaustion of the Chincha Islands other
deposits were found, and the Macabi, Guanape,
Lobos, and Ballestas Islands furnished several
millions of tons. Some newly-discovered depos-
its were found upon the mainland which fur-
ished considerable quantities, and some less
valuable supplies were found in other localities
which, however, had lost their soluble and most
useful portions by the washing of the periodical
rains. The end of the guano supply seems now
to be in sight, for with the clearing of the Peru-
vian sources of it there remains no others that
are known, and it is not probable that any will
be found. For the conditions under which
guano of a valuable quality can exist are pe-
culiar. A remote and isolated locality is re-
quired, and a rainless climate; first for undis-
turbed breeding and increase of the birds, and
second for the preservation of all the soluble
elements of their excrements, and of the myri-
ads of dead birds which perish from natural
causes.
That guano is an organic product is quite
certain. It contains in large proportions the
substances of which decomposed animal excre-
ment consists, viz: Ammonia, uric acid, (which
is contained in urine,) phosphoric acid, magne-
sia, lime, soda, potash, sulphuric acid, carbonic
acid, oxalic acid, and chlorine. A small quan-
tity of silicious matter is also found in it, and
this has an important bearing upon the question
of its origin. This silicious matter consists
chiefly of the coverings or valves of small mi-
croscopic plants, which are known as diatoms.
Some of these are found to have the most ex-
quisite forms and ornamentations, when viewed
under a powerful microscope, and they are so
well known through other sources as to be


easily identified as the remains of marine vege-
tation, and of which the slimy ooze and mud of
the sea mainly consist. This is consumed by
fish, which in their turn are devoured by the
marine birds which gather on these rocky islets
in vast and countless numbers ; and so the re-
mains of these organic products become depos-
ited as undigested matter in the excrement, and
being, from their character, indestructible, re-
main as a proof of the origin of the substance of
which they are a part. This is one of the many
instances which may be observed in the minute
processes of nature, individually considered, but
which in their wonderfully vast collective ca-
pacity are of such enormously great develop-
ment as to be incomprehensible to the under-
standing. For as thousands of square miles of


the ocean bed are covered to an unknown depth
by oozy mud which is wholly composed of these
infinitely ;small remains of vegetation invisible
to the unaided eye, what illimitable andin com-
prehensible figures would need to be used to
number the whole of them. A man's mind may
be able to see and grasp the relations of the
individual, small as it may be, and even exceed-
ingly small as compared with a needle's point,
but the vastness of the aggregate is wholly be-
yond his conception. And this is one of the
interesting thoughts which may occur to the
mind of the intelligent farmer as he considers
the history of guano. The Charleston phosphates
have a somewhat parallel history. In what is
known as the Charleston basin there are about
1,200 square miles. This includes the district
of which that city, in South Carolina, is the
centre for several miles inland and up and down
the coast. Here is found an enormous deposit
of a substance which contains from 25 to 30
per cent. of phosphoric acid in combination with
45 per cent. of lime. This vast deposit consists
chiefly of remains of extinct marine animals,
some of which are sufficiently well preserved as
to be identified as having belonged to animals
of which the character and habits are known.
Even their food can be traced in the remains
of the excrement and in the contents of the
stomachs and intestines, buried ages ago in the
soft mud and turned to stone. Here is another
world of life opened to our view in the restless
search for fertilizing matter with which to feed
our crops. This deposit of phosphoric matter is
certainly of organic origin, and furnishes the
bulk of the material of which superphosphate
of lime is manufactured. Only a few years have
elapsed since this deposit has been worked to
any extent, although its character has been
known for many years. It is a substitute for
bones in the manufacture of this indispensable
fertilizer, and as it can be procured much more
cheaply than bones, it relieves us from the scar-
city and cost of the fertilizer had we to depend
upon bones for the supply. This vast basin
was at one time a shallow delta or estuary of a
great river, and in time became a marsh, and
must have been for ages the haunt and the
burial place of amphibious and marine creatures
which are now extinct. Here one preyed upon
another; the carniverous animal upon the
vegetable feeders, so that the products of the
soil in great part served as the ultimate source
and origin of this great deposit which is now, in
the cwhirlagig of time," being returned to the
place from whence it came.
Nitrate of soda is the source from which a
large part of the nitrogen used in fertilizers is
derived. It is the most valuable form in which
we can use nitrogen, because it is soluble and
supplies to plants the nitric acid and the
soda which they require in a form in which
these can be quickly absorbed and assimilated.
No other fertilizer has so quick and perceptible
an action upon vegetation. An enormous quan-
tity of it is used in agriculture. Indeed, as an
article of commerce for this use it is of such


great importance as to have lead to one of the
bloodiest wars of modern history, and to the
practical wiping off of a considerable nation
from the face of the earth. Peru, which owned
the largest deposits of this substance in the
world, has been despoiled of them by its victo-
rious and jealous neighbor, Chili, and now lies
disorganized and paralyzed at the feet of her
conqueror, while the latter takes an early op-
portunity to realize upon the spoils by offering
to the eager and waiting purchasers a million
tons of the nitrates with which to supply the
markets. This salt, which is so soluble that it
melts to a liquid in a damp atmosphere, is com-
posed of nitric acid and soda, and has been
preserved in its beds in the soil by reason of the
complete dryness of the climate. How these
deposits were Yformed is not known, but it is


scarcely to be doubted that they are not of min-
eral origin.
Lime is one of our indispensable fertilizers
and, fortunately, it is one of the most abundant
minerals.. While it is a mineral, it is, doubt-
less, of organic origin. Its formation is going
on under our observation every moment. Vast
beds of limestone rock are forming in the ocean
continually and the vast work is accomplished
by the most insignificant individual agency.
And this agency has been operating for vast
periods of time. Limestone has been formed in
great mountain masses by the slow operation of
very minute animals, known as infusorime.
Ehrenberg, a German student and scientific in-
vestigator, was the discoverer of the manner of
the formation of chalk, which is carbonate of
lime, and of which thousands of miles of the
earth's rocky crust consists. He found it to
be made up of the skeletons of infusorial animal-
culse, and that one cubic inch of it contained
the remains of 40,000,000 of these creatures.
The solid limestone and the fine marbles are all
of this character, but crystallized by heat and
pressure during the slow changes by which the
earth has acquired its present form, while the
great beds of soft chalk are of more modern
structure, and indeed are even now in course of
deposit in the dark depths of the ocean. In
other places the coral insect is building up great
reefs and cliffs which form islands of solid lime-
stone, and our own Florida has been, in great
part thus raised from an ocean bed by this
agency, weak in its individuality, but able 'to
change the geographical features of a great
continent and to fill up great seas in its aggre-
gate power. And the Florida farmer, or the
farmer everywhere, in fact, who burns lime
for his fields from the coralline rocks, or the
limestone filled with shell, such as that over
which the great Niagara plunges, is turning to
his own benefit and uses the silent labors of
insignificant creatures which lived and worked
and died in ages so far back that we cannot
conceive of their distance, and can only meas-
ure them by figures, which we may contem-
plate only with hopeless failure to realize their
full meaning intelligently. But we may gather
from the contemplation the interesting fact
that the world was evidently made for man,
and that every creature, and the work and
purpose and labor of every creature, seem to
have existed for the benefit, the use, and the
gratification of mankind and for our more
complete development; for the preparation and
the utilization of all these products of ages of
organic life are but means to develop human
intelligence and skill. And not the least of this
development is found in the pursuit of intelli-
gent and skillful agriculture, helped to a very
great extent by these useful and indispensable
products. For certainly it can be easily real-
ized by a thoughtful person how great an ad-
vance has been made in the social and material
condition of mankind by the more productive
labors of the husbandman which have been
made possible by these useful aids.-N. Y.
Times.


-It is claimed that the largest steam whistle
on earth has just been made at Bridgeport, Ct.
It is of brass, four feet nine inches long, weighs
400 pounds, and to blow it takes 150 pounds
pressure from a 150-horse-power boiler. It can
be heard 50 miles, and it is to adorn a Canada
saw-mill.

AIR PLANTs.-The air-plant is one of the
most luxuriant growths of this climate, and yet
it requires no earth whatever, but will grow on
a gate-post, or if tied to a column of the piazza,
or anywhere it may be placed in an exposed
position to the out-door atmosphere. Visitors
to South Florida are greatly pleased with this
plant, and much surprised at its nature.-Apop-
ka Citizen.


I I


THE FLOREtIDA DSPTC


255







256 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Pyrethrum-"Insect Powder."
LANCASTER, N. H., June 5, 1882.'
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
GENTLEMEN : After a very delightful winter
in your State, and becoming interested in all
which pertains to its welfare, I venture to ad-
dress you.
I have never seen in any of the journals or
works on the culture of the orange, anything in
regard to the Pyrethrtun Roseum as an insect-
icide. While in Austria, I visited Dalmatia
and learned of its use. It grows wild, and the
flowers, leaves and tender twigs all possess the
insecticide qualities. There are two varieties-
Pyrethrum Roseutm and P. Cinerarice-the
former having pinkish colored flowers. The
flower is the part used, being dried and pulver-
ized. Used in this form it is sure death to insect
life, while harmless to the higher order of ani-
mal life. The most convenient and effective
form of using is, as a decoction or infusion, and
used with a syringe spray. Twenty-five grains
of the powder in two quarts of water, simply
stirred in, will kill the potato bug and cotton
worms. The aphis on roses, and the scale bug on
the orange tree can be killed with less than an
ounce to a gallon.
The application of the water solution leaves
the plants clean and healthy, which cannot be
said of any of the soaps and washes used. An
infusion of one and one-half ounces of the flowers
to a gallon of boiling water would be as effective.
It should not be boiled, but covered to prevent
evaporation after pouring on the hot water.
The Pyrethrum has been successfully raised
in California, and I see no reason why it could
not be raised in Florida. If so, each owner of
a grove could, with little care and expense,
easily protect his trees from the attacks of their
insect enemies. If wilted and made into cones
and burned in a closed room, it will rid it of
flies and mosquitoes; the odor is not offensive
nor are the fumes harmful.
An alcoholic extract may be made from a
pound of the flowers with strong alcohol-one
pint-then mixed, one part to 15 or 20 of water,
will kill the cotton worm-used as a spray.
I see the seeds advertised by several of your
seedsmen. From what I have seen and know,
I think if its qualities were known it would
prove an efficient and cheap remedy for all of
the insect pests which infest the orange and
other fruit trees and plants.
I look for the coming of THE DISPATCH with
interest, from week to week, as it carries me
back in my thoughts from our chilly, icy-edged
winds and backward vegetation to the flowers
and smiles of the sunshine of your beautiful
State. Yours sincerely,
F. A. COLBY, M. D.

Fruit, Bees, &c., in Georgia.
The following letter, written sometime since,


was inadvertently delayed.
HAWKINSVIJLE, GA., May, 18th, 1882. '
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
We are not in the "Land of Flowers," but
hope you will be none the less interested in our
welfare. The crops generally are in excellent
condition for this season and many of the oats
are more than ordinarily fine, though much
damage was incurred by heavy rains. It was
feared the fruit had been destroyed by the late
cold and I notice in our orchard that the peaches,
plums, and such like varieties were left almost
barren. Strawberries are flourishing and the
LeConte pear still retains much of its fruit.


Bees are "booming" and I expect to have "dead of the fruit grow low, so as to be less affected
loads" of honey. Astonishing results are being by wind-storms. No fruit tree can be healthy
recorded in this new vocation (520 lbs. from and vigorous pruned high so as to walk under it.
one hive in 24 days, 566 lbs. in a single season, Sun bakes the trunk and stops circulation.
etc.,) and with the improved system and our 6. Mulching, and also frequently stirring the
gentle, industrious Italian bees, it will soon be- surface soil, makes healthy, vigorous trees here.
come an important industry, being far more This is all the fertilizer I use in growing trees.
remunerative than ordinary farming. 8. Most of our orange trees and peach trees
Wish you much success with your interesting are seedlings. I prefer to bud orange, to have a
and very valuable publication. known kind.
CHARLES R. MITCHELL. Next comes the Japan Plum. Healthy and
-- n--- abundantly fruitful in good rich ground, is in-
Green Ginger. jured by -pruning; best to plant the seed where
DILLON P. O0. WALKER COUNTY, GA., you would have the tree, but will bear trans-
July 6, 1882. J planting very well. Other plums are uncertain
Editors of The Florida Dispatch: crops, because of curculio.
Can you inform me whether fresh green gin- Peaches-Occasionally a good crop. Seed-
ger can be had near Jacksonville, or in your ling trees do better than budded. Peen-To is
State at all; and if so, from whom ? and oblige, growing but has not fruited here to any extent
Yours respectfully, yet. The enemies of the peach are the borer,
J. W. BRYAN. girdling the stock and so weakening the tree.
I Remedies tried: Ashes or lime about the stock ;
[Mr. A. I. Bidwell, of the "Arlington Nurs- also, removing the earth about the collar of the
series (this city) can furnish you green ginger trees down to the branching off ofthe large roots.
roots for seed.] This is done in the fall-the cavity thus formed
to be left open all winter and fresh earth from
Lime Pickles and Jelly. the middles heaped a foot high around the
ST. LUCIA, FLA., June 25, 1882. trunk early in the spring, to remain all sum-
Editors of The Florida Dispatch: mer.
My wife wishes you to send her a recipe The Japan Persimmon is grown successfully
My wife wishes y ou to s end her a recipe here. Trees two years old from the bud, on
how to pickle limes. Also, one to make jelly. active stock, have grown as many as 60 speci-
Will send some of each to you. means of fruit.
Respectfilly yours, A.bG.L. Chinese Quince is also cultivated and has
[Will some of our South Florida subscribers fruited here.
kindly answer the above ?] The LeConte Pear is fruiting here for the
first time. Trees five and six years old have
FLORIDA FRUIT GROWERS. two or three bushels of fruit on them now-first
crop. *
Replies to Queries. Pomegranates are growing here.
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., July 8th, 1882. Some fair apples, of the early variety, are
Edi n. of the Flori, d D .ath:. grown here.


DEAR SIRS: With your permission, I" will
attempt to give a few facts concerning our
fruits.
1. Besides oranges, limes, citrons, &c., we
grow successfully the strawberry. It com-
mences to ripen in February and continues
fruiting till June. The Nunan does the very
best within me; a fine fruit, early as the Wilson;
good flavor, color, and fine flavor ; abundantly
fruitful and stands Florida's summers; clean
cultivation.
Grapes are raised-both the Scupernong
and the French grape. Ives, Delaware and
Concord do the best. No wine made here.
Figs are grown to perfection. We have a large
yellow fig, as large as a Seckel pear, and when
fully ripe, most delicious; the very kind for
preserving. Many others, as the Celestial and
Brown Turkey are raised, subject to no disease.
I think Charles Choate, my neighbor, has the
largest and most fruitful fig tree in all Florida.
It now holds a wagon load of fruit. The Fig
requires good soil to be fruitful.
2. Orange Crop-Trees rapidly recovering
from freeze of '80 and '81; some fruit; not
many trees of bearing age, consequently crop
light.
3. Yellows in the Peach-No remedy 'tried.
Insects and crickets in the strawberry-rem-
edy : Catch and kill.
4. Soils, Hills and Valleys-The red lands,
composed of humus with just the right propor-
tson of sand underlaid with red or yellow
clay at depth of eight to eighteen inches; other
level portions more sandy. Rotted cotton seed
the only fertilizer used.
5. Prune to upward and outward bud, gener-
ally. Aim to combine fruit capacity with beau-
ty of form, shading the trunk and have the bulk


W. H. HASKELL.

AKRON, ORANGE CO., FLA.
D. H. Elliott, Secretary Florida Fruit Growers
Association.
DEAR SIR: In complying with the request
of your Society, published in THE FLORIDA
DISPATCH, I will endeavor to answer your en-
quiries in reference to this locality.
1. In addition to Oranges, Lemons, Limes,
Citrons, &c., we grow Scuppernong Grapes,
Rogers's No. 15, Hartford Prolific, Isabella and
Delaware; Pine-apples, Strawberries, Bananas,
Guavas, Mulberries, Surinam Cherries, Japan
Plums,; the LeConte Pear trees grow very fine;
none fruited as yet. Japan Persimmon trees
also grow very vigorously; Figs ditto.
2. The prospect for a crop of oranges, the
present season, medium, that is, for the fall
crop. Many of the old trees are full of blooms
at present and have been blooming since May
1st.
3. We have no insect, as yet, to trouble us
much ; a very few scale ; we usually apply salt
on the ground, from one to two feet from the
body of the tree ; it has never failed to kill
insects, to my knowledge.
4. Our soil is mostly sand with clay sub-soil
in many places; usually gray on the surface,
with yellow sub-soil ; have considerable black
soil with less sand in sub-soil.
5. The prevailing mode of pruning is to trim
from the ground up. I do not suppose that .a
single individual could give an intelligent reason
why they prune thus, farther than to say that*
it makes it handy to cultivate the trees.
6. Mulching has proved very satisfactory


I


2,56


THEFLOIDADISPATCH.





THE LORIA DIPATC 25


where it has been tried, but little of it is prac-
ticed. Usually some crop is grown in young
groves and frequent cultivation resorted to.
7. Fertilizers are usually put in trenches
around the trees and covered about from two
to three inches deep.
8. I should say that fully one half of the
trees are budded and think that the tendency
is to favor budding.
9th to 10th answers in the 1st, except the
Chinese Quince ; we have none of them that I
know of.
11. Figs fruit well but trees grow slow. Ba-
nanas grow fine and fruit free. Guavas-tender
-grow very rapidly and fruit heavily. Pine-
apples do finely; they require slight protection
in winter. There are none of the above fruits
raised here for shipment. We have a home
market for all surplus, among the new settlers,
at remunerative prices.
12. Strawberries do well, the Agriculturist
and Wilson's seedling being the only varieties
tried.
13. We have only the native Cracker Peach,
which succeeds well on clay sub-soil; it fruits
freely after a cold winter. The fruit is very
large and of excellent flavor. Peen-To just
introduced. Bees do remarkably well, and no
enemy except the Bee-moth. I have taken over
100 lbs. from a single hive.
14. Grapes are not cultivated to any great
extent. Most every settler has a few vines.
They are generally young and just beginning to
fruit. The indications, so far, are, that it will
prove a paying branch of horticulture with us.
No wine made to my knowledge.
I would also add that this is a new settlement;
that we have not yet gotten many of the vari-
ous trees into fruiting, but we can show groves
that will compare favorably with any that we
have seen in the State, and all made without the
use of any commercial fertilizers. So far, our
practice is to fertilize with green crops of peas,
weeds and grass grown in summer and rye in
the winter. We are located about six miles from
the St. John's & Lake Eustis Railroad, nine
and a half miles from the St. John's River,
three miles from Spring River, which is navi-
gable for small steamboats, such as are run on
the Ocklawaha. We have good society, church
organizations, Methodist and Presbyterian, pub-
lic schools five months in the year, mails tri-
weekly, a saw-mill and corn grist-mill, with
land worth from $1.25 per acre to $15,wild. Some
improved places can be bought at reasonable
figures. A hearty invitation is extended to
everybody who are looking for a home in Flor-
ida. J. H. CAMPBELL, P. M.

[To read the following intelligently, refer to
questions in THE DISPATCH of July 3, page
233.]
SWITZERLAND, ST. JOHN'S Co., FLA.,
July 10, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:


With your permission, I attempt, through
the columns of THE DISPATCH, to reply to the
questions concerning the fruit interests of this
section.
Before entering into categorical replies of the
questions submitted, I will briefly tell of our
country, and what our people are doing.
Beginning at Scott's Landing, on the north,
there is a beautiful hQ d shore running west-
ward, and then south i to Remington Park,
forming that beautifuIand attractive point upon
which Switzerland is. The bluff, at many points,
is 25 or 30 feet above the broad St. John's
whose waters wash our shore from a point
northeast of us, around north, west and south,
to a point southwest, of us, with a broad
expanse of water north;, northwest, west, thus
giving us all the advantages which are claimed
for water protection. My Sicily lemon trees attest


very strongly that there is virtue in such pro-
tection. The great cold of. December, 1880,
did them but little damage, and now they have
fruit in all stages.
This beautiful stretch of water-protected bluff
has caught the eye as well as the money of a
number of practical fruit grohs. Our shore
is rapidly becoming a continuous grove. There
remains but a few lots on our river front that
can be bought. However, there are some hand-
some pine-land lots upon a new and beautiful
road that is being opened by our enterprising
people.
Besides paying much attention to fruits, our
people are not behind in the vegetable business.
This season, though a drouth, has not been a
failure. All are pretty well satisfied as to re-
sults, and feel encouraged to embark more ex-
tensively than ever. My own experience is
limited. From one-half acre of tomatoes, after
deducting for seed, cultivation, fertilizer, com-
mission, freight and boxes, there remained as my
share, $157. This is not an exceptional case.
For fear I grow prolix upon the theme of my
section and neighbors, I will turn to Mr. Red-
mond's questions:
1. Guava, banana, pecan, peach, scupper-
nong grapes, figs, with other varieties.
2. Medium, tending to a small crop of or-
anges.
3. Foot-root has appeared in one grove,
caused, I think, by wood-ants or lice. Scale
insect has been plentiful in several groves; lye
from oak ashes has effectually subdued them
for the time; many decoctions have been used.
4. Soil, a. sandy loam; in many places un-
derlaid with a sandy, yellow clay that turns up
with plowing, upon which soil the orange thrives;
domestic fertilizers predominate, bone is consid-
ered good in the absence of barnyard compost.
5. I trim out centre, in order to increase
outside bearing surface; give inside ventilation,
and make it practicable to get at the limbs to
wash and subdue insects; I leave limbs low to
shade roots.
6. Neither. Keep clean under the trees;
shade space with pea vine, watermelon, or, if
nothing better, let crab grass grow and mow it
for hay in September.
7. On the surface.
8. Equally divided; prefer seedling.
9. Has not.
10. Not as yet. *
11. The fig, banana, and guava are success-
ful.
12. It is. Florida seedling, Wilson, Albany,
and several new varieties.
13. Have not experimented with budded
peaches.
14. Cultivate scuppernong wine for home
use. Respectfully,
M. S. MOREMEN.

East Florida Seminary.
By a card from Edwin P. Cater, A. M., Pres-
ident of the "East Florida Seminary, State
Normal School and Military Institute," at


Gainesville, Fla., we learn that our county,
(Duval,) under the laws of Florida, is entitled
to send to this Seminary four (4) students, who
will receive their tuition free. We also learn
that, during the last year Duval County had
only one (1) representative in the Seminary.
As a matter of general interest we publish
the address of the Faculty, and give the forms
of application for scholarships, etc.
TO THE PEOPLE OF FLORIDA.
The Board of Education of East Florida
Seminary desire to call your attention to this
Institution, which in its character of State
School appeals to the State pride and patriot-
ism of every resident of Florida.
As now organized and equipped, East Flor-


ida Seminary offers to the youth of Florida
educational advantages equal to those offered by
any similar institution in the United States. In
fact the student cannot find superior advanta-
ges anywhere, save in the richly endowed higher
colleges and universities which can be attended
only at heavy expense.
The courses of study have been so arranged
as to enable students at their option to secure a
classical education equivalent to that generally
furnished by colleges, or a good English educa-
tion, or an education that will fit them for intel-
ligent and successful work as teachers, or to
secure an education which will be the best pos-
sible preparation for the study of any of the
learned professions or for-entrance upon the
advanced courses of the higher universities.
The military organization and equipment is
superior to that of any similar institution in.
the South. Military discipline and drill have
proved most efficient aids to academic work,
and the whole system must commend itself to
those parents who wish their sons to pass from
the school-room to their life-work, strong in body
and in mind, manly in bearing and courteous
in demeanor, and confirmed in those habits of
prompt obedience and respect for government,
which will make them earnest, efficient, and
useful citizens.
Nor has the Board been unmindful of young-
lady students. The literary training of the
Seminary is equal to that of the best female
colleges, and those students who desire it can
receive in the Seminary building instruction in
vocal and instrumental music from a most ac-
complished teacher, and instruction in art studies
can be secured from private teachers in
Gainesville at moderate cost.
Under such circumstances, the Board of Ed-
ucation feel justified in urging upon the people
of Florida the claims of East Florida Seminary,
and in asking those parents or guardians who
wish to give their children or wards a good ed-
ucation to inquire into the merits of this Flor-
ida State School, before sending their children
or wards to schools in other States.
FORM OF APPLICATION TO BE USED BY PA-
RENTS OR GUARDIANS.
To the Honorable the County Commissioners of
County:
I, hereby, make application for the appoint-
ment of my- named- as a State pupil
from this county to East Florida Seminary.
My- is- years old.
I hereby promise that my-- if appointed,
will comply with all the rules and regulations
of the Seminary.
FORM OF NOTIFICATION OF APPOINTMENT TO
BE USED BY COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.
STATE OF FLORIDA, )
County.
We, the County Commissioners of said Coun-
ty, do hereby appoint- aged years, as a
State pupil from this county to East Florida
Seminary, and hereby notify the Board of Edu-


cation of said Seminary of our action. This ap-
pointment is made upon the condition that said
pupil will attend said Seminary for at least
-and will comply with all the rules and reg-
ulations of the school.
(To be certified to by Clerk of Court in usual
form.)
The law requires that preference shall be
given to applicants who wish to fit themselves
for the profession of teaching.
GUINEA COWs, or Heifer calves wanted.
Write the Editors of THE DISPATCH.
June 5 '82, tf.
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


--


THEFLOIDADISPATCH


257





S THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


lina for early vegetables. Charleston ships these
things many days before Norfolk is ready and
consequently reaps the cash benefits. The country
all about the city, including many of the islands,
is a perfect garden, and the truck trade handles
more clean cash than any man would credit
without figures and statements. A million and
a half of dollars are represented in the truck
farms, and that sum is no comparison to what
they paid their owners in the last fifteen years.
The number of barrels of new potatoes shipped
North last year exceeded 100,000 barrels, and
brought $2 per bushel. Here was $500,000 in
this one item. Before the North sees its last
sleighing these truck farmers are planting, and
before the New Englanders have their over-
coats off, they are gathering and selling. From
2,000 to 3,000 persons find employment in this
business around Charleston, and all earn a good
living. Hundreds of women and girls who
could not find other employment earn good


The Charleston of To-Day.
Our friend, "M. Quad," of the Detroit "Free
Press," writes thus of Charleston, as he now
finds it:
Previous to the war the great staples of the
South were cotton, tobacco, sugar, rice and
molasses. So little attention was paid to general
agriculture that it became a common belief in
the North that the warm States could grow
nothing except the first four staples mentioned.
This belief yet clings, and it is keeping thou-
sands of men out of that country. Never was
there a greater mistake. The war created hun-
dreds of radical changes in the South. The
man who returned from the army to find slaves
gone, stock gone, houses and fences gone, and
all his neighbors without a dollar, had only one
thing to fall back on-his land. He had al-
ways planted cotton, tobacco and cane. Now
he turned to corn, oats, wheat, grass, melons,
turnips, hay-things he could eat and find a
ready market for. He was just as much aston-
ished at the wonderful fertility of his soil as
Northern men are who go down there to-day.
Before the war there was no market for truck.
The trouble now is to get enough of it. The
North did not care to buy the early peaches,
grapes, strawberries, pears and melons of the
South. Now she takes all the fruits offered.
There was no encouragement twenty years ago
for the Southerner to put time and money into
orchards and vineyards and great melon-patch-
es. Those are now a grand source of income.
As to what may be called straight farming,
Georgia and Alabama and a part of South
Carolina will grow every edible vegetable, plant
or cereal known in Michigan, Ohio or Indiana,
and grow it twice as quick and from twice to
four times as large. Either of those Southern
States will double discount us on corn, oats,
potatoes, turnips, grass, and in some sections on
wheat. The man who has an idea that the
South is lame in agriculture and behind the
North in her way of working, will be sadly dis-
appointed when he travels that way. There is
an ambition which is carrying her to the front
in more than agriculture. Southern men are
taking hold with a grip which means business.
War and carpet-bag-ism have been forgotten
in the general determination to get ahead, and
the result is that thousands of men who hadn't
a shilling when the war closed are now well off
-some wealthy. Every year will add largely
to this number, and every year will bring the
South into more prominence as an agricultural
district.
SOUTH CAROLINA TRUCK.
New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and
Boston depend almost solely upon South Caro-


yet one may travel all day and not see a sign of
"To Rent." She has opened new streets, repaved
scores, built immense storehouses, laid out new
parks, repaired her public buildings, opened
new hotels, attracted new manufacturers, and
on the whole .made such a gain as one can
hardly credit. When the Federal troops en-
tered Charleston a Federal General said : "She
can never recover from this. She is ruined for-
ever." Chattanooga, Charleston, Atlanta, Ma-
con, Montgomery, Richmond, Mobile, ana oth-
er Southern cities visited by the ruthless hand
of war, and in some cases left a heap of ruins,
have shown 'more pluck, energy and ambition,
and have made greater improvements in the
last seventeen years than the same number of
cities in sections of the North. The South is
pushing ahead in a manner which will give us
a cold chill as we read the figures ten years 1
hence. There will be little or no call down


wages at this. Many of the cotton-planters are
also truck-farmers and work both crops.
THE CITY.
The queerness and quaintness of Charleston
strikes one from Atlanta the same as one from
Detroit. Many buildings are tile-roofed and
extensively gabled, the streets are narrow, all
the pavement of cobblestone, and there are miles
of sidewalk so narrow that two persons van
hardly walk side by side. While Charleston
has grown and improved every year since the
war, she has been slow to accept modern archi-
tecture and the newer ideas. And yet she is
doing a business which few Northerners dream
of. She is the sea-port of the South. She has
wharfage for 250 vessels, a harbor large enough
to accommodate 5,000, and storage for all
freight that may come and go. She is now com-
pressing 10,000 bales of cotton daily, has four
or five rice mills in operation, and all her man-
ufactories are being run to their fullest capacity.
She has been very fortunate of late years in
securing honest and efficient city governments,
and as a consequence, her taxes are low and her
credit high. Her schools are as good as any
in the country, and the city has less need of
a police force than some Northern villages.
She needs other lines of railroad communica-
tion, and she will soon have them. The fur-
ther improvement of the harbor is the business
and duty of the government, and it is a work
which cannot long be delayed.
SOME FIGURES.
War fell with a heavy hand upon Charleston.
Shot and shell and fire left her in ruins, and
she was robbed ald plundered without mercy.
When the climax came it would have been
almost impossible to have found a legitimate
citizen of Charleston with ten dollars in cash in
his possession. Railroads were destroyed, mer-
chants without credit, shipping gone, store-
houses, mills and factories swept away, and all
the plantations for hundreds of miles around
laid waste or in the hands of squatters and rob-
bers. Hundreds of the best citizens were un-
der the espionage and tyranny of the Federal
provost marshals, and negroes who could neither
read nor write and had no idea of business were
made members of the Common Council. And
yet, under all these burdens and discourage-
ments, Charleston opened trade within twenty-
four hours of its surrender, and in that same
year received and shipped enough cotton, lum-
ber, rice, dry goods, groceries, naval stores, etc.,
to set business fairly on its feet. In seven years
from Lee's surrender, her citizens, who were
beggars that day, had saved and deposited in
the banks almost $3,000,000. Inside of two
years she had every factory running and was
building ships, and all her railroads were in
good order. In three years she was handling
more freight than ever before, and had $1,000,-
000 invested in truck farming. Charleston has
built hundreds of residences since the war, and


very considerable part of the foreign born were
not qualified to vote, not having yet been natu-
ralized. And the proportion must have been
large in 1880, for during that year nearly half
a million immigrants arrived in the United
States, a greater number than in any previous
year, 1873 alone excepted. But perhaps it
would be safe to say that about one-fifth of the
voting population of the Union were of foreign
birth, against something like a tenth of African
descent, and about two-thirds of native whites.
About nine-tenths of the negroes were in the
Southern States, but of the more than three
million foreign-born men, less than three hun-
dred and fifty thousand were found there, and
of these all but about seventy thousand were in
the States of Missouri, Texas, Maryland, Ken-
tucky, and Louisiana.
The foreign-born men actually exceeded the


.1
mltb


there for Northern wheat, corn or potatoes, and
for every million feet of pine lumber shipped
this year the South will build a saw-mill and
supply herself next year. Cotton, flour and
swollen mills are building in every section ;
great manufactories are springing into life ; coal
and iron mines are being worked as never be-
fore.
Our Sea Coast.
The chief trouble with people who seek ad-
vantages on our sea coast, is the want of society
or something to stave off the monotony after
their few days' or weeks' sojourn. One who goes
to the bar finds little to look at but the breakers
as they roll in and out with the tide. Each family
tucked away in some temporary location keep
pretty much to themselves. They don't dress
to visit ; find no festivals or dancing parties,
they become weary of solitude. And yet there
is music in the winds and sea, and the long
reaches of sea shore turn up something at every
flood tide that may be interesting, to say noth-
ing of curious marine plants, and many other
things which, in themselves, to an intelligent
mind, is exciting and afford hours of pleasant
recreation in looking after them. One month
or two months on our sea coast during July and
August will renew life, give health to the sick,
and make robust the debilitated. Go if you
can.-Palatka Herald.
To which the St. Augustine Press adds:
Just at present, (and it is a trifle early yet,)
there are quite a number of inland visitors so-
journing in our city by the sea. There seems
to be plenty of general society to pass away the
time agreeably. Our boarding houses and ho-
tel accommodations are all that any mortal can
desire or expect. There is the best band in the
South, south of Washington, stationed at the
Barracks, which discourses music on the pa-
rade ground, and many visit the locality two
afternoons during the week, to lend their ears
to the sweet strains of music there discoursed.
Many other attractions extend sufficient recrea-
tion to our summer visitors. So, come over ;
we will make it pleasant for you.

The Men of the Country.
According to the table compiled at the Census
Bureau, there were 13,830,349 males of twenty-
one years of age and over in the United States
in 1880.
That total is made up of 8,270,518 white na-
tive, 3,072,487 white foreign, and 1,487,344
colored men. Among the colored were included
Chinese, Japanese, and Indians, but of course
the vast majority were of African blood. Some-
thing above a quarter of the males of a voting
age were, therefore, foreign born, and about
one-ninth were colored. Foreign and colored
together made up nearly one-third of the total.
It must be borne in mind, however, that a


25S


TIIHEFLRD DIPTH






THE. FLO ID DIPA CH 2-- -----;--9~--


cover a portion of the walls, while many a little
nook, corner, and border that might be made
beautiful, and, consequently a joy forever, is
rendered instead dark, damp, and disagreeable.
It is true that many trees that have only begun
to grow can be placed advantageously where,
when they become large, they are objectionable.
It is easy so say plant freely, and cut out as they
increase in size, and we well know the old rule,
cut'a tree when found in a place where you
would not plant one, but we all know the disin-
clination almost every one has to cut down a
shade tree.
"A certain amount of shade, then, is not only
grateful, but necessary, and no one should do
himself the injury to be without it. But with
this as with other things, moderation is com-
mendable. It is possible to have too much even
of a good thing; or, in other words, that which
may be good in moderation may become absoa-


'i


natives in the States of Minnesota, Nevada,,
and Wisconsin, and in the Territories of Utah
and Dacota. With the help of its Chinese
population, almost wholly men, California had
127,347 foreign to 135,209 native. In New
York the foreign were 536,598, against 852,094
native, while Illinois had 277,899 foreign and
505,272 native, and Massachusetts 170,690
foreign and 326,002 native.
In 1880, when the total male population of
twenty-one and over was 13,830,349, the whole
number of votes cast at the Presidential elec-
tion was 9,204,428. In the first total, however,
are included Chinese, Indians, and un-natural-
ized foreigners not qualified to vote.-N. Y.
S n.
Too Much Shade.
"There is nothing," says the New York SAn,
"that strikes us more unpleasantly than a farm
house standing entirely alone, exposed to wind
and sun, with not a single tree for shelter or
shade. No matter how it may be in other re-
spects, how nicely planned or expensively built,
or with what surroundings of lawns, plants, or
shrubs; without trees it looks lonely and for-
saken. To be sure, this condition has its advan-
tages ; there is compensation in everything; the
free air of heaven reaches it without let or hind-
rance, and the sunlight can, if permitted, find
entrance through the windows; but these ad-
vantages are not enough to recommend the
isolated position. Trees are a necessity, and
should-be planted judiciously so soon as the
house is built, or sooner if it be practicable.
"But there is danger of going to the other
extreme, and surrounding the house with a
forest. When small trees are planted we are
very apt to forget the size they will attain at
maturity, and set them too close. It is conse-
quently by no means uncommon to see a house
completely shut in by the dense foliage of the
large trees, which, while it has not the lonesome
look of the unshaded one, because our attention
is detracted from it by its surroundings, renders
it much less attractive than it should be. This
is wrong for' several reasons. First, from a
sanitary point. The free circulation of the air
is impeded to an extent that renders the puri-
fication of the various rooms a matter of extreme
difficulty; the healthful rays of the sun are
shut out, and the light is so impeded as to take
many hours that should be daylight from its
inmates, while the walls of the house inside and
out are kept damp and cold, and, consequently,
unhealthy.
"The lover of flowers will also have cause to
complain that he loses some of the best situations
for the culture of choice plants, climbers especi-
ally, that might, but for the shade, be made to


m


lutely bad by excess. This is certainly the case
with shade trees about houses, and while we shall
always approve of them, we shall, nevertheless,
advocate judicious planting and thinning out."

Good Advice.
Gol. Finley, the sage of the Lake/ City Re-
porter, gives this excellent advice to young
men:
Young men, think of this! Year by year
you grow older, spending probably much of

your earnings in purchase of what you now call
pleasure. In a few years, at best, you will have
to assume responsibilities, and possibly bear
burdens which to-day you little dream of. If
you continue in your course, you will have no
property to fall back upon for support, and life
will become drudgery. You can avoid much
of the latter if you will but be provident. Buy
a home in Florida; you need not be particular
where-only see to it that it is in some location
accessible to transportation, and where present
settlers are healthy. After selecting and buy-
ing your land, put all the cash you can spare
into making improvements, planting fruits;
which are known to succeed in the locality,
give as much of your time as you can spare to
overlooking your place. If you do not desire
to live upon it, put a good tenant upon it, un-
der written contract, and in a few years ninety
per cent. of you will find yourselves wealthy.
Florida is just the State to invest in. Not
only is she blessed with cheap lands, which are
appreciating in value, but transportation is be-
ing furnished to nearly every locality. The
crops and fruits produced here are valuable-
a demand for all which can be grown. If
Florida had nothing but her climate to boast
of, it would bring wealth to her people, but she
has a climate unexcelled, and soil capable of
producing fruits and crops to sustain an im-
mense population.



Vegetable Culture in Middle Florida vs.
Orange Culture in South Florida.
A gentleman, long a resident of Leon County,
afterwards a resident of Madison County, en-
gaged in agriculture all the while, now engaged
in orange culture in one of the most attractive
regions of South Florida, writes thus to the
editor of the Economist:
"I have no idea of making this my perma-
nent home. As soon as I make money enough
to purchase me a few acres in Middle Florida,
and stock it, I am going back there, though never
to plant another acre of cotton. I have thrown
away a good start in the world and fifteen
years of my life in trying to make it for noth-
ing. I have about fifteen acres of orange trees


of experimental plantations to the younger
nurserymen about entering into the business,
but which will apply more or less to all culti-
vators, and will be useful to amateurs. He said
it was impossible for nurserymen to acquire a
thorough knowledge of all the varieties and to
know that they are true to their names without
having specimen grounds, where the fruits may
be watched and studied. By planting in suc-
cessive years, this need not require a heavy
outlay. If it is desired to test, say, a hundred
varieties, it may be done conveniently by plant-
ing dwarfs. To set out, say, one hundred vari-
eties of .the apple as standards, would occupy
two acres, and it might be ten years or more to
reach satisfactory results by their bearing. But
by using the French paradise stock a hundred
may be planted on a third of an acre, and the
fruit may be tested in three or four years. [The
different varieties of the Citrus family, such as
oranges, lemons, limes, etc., can be speedily
tested in this way, by budding on stocks of the
Otaheite or C. Trifoliata.-EDs. FLORIDA Dis-
PATCH.] Pears on quince stocks may be plant-
ed ten or twelve feet apart-three or four hun-
dred trees to the acre-and they will bear in
three or four years. When one sort has been
sufficiently examined, the tree may be grafted
over to a more popular or valuable variety.
The plum, cherry and peach are all capable of
being grown as dwarfs. Specimen grounds of
ornamental shrubs and trees would also be use-
ful. Mr. Barry paid a deserved compliment to
the nurserymen of this country, and said they
had transacted their business with a degree of
enterprise, liberality and skill, which entitles
them to the admiration and gratitude of the
Amejican people. They have filled the land
with the finest of fruits, and scattered orna-
minentals and brought them within easy reach of
all. The parks, cemeteries, pleasure grounds
public and private, give evidence of this every-
where.- Country Gentleman.




PAPER CAR WHEELS.-The process by which
the paper sheets employed in making car wheels
are converted from a loose mass into a compact
dense body, capable of withstanding such a
tremendous crushing force, is by pasting ten
sheets together, one upon the other, making a
disk about one-eighth of an inch thick; a pow-
erful hydraulic press being filled with those
disks, a pressure of nearly a ton to the square
inch is given, and, when removed, the disks are
hung on poles, and steam-dried for six days;
thicker disks are then made by pasting together
two or three of those already finished. Press-


j


ing and drying again follow, and the process is
repeated until a block is built four inches thick
and of about the consistency of lignum vithe.
After each pasting and pressing, six days are
allowed for drying, and when the block is com-
plete it is left in a drying room until thoroughly
seasoned.

ONE HUNDRED (!) CHICKS A DAY !- The
Fort Ogden correspondent of the Pine Level
Signal says: "Mr. Cross is one of our most
progressive citizens. He has recently ordered
a patent incubator which will hatch out 100
chicks per day." [Good incubator ; but we'll
take our part of the chickens and-story cum
grano salis.]
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


under my charge-one half bearing trees and
the others from five to eight years old, and my
experience is that they are nearly as much
trouble to cultivate and keep'in order as a cot-
ton crop. So you may guess I am not crazy on
the subject of orange groves. My opinion is
that five acres in vegetables for ten years the
time it takes to get (orange) trees to pay any-
thing at all will buy the finest grove in this
county, of say, fifteen or twenty acres. There
is no humbug in vegetables; they can be sold
right here for a good price. I sold here (the
past season) cabbages and all that I could spare,
at from 10 to 20 cents ; beans 25 cents a gallon;
beats 25 cents a bunch for 6 or 8, and other
things in proportion.
Experimental Fruit Plantations.
Some valuable suggestions were made at the
Nurserymen's Convention at Rochester, N. Y.,
by P. Barry, in which he urged the importance


25


THEFLOIDADISPATCH,




THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


rhe loda Iispach.
JACKSONVILLE, JULY 17, 1882.
D. REDMOND,
EDITORS: D. H. ELLIOTT,
SW. H. ASHMEAD,
Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.
RATE OF ADVERTISING.
SQUARES. 1 TIME. 1 MO. j 3 MO. 1 6 MO. 1 YEAR
One.............. $1 00 $ 250 $550 $10 00 $ 1850
Two ..................... 2 00 500 1000 18 00 34 00
Three..................... 3 00 7 0 1400 25 00 4600
Four...................... 4 00 9 0 1750 30 00 58 00
Five........................ 450 1100 1900 3500 6500
Eight..................... 8 00 1650 3000 50 00 10000
Sixteen.............. 16 00 3000 5000 80 00 15000
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square:
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words to line) ten cents
per line.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the best ad-
vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.

Special Club Rates with "The Dispatch."

Read and Subscribe--It Saves Money and
Will Pay You.
We have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
following publications, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt of price, for ONE YEAR :
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH AND
Savannah Weekly News...............................$2.50
Florida Weekly Union ............ 2.25
New York Weekly SunH............................. 1.75
New York Weekly Herald............................. 1.75
New York Weekly Tribune ................ 2.50
New York Weekly Times............................ 1.75
New York Weekly World.............................. 1.75
Philadelphia Weekly Times............................2.50
American Agriculturist............................... 2.00
Country Gentleman...................................... 2.75
Southern Cultivator*............................ 2.00
Atlantic Monthly Magazine......................... 4.00
Harper's Monthly Magazine......................... 4.00
The Century Monthly Magazine (Scribner's).... 4.00
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine..................... 3.15
Popular Science Monthly............................. 5.00
North Americari Review.............................. 5.00
Harper's Illustrated Weekly........................... 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Bazar........................ 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Young People................ 2.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly.................. 4.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4.00
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly.................... 3.15
Frank Leslie's Sunday Magazine.................... 3.15
Scientific American...... ..................... 3.75
W averly Magazine...................................... 5.00
Detroit Free Press................ .................... 2.35
The above are among the very best publications"
Remittances should be sent by Check, Money Order,
or Registered Letter, addressed to
ASHI1EAD BRO'S,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

THANKS to the United States Department of
Agriculture for extra copies of the very valu-
able pamphlet on "Florida: its climate, soil,
productions," etc.-favorably noticed in THE


DISPATCH of July 10.
Do NOT fail to read the various replies to
inquiries of "Florida Fruit-Growers' Associa-
tion." We hope by the queries already printed
to draw out and publish many important facts in
fruit culture from all parts of the State, and we
shall follow up this most important subject.
BIG OAT CROP.-The Milledgeville (Ga.)
Recorder says: "Far be it from us to pluck a
single feather from the chaplet that should
adorn the head of a man who made the most
oats on an acre of land, in a pool of 20 of the
best farmers in the county. But we did so.
Capt. C. W. Ennis is the man who raised 108
bushels and six pounds of oats on one acre."


Mammoth Orange Leaves.
We are indebted to A. F. Styles, Esq., of this
vicinity, for a wonderful and unique lusus na-
turce in the way of an orange twig with three
immense leaves attached.
Our readers, we are assured, will hardly be-
lieve us, when we state that the largest of these
measures eleven inches in length and seven and
seven-eighths inches in width! Nevertheless,
it is a fact.
The other leaves are but slightly smaller, but
all appear to be perfectly healthy, and have a
rich green, glossy appearance.
The twig is a bud, in which the germ or
sprouting centre has been destroyed, which
forces an unnatural and vigorous growth into
leaf-tissue.
It is an astonishing and remarkable illustra-
tion of what nature will sometimes accomplish
when her forces are restrained and forced into
unnatural channels.
If we could only succeed in restraining and
forcing this wonderful inherent force into our
luscious oranges, what a feat it would be; in-
stead of the usual sized orange, we could have
them as large as pumpkins! Is this Utopian ?
What is to prevent it ? Can it not be done ?

The LeConte "Boom."
For some years past, the propagation and
cultivation of the LeConte Pear has been one of
the leading "new departures" in our neighbor-
ing city of Thomasville, Ga. We have watched
the growth of this industry with much interest,
and we are not surprised to learn from a late
number of the Southern Enterprise that a stock
company has just been formed in Thomasville
for the planting of one hundred acres in this
very profitable fruit. The Enterprise says that
it is only a few weeks since the question of
starting this great pear orchard was first sprung,
and "already the stock has been taken, and or-
ganization perfected, and a charter applied for.
This is quick work for so grand an enterprise,
but it shows the faith of the public in this truly
wonderful fruit. Had it been started elsewhere,
it might have seemed a wild scheme, but the
starting of it in Thomas County-the home of
this pear, where its merits are certainly better un-
derstood than elsewhere, is an endorsement of the
LeConte, well calculated to carry conviction to
the minds of fruit-growers throughout the coun-
try. There is no man in the company who is
not familiar with this pear or does not rightly
appreciate its qualities, hardiness, early matur-
ity and wonderful productiveness. Nor is there
a member who is a wild or reckless speculator.


On the contrary, all are careful, sagacious and
successful business men. Most of them already
have large interests in the LeConte Pear, but
are so fully satisfied of the profits to be derived
from growing it that they readily and anxiously
went into this mammoth project.
"The orchard will be located on or near the
railroad, and work will soon be commenced.
"The following is a list of the stockhold-
ers:
"T. E. Blackshear, President; Dr. E. M.
Mallette, Secretary and Treasurer ; H. H. San-
ford, E. M. Smith, B. F. Walters, John L.
Finn, Withers & Kneller, Dr. P. S. Bower, R.
Thomas & Co., and Jas. Watt."


Speaking of the productiveness of the Le-
Conte, and comparing the orchards of two lead-
ing growers of the fruit, the Enterprise says:
"Those who have visited both orchards think
that Mr. Varnedoe's old trees have perhaps
more fruit on them than have those of Mr. San-
ford. We shall not be surprised to hear of
forty bushels to the tree being gathered by these
gentlemen."

New Publications and Exchanges.
The United States Monthly Magazine, Lake-
side Building, Chicago. June. No. 6-Vol. 2.
One dollar per year. Present number has some
beautiful illustrations of the "Dells of Wiscon-
sin," and the magazine is very cheap and quite
attractive.
The Orange Grove. Vol. 1-No. 1. Weekly
of 16 pages, at $1 per year. Neatly printed
and well filled with interesting and useful mat-
ter. Address: "Orange Grove, 84 Nassau-st.,
New York."
Catalogue of Printing Presses, etc., R. Hoe &
Co., 504 Grand-st., New York. A superbly
printed catalogue of Printing Presses and Print-
ers' Materials-royal octavo, thick paper, etc.
-a model of typographical taste and beauty.
"Health Resorts of North Georgia and Western
North Carolina." This is an exquisitely beau-
tiful pamphlet of 56 pages, issued by the Rich-
mond and Danville R. R.," and very kindly
sent us by A. POPE, Esq., General Passenger
Agent. The scenery so graphically pictured
and so well described in the pamphlet, is unsur-
passed by any in the Union, as we know by
personal observation; and we are assured by
those who have recently traveled over the main
routes that the railway management and the
hotels are all that need be desired. It is no
wonder, then, that this midland mountain land
should attract multitudes of tourists and seekers
for health and pleasure from all parts of the
country, and that the present summer at these
delightful "resorts" promises to be the most
brilliant and attractive of many years.
"Rural Record."-A Journal for the Farm,
Plantation and Fireside. Monthly. $1 per
year. Adolph S. Ochs & Co., publishers, Chat-
tanooga, Tennessee.
Planters' Journal.-Official Journal of the
National Cotton Planters' Association of Amer-
ica. Vicksburg, Miss. Published monthly at
$2 per year. Contains 28 pages, illustrated.
Address: "Planters' Journal, Vicksburg, Miss."
Southern Indutsries, for July. Monthly, of


40 pages, handsomely printed and ably edited.
$2 per year. Address: Rolfe S. Saunders, Nash-
ville, Tenn.

THE following addendum to a business letter
to the publishers of THE DISPATCH, is a sample
of the kind and cheering words we daily re-
ceive :
"By the way, let me add that, under your
admirable management, THE FLORIDA Dis-
PATCH is made a genuine home blessing to
Floridians and a reliable guide to outsiders. I
know that it excels any periodical or news-
paper of its character in the South. Success to
you, gentlemen, and to your enterprise!
"Yours truly, W. H. C.,
of Live Oak, Florida."


2e0


mm


L


I






THEI FLORIDA.. DISPATCH ...2..


PYRETHRUM.-Referring to the effects of
Pyrethrum-a communication concerning
which will be found elsewhere-we notice the
following from Prof. Riley. He says:
"I placed ten cabbage caterpillars (Pieris
rape) in two small wooden boxes, which were
covered with wire gauze. In one box I dusted
the least possible amount of Pyrethrum mixed
with flour in proportion of one part of Pyreth-
rum to twenty parts of flour. I sprayed those
in the other box with a liquid mixture, using
one tablespoonful of Pyrethrum to twenty gal-
lons of water. In five minutes all the larvae
were on their backs, nor did any of them re-
cover. A large number of caterpillars on the
cabbage plants were sprinkled or dusted with
the Pyrethrum, the proportion being the same


Honors to a Florida Lady.
It affords us very great pleasure to notice, in
a report of the "Second Annual Reception of
the Philadelphia School of Design for Women,"
(recently published in the Ledger,) that a prize
of a handsome gold medal, founded in 1876 by
Mr. George W. Childs, to the student attaining
the greatest proficiency during the school year,
who, during this time, has been regular in at-
tendance from nine to two, and whose report
for deportment is entirely satisfactory, was
awarded to our highly gifted young friend, Miss
EMMA CHANDLER, of Pensacola, Fla.
We find, also, among the awards to Miss
Chandler, the following:
Portrait Sketches in Charcoal, second prize.
Illustrations done through the year, first
prize.
Display of Time Sketches, first prize.
For the best Original Design, illustrating a
passage or incident in some Literary Work,
honorable mention.
These well-merited awards are very gratifying
to the friends of Miss Chandler, and presage for
the young lady a bright future in her chosen
vocation.
Cotton Crop.
We see, by the July reports of the Agricul-
tural Department, that the condition of the
cotton crop has improved since the first of June,
but that the general average is still over that
during any year of the past ten, except that of
July, 1873 and 1874. This condition is due to
the late and wet spring, and is rapidly and
generally improving under more favorable
weather. If this favorable weather lasts the
deficiency will be made good, but unfavorable
weather in July and August would make a full
crop impossible. The general average for Flor-
ida is reported at 92.

NEWSPAPER QUARRELS.-The following,
from the Thomasville (Ga.) Enterprise very
well expresses our ideas on the subject :
"We think when the newspaper men desire
to make such uncomplimentary remarks about
each other as have recently been passed between
the Atlanta Constitution and the Macon Tele-
graph, that they should be made face to face,
and not through the medium of the press. If
men get mad enough to fight, let them fight,
but the exchange of personal epithets through
the papers is not calculated to elevate the tone
of any journal. The paragraph in the Consti-
tution, of Saturday last, was one that we think
had much better been sent by the hands of 'a
friend' than through the columns of a news-
paper."


REPLY.-We know of no wash to apply that
will not kill both scale and parasite. The only
method we can suggest is, to jar or shake trees
before applying the wAsh. This will cause
many of the parasites 'o fly off to other trees,
and, doubtlessly, enough wil escape to propa-
gate their kind.
RIXFORD, FLA., July 10, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
GENTLEMEN: I send you by mail this a. m.,
a limb from one of my LeConte Pear trees that
is affected with some disease that I am not ac-
quainted with. You will notice under the
spars, a spot which has turned black, and the
disease appears in different stages along up the
branch. Whether it is anything that will ulti-
mately kill the tree, I do not know, but it is


as above. In one hour the plants were exam-
ined and in every case the caterpillars were
dead."
Florida--Then and Now.
The Columbus, Georgia, Enquirer-Sun says
of our State: "A few years ago Florida was
looked upon as one of the sections which 'God
looked upon and cursed the land.' The idea
prevailed that its chief productions were galli-
nippers sand flies, alligators, and other creep-
ing and venomous things. 'But Linden saw
another sight,' and to-day Florida is heralded
over the country as one of the garden spots of
the earth. No State in the Union has shown a
greater proportionate share of progress and en-
terprise within the past ten years. This has
been shown in material industries, in manufac-
turers, in fruit raising, and in various ways
that go to build up the State."



Meteorological Report.
Weather for week ending July 14, 1882.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION
SIGNAL SERVICE, U. S. A., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Therm. c$ Wind.

DATE.g
0

Saturday 8........ 30.13 86 73 78.3 78.7 0.07 SW 2 Cloudy.
Sunday 9......... 30.16 90 7780.0175.7 00.3 SW 4 Cloudy.
Monday 10......' 30.1289 74 80.31 75. 3 0.02 S 5 Fair
Tuesday 11......30.09 91 76 8.3 72. 0.36 SW 6 Clear.
Wednesday 12 30.07 907783.3172.3 0.00 SW 4 Fair.
Thursday 13... 30.08 90 75 79.0! 76.0 0.00 W 8 Fair.
Friday 14........ 30.08 83 73 77.7 83.3 0.34 SW 1 Clo udy.
Highest barometer 30.18, lowest 30.03.
Highest temperature 91, lowest 73.
NOTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Oberver U. S. A.
Scientific Department Correspondence.
J. Sutton, Midway, Ky.: In reference to your
query of 4th, we would respectfully refer you to
Professor Clarkson's communication in this is-
sue.
E. L. Carney, Lake Weir: Your communi-
cation has remained unanswered from same'
cause.
LAKE WEIR, FLA., July 3, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
GENTLEMEN : Mr. Wm. H. Ashmead, in his
valuable book on "Orange Insects," tells us
when and how to wash our trees with whale-oil
soap, etc., to kill the scale. He then goes on and de-
scribes the various insects that prey on the scale,
and speaks of their importance, thus: "It is one
of the chief agencies in holding them in check;
and I am firmly satisfied, could these minute
foes be removed but for a season, the numerous
scales would so increase in numbers as to ut-
terly destroy all orange trees." Now, will you
tell us, in THE DISPATCH, how we can apply
any wash that will kill our enemies (the scale)
that will not also kill our friends ?
Yours truly, ALFRED AYER.


I


evidently something that calls for attention. A
friend of mine, who has one of the trees in bear-
ing, tells me he noticed the same thing on his
trees several years ago, but says the tree has
recovered from it. I have noticed several trees
in another part of the State similarly affected,
but I do not know how it is with them in South
Georgia. This is the only one that is affected
of a lot of twenty. Please give us your opinion
about it, and the remedy.
Very truly yours,
GEO C. RIXFORD.
REPLY.-We regret we are unable to satis-
factorily account for your trouble, and hesitate
giving'an opinion without more study. Will
some of our Georgia subscribers please inform
us if they are acquainted with the disease ?
ARCHER, FLA., July 10, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
GENLTEMEN : Enclosed find a section of bark
from one of my fine Umbrella China trees,
which is covered with a light brown scale and
minute insects which I have seen on nothing
but the China trees. An application of whale-
oil soap solution, with a little kerosene oil, de-
stroyed all it was applied to some weeks ago.
Please answer, through THE DISPATCH, and
oblige, yours yery truly, W. B. LIPsEY.
REPLY.-The scale is a species, not yet de-
scribed, belonging to the genus Apidiotus.
Prof. J. H. Comstock, of Cornell Univeristy, is
at present monographing the Coccidce, and,
doubtlessly, has and will describe it in his forth-
coming work.
Girdled Trees.
WAUKAN, IOWA, July 10, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
GENTLEMEN: "When the tree is completely
or almost girdled, there is no remedy-the tree
must die." So said THE DISPATCH, on page
229. Now I have apple trees in full vigor and
productiveness that were entirely girdled by
mice twenty years ago. If the injury is discov-
ered before the vitality of the tree is reduced too
low, it can be saved and fully restored to health
by inarching cions over the girdled portions,
thus again restoring the connection between the
branches and roots. These. cions will rapidly
increase in size and soon meet each other and
encase the old naked trunk in a solid palisade
of new ones and eventually the place can hard-
ly be detected by the eye.
I have frequently applied the same remedy
to orange trees at Tangerine, Fla., completely
girdled by white ants (wood lice,) with perfect
success.
Some of your readers may be glad to save a
valuable tree after it has been girdled, and in
this way fifteen minutes' work will suffice.
Truly yours,
DUDLEY W. ADAMS.


Analyses of Soils.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., July 12th 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
A few months ago I was enabled through
your kindness to communicate with the people
of Florida, offering to have analyzed, free of
expense, any samples of soil, minerals, &c.,
that might be forwarded to me. Several sam-
ples were forwarded through me to the chemist
at the John Hopkins' University and a few re-
sults announced; but owing to sickness brought
on by the laboratory fumes, the young gentle-
man who had so kindly volunteered to do this
work has been entirely incapacitated there-
from, and I am afraid he will not be able at any
time to continue the analysis.
I offer this as explanation of the failure to
report to those who had forwarded samples, &c.
Very Respectfully,
W. B. CLARKSON.


THEFLRD DIPTH


261





A_ mTHE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
WE..


SANITARY Y COLUMN.
(EdiWed by Dr. S. Baldwin.)

4.. 9TA IQUS DISEASES.
Scarlet Fever, Diphth ria, Small-Pox, Ty-
JhirI Fever, Etc. -General Rules for
S Their Previip and. ,RAstrictqn.
ISSUED iY'MICHIANI STATE BOARD OF HEAL'L .
DECEMB 181.: "

1 Avoid the contagium "o sipedifl .-caise of
the, disease. Do not take -the breableof one
sic.,, Unless you are, needed 'to aitefor.-the!
*Consumption is now believed ito be a cP'iunicibe.e'
diseAs: therefore, many of these "iles aeo ~pH its prevention and restriction. ,
W rhod ering-cOugh is a communicable dish vtifch, ino
Michigan, causes more d l&ths than d res vk. ietex, Most
of these riles, except perhaps those for disainfection f
the discharges fvoh te kidneys and boii4l, are itap'P-
cable^for itsrevq^tlon an restrictipp, .. ,.
Ac gaerd$(% "a ltldk,-ee hiles are appUcabIewhenr-
ever the disease occurs, ,but by vaccination 'and re-vacci-
nation, small-pox may tb almost wholfy prevented,
*..lm ost ,


Xeteorolofieal Summary for June, 1882.
[EXTRACT, TORMi o. 113, A.]
PUNTA RASSA, FLA., July 1, 1882.
Monthly mean of barometer 30.060.
Highest barometer, 30.179, on 27th.
Lowest barometer, 29.880, -oh 9th.
Monthly range of barometer, 0.290.
Monthly mean temperature, 80.50.
Highest temperature, 91, on 5th, 21st and 25th.
Lowest temperature, 68, on llth.
o.em'lthly rTange of temperature, 23.o
Greatest daily range of temperature, 17.50, on 25th.
Least daily range of temperature, 7, on 17th.
Monthly mean dew point, 710.
Monthly mean relative humidity, 73.7 per cent.
Prevailing wind direction, east.
Total monthly movement of Wind, 6,352 miles.
Maximum velocity of wind and direction, 38 miles,
southeast On 21st.
Total rainfall, 8.46 inches.
'iifberl of clear days, 6.
N.nmber of fair days, 17.
Nl-mbe- of Cloudy days, 7.
SNp ~ber 9f days on which rain fell, 12.
Dates of sblar halos, 3d, 18th. '
IDates of lunar halos, 1st.
Dates' of auroras, none.
Dates of polar bands, 5th.
Dates of zodiacal light none.
Average hourly velocity afd prevailing direction of
Swind at 40 a.,mn., for month, 7.8 miles, east.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 2:40 p. m., for month,12.1 miles, west.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 10:40 p. m., for month, 5.8 miles, east.;' r
Wiu4ds of 25. miles perhour and over (dates wind direc-
tions and 'velocities) 7th, 30 miles east; 9th, 29 miles,
northwest; 10th, 26 miles, southwest; llth, 26 miles, west;
21st, 13 miles, southeast.
Number f fair sunsets, 16.
lumber of fair sunsets verified, 13; not verified, 3.
Number of foul sunsets, 14.
Number of fu l sunsets verified, 8; not verified- 6.
Number of doubtful sunsets none. '
Percentage of verification of sunset predictions, 70.
.W. J. EVANs;
S Sergeant Signal Corps, U. S. A..
[FORM No. 113, A.]
KEY WEST, FLA., July 1, 1882.
-lMonthly Ineami actual barometer of three telegraphic
observations, .30.030.
MOtthly mean reduced barometer of three telegrdaphic
obrvations, 30.050. .
Highest barometer and date, 30.161 on 27th; lowest and
date, 29.916 on 9th; range, .245.
lo0nthly mean temperature 84.30; highest and date,
93.5 on 20th; lowest and date, 71.2 on 12th.
Monthly range of temperature, 22.0; greatest daily
and date, 190 on 11th;, least daily and date, 10.40 on 3d.
Monthly mean humidity, 6A.8.
MQonlthlray e 4e point, 72.50. /
Prevailing wind direction, three telegraphic observa-
tions, southeast. ,
Prevailing wind direction all observations, southeast.
IrOtai alinfall or'meltd snow, 3.48 inches.
,4verago depth of unmelted snow on ground, at end of
month, none. ,
Total monthly miovefiient of wind from 11 p. -m. to 11 p.
m,. 4,949 mles.. .
S'Maxtnum velofty and direction, 35 miles north,"
dNumber f foggy days (g), none.
Nmtier of clear lays on Which-rain or snow fell, 2; oh
Wih no ri or w snofejl 10, i o ,
Nmbefrof fair days on which rain or snow fell, 8; on
wiih no rain or snow fell, 8.
o Whlchriorain'orsnow fell, 2.
Nwber of days on which. rainor snow iUl, 1) on
whloh no rain or snow fell, 20
DAte'olF auroras and times of beginning and ending.
llth, 7 to I.p. m ,
tes' ofr olar halos, none observed.
Date otlnaar halos, 2d. .
Datea of zodiacal lights, none oberved.
Dty* of frost, -none observed. ..r. .
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 7 a. m., for month southeast, 6.7 miles. ;
avetage hottrly velocity and prevailing direction of
w iat,3 p. m., for n ontia, out4ajst, 7.0 miles.
Averagehourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wiibtn& 41 p.im:, formnonth, east, tk6.miles.
Gales df 25 miles per hour and over (dates, wind, dir,ee-
tions and wind velocity); llth, 35 miles north and 32
nilles iuthai '' ' '. : /-; .. .. : -
*eent R. H. PAXTQO
,i,, sergeant Signal Corps, V.S. .


two ounces of common salt to one gallon of
water. Hang up and loosely spread out cloth-
ing, bedding, etc., that cannot be boiled in the
zincrsolution, or spread it loosely over chairs in
the sick-room, leaving the bedstead and other
furniture in the room. Close all openings to
the room very tight. F* a room ten feet square
place two pounds Of sulphur in an iron pan.
supported on bricks. Set the sulphur on fire
with live coals or with -ar spoonful of alcohol
lighted with a match, Be careful not to breathe
the sulphurous fumes. Leave .fte roidm tightly
closed for several hours, thpn air. it thoroughly.
,For a larger rolm .i1s.e4 prpportiqp tply iarpr
quantity of sulphur, at the ra;,. of two; pounds
obr each' 1,000 cubic feet of ,air-space, apd try
to burn as much as possible, of the..sulphur

S4 Keep 'your house and premises. 4d every-,,
thing; connected therewith clean, but remember


sick, or are protected by having had the dis-
ease, or in case of small-pox by thorough vacci-
nation, do not go near the sick person. Do not
allow your lips to touchany food, cup, spoon,
or anything else that, the sick person has
touched or that has been in the sick room. Do
not wipe your face or hands with any cloth that
has been near the sick person. Do not wear
any clothing the sick person has worn, during,
just before, or just after his sickness. Keep
your hands free from discharges from the body
or skin of the sick person. Do not touch him
with sore or scratched hands. Particularly
avoid inhaling or in any way receiving into the
mouth or nose the branny scales that fall off or
peal off from one recovering from, or apparent-
ly wholly recovered from scarlet fever.
2. Restrict the contagium or special cause of
the disease. Isolate the sick. Separate those
sick with any of these diseases, even if they are
but mildly sick, from all persons except neces-
sary attendants. A person sick with any of
these diseases should not be permitted to suffer
for want of care, food, or comfort; but all his
wants should be attended to by adults, or by
those who are protected by proper vaccination
or having had the disease. Children and those
who are not thus protected, should keep away
from these diseases. Do not go from the sick-
room to a child or other unprotected person
until after change of clothing, and thorough
washing of hands, face, hair and beard. Al-
ways wash the hands thoroughly after any nec-
essary handling of the sick person or of any-
thing that has been in contact with the sick per-
son. Keep those who have been exposed to
any of these diseases away from schools,
churches and other assemblies, and from all
children until it is known whether they are in-
fected-and if they are found .to be infected,
isolate them till after complete recovery and
thorough 1isinfe.tion. -
3." destroy the contagium or special cause of
the disease-
a. .By thoroughly disinfecting: or destroying
whateVef is removed from the person sick or
from the sick-room. All discharges from the
patient should be received into vessels contain-
ing a strong solution of sulphate of iron (cop-
peras) and then, in cities, thrown into the wa-
ter-closets; elsewhere they should be buried
100 feet distant from any well or where this
is impracticable,, they should be receivedon o ld
cloths which should immediately be burned or
disinfected and buried:
b. fily thoroughly disintecting the sick-room
and' its contents, after removal of the sick per-
son, whether by death or recovery.
Disiniect a follbHows: Burn whatever has been
in contact with the sick person and is riot. too
valuable to burn. Garments, sheets, blankets,
etc., that will not be injured by bleaching,
should be boiled for half an hour in a zinc-so-
lution made by dissolving zinc sulphate and
common salt in water, in 'the proportion
of four ounces of the zinc sulphate and


cure dysentery as well as ,and mwrequickly than
any other remedy known. Dysentery is really
a constipation, and is the-opposite of diarrhoea.
It is inflammation of theblowes with congestion
of the 'portal circulation'-the circulation ofi
blood through the bowels and liver. It is a
disease always prevalent in th9 summer and
autumn. Fimin considerable observation I feel
-warranited 'in tying that buttermilk, diunhk
moderately, Wilt etitre every tase ofit; certainly
when taldeui irithe dkrly stages." -
GUINTA, Cows, or Heifer calves. wahted.
Write: the Editors of THE-'DISPATCH.


PERS-OS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VE1RTTSSRS APPEARING 1 THE DIS-
PAA *ILL' CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING, THEIX TO THAT EFFECT.-


4-


- --- ~.~~


I


I


that the contagium of these diseases may attack the
cleanest article of clothing, food, drink, book,
or paper if it is exposed thereto.
The law requires householders and physicians'
to notify the local beard of health of the first
case and of every case of these diseases.
When the death of a person who has died
from scarlet fever, diphtheria, or pmal-pox is,
announced in print, the notice should'state the
cause as "from scarlet fever," diphtheria, or
small-pox, as the case may be, to prevent at-
tendance at the funeral or yisit to.the house by
persons liable to take. the disease.
For more complete statements of meaps of
restricting and preventing these diseases, she
the State Bbard of Health documents on the
Restriction and Prevention of Scarlet Feveir.
the Restriction and Prevention of Diphtheria,
and the Restriction and Prevention of Small-
pox, which may be had by addressing the Sec-
retary of the State Board of Health, Lansing,
Michigan.



Milk Diet.
If any one who wishes to grow fleshy, a pitit
of milk taken on retiring at night will soon
cover the scrawniest bones. Although we see
a good many fleshy persons now-a-days, there,
are many lean and ljyk ones,, who sigh for the
fashionable measure of plumpness, and who
would be vastly improved in health and appear-
ance Qould their figures be rounded with good
solid flesh. Nothing is more coveted by a thin
woman than a full figure, and nothing will- so
raise the ire and provoke the scandal of the
"clipper-built" as the consciousness of plump-
ness in a rival. In a case of fever and summer
complaint milk is now given with excellent re-
sults. The idea that milk is feverish has ex-
ploded, and is now the physician's great reliance
in bringing through typhoid patients, or those
in too low a state to be nourished by solid food.
It is a mistake to scrimp the milk pitcher.
Take more milk and buy less meat t Look 'to
your milk-man; have large-sized, welt-fill4ed
milk pitchers on the table each meal, and you
will have sound flesh and save doctor's bills.-
Housekeeper. .. _

Buttermilk as a Summer Drink. '
A recent writer asserts that for a hot-weather
drink, nothing equals buttermilk. It is, he says,,.
"both drink and food, and for the laborer is the
best known. It supports the system, arid even
in fever will cool the stomach admiribly. Ift is'
also a most valuable domestic eminedy. It will :


1


&






-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Tropical Fruit Growers' Association of Monroe County,
Florida.-Home office, Myers, Florida; F. A. Hendry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson,
President; Thomas Tillis, First Vice-President; J. B.
Sutton, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary; J. M. Barco, Recording Secretary;
L. W. Hamlin, Assistant Recording Secretary.
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Association.-
John Bradford, President, Bradfordville, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida.
Pinellas, Florida, Fruit Growers' Association.-D. W.
Meeker, President; Wm. P. Neeld, Secretary.
Central Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida.-Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
Evergreen Horticultural Society Dunedin, Florida.-
J. W. Matchett, President; W. 'late, Vice-President;
Geo. L. Jones, Secretary.
Decatur County Fair Association, Bainbridge, Geor-
gia.-Maston O'Neil President; I. Kwilecki, Secretary.
Lake Wier Agricultural and Pomological Society (of
Marion County, Florida).-Captain J. L. Cainy, Presi-
dent; Dr. L. M. Ayer, Corresponding Secretary.


Outside the Bar.
Outside the Bar, amid the breaking surges,
By mighty winds capriciously misled;
Toy of the tempest god who madly urges
The ship toward yon reef that lies ahead;
Beset by Night, whose darkling clouds are driven
Across a sky that shows no friendly star.
With rudder broken, and with canvas riven,
How will she reach her goal within the Bar ?
Outside the Bar, like some great soul in sorrow,
The laboring bark bemoans the bitter hour;
And her brave crew, with longings for the morrow,
Toil through the night against the tempest's power.
Ah! can she conquer when each giant billow
Has roused itself man's handiwork to mar?
Their angry crests afford no restful pillow
To one who longs for peace within the Bar.
Outside the Bar, the storm-fiends, wildly mocking
At human weakness, rave in accents rude;
While in their ruthless grasp the ship is rocking
A prey to every demon's changeful mood.
The way to port is through those breakers standing
Like foeman-sentinels in time of war,
Their iron-clad and hostile forms commanding
The haven of her hopes within the Bar.
Outside the Bar the ocean voices thunder,
And Night bends over all her deathly frown;
Within the Bar some tender hearts do wonder
If ships will tind their refuge near the town.
Now, for the sake of those our spirits cherish,
Who toss upon tempestuous sees afar,
Pray that the bark beleaguered may not perish,
But anchor safely yet within the Bar.
-Chumbers's JTournal.
Agricultural, Horticultural and Pomological
Associations.
Florida Fruit-Growers' Association-Office at Jack-
sonville-D. Redmond, President; W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; W. H. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding Sec-
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee-Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, 0. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official organ-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA STATE GRANGE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICES.-Master, Wm. H. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Wm. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B. F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Field-
ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. H. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate
Keeper, Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Wm. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T. W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H.
Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Geo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Umstead, Hous-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville.-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J. C. Greeley, Treasurer.
Directors-J. H. McGinniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro, P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney. Annual meeting-
Last Friday in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; 0. E. Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. 0. Taylor, Secretary and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Florida.-President, A. B. Bartlett, Georgetown; Vice-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. Hawkins, Lake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George; George H. Thorn, Treasurer,
Georgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
m9nd, Fort Gates.
Picolata Agricultural and Horticultural Society.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, W. N. ParKer, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Corresponding Secretary,
N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., Recording Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer. Meets first Saturday in each month.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. Mathers, Second Vice-President; B.
W. Powell, Corresponding Secretary; B. F. Jordan, Sec-
retary and Treasurer.


BEESW AX- per lb............................................... 20
WOOL-Free from burs, per lb......................... 17@22
Burry, perlb............................................ 11@ 15
GOAT SKINS-Each per lb... ... ...................... 10
Meat market advancing.


LANDS FOR SALE
SUITABLE FOR

Orange Groves,
In lots to suit, in the town of


saotoma, PItnam *uCny, Floriqa,
Send for circular to

WHITNEY, GOLD & HODGES,


june 26-tf


Satsuma, Nashua P. 0.,
-FLORIDA.


Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Higgins, Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Association, Albany,
Georgia.-L. E. Welch, President; T. M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
Sumter County Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation.-D. L. Hubbard, President, Leesburg" W. C.
Dodd, Recording Secretary, Leesburg; A. P. hoberts,
Corresponding Secretary Leesburg.
Florida Central Agricultural Society.-Thos. F. King,
President Gainesville; Secretary,
- ; W. K. Cessna, Corresponding Secretary, Gaines-
ville.
Archer Agricultural Association.-W. B. Lipsey,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine, Secretary; Dr. J. C. Neal,
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President; John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewis, Treasurer, Tallahassee.
Indian River Agricultural and Pomological Society.-
A. P. Cleveland, President; W. H. Sharp, Secretary,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
Association.-R. J. Mays, President; Frank W. Pope,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
Orange. County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred. L. Robertson, Corresponding
Secretary.
Gadsden County Fair Association.-Jesse Wood Pres-
ident; W. H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R. Harris,
Second Vice-President; J. W. Kendricks, Secretary; E.
C. Lou, Treasurer.
South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion, Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
which we may have fallen in the naming of officers, &c.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH ?]___




Jacksonville Wholesale Prices.
Corrected weekly, by JONES & BO WEN, Wholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.
SUGARS-Granulated ........................................ 10%o
W hite Ex. C............ ....................... 10
Golden C............................................. 8%
Pow dered............................................. 11%
Cut Loaf ............................. 11
COFFEE, Rio-Fair............................................ .. 11
G ood ............................................. 11
Choice ......................................... 121
B est .............................................. 13
Java O. G ............................................ 25
M ocha ................................ .................. 35
P eaberry............................ .................. 18
M aracaibo............................................. 18
Any of above grades roasted to order
FLOUR-Snow Drop, best.................................. 9 00
Oreole, 2d best...................................... 8 00
Pearl, 3d best..................................... 7 75
M EATS-Bacon..................................................... 1312
Hams (Merwin & Sons)........................ 16
Shoulders........................................... .. 14
HoMINY-Pearl, per bbl.................... 5 40
M EAL-per bbl................. .............................. 5 40
LARD-Refined in pails...................................... 13Y2
BUTTER-Very best, kegs (on ice)............... 29
CHEESE-Full cream ...................................... 15
Half cream........................................ 12Y
TOBACCO-Shell Road.................................... 55
Florida Boys, 11 inch 5's.................. 36
Florida Girls, bright twist, 14 to lb.. 50
Smoking in packages, 8 to lb ........... 32
SOAP AND STARCH-Colgate's 8 oz., per box.. 3 50
Peerless, 8 oz., per box............................ 3 50
Starch, lump, per lb........................... 5@6c
HoPS, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS-
H ops, per Ib............................................... 15@22c
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz.......... 60c
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. 1 lb. 2 25
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. 1 lb ..... 2 70
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. lb ...... 1 50
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl., new.... .......................... 6 00
CHICKENS, each..................... ............................. 20@40
EGGS- Per doz..................................................... 15@ 18
HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lb., first class 13
Country Dry Salted, per lb..................... 9@11
Butcher Dry Salted, per lb....................... 9@10
Dam aged H ides..................................... 6
Kip and Calf, 8lbs. and under................ 10
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb.......................... 35
Deer Skins Salted, per lb..................... 26@30
FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter...................................................... 1 50@ 4 00
Raccoon, each........................................ 5@15
W ild Cat, each....................................... 10@20
Fox, each.............................................. 5@ 15


State that you saw this in THE DISPATCH.
July 3, tf



IHOM IN T UNNY SOUTH
--o----

SPLENDID OFFER TO SETTLERS


40 Hours from New York City: 108 Miles
from Savannah.


SolUtil c-eorgia Ljai ads for
Sale b0r

J. M. STICKER,
Glenmore, Ware Co., Ga.
June 19-tf


T HE






DAILY TIMES.








THE TIMES is the official paper of the city and the
leading paper of the State. It has the largest circulation
in Florida, and reaches all parts of it. It is not merely
a local newspaper, but aims to advocate the interests
and promote the prosperity of Fiorida as a whole.
Its reputation outside the State is very high. It has
taken rank among those journals whose columns are
looked to for news, and whose comments are quoted
with respect throughout the country.
Its editors have had wide and varied experience in
journalism North as well as South; its advertising pa-
tronage is liberal and of the best character; and its re-
sources, financial and other, are ample. It will furnish
Florida with a live, progressive, outspoken, and reada-
ble newspaper, the peer of any.


ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.
THE TIMIES has secured by special contract the full
despatches of the ASSOCIATED PRESS. Besides that
its Editor is Agent of the Associated Press for the State
of Florida, which gives him great advantages in obtain-
ing the freshest and most important State news.


SPECIAL DESPATCHES.
With representatives in the leading news centres of
the country THE TIMES is well served in addition to
the regular Press reports. During the past winter it has
received a very large number of telegraphic "specials."


CORRESPONDENCE.
Its regular correspondence from Washington, New
York and Boston is of noteworthy excellence; and its
State correspondence has attracted much attention.
This feature will be extended and improved; and to
this end correspondence containing news or items of
information of any kind is solicited from all quarters.


"OLD SI. "
In addition to his editorial work, Mr. Small will write
regularly for THE TIMES, and in its Sunday issues the
famous "Old Si" will disseminate wisdom in chunks
to the Florida public.

TERM (strictly in advance): One year, $10; Six
months, $5; three months, $2.50; one month, $1. sent
one month on trial for 50 cents.
Remittance should be made by draft-or post-office
order, or in a registered letter. Address
JONES & SMALL,
to sept 26,'82 Jacksonville, Fla.



Hickory Bluff, 46 acres, 18 acres Hammock, cleared and
enclosed with Picket fence. 200 thrifty young Orange
trees growing on the place. Bold bluff river front of over
a quarter of a mile, and steamer channel close in shore,
and over five miles of water protection to the northwest giv-
ing perfect security against frost. Nine miles below Jack-
sonville, and one mile from New Berlin. Can come to
city every morning on mail steamer and return in the
afternoon. A choice place for orange growing and truck
farming. Price, $2,500.
Also, two desirable city lots 53x209 feet, and one 70x156
feet covered with thrifty orange trees 6 years old, half
mile from business center. Good neighborhood (all
white). Price of first, $600each. Price ofsecond, a corner,
very handsome, $800. Apply to

J. HI. NORTON,
No. 1 West Bay Street, - JACKSONVILLE.


oft I









2e,: THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


George Washington and Mules.
Few of the farmers of this country are aware
what a debt of gratitude they owe George Wash-
ington for the introduction of mules in general
use for the purpose of the farm. Washington
became convinced that the introduction of mules
among Southern planters would be a blessing.
As soon as it became known that the illustrious
Washington desired to stock his Mount Vernon
estate with mules, the King of Spain sent him
a jack and two jennets from the royal stables.
The first was named Royal Gift. The other was
called the Knight of Malta. .He then bred his
brood mares to these jacks, and produced such
excellent mules that the country was agog to
breed some of the same sort, and it was not long
before they were common. This was the origin
of improved mules in the United States.-Nor-
folk Landmark.


Vegetable Quotations.
FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE,
315 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, July 12,18
Receipts of fruits and vegetables at this port week
ding 11th inst., via Florida Dispatch Line and Soutl
Express Company: 800 packages; watermelons, I
car-loads.
Tomatoes coming mostly in poor condition, sel
from $1f@2.50 for Floridas; $2@3 for South Georgia,
$2@3 for Norfolk.
Potatoes-Best Southern, $5@6, and $5@5.50 for L
Island.
Peaches coming in increased quantities, bringing $
for ordinary, and $2.25@,3.50 per crate for best.
Watermelons-Not coming in good condition, m
s mall and specked, selling from $25@35 per hundred.
Respectfully,
C. 1). OWENS,
General Agei




THE SUWANNEE



STEAM SAW & PLANING IMILI

ELILAVI ILE, FLORIDA,

DREW & BUCKI, Propriet
-o-0
-We respectfully announce to our friends and the p
lie generally, that, having secured the services of c
petent Draughtsmen, Architects and Mechanics, we
prepared to estimate on and contract for the building

DWELLINGS,
COTTAGES,
FACTORIES,
HOTELS
PUBLIC EDIFIC
etce, at any point accessible by the several railroad
steamboat lines. Possessing the advantage of manu
turning our own lumber, we are enabled to offer very
eral inducements as to terms and quality of material
Draughts, plans,estimates and information furnis
on application.
We have also made extensive additions to our P
ing Mill, and will continue, as heretofore, to manuf
ture and keep in stock a full line of Framing and Fir
ing Lumber, Mouldings, Brackets, Balusters, Pici
Laths, etc. DREW <4E BUCKI
July 17, '82-tf. Ellaville, Florid


82.1}
end-
iern
nine
ling
and
'ong
1@2
any

it.


FRANK W. MUMBY. JNO. N. C. STOCKTON. RAYMOND D. KNIGHT.

MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
-- SUCCESSORS TO
1879. I 1870.
F. W. MUMBY & CO. JNO. S. DRIGGS & CO.
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE AND RETAIL


Crockery, China, Glass and Earthenware.
We have the largest and most complete stock in the State. All the Latest Novelties in Majolica and Fancy
Goods, Vases, Motto Cups and Saucers, etc. Decorated Tea, Dinner and Chamber Sets in a large Variety. Lamps
and Chandeliers, Fancy Vase Lamps in Majolica Faience, Kito, Porcelain and other Wares. Wood and Willow,
Stone and Tinware. The American, Crown and Peerless Ice Cream Freezers, Water Coolers, Filters, etc.
SOLE STATE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED

Monitor Oil Stoves and Little Joker Oil Cans.
THE BEST IN THE WORLD. Send for Price Lists.
The best and only absolutely safe Oil Stove in the World. It is Economical, Ornamental, Convenient, Dura-
ble, Compact and Cheap.. Its fuel is Coal Oil: No Dust! No Ashes! No Smoke! No Trouble! Testimonials
from those using the Stoves given on application.
* Fruit Jars and Jelly Tumblers Wine Bottles, Flasks, etc. Special inducements to the trade.
Merchants, Hotels, Boarding houses and Bars will find it greatly to their advantage to give us a trial. Send
for list of assorted packages.
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD.
MUMBY, STOCKTON & KNIGHT,
to July 1, '83. (Mention this paper) 13 WEST BA Y STREET.


NEW CROP TURNIP SEEDS!
Warranted Strictly Fresh and Genuine. Purple Top Flat, White Flat, Red Top Globe, White Egg, Golden
Ball, free by mail, postpaid, 75c. per lb. White Globe, Large Cow Horn, Yellow Aberdeen, Amber, Globe, Im-
proved Purple Top Yellow Ruta Baga, White. Ruta Baga, &c., 70c. per lb., postpaid. Customers ordering by
freight or express can deduct 16c. per lb. from these prices. Catalogues Free.
Branching Sorghuwf Seed, 10c per pound, $3.00 per bushel. Address
JOHNSON & STOKES, Seedsmen, 1114; IVCarset St.Plblilad.elphia
to June 9, '83.

Ocean Steamship .Company.

SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.


The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, July 1st, 6:00 p. m. -
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, July 5th, 10:00 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, July 8th, 12:00 noon.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, July 12th, 4:30 p. m.
i| CITY OF MACON, Saturday, July 15th, 6:00 p. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS; Wednesday, July 19th, 9:00 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, July 22nd, 11:00 a. m.
GATE CITY, Wbdnesday, July 26th, 3:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, July 29th, 5:00 p. m.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
ors, H. YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agent of Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. Y.
-ub-


'om-
are
ig of






ES,
and
ifac-
lib-
Ll.
shed
'lan-
acu-
iish-
kets,

la..


LANDS FOR SALE
SUITABLE FOR

Orange Groves,
In lots to suit, in the town of

8atusma, Pumam Coun, Mlurif4,
Send for circular to
WHITNEY, GOLD & HODGES,
Satsuma, Nashua P. 0.,
june 26-tf FLORIDA.k


W, itl r'l" I rt a is a new town in Orange 1ISTE: ::o.,s
WINTER PARK County, Florida eiIhteen
with a frontage of two miles uon three beautifulLakes.round Bone,
WINTER HOMES in the midst of Orange Groves, for -o e
Northerners, is the main idea. For Pamphlets and
Maps giving particulars, address THE BEST AND CHEAPEST
CHAPMAN & CHASE, T mTTTI rnn
Winter Park, Orange Co., Fla. III
to july 17, '82FRLIUORAUNGE TREES.
Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
TURNIP TUR N I P S EE D PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.


True American Purple Top and White Flat Dutch,
White and Yellow Ruta Baga, and all approved varie-
ties of Swede Turnip Seed, 50 cents per pound; if sent by
mail, 16 cents added. Warranted fresh and genuine.
Especial prices quoted for large quantities.
A full assortment of Garden Seeds for the season.
Especial attention given to orders per mail.

0C. S. : xOGrE=:MS, SEEDSMAN,
133 MARKET STREET,
PHILADELPHIA.,
to August 3.

50,000

Lboanto Popr TI'P aoos M O 0i5is

FOR SALE AT
Duirie bTZuxrsery.
H. H. SANFORD Proprietor,
to Aug 21 THOMASVILLE, GA.


Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTER & BEAFN,
Agents for the State of Florida,


A*Analysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


to sept 26, '82


TALLAHASSEE NURSERY.
LeConte and Kleffer Pear Buds, $5 per hundred, by
mail. Also, trees of same for sale.
aW. H. EYASKSE& IL- ,
to July 1 24 Tallahassee, Florida.



BEST ITALIAN BEES, QUEENS Etc., at greatly
reduced prices. An average profit of $69.63 per colony,
net. A salary of $2,963,00. Also eggs for rearing cocoons
for American silk-a new and important industry.
Send at once.
CHAS.'R. MITCHELL
11, 13, 15, 17-p. Hawkinsvllle, Ga.






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 2


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE.




Rates on WATERMELONS in Car Loads of 20,000 Pounds.


TO T0A E2:E E37" E3 T 0V. Aa2" 20th., Iee2.


^TO tFr o m Jacksor
Io- QCallahan and
Oak.

Atlanta ........ ............ ...................................................... $ 60 00
A ugusta.................................................................................................................................. 55 00
B altim ore................................................................................................................................ 100 00
Boston ....................................................................................................................................100 00
B ristol, T enn ........................................................................................................... .............. 90 00
Charleston, S. C..................................................................................................................36 00
Columbus, Ga....................................... ........................................................................0 00
Chattanooga, Tenn........................................................... ............ .. ............... ...... 0 00
C in cin nati, 0 .................................................... ..................................................................... 80 00
Cairo, Ill..................................................................... .......0 00
Columbus, 0....................................................................................... ............ 1000
Cleaveland, 0....................................................................................................................100 00
Chicago, Ill.................................................................................................................... 110 00
Dalton, Ga............................................................................................. ........ .......... 70 00
Evansville, Ind........................................................................................... .............. ......... .... 80 00
Indianapolis, Ind............ ................................................................. ............90 00
Knoxville, Tenn................................................................................... ...................................84 50
L ouisville, K y ............................................................................. ...........................................80 00
M acon G a ............................................................................................................................... 45 00
Montgomery, Ala..................................... ............ ....................................................... 60 00
Mobile, Ala............................................................................ ............................... 70 00
Memphis, Tenn........ ...................................................................................................... o 00
Nashville, Tenn............................................................... ...............................o............... 75 00
New Orleans, La................................................................................................................5s 00
New York, N. Y.......................................................... ............................................ .............100 00
Peoria, IllP........................................................................................................................ ... 110 00
Philadelphia, Pa0......................000........................................................................................... 100 00
Rome, Ga ....................................................................................................................... 70 00
Savannah G a ........................................................................................................................ 22 00
S t. L ouis, M o.......................................................... ...................................................... .........90 00
T erre H au te, In d................ ..................................................................................................100 00


aville,
Live


From Florida Tran- .
sit Railroad, except Florida Transit Rail-
Ocala and Points be- road, 0 c al a and
yond. Points beyond.


$ 85 00
80 00
125 00
125 00
115 00
61 00
85 00
95 00
105 00
115 00
125 00
12500
135 00
9500
105 00
115 00
109 50
105 00
70 00
85 00
95 00
105 00
100 00
105 00
125 00
135 00
125 00
95 00
47 00
115 00
125 00


$ 9000
85 00O
130 00
130 00
120 00
66 00
90 00
10000
110 00
120 00
130 00
130 00
140 00
10000
11000
120 00
114 50
110 00
75 00
90 00
10000
11000
10500
110 00
130 00
140 00
130 00
100 00
52 00
12000
13000


Florida Central and
Western Railroad.


$ 80 00
75 00
119 00
119 00
110 00
56 00
80 00.
90 00
100 00
110 00
120 00
120 00
130 00
90 00
100 00
110 00
104 50
100 00
65 00
80 00
90 00
100 00
95 00
100 00
119 00
130 00
119 00
90 00
41 00
110 00
120 00


Excess of 20,000 pounds will be charged for pro rata, provided the weight loaded does not exceed the capacity of the car, as marked thereon. If cars are not
marked with the capacity thereof, the weight of load must not exceed 20,000 pounds. All excess of load above capacity of the cars will be charged for at double rates.
Melons must be loaded and unloaded by the owners. Shipments of Melons will be receipted for only as "Shipper's Count." This Line will not be responsible
for deficiency in quantity loaded in the cars, nor for damage resulting from improper loading. Shipments via Florida Dispatch Line will not be required guaranteed
or prepaid.


D. H. ELLIOTT, Gen'l Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.


JAS. L. TAYLOR, Gen'l Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE in connection with A TLAIW G WOOAST LINE
Rates on Watermelons in Car Loads of 20,000 in Cents per 100 lbs. To take effect May 20th, 1882.


To-



Baltimore....... .........
Boston........................................ ..................... ............
N ew Y orkt ...................................................................
Providence................ ............. ......................................
Philadelphia Va...................................................... ....... ....................... .......... ..
Petersburg, Va............................................................ ..................
R ichm ond, V a...................................................................... ........... ..........
W ilm ington, N C ................... ................................ ...............................................
Washington, D. C. (via Portsmouth)............................................................................
Shipments via "ATLANTIC COAST LINE" must be prepaid to destination
will be charged at double rates.


Florida Transit and
From Jacksonville Peninsula Railroad, Florida Transit Rail- Florida Central and
and Callahan. except Ocala and road, 0 c a 1 a and Western Railroad.
Points beyond. Points beyond.

Cts. Cts. Cts. Cts.
.. .76 .781Y .73
.68' .81 .831 .78
.68V2 .81 .8312 .78
.68Y2 .81 .83V .78
68Y .81 .83>' .78
.48 2 .61 .631 .58
.481 .61 .63 2.58
.48/ .61 .63V .58
.38 .51 .53 .48
.63Y2 .76 .78)~2 .73
)n. 20,000 lbs. will be the minimum rate charged for. All excess of capacity of cars


---


I


- -----~






e THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


ia.Daily Jacksonville to Charleston.
,Il)aily Jacksonville to Cincinnati.
Sleeping car from Jacksonville to Savannah (5:35 p.
m. trains) Tuesdays and Fridays.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
The morning train from JncKsonville to Savannah,
connects daily with through Pullman sleeper for New
York.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to Montgomery and New Orleans
take the evening train.
Passengers roim line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. m. and arriving at Savannah at 2:30 a. m., or train
at Jacksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vannah at 3:35 p. m.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, at Depot Ticket
Office. JAS. L. TAYLOR,
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*] Ticket Agent.


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
-o-
MERCHANTS & MINERS

TRANSPORTATION COMPANY!






The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail
From BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH
EVERY FIVE DAYS,
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE, as follows:
Monday, July 3d, at,9 a. m.
Saturday, July 8th, at I p. m.
Thursday, July 13th, at 5 p. m.
Tuesday, July 18th, at 9:30 p. m.
Monday, July 24th, at 1 p. m.
Saturday, July 29th, at 5 p. m.
Thursday August 3d, at 10 a. m.
Tuesday, August 8th, at 1 p. m.
Monday, August 14th, at 8 a. m.
Saturday, August 19th, at 10 a. in.
Thursday, August 24th, at 2 p. m.
Tuesday, August 29th, at 8 a. m.
The steamers are first-class In every respect, and every
attention will be given to passengers.
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $15,
Including Meals and Stateroom.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Baltimore.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
column.
JAS. B. WEST & CO., Agents.
Savannah, January 8th, 1878. 30-tf

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA




WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, JUNE 4th, 1882, Passen-
V ger Trains will run over the Waycross Short Line
as follows; Fast Mail. Jack'lle Ex.
Daily. Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at............... 9:00 a. m. 5:35 p. m.
Arrive Callahan at....... ........ 9:00 p. m. ...........
Leave Callahan at.................... 9:45 a. m. 6:45 p. m.
Arrive Waycross at.......................11:45 a. m. 9:15 p. m.
Arrive Jesup at.................................. 1:32 p. m. 11:25 p. m.
Arrive at Brunswick at................. 6:10 p.m. 8:20 a. inm.
Arrive Savannah at ............ 3:35 p. m. 2:30 a. min.
ArriveCharieston at.................. 9:30 p. m. 8:45 a. m.
Arrive at Augusta at..................... 5:20 a. m. 2:30 p. m.
A rrive M acon at.............................. .......... 7:00 a. m .
Arrive Atlanta at.......................... 3:40 a- in 12:50 p. m.
Arrive Louisville at................................ 8:00 a. m.
Arrive Cincinna ati at...................................... 7:00 a. m .
Arrive Washington at................ 9:4(e p.. 7:40 a. m.
Arrive Baltimore at.................11:4 p. m. 9:15 a. m.
Arrive New York (limited express).......... 3:50 p. m,
Arrive New York P. R. R............. 6:50 a. m. 5:20 p. m.
Arrive St. Louis at....................................... 7:00 p m .
Arrive Chicago at............................. ......... ...... 7:00 p. m ,
Fast mail arrives at Jacksonville daily at...... 6:10 p. m.
Jacksonville express arrives at Jacksonville
daily at......... ........................ 8:10 a. m.
TIME.
To Savannah................................................... 6:40 hours.
To New York........................... 45:45 hours.
To W ashington.............................................. 36:30 hours.
To Chicago................................................ 49:00 hours.
To St. Louis............................................... 49:00 hours
THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.


Johnson's Prepared lKalsomine. Wads-
worth, Mlartinez and Longman's
Pirepaied Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
to mar25,'83 JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

[4--347.]
MTotice for 7P1aLblicstior-.

LAND OFFICE AT GAINESVILLE, FLA., May 3, 1882.
OTICE is hereby given that the following named
settler has filed notice of his intention to make final
proof in support of his claim, and that said proof
will be made before T. E. Buckman, Clerk Circuit Court
at Jacksonville, Florida, on Saturday, June 24th, 1882,
viz.: Jacob Robinson, Duval County, homestead entry
No. 561, for the Nw i of Nw 4, section 6, township 3s,
range 27e.
He names the following witnesses to prove his con-
tinuous residence upon, and cultivation of,; said land,
viz.: Calvin Hughes, Samuel Anderson, Andrew Sess-
ions, Lee Clark, all of Jacksonville, Florida.
L. A. BARNES,
May 8 tf Register United States Land Office.


HUAU & CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF

FINE KEY WEST CIGARS
-AND-

WHOLES.ALE LEAF KE. ALE(RS.


Proprietors of Factories Nos. 29, r and 81, D'ctrict
of Florida,
.Jacksonville, Florida,
The Most Extensive Manufacturers in the State.
lyr to april 23, '83.

D. G. AMBLER. .T. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN &STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as

AMBLER'S BANK.
T RANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf


Sportman's Emporium.





W. C. PITTMAN,
No. 3 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0--
Guns, Pistols, Rifles and Cutlery,
Sliooting and Fishing iL'aeckle.

SHELLS LOADED TO ORDER.
1 yr to April 23, '83



DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,
GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, C00PPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emnery Papers, &e.
AGENT FOR

PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FTIRE TEST.


WALTER B. CLARKSON,
Box 877. Jacksonville, Florida.
In corresponding, please mention this paper.
to August 29, '82.

RICH'D H. MARKS'


ORAN GE COUNTY LAND AGENCY,
SANFORD, FLORIDA,
Agent in Orange County for

FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMPLY.

BUYS AND SELLS

Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission,
ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
june 12-tf


A FEW CHOICE LOTS OF FIFTEEN OR MORE
acres, river fronts, affording attractive and lovely
building sites, and admirably suited to the growth of
oranges, figs and other Florida fruits, may still be ob-
tained on reasonable terms.
"HOLLYWOOD" is south of "Point La Vista," on
the eastern shore of the St. Johns River, four miles from
Jacksonville. For circulars, maps, terms, etc., address
D. REDMOND,
apr 3-tf Box 257, Jacksonville, Fla.
W. II. PITLOW' 9

STRAWBIEY 9 #H1. A PINC{Y
-AXD--
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE
REPACKING AND
COMMISSION HOUSE,
Has closed till NOVEMBER. Present address,
may 12, '83. 1AC N01, GA.

ST.MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0-
CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.


OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
1 yr to April 23, '83

VIEWS OF FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In Book Form, Containing 12
Views Each.
Souvenir of Florida, (small size)......... .........25c.
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size)...... ...............................................25c.
Souvenir of Jacksonville,( large size)........ ........ 50c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine,(large size)............. 50c.
Stereoscopic Views, per Doz. $1.50.
Address

ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
S.TACISONVILL E, FBLA.


A Good Investment!
-o0


In the County of Hernando, East of Brooksville, the
county seat, and near the
ropioal F' lozrildJ ". 'A-,
which is now actively building, two tracts of land. The
first contains two hundred and forty (240)acres in a body;
the second contains eighty (80) acres. These tracts both
touch Upon a Lake of about 150 acres area; are
well timbered with pine suitable for lumber; the second
about half mile southeast of the first; between them
lies a cultivated farm. These lands are well adapted to
Oranges and Other i,'ruits, being of good
soil, with little underbrush, and are easily cleared. They
were selected by Hon. WValter Gwynn, Ex-
Treasurer of the State of Florida, and they may be relied
upon as being what is represented. These lands are in a
part of the State that is rapidly settling up
and offer a good field either or an investment in Flor-
ida real estate, or for orange groves and the like.
Price and terms will be so arranged as to be satisfac-
tory to the purchaser. Apply to .


I ,






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH


F. S. CONE, A. H. MANVILLE, E. A. MANVILLE,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer

Lake George, Florida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums
Peaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, and over one hundred varieties of the Citrus.
ORAl]NGE AN lD LIE1VMON 'I' TREES a specialty.
Catalogue free. to apr 17, '83

ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]
J. A. IBARNES & O.,

FRUIT AND PRODUCE


COMMISSION


MERCHANTS.


Solthtitern. MFru.it arncd vegetablesls a Specialty.
3 6O and 328 North Delaware Avenue, Philadelphia.
to jan 6, '83




WHOLESALE GROCERS,

AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


DRY HOP


YEAST CAKES,


60c. PER


DOZ.


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND

SNOW-DROP PATENT FLOUR.

First Ia=ncls o: Firest Q'aality

Best Butter in Tubs at 30 to 3x Cents per Pound,

M: E 0E 10a1


No. 7 West Bay Street,
To sept 27, '82


- Jacksonville, Florida.


Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide.

H. D. BOUNETHEAU, PROPRIETOR


NOR DYKE

MILLS
-MANUFACTURE-

Freshlrourtd
FEED, GRITS,
MEAL,
(Bolted or unbolted.)
Pearl Hominy.
GRAIN, HAY, COAL AND
WOOD-YARD.


FLORIDA CHEMICAL OIL AND SOAP WORKS,
MANUFACTURER OF
Lubricating and Boiler Compounds, Compressed Soaps, Car and
Axle grease.
ALSO SOLE MANUFACTURER
of the best Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide extant-
O R.AZ2?TG-E Txm M -E73VI^T.3LSIOT!
made from Whale-Oil Soap, combined with other powerful ingredients known
to be most effectual for destroying the Scale and other insect pests and
parasites of the Citrus family. It will also put the tree in a healthy and flour-
ishing condition. Prepared for immediate use. Perfectly harmless to the
youngest tree or plant. In packages of from 25 to 300 pounds. Price, 10 cents
per pound. Discount to the Trade. Wir Full directions for use accompany
each package. Address
II. BOUJNETHEAU.


P. O. BOX 984, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


to july 31 '82


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
-0-
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT' EVERY SATURDAY.
-0
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's &hips to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers for July are appointed to sail as follows:
JUNIATA, July 1st, at 6:00 p. inm.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, July 8th, at 12:00 noon.
JUNIATA, July 15th, at 5:00 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, July 22d, at 11:00 a. m.
JUNIATA, July 29th, at 5:00 p. m.
Days and hotrs Subject to change, without notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, :WM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.


Boston an Savanna l Btomslhip Linue





ONLY DIRECT LINE BETWEEN
SAVANNAH AND BOSTON.
Transhipment and extra handling saved. No danger
of fruit being frozen. Cars are unloaded at the steam-
ship wharf in Savannah, avoiding drayage.
CABIN PASSAGE, $18.
SAILING FRO.f SAVANNAH.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, July 6th, at 11:00 a. m.
Seminole, Thursday, July 13th, at&4p. m.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, July 20th, at 10:30 a. min.
Seminole, Thursday, July 27th, at 4 p. m.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
44-tf Savannah, Ga.

DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
The largest 8tock in the State: Countrmy'
buyers will consult their own interests
by corresponding with me. All orders
promptly filled at prices to competee with
any house south of Baltimore. Remem-
ber my only Florida address.
GEO. HUGHES,
to june 26, '82 Cor. Bay and Ocean, Jacksonville, Fla.

PIANOS AND ORGANS
A M. B C -OSMI.=3E 3i3,L, -
15 East Bay ,Tacksonville.
SOLD ON INSTALLMENTS, AT LOWEST PRICES-
branch of Ludden & Bates, Savannah-EXACTLY
SAME PRICES AND TERMS, Sheet S Igsic, Strings
and small instruments Of all kids. Send (or cata-
logues, prices and terms. TUNING AND REPAIRING
a specialty. My tuner will make regular tourt through
the State, and my customers will thus have my repre-
sentative at their doors, a great advantage to purchasers
of instruments, to sept 26, '82

M. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the
of the Marshall House. Screven House.
THLE HARNETT HOUSE,
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARNETT & GEORGE, Proprketors.
RATEiS, $2 PER DAY.
This favorite family Hotel, under its new manage-
ment, is recommended for the excellence Qf-Uteuisiue.
homelike comforts, prompt attention ando moderate
rates. to sept 4,82

O. L. KEENE,
MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,

Laces, Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF

HWx? GLOVES


67 West.
JACKSONVILLE,
to feb 20, '82


Bay Street, Corner Laura,
FLORIDA.


SEND $1.4'50 TO


35 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.,
And get a bottle, of Richmond's Samaritan NertVie.
Cures Nervous Disorders, Dizziness, Vertigo, semrtal
Weakness. The only sure cure for Epileptic Fits.
Address HOLT'S PHARMACY.
to aug 20, '82


RUBBER


STAMPS


Are manufactured right in our establishment in the
best manner and at the shortest notice.
4AiSend in your orders.
ASM MEAD BRROV.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
May 1-tf


ACER'S









68 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


A. N. DOBBINS & BRO.,


PT.TE 'IE a-O:ND BOTEY, $38.50 per Ton.,
(Guaranteed Pure.)

COTTON SEED E.A..ZMA, $38 per Ton.,
(100 Pound Bags.)

COTTON SEED *-EL..L .A.S3, $27 per Ton,
(The Best Potash in Use.)


.GnR, Locksmits11 aRi tncll EuItfc s,
24 LAURA STREET,
JACKSONVILLE - FIOUI1)>A,
Gunsmithing done in all its branches.
IRON SAFE WORK.
Special rates on Stencil Cutting, by mail. Address,
to June 12'83, (P. 0. Box 833.)


S. B. HUBBARD & CO.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in

lh waro, ,Sove Doors, gas, Blidls
Paints, Oils, Pumps, Lead and Iron Pipe.
Sugar Mills, Rubber and Leather Belting,
Steam # Gas-Fitting, Plumbing 4 Tinsmithing,
Agricultural Implements of all Kinds,
HAZARD'S POWDER,
BARBED FENCE WIRE.
Agents for S. L. Allen & Co.'s Garden Tools.
iW- Send for Price List and Catalogue, W&
to June 11 '83


100 BEARI I ORA1NGQE TREES,
Surrounding a handsome residence in Jacksonyille,
halt-mile from the centre of business on Bay Street.
House has seven rooms neatly finished in natural
wood, with kitchen and servants' rooms, store room,
and plenty of closets. Good stable and carriage house,
PURE WATER,
Good neighborhood-(ALL WHITE.) Lot is 210x157 feet,
has
100 Orangie Trees,


12 to l6 years old, large and thrifty. Also, BUIY THE BlESiT A1WD CHEAP PE T


Grapes,
S Pecans,
Etc.
Splendid chance for any one desiring a lovely home in
Florida, and a bearing grove.
For price and terms, apply to
J. H. NORTON,
Jacksonville, Florida.
State that you saw this advertisement in THE FLORIDA
DISPATCH. June 12, '82-tf


AT MANDARIN, FLORIDA.
20 FORTY-ACRE TRACTS only 12 miles from Jack-
sonville- extra good land, well located, between river
and J., St. A. and H. R. R. R. Price, $10 per acre. Will
sell on monthly payments of $12.50. These lands will In-
crease in value, being located in an already prosperous
town, making a paying investment at small outlay.
Maps can be seen at No. 41 East Bay Street.
to nov 21, '82. GEO. R. REYNOLDS.
Jacksonville, Fla.

HEADQUARTERS LeCONTE PEAR.

0,OOO

LeIONTE PEARTREES FOR SAbE,

Grown on their own roots, at the oldest and most
reliable LeConte Pear Nursery in the world. Prices low,
and stock pure as usual. Fair and honest dealing
has alwaysbeen our motto.
Being the originator of the LeConte Pear business,
and having grown and sold more trees than any one,
we flatter ourselves, we can, as heretofore, give perfect
satisfaction.
L. L. VARNEDOE & SONS,
THOMASVILLE, GEORGIA.


to July 31,


--0--

GOULD & CO.'S


F E R T IL I Z E R
-AND-
INTSECT E0r STERMIINTA.TO ,
Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange Growers and Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, con-
tains potash, lime, phosphoric acid, ammonia and the other essential elements Plant Food, making a com
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & Bro.'s, and other high-priced Fertilizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity, and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $4 per barrel, $32 per
ton.
All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.
MESSRS. GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-I used one-half ton of your Fertilizer, in connection with the same amount of Baker & Bro.'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gave as good results as the others, which are much higher priced fertilizers--costing
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $51.50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12, 1881.
LEESBURG, SUMTER Co., FLA., March 6,1882.
GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed your
agents at this point (Messrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer,
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its fostering care, I having had the honor
to win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer better and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer kills two birds with one stone," inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies
at one and the same time. I bave been testing it in the field, garden and orange grove for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For my part, I ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. if I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork.
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOURT.
GOULD & CO.,
to aug 27, '82 NO. 6 W. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


20 B ushels Coonclb ?ea1 s for Seale.
STOCKBRIDGE FERTILIZERS for Orange Trees and vegetables, for sale by
J. E. IHARTP
to jan 6, '83 Jacksonville, Fia.


ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,

PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS

PRINTERS AND BINDERS,
AND DEALERS IN

TOYS AND FANCY ARTICLES.

NEWSDEALERS.-We keep all the latest Daily and Weekly Papers from Boston, New York, Philadelphia
Baltimore, Chicago, St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, New Orleans, Charleston, Savannah and Jacksonville, and
take subscriptions to all publications at publication price. Orders by mail promptly attended to.
LITO 0QS ON FLORIDA.
FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, VALID AD SETTLERS (Barbour, Pro usely Illustrated)...............Price $1 50
FLORIDA : ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE AND HISTORY (Lanier)...............Price 1 50
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paper..................................................................................................Price 10
FAIRBANKS' HISTORY OF FLORIDA...........................................................................................................Price 250
GU IDE TO JA CK SON V ILLE ...............................................................................................................................Price 25
TOURISTS AND INVALIDS REFERENCE BOOK OF WINTER TRAVEL..............................................Price 75
SOUTH FLORIDA THE ITALY OF AMERICA..................................................................................Price 25
DAVIS' ORANGE bULTURE (new edition)enlarged and improved.......................................................Price 50
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edition, enlarged and improved)......................................................Price 1 00
ORANGE INSECTS-Illustrated (Ashmead, ......................................................Price 1 00
ORANGE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA, by A. T. Garey, (cloth)....... .... .....Price 1 25
A MANUAL OF GARDENING IN FLORIDA (Whitner). ..........................................................Price 50
COLTON 'S M A P OF FLORIDA ...........................................................................................................................Price 75
COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-the best).......................................................................................Price 1 25
NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF ST. JOHN'S RIVER................................................................................Price 25
McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST OF LAWS OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep, postage extra).....................Price 6 00
INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA................................................Price 3 00
Any of the above books mailed on receipt of price.
O R A N G E W R A P S ........................................................................................ 10x10, 14c.; lxll, 17c.; 12x12, 20c.
LAW BLANKS.
W ARRAN TY DEEDS, per dozen.........................................................................................................................Price 50
QUIT-CLA IM DEEDS, per dozen..........................................................................................................................Price 50
M OR TGA G ES, per dozen.......................................................................................Price 50..............................................Price 50
NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, made to order.......................................... ................................................... Price $5 00
We publish a full line of Law Blanks for Lawyers and Justices of the Peace. Price-list mailed on application.
Special prices to large buyers. Adddress
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
feb 12-tf 21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


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