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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00015
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: July 3, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00015
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

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Bhutridi. p~ fle AMtig tdtural, Mtunufactnrinf and tndustrial fTtertsts of FloEida and the Soulth,


Vol. 1.--No. 15.


New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.


Price 5 cents.


Monday, July 3, 1882.


Asphaltum Walks.
Different modes and mixtures have been used
for walks, consisting chiefly of gas tar, common
pitch and coal ashes, variously applied. Some
fifteen years ago, the following was given in an
English horticultural journal, which answers
well: Three parts coal ashes and two parts of
powdered gas lime from gas-works, thoroughly
worked together and then made into a mortar
with gas tar. This may be laid on with a
shovel, about two or three inches thick, and
patted down flat. Another mode, successfully
used in this country, is to use three parts of gas
tar and one of common pitch, melted together
and boiled half an hour, and then mix with
sand as for common mortar ; this laid on with
a shovel, as already described. A writer in the
Country Gentleman, described last year a mode
which he had successfully employed for a num-
ber of years, and which he thought much better
than using sand as a part of the mixture. He
takes coal ashes as it comes from furnaces, which
is better burned than in common stoves, and re-
moves only the larger lumps of slag. He makes
this into mortar in warm weather by working
with tar which has not been heated, and spreads
it evenly, three inches thick, on a smooth, hard
surface with a rake, drawing the corner parts
to the bottom. It is then rolled with a heavy
iron roller, heated almost to redness. This an-
swers well for walls and driveways, but a bet-
ter finish may be given by mixing sifted coal
ashes with tar as already described, spreading
half an inch on the previously-made surface,
and rolling as before. A fourth of an inch of
fine sifted gravel may be added as a final finish.
The second coat may be put on at any time, or
even years after the first, by applying a little
tar to the clean surface before adding the new
coat. It is better if mixed a few days before
using. Some roadways, made this way over eight
years ago, and over which heavy loads are now
passing, remain in good condition. It may be
well to add that a firm bottom, or foundation,
is important. On soft soil, small or broken
stones may be covered evenly with gravel be-
fore the mortar is applied.
If there is not a good natural draiimge, and


much water, a pipe-tile may be placed at the
bottom of the broken stones, taking care that
there is a good escape for the water at the low-
est points. The small or broken stones will,
however, afford sufficient drainage in nearly
every case. If an iron roller cannot be pro-
cured, the surface of the soft mortar may be
made even and smooth by placing upon it pieces
of hard planks and pounding on them with a
small sledge. The prices of the materials vary
much with localities and supply.- Country
Gentleman.
Synonyms of Fruits.
The Pear furnishes the longest lists of syno-
nyms of any kind of fruit. The reason of this is
its adaptability to different countries and cli-
mates. As a natural consequence, all those
pears which have many synonyms are Euro-
peans. The White Doyenne and Pound have
each over 30 names; Passe Colmar and Brown
Beurre, over 25 ; Glout Morceau, Flemish
Beauty, Beurre Diel, Catillac, Vicar of Wink-
field and Summer Bonchretien, over 20. These
names have been picked up in different coun-
tries and nations ii which they have been cul-
tivated. But our native sorts have not trav-
eled sufficiently around the circle, and the failed
Seckel has had but four or five different names,
Clapp's Favorite only one, Tyson but one, Law-
rence but one, Fulton but one, and Sheldon but
three or four. These facts furnish an item in
the history of fruits. Fifty years and more ago,
there was little pomological literature, and local
names were largely adopted. Now, new fruits
of merit are named, described, and widely pub-
lished in books and periodicals, and but one
name for each is necessary.- Country Gentle-
man.
A Great Southern Industry.
Sheep-raising and wool-growing would be
highly remunerative in Tennessee, Kentucky,
Alabama, and other parts of the South; and
this would be one of the easiest industries for
the people to engage in who' have not much
capital. But the South, in common with large
portions of New England, is devoted to another
industry, which is always incompatible with


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.

sheep-raising and wool-producing. This is the
rearing of dogs. They are so numerous, ahd are
increasing so rapidly; they occupy a place of
such prominence in general life in the South,
and so dominate public sentiment and influence
public morality, that one is constantly inclined
to the conviction that their rearing and care
must be among the most important and valu-
able pursuits of the people. I was told that
there is a dog-tax in some of the States, but
that when the assessor of taxes goes the rounds
scarcely anybody can be found who will confess
to owning a dog. A vigorous effort was made
in the Legislature of one of the chief Southern
States, a few years ago, to enact a law to limit
or discourage the rearing of dogs, and to stim-
ulate the production of sheep and wool. But a
colored member of the Legislature made an
eloquent and enthusiastic defence of dog-rear-
ing, and talked sentiment, and quoted what the
poets had written in praise of dogs (some white
wags having assisted him in preparing his
speech), until one would have thought that the
highest interests of civilization depended upon
having as many dogs in the country as possi-
ble. The obnoxious bill was voted down by a
large majority, and the imperiled industry was
rescued-Atlantic Monthly.

CRAWFISH SPOILING DAMS.-I went to con-
siderable expense and trouble last fall to con-
struct a carp pond, and after filling it found
that crawfish had "honey-combed" the banks to
such an extent that although I.had a very con-
siderable stream of water running in, it was not
sufficient to overcome the drainage caused by
them. My pond is about one acre in extent,
from three to six feet deep, averaging about
four feet, with artificial banks about 20 feet
wide at the base and 10 feet on top. The bot-
tom is mud, with considerable gravel. I should
like to hear from some of the numerous corres-
pondents of your paper, as to remedies for this
evilas it will be an advantage, not ohly to me,
but to others of your subscribers who may wish
to construct ponds to raise this beautiful and
useful fish.--0. B., in Country Gentleman.


G~ ~e3~: ..~k~*






22I THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


JUTE CULTURE.

An Interesting Letter-The Experience of
Columbus H. Allen, Esq., President of
the Land Reclamation Company.
A reporter of the Times-Democrat learning
that Columbus H. Allen, Esq., President of the
Louisiana Land Reclamation Company, was
prepared to furnish some valuable and inter-
esting information relative to jute cultivation,
yesterday called upon him at his office on Tchou-
pitoulas street.
On the reporter stating the object of his visit
Mr. Allen produced a letter, which he said cov-
ered some interesting points on the cultivation.
of jute, and which had been but just received.
The letter read as follows :
No. 3 WATERLOO ST., CALCUTTA,
April 18th, 1882. J
Columbus H. Allen, Esq., President Louisiana
Land Reclamation Company, New Orleans:
DEAR SIR-Since writing you on March 21st,
I have been so busily occupied that I have
found it difficult to comply with my promise to
write you, more particularly on the subject of
jute, and now I fear this letter may reach you
rather late in the season. I do not know when
your rains prevail, whether you have spring
rains or summer rains, but I know by experi-
ence that you have rains in March. If you
hvae rains in April, May or June, one or all,
jute might be planted in either or all these
months. The April planting coming off about
July 1st, May planting say about August 1st,
and the June planting about September 1st.
The land should not b.e sandy, but a mixture of
sand and loam, or clay, is better than all clay.
Almost any of the lands of the Delta, which
are not submerged, your sugar lands, for in-
stance, should grow jute, and your reclaimed
lands are especially good for jute growing.
Plowing should be done as early as possible
to serate the lands, and before the seed is sown
the land should be plowed twice again, harrowed
before planting and the seed bushed or lightly
harrowed in. Planting should be done as soon
after a shower as the state of the land will per-
mit, the moisture causing the seed the more
easily to germinate.
WEEDING.
When the plant is a foot high the ground
should be carefully weeded, and if the plants
stand too 'thickly the poorest of the plants
should be plucked out.
Overcrowding in a field is known to check
the full development of the jute plants, and for
this reason the crop is thinned whenever it be-
comes too thick by the removal of the more
backward plants. Ordinarily the space left
between the plants is six inches, and the thin-
ning is carried to that extent, but in some
places the plant is left wider apart.
The season for the jute harvest necessarily


depends on the time when the seed has. been
sown. In some places in this country jute is
harvested at the end of June, and in others as
late as the end of October.
TIME TO CUT.
The best time for cutting the plant is when
it is in flower and just before the appearance of
pods. The fibre of the plant then cut is of su-
perior quality, while that cut too early before
flowering is weak, and that from plants cut
when the seed is harsh and wanting in gloss.
Tie in bundles when cut, and steep in clear,
still water, or water only moderately in motion,
just sufficiently in motion to keep the pool from
getting stagnant. If the steep be stagnant, the
color of the fibre will be dark, and wanting in
gloss. Be careful there is no sand in solution
in the water, if the current be quick or rapid.


While steeping, the bundles should be sunk be-
low the surface of the water by loads of timber
or articles of weight.
TIME DEVOTED TO SETTING.
The duration of steeping is obviously regu-
lated partly by the nature of the water used ;
that is, whether the water is of a stagnant pool
or of a running stream, and partly by the con-
dition of the plant at the reaping time-that is,
whether it was in flower when.the bark would
be tender, or whether it was in seed when the
bark would be hard. Care must be taken to
steep sufficiently, as understeeping leaves run-
ners and pieces of bark adhering to the fibre.
Excessive rain does not spoil jute if it does
not produce a flood, large enough to entirely
submerge the crop and does not last so long as
to cause moss.
Drouth stunts and dwarfs the plant.
Rotation of crop should be resorted to unless
the land be manured. Jute exhausts the lands
so far as jute is concerned; but it does not ap-
pear to interfere with sugar-cane or rice.
We say here, when the sun shines an hour and
the rain falls the next, and the weather is
hot and sultry, the jute crop is sure to be a large
one, for such weather is exactly what suits it
best, and one week of rain and shine is worth
more to the crop than two weeks of clear sun or
clear rain.
With many apologies for the meagre infor-
mation herein contained, I am, dear sir,
Yours faithfully,
R. MACALLISTER.
When the reporter had concluded the peru-
sal of the letter, Mr. Allen said : When Mr.
Macallister was here he told me that the sur-
roundings of New Orleans were very similar to
those of Calcutta, and that certain of the lands
of this State were peculiarly adapted to the
cultivation of jute. In a letter which he wrote
me, he declared that we could raise better jute,
and raise more to the acre, than they do in
India.
We have tried the cultivation of jute on un-
reclaimed lands, and succeeded splendidly with
it both on the low wet land, and on the higher
and better-drained. We found that once well
rooted and high it would grow right through
water and could he raised alongside of rice. We
intend putting in a large crop, and would have
had one in now had it not been for the over-
flow. The water came over our levees and sub-
merged our lands and of course we could do
nothing with them.
I am satisfied that if there is anything, there
is but one to interfere with the successful culti-
vation of jute in this State; and that one thing
is the want of a decorticating machine ; but I
understand there are several men in this city
who each claim to have invented such a ma-
chine as we will need.
I returned from St. Louis only this morning,
and while min that city I visited the Southern
bag factory, and found about 300 persons em-


played there turning out covering for our cot-
ton crop. It made me feel peculiar to think
that although we could supply all the jute
that factory needed we did not give it one
pound.
"When," said Mr. Allen, in conclusion, "it is
remembered that Ihe jute butts are brought
from Calcutta to New York, where it pays $10
a ton duty, and from that city to St. Louis,
often coming through New Orleans to get to
St. Louis, it will be seen what a profitable crop
the fibrous plant would be."-N. 0. Times-
Demo-crat.

The Good Effects of Cultivation.
It is a question worth considering how much
hoeing and cultivating, or rather how little,
would be given to crops were it not for the
presence of weeds. The farmer is apt to say,


"The corn or the potato field is getting very
weedy and must be cultivated," but one rarely
says, "The soil must be stirred," and this simply
for the benefit which results from it. But this
stirring of the soil is far more necessary for the
benefit of the crop directly than for its ad-
vantage through the removal of the weeds.
Every farmer should thoroughly. understand
his soil, for it is the instrument with which he
works. It is his raw material, from which
he draws the most subtle and delicate elements,
that are finally elaborated into products from
which he reaps his profits. And it depends
wholly upon the manner in which he manipu-
lates this raw material how effective and profit-
able to him may be the results of his sum-
mer's labor. The farmer is, in fact, a chemist,
and deals with the soil as the chemist in his
laboratory. He can in a measure analyze the
soil, for he can draw from it by his processes,
which are truly anylitical, certain substances
in the form of products, just as the chemist in
his laboratory can draw from it the nitrogen,
phosphoric acid, and potash by his solvents.
The agents which the farmer uses are solvents
too, for the plants grown by him take nothing
at all from the soil that has not been dissolved
previously and presented to their roots in a con-
dition of solution. In short, the whole prac-
tice and results of agriculture are a chemical
process, and if the farmer does not understand
how his soil is constituted, and how it behaves
under varying circumstances, how can he pos-
sibly manage it with discretion and success ?
He cannot. He may approach more or less
closely to a successful issue in his dealings with
it, but his work is a matter of chance, depend-
ing on mere accident, and not upon any cer-
tainty.
Now, when a chemist undertakes to decom-
pose a portion of any soil he first reduces it to
the finest possible state of division, and in this
condition he exposes it to the action of the sol-
vent substances which he uses to reach his ends.
He not only does this at the first, but he con-
tinues it until the end. He stirs and agitates
the soil so that each particle is exposed to the
action of his chemical agents. So must the
farmer do. He plows, harrows, and pulverizes
the soil and he sows his seed. Immediately the
seed has germinated and a tiny rootlet proceeds
from it, the chemical action must begin, for
that rootlet is seeking food. Then the farmer
must take pains to keep the soil finely pnlver-
ized, so that this chemical action may not be
interfered with, but may be furthered and has-
tened as much as possible. If the farmer who
has sown his seed neglects to break up the hard
crust which forms after the first shower upon it,


he prevents this action from taking place as
much as the chemist would if he inclosed his
sample of soil in a tightly corked bottle, and of
course the sustenance of the growing plants is
correspondingly arrested. For when the soil is
run together in the form of mud, and is then
dried, it becomes more closely packed together
than if it were powerfully compressed, and is
made as nearly impervious to air as soil can be,
and completely impervious to water. And
when a shower falls npon a surface so crusted
and solidified it pours off and settles in low
spots or runs off altogether, washing the surface
of the higher parts and carrying off to lower
spots the most valuable portions of the soil.
Water alone is not a sufficient solvent of the
soil, but yet water exerts a beneficial effect in
proportion to its quantity up to a certain point,
and beyond which it would be in excess and
injurious. Water requires to be acidulated by
carbonic acid and mixed with a certain portion


I I I I :





' THE P LOlIbAb ISPA Ch.


of atmospheric air before it can fully exert its
necessary solvent power upon the soil. It de-
rives its carbonic acid from the air, in which
this gas is mingled to the extent of about four
parts in 2,500 of air. Water has the power of
dissolving this gas and holding it in solution,
and its agreeable flavor when drank is due in a
large measure to the presence of this acid. So
that not only must the soil be made completely
permeable by water, but it must also be render-
ed sufficiently permeable by air before the water
can either exert its power of dissolving the ele-
ments of fertility from the soil or supply the
crops with sufficient moisture for their growth.
And this condition can only be conferred upon
it by repeated thorough pulverization through
continuous cultivation, or at least such frequent
stirring as to keep it sufficiently open and porus,
and this must be done irrespective of weeds,
and although the soil may be perfectly free
from them. But the water of the soil is sup-
plied only in part by the rain-fall; a large
portion of it is deposited in the form of dew.
It must not be supposed that dew is deposited
only upon vegetation, for it is absorbed by the
soil very freely, and all the more freely as the
soil is more open to its circulation through it.
And the air circulates very freely through the
soil when it is porous. Changes of temperature,
it is well known, cause very active currents in
the atmosphere. Not only the gentle summer's
zephyrs, but the thunder gusts and the tornado,
are caused by variations of temperature. So in
the soil ; every change of temperature causes
a disturbance of the atmosphere held within
its interstices. When the sun's heat warms the
soil during the day the air in it expands consid-
erably, and much more so than it does above
the soil, because the latter absorbs heat very
freely, while air only takes heat by radiation
and absorbs it slowly. Then the soil loses its
air to a considerable extent during the day, and
this movement of the air is all the more active
as the soil is more porus and loose upon the
surface. This escaping warm air must come
from below, and as it comes to the surface it
brings up a portion of moisture from the sub-
soil, because the warmer the air the more water
it can hold in solution. This increased moisture
then exerts a double effect. Upon the one
hand it supplies the roots with an increased
quantity, and as a warm moisture is more ac-
tively solvent than cold moisture, it has a more
powerful effect upon the soil in preparing plant
food for the sustenance of the crops.
When the soil is cooled by the radiation of
heat into the atmosphere during the night, the
air contained in it rapidly contracts, and afresh
supply is drawn from the then warmer air
above it, which quickly deposits its excess of
moisture within it as well as upon it, and this
moisture penetrates as far as the air penetrates.
But not only so, for as the soil absorbs more
moisture from the air, the drier air will absorb
more moisture from the adjacent air, and so a
very considerable circulation of watery vapor
goes on concurrently with the circulation of air.


This effect is all the greater the more open and
porous the soil has been made, and cannot go on
at all if the surface is encrusted or beaten hard
by rain and wind. But it is unnecessary to
pursue this point further. Every intelligent
farmer can do that for himself, and from his
own knowledge, as soon as he sees how the ac-
tion and reaction occur continually.
Another point is equally important. This is
the process of nitrification which is going on
continually in the soil during the summer when
heat and moisture are present. This cannot go
on without the presence of air in the soil. We
cannot as yet tell precisely how this process is
accomplished. It is known that the active agent
is an organic germ which produces fermentation.
We know that these germs dispose of a consid-
erable quantity of oxygen, and produce various



acids during their growth and increase. We
know that air contains about 79 per cent. of
nitrogen, and that when the 21 per cent. of oxy-
gen has been removed from a certain quantity
of air about four times as much nitrogen has
been set free. What, then, becomes of this ni-
trogen ? It is very reasonable to suppose that
it is retained in the soil until it forms compounds,
such as nitric acid or ammonia or other com-
pounds in which these are united with other
substances and form nitrates or salts of ammonia,
and that the process of nitrification known to
be going on actively during the growing season
may be started and supported in this or some
analogous manner. Perhaps we may soon be
able to verify this supposition, or we may not,
but the fact is known, although the reason for
it may not be known. But this we know with
the greatest certainty, viz., that this process
goes on only in loose, mellow soil and not in
compact, solid earth. So that the business of
the farmer is simply to provide the necessary.
conditions and Jet nature, in its benificent way,
operate to its fullest extent, without any hin-
drance upon his part.
One more point may be briefly noted ; this is
the manner of cultivation. While the soil is
kept open and mellow by frequent cultivation,
this work is to be done in such a manner as to
facilitate the natural results from it. The mois-
ture of the soil is to'be preserved as much as
possible. This is clearly best done by prevent-
ing evaporation as much as possible and keep-
ing the soil as deep as possible over the roots of
the crops so that those may not be injured and
prevented from doing their share of the work.
Without going further into the consideration of
this point, it might be suggested if this is not
better secured by flat cultivation, as far as may
be possible, rather than by deep plowing in the
rows and elevating the soil into ridges against
the plants, by which the soil is not only exposed
to greater evaporation than when kept level,
but is also prevented from holding so much of
the moisture contributed by the falling show-
ers.-N. Y. Times.


SUCCESS IN FARMING.

Importance of Rotation, and Clover
Grass Crops.
BY HON. WILLIAM FULLERTON.
/ ---


and


The necessary steps toward an improved hus-
banday are-
1. To cultivate less land.
2. To make that which is cultivated rich in
plant-food, so that it may produce large crops.
3. The practice of a rigid system of rotation
of crops and mixed farming.
4. The cultivation of the grasses and less of
the cereals, and the feeding upon the harm the
most of its products.
5. Raising clover and enriching the land by
turning under green crops.
I believe that the faithful practice of such a
system of tilling would in ten years increase
the value of real estate 100 per cent., and place
the farming population in an independent posi-
tion. All observation and experience go to
show that those sections of the country are more
prosperous where a mixed system of farming
prevails. The farmer who finds in his own
garners that which is needed to supply his daily
wants is far removed from the vexation and
losses attendant upon outside purchases, which
so severely tax his means. It is not infrequently
the case, when he produces but a single article
for the market, that it commands a price which
but poorly compensates him for his labor, while
he has to pay exorbitant prices for that which
he is compelled to purchase. This is "selling


the hide for a penny and buying back the tail
for a shilling," which surely is not a profitable
transaction. Mixed agriculture necessarily
leads to a system of rotation of crops, which is
the key to successful farming. That there is a
vast recuperative power in the land where a
succession of different crops are grown, no one
can deny in the light of universal experience.
Thousands of those who have hitherto devoted
themselves to a single production, such as cot-
ton, tobacco or grain, now acknowledge this
error.
Successive crops of the same character ex-
haust lands of the particular food they require
with great rapidity. The aid which nature so
freely renders, where crops rotate, is withheld
in such a system of cultivation, because the
farmer is violating her laws. To fight against
nature is to war at fearful odds, and it is not
difficult to forecast the result. To work in
harmony with her insures a comparatively easy
victory. One of the most beautiful of her pro-
visions is, that while one crop exhausts the soil
of that element which enters most largely into
its composition by the operation of some myste-
rious law, it prepares that same soil for some
other crop of a different character. This is a
very curious and interesting process of nature,
which results immensely to our advantage if we
accept her aid. As an illustration of this prin-
ciple, we know that clover does not successfully
follow itself, although it leaves the ground in
the best possible condition for corn or wheat.
One crop, therefore, restores in a measure what
another has taken. By raising continuously
the same plant you interfere with this beautiful
contrivance of nature to rebuild her wasted
strength. How this is done is imperfectly un-
derstood. We do know, however, that the
deep-rooted plants like clover will pump from
the depths below for the use of those that grow
near the surface that food which has been car-
ried beyond their reach. And not only that
this element, when brought to the surface, acts
chemically upon what it finds there, and renders
soluble and available as plant-food what before
was inert and resisted assimilation.
Nature, therefore, will do much of our work
for us if we only second her efforts and give full
scope to her beneficial laws. It is, therefore, a
question for the farmer to determine whether he
will, by a rotation of crops, have this soil en-
riched by drafts on nature's treasury, or draw
entirely upon his own. I do not mean to argue
that there is nothing for the farmer to do but
follow this rotation to make his lands produc-.
tive. Far from it. But I do argue that he
may make nature a co-worker with him in at-
taining a desirable end. Change is a promi-
nent feature in nature's economy. Cut down
the forest of hard wood and the pines succeed.
Again, remove the pine and the hard wood re-
appears. One kind of grass succeeds another,
and nature supplies the seed. These changes
give the soil rest, to the end that the process of
re-invigoration may go on.-Nashville (Temnn,)
Southern Industries.


Adulteration.
"What is that, mother, that comes from the urn
Fragrant and strong, as we get it in turn?"
"An infusion of leaves from far Cathay,
Leaves of the alder and leaves of the bay,
With a twang and full-flavored, just as it should be,
And I think there may be some leaves of the tea."
"What is that, mother, so coldly blue,
Like a wintry sky of azure hue?"
"That is milk of the city, that mixture, my dear,
The milk of the chalk pit and pump that is near,
That would not be owned by a sensible cow,
For she never could make it; she wouldn't know how."
"What is that, mother, yellow as gold ?"
"Butter, my boy; not the butter of old.
In the hey-day of youth we said tit for tat,
'Twas a prophecy when we said butter for 'fat;'
That is butter to those whom the scoffer calls green;
To the elect it is oleomargarine."
"What is that, mother?" 'Tis the pepper of trade,
But the Lord only knows of what it is made;
Of roasted meal, of dust, and peas,
With a dash of cayenne to make one sneeze;
It is hot and strong, but it's rather queer,
Of the ground pepper corn, there is none of it here."
0--Puck.


__


I I


I





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


The Summer Solstice.
On the 21st of June, at 8 o'clock in the morn-
ing, the sun enters the sign Cancer, and inau-
gurates the great physical epoch known as the
summer solstice. He has reached his extreme
northern declination of twenty-three and a
half degrees, and, just grazing the Tropic of
Cancer, pauses for a few (lays in his course be-
fore turning his steps from our northern clime.
The familiar terms explain the apparent move-
ment, the word tropic coming from a Greek
word meaning to turn, and the word solstice
coming from two Latin words meaning the
sun stands still.
The days remain of the same length, fifteen
hours and sixteen minutes, for nine days, from
the 16th to the 25th. On the 26th a change
comes, and a decrease of one minute marks the
southern course of the sun. In a few days the
change will be apparent to careful observers.
The sunrise and sunset points will swerve
slightly to the south, and the sun will not mount
quite so high at noon-day toward the zenith.
The movement of the sun to the south and his
lessening meridian altitude will go on until the
21st of December, when the winter solstice oc-
curs, andthe days have reached their minimum
length. The process will then be reversed ; the
sun will move northward, and his meridian
altitude increase until he comes round again to
the summer solstice of 1883. Observers can
see for themselves the changes in the sun's
place in the heavens that mark the change in
the seasons, and will readily note that the fur-
ther south the sun rises and sets the shorter will
be the days, and the lower the altitude of the
noon-day sun the less will be the intensity of
the heat.
This oscillation of the sun to the north and
south, and his varying meridian altitude are
only apparent, the real cause of the movement
being the revolution of the earth around the
sun with her pole inclined twenty-three and a
half degrees to the plane of her orbit, her sea-
sons varying according to the manner in which
her surface is presented to the sun. In the north
temperate zone the sun's rays now shine with
full force, and summer reigns supreme. The
mornings and evenings mark his furthest pro-
gress northward, the noons show the highest me-
ridian altitude, the evenings bear witness to the
period when his beams linger longest above the
western horizon after sunset.
It would seem that our hotest days should
occur about the 21st of June, when the sun's
perpendicular rays fall upon this portion of the
globe. But such is not the case. As midsum-
mer approaches the quantity of heat received
from the sun during the day is greater than
the quantity of heat lost during the night,


and there is therefore an increase of heat each
day. The daily increase reaches its maximum
at the summer solstice. But the heat garnered
up by the process causes an accession of heat
each day until the heat lost during the night is
just equal to that received during the (lay. This
happens some time in July or August. Our
hottest weather for this reason occurs some time
after the summer solstice, just as the hottest
part of the day is sometime after midday, and
the coldest part of the night is towards morn-
ing.
There are four great time marks in the annual
revolution of the earth, the vernal equinox, the
summer solstice, the autumnal equinox, and the
winter solstice. The summer solstice is the
most interesting and suggestive of them all.
It is, in our zone, the culminating point of solar
power, the gala-day of the sovereign who holds


in his hands the issues of life and death for every
member of the human race. The earth rejoic-
ing in verdure, the perfection of foliage, the
brilliant flowers, the ripening fruits, bear wit-
ness to the fertilizing power of his 1)enignallnt
beams. Out-door life furnishes the conditions
of enjoyment, and earth, air, and sky hold out
separate allurements to increase the number of
those who share in the general holiday. So de-
lightful are the charms of midsummer that one
longs to make them immortal, to hold back the
sun in his course, and perpetuate the present
conditions of his reign. But such are not the
conditions of human life. The seasons come
and go, swayed by an omnipotent hand; at the
culminating point of solar intensity the picture
changes, the supreme moment passes. Before
the sun that rises on the 21st of June sinks be-
low the horizon, his face will be turned from us,
the earth will have traveled thousands of miles
towards the regions of cold and darkness. A
fraction of light will be lost from the longest
day, a fraction of darkness will be added to the
shortest night.
No one can help mourning over the loss of
the first minute of daylight that follows this
summer solstice. No one can help rejoicing
over the gain of the first minute of daylight
that follows the winter solstice.
On the 26th the decrease of a minute in the
day's length is recorded on the astronomical
calender. It is only a minute at first, but
minutes will be piled upon minutes, as the earth
rolls on, until ~he last of July, the day will be
forty-seven minutes shorter than it was under
the beams of the solsticial sun.-Scientific Amer-
ican.
Green Manuring.
After all that may be done in the way of
saving and utilizing stable manure, cotton seed
and other similar fertilizing materials-supple-
.mented by the purchase of acid phosphate and
potash, we must rely upon the far cheaper pro-
cess of green manuring to bring up our soils and
keep them up to a high degree of fertility.
The proper saving and application of the
home manures above alluded to is nothing more
than an act of simple justice to the otherwise
overworked soil. We may as reasonably ex-
pect our work animals to do as much work
without supplying them with necessary food, as
to expect the soil to yield abundant annual
crops without manure. Even the very richest
soils will in time fail to remunerate the labor
of tillage if denied the benefit of manure of some
kind.
We do not mean to say that turning under
green crops will of itself restore to the soil all
the elements of fertility that are annually ab-
stracted from it by the crops, and that this pro-
cess may be made independent of other efforts
at improvement. The absolute quantity of phos-
phoric acid, lime, potash and other inorganic
elements of the soil are not one whit increased


by turning under a crop grown on the soil.
But the proportion of these valuable elements
available for the wants of a succeeding crop is
greatly increased by growing a crop of clover
or pea-vines. The quantity of the inorganic
elements just mentioned, is sufficient, in a fertile
soil, to produce thirty, forty or one hundred
crops of corn, cotton, etc., if these elements were
in a soluble, available form. But such is not
the case, and it is the business of the scientific
farmer to render them soluble. This is done
by deep plowing, liming and green manuring.
But there are other elements juAt as important
to good crops as those mentioned, and which
may be supplied entirely by turning under
green crops. There are ammonia and carbonic
acid, which are abstracted from the air and
stored up in the roots, stems and leaves of the


renovating plants, and by the decay of the lat-
ter are left just where wanted by the succeed-
ing crop of grain or cotton. Ammonia and
carbonic acid not only serve as food for the next
crop, but also assist greatly in reducing the in-
soluble phosphates, and silicates of the soil to
soluble forms by chemical reactions which oc-
cur during decomposition.
When we add stable manure, superphos-
phates, cotton seed and other more or less con-
centrated matters to the soil, we supply the soil
with food elements in a state almost ready for
absorption ; and usually the quantity applied is
too small to generate any extensive changes in
the soil by decomposition and chemical action.
But when a heavy crop of peas, clover or other
similar plant is grown and turned under, adding
tons of fertilizing material to each acre, the
mass acts as a most efficient leaven-so to speak
-not only adding large quantities of ammonia
and carbonic acid gathered from the air, but
breaking up insoluble forms of plant-food and
making them available to the next crop. The
natural laboratory of the soil is thus supplied
with more abundant re-agents and fuel, to do the
work of preparing food for future crops.-
Southern Cultivator.

Lime for the Curculio.
Thomas Beall, of Victoria County, Canada,
reported the following experiment to the Fruit-
Growers' Society of Ontario, the plunis in the
district where he resides having been nearly a
total failure from the attacks of the curculio:
In a plum orchard of 100 trees, they all blos-
somed freely. Large numbers of the curculio
beginning to make their appearance, five trees
were selected and liberally dusted with air-
slacked lime, just as the blossoms were falling.
The dose was repeated in two weeks, and a third
dusting in two weeks more. The result reported
was that from these five trees enough fruit was
gathered for the use of the family, and thirteen
"pails" of plums were sold. The. remaining 95
trees did not bear a bushel in all. Experiments
do not establish a rule. The only use of lime
which we have witnessed for repelling the cur-
culio was in the form of whitewash. It was
thrown over four nectarine trees, leaves and all,
as soon as the blossoms had fallen, and they
appeared at a distance as white is if enveloped
in cotton. When rain and dew removed the
whitewash from the small nectarines, the show-
ering was repeated. The insects would not
pierce the lime coating, but they quickly found
a spot where leaves chafed the surface, or where
a drop of dew washed it, and here they depos-
ited their eggs. In this way they punctured
every nectarine on the four trees except five on
one tree-but under this tree a young calf had
been kept tied, and by his presence succeeded
in frightening the insects from the five small
specimens.- Country Gentleman.


A MOVING TowN, which can certainly be
classed among the modern curiosities, actually
exists in Manitoba. It is called "Boomtown,"
and can always be found at the terminus of the
Canadian Pacific Railroad. When the town is
located, building lots are sold at fancy prices,
and in a day or two the place contains all the
evidences of a bustling, busy place, but with
another advance of the construction party the
old site is vacated as if by magic, and the lively
scenes are transferred into another locality,
which is given the same name, contains the same
people, and the houses and tents are constructed
of the same material that composed the former
residences.-Railroad Gazette.
[Lookout for "Boom Towns" along some of the
new lines of railways in Florida.]






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH 12


thought I would send it to you. They may be
common enough, but I have never noticed one
before; it appears very bright at night.
Yours, A. L. HATCH.
REPLY.-The beetle sent belongs to the fami-
ly Elateridce, many of which are justly cele-
brated for the display of fine phosphoric light
which is observed to emanate from them while
flying at night. The specific name of the speci-
men sent we cannot at present recall, although
it is already in our cabinet. Among the larg-
est of the fire-fly beetles is, Elater noctilucas,
found in the West Indies, where the ladies use
them for ornaments, fastening them in their hair
and in little gauze nets about their persons, be-
fore going out to an evening party-for in the


note above, which does not sufficiently charac-
terize or convey an idea of the trouble, we never
could have diagnosticated the disease. Fortu-
dately, however, he also sent specimens, with a
brief note, to our friend, Mr. A. I. Bidwell, who
handed them, with accompanying note, to us
for a reply, and from a dozen words: "Bark
above crown of roots is loosened and dies; trees
turn yellow," we recognized the trouble.
It, therefore, gives us much pleasure to say
we are able to give, from our own experience, a
remedy.
We have eighteen bearing trees on our place.
Last fall, a large tree eighteen inches in diame-
ter, began to turn yellow; we paid very little


In


soil] rom around the trunks and the ants will not,
in fact, cannot, injure your trees. It is only when
they girdle the tree above the crown of the roots
and prevent the free flow of sap, that they can
injure the tree. Of course, when the tree is
completely or almost girdled there is no remedy;
the tree must die.
Our correspondent and others whose trees
are similarly affected would do well to examine
at once all their trees and follow out hints
given above. They will no doubt save many
trees and prevent others from being attacked.
The ant causing the trouble is about one-tenth
of an inch or more long, of a brown color, has
a large head with strongly developed cutting
jaws, and is evidently nocturnal in habits.


' I


Meteorological Report.
Weather for week ending June 30, 1882.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION, }
SIGNAL SERVICE, U. S. A., JACKSONVILLE, FLA._
Therm. ..Wind.

A E. ; -+;


Saturday 24...... 29.12 93 4. 70.7 0.00 S Fair.
Sunday '25....... 42. 4!;17 .s,.7 32.7 0.00 SW 8 Fair.
Monday 26......: 30.07!92791.85.7 62.0 0.00 SW 10 Clear.
Tuesday27 ..... 30.06 94 731 84.7 72.7 0.95 S 7Fair.
Wednesday 28 30.12 93176;84.3 74.0 0.00 SW 12;Fair.
Thursday 29... 30.12 91 74 82.0 72.7 0.25 SW 5 Fair.
Friday 30.......30.10 88'751 80.7 71.3 0.00 NE 4 Clear.
Highest barometer 30.17, lowest 29.85.
Highest temperature 94, lowest 73.
NOTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Obs-rver U. S. A.

Correspondence.
STAFFORD, MD., June 14, 1882.
W. H. Ashmead,
DEAR SIR : I noticed a paragraph going the
rounds of the press, that the orange crop of
Florida will be a failure this season, owing to a
dangerous insect appearing in the groves and
injuring the trees; also states that this occur-
red some years ago and it was feared orange
culture would have to be abandoned.
Is there any truth in it ?
Respectfully,
E. L. MILLER.
REPLY.-Investigations respecting orange
insects have been very ably and thoroughly
conducted within the last few years, and such a
fund of knowledge has been gained of their
habits and transformations, as to make it simply
impossible ever to be again afflicted with such
a scourge of insect pests as visited our groves in
the year 1835..
True, a tree or two is occasionally killed by
tardiness in applying the proper remedies, but
this seldom happens and we are justified in say-
ing would never happen, if on the first appear-
ance of the evil the proper precautions were taken.
Our correspondent, can, therefore, rest assur-
ed that such reports can only be promulgated
by outside parties whose sole desire is to injure
the fair reputation Florida is so rapidly gain-
ing as the State of States for early fruits and
vegetables.
Hereafter he can treat them with the silent
contempt they merit, as there is not a particle
of truth in them.

CITY POINT, FLA., June 14, 1882.
DEAR SIR : Last evening I was struck with
the appearance of a little beetle fire-fly; it be-
ing different from anything I had ever seen, I


darkness of night they rival the costly diamond
in brilliancy-emitting a most beautiful golden
blue lustre.
Cassell says: "We are told that the original
natives were formerly accustomed to employ
these living lamps, which they called cucuij,
instead of candles, in their household occupa-
tions. In traveling at night, they used to
tie one to each great toe, and in fishing and
hunting required no other flambeau. Besides
this they were sought after and encouraged into'
houses, and especially into sleeping-rooms as
extirpators of gnats, which constituted a great
part of their food."

ORLANDO, FLA., June 19, 1882.
Editors Florida Dispatch :
I sencdyouby to-day's mail two orange twigs
affected with the die-back for your examination.
One of the twigs you will see has commenced
to turn brown ; the blisters on the twigs burst
and exude a clear amber colored gum and com-
mence to die-back-the disease comes on the
second growth-have never found any on the
spring growth.
J. C. SEISER.
REPLY.-We would respectfully refer you to
what we had to say on this subject in number
ten, present series of the DISPATCH.
On the twig you send us, however, we find
no fungoid growth and they otherwise seem dif-
ferently affected.
We are therefore led to conclude that your
troubles exist in the soil-probably from a su-
perabundance of some mineral constituent
which the tree cannot assimilate. We would
suggest the propriety of your experimenting
with this idea in view. Remove part of the
earth from around affected trees and put a dif-
ferent quality of soil in its place and watch
effects. This is the quickest and surest method
of arriving at a knowledge of the difficulty.
There seems to be two or three kinds of die-back.

ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA., June 23, 1882.
DEAR SIR: I send you to-day, by mail, two
packages of roots, taken from orange trees so
badly diseased, that after many efforts to recu-
perate, the owner is digging up. The large roots
are lateral, smaller from top, (extreme ends ofthe
top are cut off when transplanted,I think). Please
notice those with red deposit adhering to bark.
Wish you, Davis and Kenworthy would come
here and examine soil, etc., as the tree roots are
now fully exposed, being cut about before tree is
felled. The trees are ten inches to one foot in
diameter. A sad sight to see them dug up.
W. W. DEWHURST.
REPLY.-From our correspondent's brief


attention to it, merely looking at it occasionally,
two or three times. As we could see no cause
for its strange appearance, finally came to
the conclusion it was caused by change of
season. Alas! for our indifferenW, we lost the
tree and came near losing others, whereas, if we
had only given it the proper attention it demand-
ed, it might have been saved. The last of De-
cember, our tree began budding and during the
whole of January was deliciously fragrant with.
orange blossoms.
Orange trees should not bloom in January,
and it did not require a very keen perceptive
faculty to understand something serious was the
matter.
What to do was the question. A thorough
examination revealed the bark loosened just
above the crown of the root as described by
Mr. Dewhurst ; but nothing could be found as
to the cause.
Weeks rolled by; about 500 oranges, the size
of marbles, appeared to remind us of "what
might have been"; then the leaves dried up and
dropped off a few at a time ; then it died. At
present a bare lifeless trunk is all that remains
of our once fragrant tree. It is completely gir-
dled above the crown.
A few weeks ago two or three other trees be-
gan to turn yellow, droop and lose their fruit
and we became seriously alarmed. What were
we to do ? Stand idly by and see large bearing
trees die-one by one-and no help for it It
looked so ; but determined to make a last effort
to save them and knowing how the other was
girdled, knew here must be the difficulty.
Could it be stopped ? With a trowel we dug the
earth from around the trunk of the tree-away
from the crown of the roots--revealing the tops
of the lateral or surface roots. Here we dis-
covered the bark loosened and living beneath
it colonies of a species of wood-eating ant.
They had more than half girdled the tree, hence
preventing a sufficient flow of sap for the nour-
ishment of the tree. Carefully removing the
earth from around all affected trees and expos-
ing the lateral roots, with a kettle of scalding
hot water, we soon scalded out and destroyed
the ants. The trees though seriously injured
are saved. Some show that they are about a
quarter girdled, others a half or more; but the
trees will make new bark, which will soon grow
over the scarred places. Those trees having the
tops of the lateral roots showing, were not
affected, but all those buried several inches, were.
Here then is the rub-take the hint. Never
allow your trees to be buried too deep. Keep the






130 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Injuring the Asparagus Bed.
Much harm may be done by continuing the
cutting too leog. The fact that shoots continue
to be produced, should not tempt us to appro-
priate all that grow. The shoots we have been
enjoying this season all came from strong buds,
formed at the crown of the root last summer.
If we want a similar crop next spring, we must
give the plants a chance to prepare for it. This
production of new shoots as fast as others have
been cut, has more or less exhausted the plant.
It can only recover by the help of the green tops.
Allow these to grow, and they will not only re-
pair damages, but prepare a stock of buds to
afford new shoots for next year. Near New
York city the cutting stops early in June, the
usual rule being to cease when early peas are
ready. In this country it is customary to cover
the bed, before the ground freezes, with coarse
manure; in spring the coarse stuff is raked off'
and the fine portions forked into the surface,
taking care not to injure the roots. Some Eng-
lish growers have found it beneficial to apply
manure dressing as soon as the cutting is over.
Nitrate of Soda, dissolved in plenty of water,
and applied, has given most excellent results,
and some advise using as much as two pounds
to the square yard. This seems to us rather
heavy, and we advise to experiment at first with
half that quantity. Inland, beyond the influ-
ence of the sea, good results have followed the
application of salt, not to exceed five bushels to
the acre. The weeds which start in the bed
should be cut away with the hoe until the plants
get large enough to shade the soil, when the
pulling up of any large weed that may appear
in the ground will be all the care they require.
-Exchange.



Errors in Poultry Keeping.
We take the following from the Husband-
man :
Although there are many widely different
breeds of fowls, adapted more or less to the
varied wants of the farmer, there are some gen-
eral rules for their management, which are ap-
plicable everywhere; and many flagrant errors
are made by most farmers; serious errors is the
common custom of keeping hens until they be-
come too old for profit, because they were choice
and good layers when young. A hen of any
breed will lay only about half as many eggs
the second year as the first after she commences
laying. All fowls kept by a farmer after they
are two years old are kept at a loss, so far as
money is concerned. When a whole flock is
allowed to run without killing off the old ones
and replacing them by pullets, disease is sure
to attack them. They become liable to gapes,


cholera, etc., after they become aged. If the
practice of keeping only pullets is once followed,
I am sure that no farmer will ever abandon it.
Another bad practice is that of allowing the
fowls to become wild, so that they are afraid of
any one and hide away their nests, and the few
chickens they hatch lose their lives from want
of food, care and shelter. To be sure, chick-
ens hatched late in summer, brought up in the
fields by a wild mother are hardy, but this prac-
tice is not profitable, as the cost of wintering
exceeds the summer returns. As a general rule,
however, summer chickens are more profitable
than the very early ones, as they get a more
varied diet, better exercise, and are healthier
every way. But fowls to be profitable, must
be kept tame. If, however, the chickens are
to be grown for sale, for breeding or show pur-


poses, it is necessary that the chickens should
be hatched as early in the season as possible, so
that they may attain full growth and feathering
by fall.

Which Pays Best ?
Many persons with limited experience, judg-
ing only from the great difference in price, sup-
pose that pure and fancy-bred fowls are only
desired for the gratification of a whim of the
poultry fancier to possess handsome fowls, and
not from any consideration of profit. There
cannot be a greater mistake, for it has been
thoroughly settled in the minds of those who
have had even a limited experience, that even
a cross of the pure breeds with the common
fowl will bring about wonderful results in the
way of improvement in egg production and size
of the birds at maturity. Those who give their
attention to the improved breeds alone of poul-
try are too often misunderstood; as in many
cases, where people devote themselves to some
special pursuit, the poultry fanciers are regard-
ed as mere enthusiasts, who simply amuse them-
selves, without conferring any benefit on the
public. This is a grave error, which does great
injustice to them, for farmers especially owe
much to poultry fanciers. They have worked
and are still working hard to demonstrate that
it costs no more to keep good fowls than poor
ones. After getting a fair start, few pure-bred
fowls will more than pay the seemingly extrav-
agant price given grudgingly for them, simply
by the extra number of eggs they give. Besides
this, the Brahma fowl will dress for market or
table and be more than twice as heavy as one
of the common kind. Then the eggs are larger
and of a richer, firmer flavor. These results are
from the labor of poultry fanciers, and if farm-
ers would only look with a little more favor
upon them, and appreciate their efforts toward
improvement, their eyes would soon be opened
to the fact that their poultry was about the best
paying stock on the farm.-American Stock-
man.




The Non-Progressive Bee-Keeper.
I s'pose all these progressive folks
With their patent hives and lotions,
Call me a stiff old fogy,
'Cause I don't adopt their notions :
I've kept bees nigh on forty years,
And yet these Yankee nobbies
Think they can teach me something new,
With their new-fangled hobbies.
They say they've got some kind of thing-
I guess they call extractor-
That slings the honey from the combs;
And, then, it is a fact, sir,
They'll drain the honey from the cells
Then let the bees refill it,
And almost every day or two
They'll go and rob and steal it.
I give my bees the first best chance
To make their own free living,
Then take whatever they have left,
And thank them for the giving;


And then they've got a patent stove
That, when they choose to make it,
Will pour a mess of stifling smoke
Into the bees-"plague take it."
I have been told they melt up wax,
And call it comb foundation;
And quilts, and clamps and other sorts
Of fool's conglomerations.
They've got to swindle honest folks,
And get their hard-earned money,
With striped bees and hives that hold
Two hundred pounds of honey.
When you have lived as many years
As I, I think you'll see
That patent hives are not the things
That they're cracked-up to be,
Those monstrous yields of honey
From one hive they receive-
Well, I want to see it 'fore
I say that I believe.
I stick to my old hemlock gums,
Without chaff or any fixtures ;
And I don't have to feed my bees
With flour and glucose mixtures.
But I suppose the world will move
On in the same old way,
For swindlers they will advertise
And make their business pay.
-American Bee JTournal


Constructing a Bee-Hive.
MITCHELL'S APIARY, HAWKINSVILLE, GA.
I will endeavor to give a few specific direc-
tions for constructing a very simple style frame
hive. This hive is not an orthodox Langstroth
or simplicity model, but answers every purpose,
the frames being of the same dimension as for
those styles.
Take an inch plank and measure for the parts
as follows: Sides, length 20} inches, height 101
inches; back end, length 12 inches, height 10}
inches; front end, length 12 inches, height 91
inches. Measure 11 inches from the top of the
end pieces and saw horizontally across two-
thirds through the plank, then split out with a
chisel from the top downward, making a place
like the rabbet in a door-facing. Take a strip
of tin 12 inches long and 1 inch wide; tack
this horizontally across the end so that it will
project 1 inch above the lower rabbet. Nail the
sides to the end, keeping them all even at the
top and you have a hive. For a top take a
plank 16 inches wide and 22 inches long and
nail a strip around on this that will just let it
fit over the hive outside. Now set the whole
on a wide plank and the difference between the
two ends will make the entrance. For the frames
make the top bar 19 inches long, i inch wide,
and I inch thick. Take strips I by 1 inch for
the other parts; 81 inches long for each end and
171- inches long for the bottom bar. Nail the
ends to the bottom bar and the top bar to the
ends, allowing it to project over an equal dis-
tance at each end. Eight of these frames are
required for each hive of the above pattern.
The frames will hang on the rabbets in the hive.
To get the bees into the new hive, provide
yourself with a bit of old rags or loose cotton
and light the same for a smoke. Blow a little
smoke in the entrance, then tilt the hive down
and continue your smoke until the bees seem
subdued. Take the old hive a short distance
away and set with the head downward on a
table, placing the new hive (without the frames)
in its stead. Now comes the tug of war. Cut
the combs loose on one side of the hive, then
cut the nails with a chisel and remove that side.
Now cut the combs out with a large table knife,
keeping the bees back with the smoke, and as
you cut them out fit them in the new frames,
tacking small strips of wood across each side to
hold them in position. As soon as you fill a
frame hang it in the hive. By the time you
have cut out half the comb you will begin to
take out the small clusters of bees hanging to
the comb, shake these off on a newspaper spread
in front of the hive so that one side of it will be
even with entrance and they will soon crawl in.
When you have cut the combs all out, shake
the bees on the paper and they will soon be in
and at work. Gather up the scraps of comb,
and if any frames were not filled hang them
also in the hive, spreading a cloth neatly over
frames and replacing the top. Evamine them


every day or two, using a little smoke, and as
fast as they secure the comb to the frames, re-
move the strips of fastenings.
Now get your Italians, for one colony of
these bees will gather as much honey as two
colonies of native bees. The queens can be in-
troduced at any time after the bees are in the
movable-frame hive, by first removing the
black one and carefully observing the directions
furnished with the cages in which they are
shipped. I would advise in all cases where it
can be conveniently done, to procure a nucleus
with a tested queen from some reliable party
near. You then have your queen without in-
troducing her and the nucleus is in all essential
particulars the model for a large hive.
For the accommodation of those who do not
fully understand, I will send a diagram of the


I







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 3


shipped to all countries from the port of Bor-
deaux is now considerably over $4,000,000 an-
nually. The exports to the United States in
1880 reached $162,903.72, being an increase
over those of the previous year of $14,575.86.
We have no figures at hand showing the im-
ports from foreign places, but they must be
considerable from certain ports in Italy.
We have in California one olive oil manufac-
tory-that of Ellwood Cooper, in Santa Bar-
bara County, said to be the only establishment
of the kind in the United States-which is pro-
ducing oil that has within a very few years,
won for itself a high reputation for purity
and excellence. Mr. Cooper, who is known as
a intelligent cultivator, .ad a cmloes te roandi
of production, is supphlied with complete and


hive and a specimen frame by mail, for 4-5 cents
to defray expenses. It will materially facili-
tate the success of those who anticipate embark-
ing in this industry to subscribe for some stand-
ard bee journal, and also to procure a simple and
reliable work on the subject, "A. B. C., of Bee
Culture," for example. The sum of $2 judi-
ciously invested would be amply sufficient to
procure both. Diligently read the instructions
to be derived from these sources and carefully
apply it with your personal observations and
success will surely be the reward of your efforts.
- Chas. R. ]Mitchell, in Southern World.



OLIVE OIL.
One of Southern California's Neglected Pro-
ducts-The Only Olive Oil Factory in the
United States-The Pr ocess of
Manufacture-Adulteration.
While we take pleasure in keeping our read-
ers informed of the progress of horticulture and
pomology everywhere, we cannot recommend
olive culture as at all likely to become a profit-
able industry in Florida-especially since the
cotton fields have come into successful compe-
tition with the olive groves. Still, the follow-
ing article, from the Los Angeles (Cal.) Times,
may be read with pleasure and profit:
While the olive tree grows and thrives in
many places in California, and especially in
the southern counties, and could readily be
made to produce fruit enough to supply oil for
the United States, we continue to import this
article in large quantities yearly. From the
French port of Bordeaux alone, as we learn
from a recent consular report, the shipments to
this country have reached a money value of
more than $150,000 in a single year. The
commerce in olive oil at this port is constantly
on the increase. The best quality of crude oil,
it is said, comes from the olive orchards in the
vicinity of Nice, and the north of Italy, where
it is pressed from the olive by very primitive
machinery. It is then shipped to Bordeaux in
large hogsheads, and sold in bulk to the various
refiners at prices which vary according to the
year's production and demand, after which it
goes through the ordeal of refining, bottling and
labeling, and is then put on the wholesale mar-
ket at from 15 to 28 francs (from $2.90 to $5.40
per case of a dozen bottles.
Several firms in Bordeaux have met with
marked success in this trade, and each has its
special process of refining. These processes are
little more than a succession of filters made
of a variety of materials, such as felt, canvas,
etc., through which the oil passes at an even
temperature, the quality being materially affect-
ed by a variation of a few degrees higher or
lower. It is the labor of refining which aug-
ments the price of the oil. The bottles contain
from 16 to 18 ounces. The total value of oil


"If the belief in the potency of sewer air as a
carrier of disease germs is not clearly estab-
lished by direct and positive proof, there is no
disposition nor reason to renounce it, nor dare
we do so with safety, without more convinc-
ing proof of its fallacy than has hitherto been
persistent. It seems reasonable to suppose that
the effluvia arising from sewage which contains
more or less of the material favorable to the de-
velopment (under suitable conditions frequently
present in sewers) of the morbific elements of
certain zymatic diseases, are capable of produc-
ing these diseases when, under favorable cir-
cumstances, they were brought into contact
with the human body. We do not know posi-
tively the manner in which sewer air becomes
impregnated with these minute particles of liv-
or by the ascentional power of the watery vapor,


improved machinery and apparatus, and has
from the start made a specialty of putting upon
the market pure oil, and only such. He boldly
challenges comparison between his oil and that
of any foreign brand and is probably safe in
doing so, since the adulteration of the Italian
article has recently become notorious. Touch-
ing this swindling practice the American Con-
sul at Naples made the following strong report:
"The large recent importation of cotton-seed
oil has been a great source of alarm here [in
Naples], on account of its competition with olive
oil, which is one of the leading articles of ex-
portation from Italy, and one of which Italy
was especially proud, as being to a considerable
extent a monopoly. Now the cotton-seed oil
threatens not only to make dangerous competi-
tion as substituting the olive oil for various
uses, but also bringing it into disrepute as an
article of food on account of its adulteration
with the former. The cotton-seed oil has already
found its way into the remotest mountain vil-
lages, whose sole production is olive oil, where
it is mixed with the latter and sold as pure; and
so great is the resemblance that even the most
expert cannot detect the mixture. The Govern-
ment is endeavoring to impose a heavy tax on
cotton-seed oil as a protection to the production
of olive oil. But even then the protection would
be inadequate as the cotton-seed oil has already
found its way into other countries to which the
olive oil was exported, especially into Russia,
one of the chief outlets for Italian olive oil. As
the cotton seed-oil can be brought to Italy and
for half the value of olive oil, the temptation
to use it for the purpose of adulteration is mani-
fest."
Meantime, while this whole adulteration of
olive oil is going on abroad-and abundant
proof of it is furnished by many of the import-
ed brands which find their way to American
tables-our honest Californian producer is
steadily supplanting the foreign adulterated ar-
ticle by his pure oil, sold under a guarantee in
every instance. We learn that Mr. Cooper has
orders in advance from a few Eastern cities for
his entire year's product at very handsome
prices.
Were the production of pure olive oil in-
creased tenfold in the United States every gal-
lon of it would almost surely find a ready mar-
ket at home.
The olive tree, in suitable localities, properly
cared for, not requiring the richest soil or irri-
gation, is a hardy grower and a prolific bearer,
living to a great age. It is a good tree for our
foothills.



(Edited by Dr. A. S. Baldwin.)

Sewer Air-Its Remedy.
The Medical News has the following on Sewer
Air:


could show that the hyposulphate of sodium,
which was so effective when mixed directly
with the virus prior to its inoculation, is equally
effective when given to the animal by the mouth
for a day or two before the inoculation ; and
that the quantity necessary for this purpose
does not affect the health of the animal, it
would be a valuable contribution to practical
medicine.
Meantime his experiments confirm the obser-
vations of others to the effect that the most ef-
fectual disinfectants in relation to cost, are sul-
phate of iron and chloride of zinc. The prac-
tical objection to carbolic acid, or any other
substance having a strong odor, is that this
odor masks the smell of foul gases and makes
performed or not.


or by the bursting on the surface of the liquid
of bubbles of decomposition, is still a matter of
conjecture. Nevertheless, with the mass of cir-
cumstantial evidence in our possession, there is
not much room for doubting the presence of
zymotic matter in the air of sewers, and the pos-
sibility of its transportation by means of gentle
currents.
"Excluding the special agency of sewer air in
transmitting the specific germs of the disease,
still remains the indisputable fact that it is a
hurtful mixture, which cannot be breathed in
confined apartments without serious detriment to
the general health. Hence the necessity, irres-
pective of this or that view of the modus oper-
andi of causing disease, of securely and perma-
nently excluding sewer air from our houses.
This is mainly to be accomplished by interpos-
ing a barrier, in form of a serviceable trap, or
by means of an air-disconnection between the
drains of the house and the common sewer, and
by thorough and constant ventilation of the en-
tire system of house pipes."
DISINFECTANTS.
From the Sanitary Engineer: Within the last
few years a number of experiments have been
made to determine the precise power of the va-
rious substances to destroy the vitality of the
minute organism or particle which are now
generally supposed to be the cause of the vari-
ous form of fermentation and putrefaction, and
of certain diseases. Among the experiments
some of the most interesting are those made by
Dr. Steenberg, United States Army, upon the
disinfecting power of various substances upon
the specific cause of a peculiar and fatal form of
septictema produced by minute organism de-
rived originally from the human saliva.
The substances which he found efficient in
solutions containing 0.5 per cent. or less, were
Iodine, Chromic Acid, Sulphate of Iron, Sul-
phate of Copper, Thymol (disolved in Alcohol)
Caustic Soda, Nitric Acid, Sulphuric Acid,
Ferric Sesqui Chloride, Sodium Hypophosphite,
Hydrochloric Acid.
The disinfectants which failed at 0.5 per cent.
but were efficient in proportions below 2 per
cent., were Carbolic Acid, Salicylic Acid, Chlo-*
ride of Zinc, Caustic Potash, Iron Alum, Sul-
phate of Zinc, Pottassium Sulphide, Tannic
Acid, Potassium Permanganate, Sodium Bibor-
ates.
These experiments indicate clearly the forms
of disinfectants most useful in cases where the
germs to be killed are contained in fluids. The
great want now is, a disinfectant which will de-
stroy the vitality of the germs within the living
body without interfering with the vitality of the
blood, in which these germs are suspended and
through which they are to be acted upon. Some
years ago, Dr. Polli, of Milan, thought he had
discovered this in the hyposulphites, and there
is some evidence that the use of these salts may
exercise a prophylactic effect against certain
diseases, but more investigation is needed in
this direction. If, for instance, Dr. Sternberg


I






2S TH0E PLORI DA DISPATCH.


Phe glorloda gll tclh.

JACKSONVILLE, JULY 3, 1882.

EDITORS:
D. REDMOND, D. H. ELLIOTT, W. H. ASHMEAD.

Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.

RATES (OF ADVERTISING.
SQUARES. 1 TIME. 1 MO. 3 MO. 6 MO. 1 YEAR
One..................... $ 1 00 $ 2 50 $ 5 50 $10 00 $ 1850
Two .................... 2 00 500 10 00 18 00 34 00
Three................... 300 7 00 14 00 25 00 46 00
Four................... 4 00 9 00 17 50 30 00 58 00
Five........................ 50 1100 1900 3500 65 00
Eight.............. 8 00 16 50 30 00 50 00 100 00
Sixteen............... 16 00 3000 50 00 80 00 150 00
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words to line) ten cents
per line.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the best ad-
vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.

Special Club Rates with 'The Dispatch."

Read and Subscribe--It Saves Money and
Will Pay You.
We have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
following publications, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt of price, for ONE YEAR:
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH AND
Savannah W eekly News................................$2.50
Florida Weekly Union............. ................. 2.25
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New York Weekly Herald............................ 1.75
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New York Weekly World........................ 1.75
Philadelphia Weekly Times.................... 2.50
American Agriculturist............................... 2.00
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Atlantic Monthly Magazine......................... 4.00
Harper's Monthly Magazine........................... 4.00
The Century Monthly Magazine (Scribner's).... 4.00
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine................... 3.15
Popular Science Monthly............................ 5.00
North American Review.............................. 5.00
Harper's Illustrated Weekly......................... 4.00
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Harper's Illustrated Young People.................. 2.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly...... ....... 4.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4.00
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly.................... 3.15
Frank Leslie's Sunday Magazine.................. 3.15
Scientific American................................. 3.75
W'averly Magazine.................................... 5.00
Detroit Free Press................ ..................... 2.35
The above are among the very best publications"
Remittances should be sent by Check, Money Order,
or Registered Letter, addressed to
ASIHMEAD BRO'S,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

WORK FOR JULY.

Plantation, Garden, and Grove.
Sweet Potatoes.-All early-planted "draws"


should now be "laid by." After scraping and
giving the ridges a thorough cleaning, lay the
straggling vines along the top of the ridge, split
out the middles entirely, throwing one or two
heavy furrows to the plants, and your work is
done until digging time, with the exception
of a run through the patch once or twice during
the season, to detach the vines which are dis-
posed to take root in the middles. This should
be carefully attended to, as this self-rooting
process detracts from the main crop. Your
early patches will now furnish an abundance
of cut vines, and the planting of these should
be entirely finished by the 10th or 15th of this
month. In forming the beds for cut vines, we


do not ridge up very high. We prefer a broad,
mellow bed, starting it with a deep and wide
furrow into which we scatter a liberal supply
of either stable manure, muck and ashes, or
some similar compost, containing potash and
vegetable matter. Bed up over this manured
furrow to the height of 10 or 12 incles-rake
off the top rapidly and lightly, leveling as you
go, and you have the ground ready for the
vines. We generally plant from 4 p. m. until
dark, if the weather is dry; but if there is a
sure rain coming, and our ground is ready, (as
it should be) we put them in at any time of
day, and as quickly as possible. It is too late
to talk to Southern readers about the inestima-
ble value of the Sweet Potato for man and
beast. We fully indorse everything said by the
correspondent of the Southern World, printed
in THE DISPATCH of June 19, page 108.
Cow Peas should now be planted for seed.
Try the Conch, which is a rampant grower, and
worth planting extensively as a forage plant,
shade and fertilizer.
Corn should soon be "laid by ;" but we hope
none of our readers, who know the value of
Branching Sorghum, "Cat-Tail" Millet, Guinea
Grass, Para Grass,-Pea-Vine Hay, or any other
good forage crop, will be found out in the
scorching sun, personally or by proxy, engaged
in the foolish old practice of "fodder-pulling."
It has been ascertained by careful experiments,
often repeated, that in all cases of fodder-pulling
the crop of corn is lessened more than the value
of the fodder; and all who have tried the job
know that it is one of the hardest "chores" ever
"tackled" on the plantation.
Sugar Cane should be constantly worked,
until the blades meet across the middles; but it
is not desirable to run so close or deep as to
interfere at all with the roots. If the crop is
backward or weakly, a liberal top-dressing of
good superphosphate, or any compost contain-
ing a large quantity of ground bone, lime and
potash will stimulate and push forward the
growth. Use from 200t o 500 pounds per acre,
scattering it along the rows about 12 or 18
inches from the stems and working it in with a
narrow light harrow or cultivator.
Turnips-such as Ruta Baga, Yellow Aber-
deen, Globe, Hanover, Purple Top, &c., must
be sown early this month. If the weather is
very dry, sow in the evening, leaving the seed-
furrows open to catch the night dews, and cov-
ering the seed thinly very early the next morn-
ing. When you cover the seed, pat the earth
down firmly upon it with your hoe, and scatter
some short grass or other light mulching along
the rows, to retain the moisture in the drill.
Sow thus, every ten or fifteen days, until you
secure a good stand. Watch for the germina-
tion of the seed; and, as soon as it is well


through the surface, take off the mulching
carefully, a little at a time, until the tender
young plants can bear the full force of the sun.
Thin out properly when the plants show the
rough leaf, and keep rows clean and mellow.
Cotton-(when the lateral branches do not
spread across the middles,) should be frequently
worked with the sweep, so that no grass or
weeds may find a foothold; and, when "laid
by," should present a perfectly clean surface.
Okra-may be planted for a succession.
Cushaw-or "Kershaw" squashes and fall
Pumpkins may now be planted, in same man-
ner as watermelons.
Sow Celery, Cauliflower and Cabbage seed
in well prepared and rich beds, shading with a
canopy of bushes and watering frequently with
weak liquid manure. The Dwarf Celery, and
Wakefield and Winingstadt cabbages are best.
Set out Tomatoes for fall crop. If you have
no rooted plants, cuttings from the old plants


can be made to strike with little trouble.
Orange seedlings should be budded with the
choice, named varieties, at every favorable sea-
son: whenever the bark slips freely. Insert
the buds as low as possible, and see that the
ties are loosed at the proper moment. Work
your young trees, either in nursery or grove,
during this month ; but give them a rest after
the 10 of August.
Bearing Orange groves may have another
light top dressing of compost or special manure,
and frequent shallow stirring of the surface,
for this month and August. Then give them a
rest, also.
The last of this month, or early in August,
prepare your gardens and "truck patches" for
fall crops.
TO FLORIDA FRUIT-GROWERS.
OFFICE OF
FLORIDA FRUIT-GROWERS' ASSOCIATION,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., July 1, 1882.
CIRCULAR.
It is the special object and desire of the
"Florida Fruit-Growers' Association" to encour-
age and promote the successful and profitable
culture of all the best varieties of Fruits suit-
able to the soils and climate of our State.
Each individual member of the Association,
and every one within the borders of Florida who
is in sympathy with the objects of the Associa-
tion,-can greatly aid in collecting knowledge on
the general and special subject of Fruit culture,
in all its branches, as now practiced in this
State; and this knowledge widely disseminated
by the press, must prove of incalculable value
and importance to thousands of actual and
prospective settlers, and to the great public who
enjoy and appreciate fine fruit, everywhere
throughout our country.
With a view of eliciting practical informa-
tion-facts and deductions drawn from experi-
ence and close observation-the Association re-
spectfully solicits immediate replies to the fol-
lowing queries :
1. What varieties of Fruit are most success-
fully and extensively grown in your neighbor-
hood, in addition to the Orange, Lemon, etc. ?
2. What are your prospects, now, for a large,
medium or small crop of Oranges ?
3. What diseases, insects, etc., have, thus far,
proved most destructive and troublesome ? And
what remedies have been tested-with results of
test?
4. What is the natural character or quality
of your soil, and what fertilizers-domestic and
commercial-have proved most efficient and
economical ?
5. What is your style of pruning ? Do you
"trim UP" or "trim DOWn," and why ?


6. Do you favor mulching and infrequent
stirring of the surface, or constant cultivation
and no mulching?
7. How do you apply fertilizers?
8. Are your trees budded, or seedlings ? And
which do you prefer?
9. Has the LeConte Pear borne fruit with
you, or in your immediate neighborhood?
10. Do you cultivate the Japan Persimmon,
(Diospyros kaki,) or the Chinese Quince (Cyn-
donia Sinensis) ?
11. State your experience with the Fig, the
Banana, the Guava, the Pine-apple and the
Cocoanut. Do you raise any of these fruits for
market ?


--- -






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. S3


Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I often read articles in your and other pa-
pers, the value and interest of which are greatly
lessened, because the writer failed to make the
reader acquainted with the section or county
from which he wrote, viz: In what county is
"Lake George ?" Your excellent paper would
be improved in value if we could always have
the county named.
[A good suggestion. Let us have it so. Lake
George P. 0., and a portion of the lake are in
Putnam County.-EDS.]

CHARLESTON, S. C.. June 20, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I notice an article in. THE FLORIDA DIs-


12. Is the Strawberry a success, with you ?
What sorts do you cultivate, and what is your
system ?
13. Can you raise any other varieties of the
Peach, (budded,) except the "Peen-To" and
"Honey" ?
14. Are you cultivating the Grape ? What
varieties ? Do you make wine for home use, or
market ?
Every Florida reader of the foregoing que-
ries, whether a member of the Association or'
not, may consider himself directly and individ-
ually addressed. We earnestly solicit concise
and explicit replies, at the earliest possible day,
for publication in THE DISPATCH; and we re-
spectfully ask the leading papers of the State
to give this Circular and any replies which it
may call forth, the widest publicity.
D. REDMOND,
President.
D. H. ELLIOTT, Secretary.

WE call the especial attention of our readers
to the advertisement ofH. H. Sanford, Proprietor
Dixie Nursery, Thomasville, Ga., who offers
50,000 LeConte pear trees for sale at reasonable
rates. This is a delicious pear, if report speaks
truly, does well in Florida and the South-
ern States generally; and as several papers on
its history, growth and culture have already
appeared in THE DISPATCH, every one should
have a dozen or more of these trees.

FRUIT DEALERS will do well to write at
once and secure some of the 400 bushels of
this delectable fruit which Mr. Sanford offers.
See his advertisement.

CORRECTION.-W. H. Haskell, Esq., author
of the article on "Orange Culture in Middle
Florida," published in DISPATCH of June 5,
page 170, reminds us that, in-the 2nd column,
the 4th line, should read: "By treating them
thus."

Alligator and Railroad.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
An alligator, fourteen feet long, was killed
the other night in Lake Griffin, by J. E. Mc-
Clung, of Jacksonville, and two other gentle-
men of Orange County-Howard McClung and
Dr. Richmond.
Can you tell us anything about the Jackson-
ville, Tampa and Key West Railroad ?
[Pretty fair 'gator. We have no special in
formation in regard to the Railroad mentioned.
But we hope it will soon be built.-EDs.]

Give Your Locality.
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., June 22, 1881.


T


PATCH, on Strawberry Culture, by P. E. John-
son, Duval County, Florida.
You must allow me to differ with Mr. J.,
in saying that the Nunan berry is late in
bearing and sensitive to heat. I have been
planting this variety on Charleston neck, for 12
years, and it is my experience that it is as early
as any berry planted. In 1880, my first ship-
ment was made on the 9th of January; in '81,
April 9th, and in '82, on the 25th of February.
I have frequently gathered sufficient ripe
berries at Christmas time to make up bouquets
with-and so well do they thrive in hot weather,
that I should like you to wall in my fields to-
day, June 13th, to see the fruit and the luxuri-
ance of the plants ; doubtless, they will con-
tinue so until July 1st.
I had berries on exhibition the first week in
February at the Agricultural Fair in this city,
and have for two years running taken the pre-
mium. In my opinion it is not the fault of the
variety, but the inexperience of the farmer that
causes them to be placed amongst the late bear-
ers; doubtless, time and experience will do much
to bring out their intrinsic value. With us
they have proved a great success. J. P.

Crops in Georgia-Rice-Huller &c.
HAMPTON, GEORGIA, June 22, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch.:
If I may be allowed to judge of the numer-
ous advantages of your section, by the descrip-
tions I read in the "DISPATCH," I would be led
to conclude that you Floridians are liable to
forget the injunction of the Apostle
"Love not the World, neither the things that
are in the World."
You have too many good things in your sec-
tion to tempt a worldly minded man to emi-
grate from the poor plow-worn hills of Middle
Georgia, to that "Land of Promise." Agri-
cultural pursuits up in this country are not
near so marvelous as I read them to be down
in your "Land of Flowers." We are pretty
well through with harvesting, and since the
eggs have been hatched, we "count the chick-
ens," and find them not quite so numerous as
were represented by newspaper correspondents.
From what I can learn, the wheat crop of this
community is not near as large as was expected,
before the improved separator divided the grain
from the straw and chaff. Some few men have
realized a fair yield of wheat from the acreage
sown, but a large majority of the planters in
this section have not realized more than from
one-half to three-fourths of a good crop of
wheat.
Our oats are better, but the mark has been
overshot in the amount of the oat crop. If the
reports spread broadcast through the newspa-
pers were to be credited, old 'Squire Carter
would have to fall back and come again. Up


10%

114

1:3
35
18
18
9 00
8 00
7 75
13
12
5 40
5 40
132
29
121
55
36
50
32
3 50
3 50
53 @(,c
15@22c
60c
2 25
2 25
2 70
1 50


Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl., new........................ 6 00
CHICKENS, each.............. ....... .... .............. 20.. 140
EGG S- Per doz.................................................... 15 IS
HIDES-Dry FlAit Cow Hides, per lb., first class 13
Country Dry Salted, per lb..................... .9i, 11
Butcher Dry Salted, per lb).................... 90, 10
Dam aged Hides..................................... 6
Kip and Calf, 81bs. and under................ 10
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lbt....... ............. 35
Deer Skins Salted, per lbf...... ............... 2i6 30
FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter........................................................ 1 50@t4 00
Raccoon, each.................................... 5@15
W ild Cat, each....................................... 10@20
F ox, each ................................................ 5 15
BEESW AX- per lb ................................................. 20
WOOL-Free from burs, per lb.......................... 17(22
B urry, per lbf ............................................ 11@ 15
GOAT SKINS-Each per lb.............................. 10
Flour and tobacco are lower to-day.


machine for cleaning rough rice, and his cleaner
will be ready by next fall. I am of the opin-
ion that seed rice raised in Middle Georgia will
mature two weeks earlier down in Southern
Georgia and Florida, than that grown in those
sections.
Let the "DISPATCH" frequently contain a
good practical article on the culture of upland
rice, and you may count me in as a regular
subscriber.
W. T. G.

Letter from Arkansas.
LEE'S CREEK, CRAWFORD CO., ARK., )
June 5, 1882.J
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
We are very muchinterested in your State; not
as a resort from the cold of a more northern cli-
mate, but while seeking personal comfort we
also desire to procure pleasant homes among the
lakes and rivers, and orange groves of Florida.
We are taking THE FLORIDA DISPATCH and
are well pleased with it. I know of no paper
that fills its place better.
There are several families in this section that
will be there as soon as they can dispose of
their properties here.
We live just within the northern boundary of
the "Cotton Belt." In accordance with Vennor's
predictions we are having a remarkably cold
spring. Cotton all dying, and corn late ; too
wet to plow, and farmers are having the blues.
I didn't think of writing you a letter when I
sat down, but my mind has taken a social turn,
which you will excuse. Respectfully,
E. G. M.




,Jaek.sonille Wholesal(f Prices.
Corrected wcek ly, by0 JONES & BO WVEN, Iholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, (Fla.


SUGARS- Granulated ......................... ...............
W white E x. C............ .......................
G olden C ............................................
Powdered.... ..........................
Cut L oaf............................................
COFFEE, Rio Fair.............................................
G ood ........... .............................
C h o ice ..........................................
B est ..............................................
Java 0 G................................ .........
M ocha ........................... . ........ .
P eaberry ...............................................
M aracaibo ............................................
Any of above grades roasted to order
FLOUR-Snow Drop, best..............................
Oreole, 2d best.......................................
P earl, 3d best............................. .........
M EATS- Bacon.................... ................................
Hams (Merwin & Sons)........................
Shoulders.................. ...........................
HoMINY-Pearl, per bbl.... .....................
M EAL- per bbl...................................................
LARD-Reflned in pails......................................
BUTTER-Very best, kegs (on ice).....................
CHEESE-Full creamH.........................................
Half cream............................ ............
TOBACCO-Shell Road...................................
Florida Boys, 11 inch 5's................
Florida Girls, bright twist, 14 to lb..
Smoking in packages, 8 to Ib...........
SOAP AND STARCH-Colgate's 8 oz., per box..
Peerless, 8 oz., per box..........................
Starch, lumiip, per lb...... ........................
HOPS, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS-
H ops, per lb................................................
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz..........
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
d oz. 1 lb................................................
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. 1 lb.
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. 1, Ib.....
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. V lb......
COUNTRY PRODUCE.


to the present time we have had fine seasons and
our corn and cotton are as promising as we
could reasonably expect. Some planters are
sowing down their harvest fields in peas. Our
sweet potatoes are backward and as a general
thing only a small acreage has been planted in
potatoes. But few ground peas are to be found
in this country. Some few men have nice or-
chards of selected fruit. Small vineyards are
becoming numerous, but the most fatal mis-
take we are making in this section, is our fail-
ure to grow rice. The great difficulty attend-
ing rice culture in this section is the want of an
inexpensive mill to clean it with. I have a
small patch growing both of up land and low
land rice. I propose saving all that I raise for
seed rice, in order that every man may have an
opportunity of procuring seed rice for another
year. Mr. W. C. Howard is building a small





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


are apt to keep those poor who do get good sala-
ries, and then a salaried position is always one
of more or less dependence and precarious in its
tenure. To be one's own master is a thing to be
coveted and sought after. The brave and en-
ergetic young fellow who has made a good
selection of a little farm in a well-watered val-
ley, and who means to be forehanded and avoid
debt and slavery, can in time, unless he is sig-
nally unfortunate, be his own master in every
proper sense, and he will find this free and beau-
tiful open-air life a thousand-fold happier than
the artificial life of towns. Here there is a field
that is ever open. There is no danger of its
being overcrowded. There will always be a
tendency to rush into the cities for the excite-
ments which flourish there, and the wise and.
ardent young men who turn their backs on these
false shows and go straightway to nature will
come out best in the long run. They will have


A Field that is Still Open.
Young men are disposed and withfsome jus-
tice nowadays to complain that all the voca
tions are overcrowded, and that for every va-
cant clerkship there are a score of applicants
It is also made a theme of lament that the pro-
fessions are too full, and young men who have
a moderate capital and some business capacity
and experience, declare that in mercantile pur-
suits competition is ruinous and that a small
sum of money is of little account in the settled
communities. Granting that these complaints
are well founded there is a .field still open for
energy, skill and ambition. The problem of how
to make a living can be perhaps more satisfac-
torily solved by falling back on the soil than by
any other experiment. There are still cheap
lands in the West and South, and if a
young man lacks money to farm on a big scale,
he can begin in a smaller way, and by stock
raising, small fruits, truck patching or some
other limited essays in this wholesome and use-
ful field of agriculture secure a living, and,
with reasonable fortune, in time a competence.
There are hundreds of young men in cities who
could, in a few years, save up enough money,
if they were so inclined, to buy a little place
and devote themselves to raising food for the
ever-increasing millions of consumers in the
country. With all the hardships of farm life,
and they have been greatly exaggerated, it is
the happiest life known to men. It is freer from
the bickerings and the worriments and the tor-
tuous devices and the selfish rivalries and the
antagonisms that mark the struggle of human-
ity for food, shelter and clothing, than any other
mode of existence. It is a life which is com-
monly attended with health, with good ap-
petite and digestion, sound sleep, clear complex-
ion, expanded lungs, firm muscles, an open
mind and untroubled conscience. The man
who gets fairly under way in this pursuit with
his house, his lands and his crops unembarrass-
ed, is certainly an independent man, if such a
being exists. In the genial Southern. climate
l smtntiapiner one." ltie is sure of fo6d and if
e is ecen prudent he never npod 1r.n.- wkI -
ebt is. There are localities in Kentucky,
Virginia, Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama and
Florida where an energetic young man, with
little capital, could do better at farming than
he could possibly hope to do in any city at any
other vocation, and out in those far regions of
Oregon and Washington Territory there are
splendid opportunities for young men to begin
now a career useful, happy and prosperous in
tilling the soil under the open sky, away from
the contentions of cities. The temptations in
cities which invite a reckless waste of money


following the civil war.
The influence of manufactures upon agricul-
ture is demonstrated in the wages of farm labor
as well as in the prices of farm productions.
The rate is higher according to the report un-
der consideration, in Massachusetts, than in any
other State east of the Rocky Mountains. It
is seen in the West, as well, affecting the aver-
ages of States lying side by side. Proximity
to large cities also increases the rate.
Whenever other industries flourish, and the
number of persons employed in agriculture are
fewer than those engaged in other occupations,
it is found that the wages of farm labor are
higher than in districts more exclusively agri-
cultural 'and statistics show further that the
prices of farm products are also higher, and
the gross and net earnings of the farm propri-
etor are greater. Whenever from manufactures,


made a good and substantial living, whilst the
spendthrifts of the towns are still wondering,
with empty heads and purses how it can be done.
The South and the Northwest still offer wel-
- come, and the generous soil yet contains re-
- wards for those who are deserving.-Louisville
Commercial.
Honors are Even.
The efforts constantly being made by individu-
als and associations throughout what is known
as South Florida, to induce immigration to their
_ particular locality, honest efforts are highly
commendable. But the prospector will tell you
that every man he meets insists that he has the
I finest location in the best portion of the State
and that he is unable to judge correctly because
of his ignorance of the products and methods of
cultivation in this latitude. The settler has ex-
ercised his judgment and considered some things
of importance that the prospector would deem
trifles, and yet the former would believe what
he asserted. Although the settler may not live
within a mile of a lake and would denounce
with much energy a residence in such a location,
enquiry might reveal the fact that he has an
absorbing. fear that his children would get
drowned if they had access to the water, while
you would retire from the State unless you
could secure a "lake front." Some would like
to live in the interior while others prefer the
coast ; some don't care particularly about mos-
quitos but detest gnats, and sand flies on the
coast are the horror of others. The sum and
substance of the matter is, that "honors are
easy," and the remedy for disappointment should
be taken in this particular case before the dis-
ease sets in. A residence of several months in
different localities possessing distinctive fea-
tures will enable the prospector to become a
satisfied settler. And this can be done readily
by the man of very small means, for wherever he
may go he will find a demand for his labor as a
mechanic, farmer or laborer.-Lake Eustis Semi-
Tropical

Rates of Wages of Farm Laborers.
An investigation recently made and reported
upon by J. R. Dodge, statistician, relative to
the rates of wages paid for farm labor in the
JInigq uif&'Tp1, mh Lee ytars rTmtsmindss activity
and financial c nfidence. The following state-
ment presents the average rate of wages, with-
out board, in employment by the season or year:
I 1882 I 1879 i 1875 1869 i866
Eastern States............ $26 61 $20 21I $28 96 $32 08 $33 30
Middle States............ 22 24 19 69 26 02 28 02 30 07
Southern States..........i 1530 13 31 16 22 17 21 16 00
Western States........... 2363 20381 2360 2701 28 91
California.................... 3825 4100 I44 50 4638 35 75
These averages indicate a recovery of the
status of 1875 in the West, a near approach to
the rate of that year in the New England, and
a partial restoration in the Middle States. There
is still a decline of 20 per cent. or more from
the inflated rates of the flush times immediately


State; but in future I hope to be able to give a
more extended article upon the natural re-
sources of that beautiful and thriving State,
familiarly known as the Land of Flowers.-
James T. Magbee, in National Farmer.

LIMES AND LEMONs.-Everybody should
raise lime trees and yet but few pay but very
little attention to it. Limes always bring afine
price. They are better than lemons and will
stand the cold just as well as the lemon. It is
very juicy and makes a delightful beverage.
Some say to suck the juice of a lime every morn-
ing, will prevent fever during the summer.
We can attest one fact ; that during a severe
cold with slight fever, we drank freely of limon-
ade just before going to bed. That night we
slept well and found relief next morning
from fever, and much of the unpleasant effects
of the cold had disappeared.-Palatka Herald.


- -- ---~---- -- -- --- --


m


mining or commerce, the non-agricultural pop-
ulation is relatively in smaller proportion to the
whole people, the law of supply and demand
inevitably secures a higher reward to rural
labor.
The higher wages in harvest will uniformly
be found in the wheat-growing States of the
Northwest and California, because of the extra-
ordinary prominence of a single crop, which is
an absorbing speciality. In the winter-wheat
region, Michigan, for a similar reason, offers
high wages for labor in harvest. The harvest
in the South is a longer season, not so exacting
in demands for immediate and speedy conclu-
sion, and wages are therefore lower relatively
than transient service in the West.
The range of rates in the present investiga-
tion runs from $1.05 in Alabama, to $2.65 in
Dakota.-N. Y. World.




Florida.
TAMPA, FLORIDA.
To the enterprising and industrious farmer
but few States, if any, offer greater inducements
than Florida, for the following reasons: It is
one of the healthiest States in the Union; the
lands are good and cheap; the climate is very
mild and not very changeable; the hottest days
in summer, the thermometer never rises above
950, and in winter on the peninsula it seldom
gets cold enough to kill the tomato vine. The
fall, winter and spring are the best seasons for
gardening there, and consequently large quan-
tities of vegetables are produced and shipped
from there to supply the Northern markets,
which command very high prices. One great
advantage the farmer has there, is, that he need
never fail to raise a crop; for if one thing fails
he can raise others, as he can plant a market-
able crop the year round. He need never be idle,
and will always find the soil returning a rich
reward for his labor. All the tropical fruits
are raised on the peninsula. Many of them are
too delicate to bear transportation and are never
seen in the Northern markets. The products
of the Florida jninsuaagaror. ricae.oottas,
tropical and semi-tropical fruits. In the north-
jiil pu or oime l ao mne cereals ana snort-sta-
ple cotton are raised. In this part of the State
the lands are generally very rich, and there is
no place on this continent more attractive and
beautiful than what is known as Middle Florida.
The hospitality of the people of Florida cannot
be surpassed anywhere. The old settlers are
from different States-many of them from the
Northern States. A hearty and kind welcome
is extended to all new comers, and in my can-
did opinion no farmer will regret that he has
selected a home in Florida. The short space
allowed will not be sufficient to do justice to the


I






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 235


Agricultural, Horticultural and Pomological
Associations.
Florida Fruit-Growers' Association-Office at Jack-
sonville-D. Redmond, President; W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; W. H. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding Sec-
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee-Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, 0. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official organ-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA STATE GRANGE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICES.-Master, Win. H. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Wm. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B. F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Field-
ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. H. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate
Keeper, Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Win. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T. W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H.
Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Geo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Umstead, Hous-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville.-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J. C. Greeley, Treasurer.
Directors-J. H. McGinniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro, P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney. Annual meeting-
Last Friday in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; 0. E. Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. 0. Taylor, Secretary and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Florida.-President, A. B. Bartlett, Georgetown; Vice-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. Hawkins, Lake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George; George H. Thom, Treasurer,
Georgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
mond, Fort Gates.
Picolata Agricultural and Horticultural Society.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, W. N. Parxer, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugn, Corresponding Secretary,
N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., Recording Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer. Meets first Saturday in each month.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. Mathers, Second Vice-President; B.
W. Powell, Corresponding Secretary; B. F. Jordan, Sec-
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical Fruit Growers' Association of Monroe County,
Florida.-Home office, Myers, Florida; F. A. Hendry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson,
President; Thomas Tillis, First Vice-President; J. B.
Sutton, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary; J. M. Barco, Recording Secretary;
L. W. Hamlin, Assistant Recording Secretary.
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Association.-
John Bradford, President, Bradfordville, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida.
Pinellas, Florida, Fruit Growers' Association.-D. W.
Meeker, President; Win. P. Neeld, Secretary.
Central Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida.-Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
Evergreen Horticultural Society, Dunedin, Florida.-
J. W. Matchett, President; W. Tate, Vice-President;
Geo. L. Jones, Secretary.
Diecatur County Fair Association, Bainbridge, Geor-
gia.-Maston O'Neil, President I. Kwilecki, Secretary.
Lake Wier Agricultural and Pomological Society (of
Marion County, Florida).-Captain J. L. Cainy, Presi-
dent; Dr. L. M. Ayer, Corresponding Secretary.
Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Higgins, Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Association, Albany,
Georgia.-L. E. Welch, President; T. M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
Sumter County Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation.-D. L. Hubbard, President, Leesburg. W. C.
Dodd, Recording Secretary, Leesburg; A. P. Roberts,


Corresponding Secretary, Leesburg.
Florida Central Agricultural Society.-Thos. F. King,
President, Gainesville; Secretary, -
vi-e ; W. K. Cessna, Corresponding Aecretary, Gaines-
ville.
Archer Agricultural Association.-W. B. Lipsey,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine, Secretary; Dr. J. C. Neal,
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President; John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewis, Treasurer, Tallahassee.
Indian River Agricultural and Pomological Society.-
A. P. Cleveland, President; W. H. Sharp, Secretary,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
Association.-R. J. Mays, President; Frank W. Pope,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
Orange County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred. L. Robertson, Corresponding
Secretary.
Gadsden County Fair Association.-Jesse Wood Pres-
ident; W. H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R. arris,
Second Vice-President; J. W. Kendricks, Secretary; E.
C. Lou, Treasurer.
South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion, Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
which we may have fallen in the naming of officers, &c.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH?]


Clearwater Home, Farm and Grove Society.
CLEAR WATER HARBOR,
HILLSBOROUGH, Co., FLA., May 30, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
At a meeting of the Clear Water Home,
Farm and Grove Society, it was resolved, that
the proceedings of this Society be furnished to
your paper for publication.
The thirtieth meeting of this Society met on
the second Saturday in May. The Society was
called to order by the President, Mr. A. C.
Turner. The roll was called, and a quorum
being present, business was proceeded with in
the usual manner.
Minutes of the last meeting were read and
approved.
Call for reports: No report from Committee
on Fruit Culture; none on General Farming.
A report from the Committee on Gardening
was presented by the chairman, Mr. W. J. Rus-
sell, which was received and ordered printed :
REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON GARDENING.
To Clear Water Home Farm and Grove Society:
MR. PRESIDENT :-We have about reached
the close of another vegetable season, which,
owing to the unprecedented drouth and perhaps
a few other causes, has been an unprofitable
one for a majority of the growers of this section;
but whether we have met with success or fail-
ure, our experience will enable us to carry on
the business more successfully in future. When
we take into consideration the expense and la-
bor of fertilizing our land, the cost of market-
ing our produce, we see plainly that we cannot
afford to make many mistakes, and if we have
made any errors the present season, in time of
planting, varieties planted, fertilizers used,
manner of applying, &c., we should try to
avoid, so far as possible, a repetition of them in
future.
A few months ago, this society adopted a res-
olution, requesting the members to submit a
written report of their gardening operations,
giving the acreage planted, time of planting,
varieties found best adapted to our soil and
climate; the kind and amount of fertilizers used,
and those giving best results; the amount re-
alized from the various crops, and those found
most profitable to grow for market.
This information derived from our own prac-
tical experience is of considerable importance
to those engaged in this industry, and it is to be
hoped that the request will be fullycomplied with.
We planted four varieties of the tomato ; the
Acme, Paragon, Hathaway and Trophy. The
Acme was first to mature and continued longer
in bearing than the Hathaway. It is a larger
tomato, a more prolific bearer, and I believe,
during the season, has produced two bushels to
the Hathaway's one. The Paragon is a fair
sized, smooth tomato, but not a very good bearer.


The Trophy was a failure in every respect. The
plants are not hardy ; a poor bearer ; the fruit
too rough for market, and rotted badly. We
would recommend planting the Acme first, Par-
agon second, Hathaway third, but no Trophy
in this latitude.
A gentleman who has been gardening on
Caximbus and adjoining islands, the past season,
informs us that the Acme and "Livingston's
Perfection" will be planted almost exclusively
on the islands the coming season.
We planted four varieties of cabbage; the
Flat Dutch, Fottler's Brunswick, Jersey Wake-
field and Winningstadt. All things considered
we like the Winningstadt best. It is one of the
largest second early varieties, and nearly every
plant formed a good solid head. They aver-
age about 45 heads to the barrel and sold in
Philadelphia at $4.50 to $5.00 per bbl. netting
about 7 c. per head ; ten to twelve thousand of
this variety can be grown upon an acre. We


consider this, if not the best, a very good vari-
ety, to grow here; it being a very reliable header
on sandy soil.
Mr. Gregory says of this: "Should the soil
of any of my farmer friends be of so sandy a
nature that they find it extremely difficult to
perfect any variety of cabbage, before bidding
a final farewell to the cabbage family, I would
advise them to try the Winningstadt."
This variety will perfect heads in from 70 to
90 days from time of planting. We would
plant from September to January. February
and March are the best months in which to ship
to Northern markets.
We planted our first tomatoes October 20th
to 24th. Commenced shipping January 1st.
Our first shipments sold for $6.00 per bushel-
crate. Received good prices during the winter
months, and no complaint of shipments arriving
in bad condition.
With proper fertilizing and cultivation
tomatoes will mature in 60 days from time of
transplanting; and for fall and winter shipping
would plant the first of September, and for
spring, in January. Prices are good for toma-
toes from November until Charleston and Nor-
folk shippers get into market, which is usually
about July 1st.
The subject of fertilizing is one of too much
importance and would require too much time to
be considered in connection with this report, as
was fully demonstrated at the Fair held at this
place one month ago. We have a soil and cli-
mate capable of producing fruit and vegetables
to the greatest degree of perfection. This Clear
Water section certainly can produce a very su-
perior orange, which for size and excellence
cannot be excelled by any orange-growing re-
gion in the world. We have never seen any-
thing to equal them in any of the Northern
markets. The produce from the fields and gar-
dens, for variety and perfection, was a surprise
to all who saw them. Now, the important ques-
tion to solve is the most efficient and inexpen-
sive means of supplying the needed fertility to
our soil. We hope from our combined experi-
ence to arrive at an intelligent understanding
of the requirements of our soil, and avoid being
imposed upon by fraudulent compounds sold
under the name of commercial manure.
Respectfully submitted by your committee,
J. W. R., Chairman.
No report on Domestic Economy. The chair-
man of the Committee on Flowers presented as
a report two beautiful bouquets, for which the
Society voted her many thanks. Committee
on Meteorology presented a report for April,
which was received:
Range of Thermometer: Highest morn., 760;
highest noon, 92; highest eve., 80; lowest
morn., 64 ; lowest noon, 740; lowest eve., 70.
Pleasant days, 23; showery, 11.
On motion, the Society adjourned for dinner.
Called to order after dinner by the President.
By order of the President, the Constitution
and By-Laws of the Society were read, after


which the books were opened for the reception
of new members, and the following names were
placed on the roll: Mr. and Mrs. Mao Dak,
Messrs. S. D. Harris, G. W. Mattinglay, J. Y.
Hearn, Mrs. Barnes, Misses Lillie Brackett,
Bell Reynolds. Mamie Ramage.
The Society proceeded to elect officers for the
ensuing year, with the following results: For
President, Wm. J. Taylor; Vice-President, J.
F. P. Kilgour ; Secretary, J. M. Dieffenwierth.
The retiring President delivered, much to
the edification of the Society, an address, and
the Society passed a vote of thanks to him for
his services. The President-elect also made a
few remarks.
The appointment of Standing Committees
was postponed till the next meeting. Mr. M. J.
Powledge was elected orator for the next meet-
ing.
The Society adjourned to meet at its usual





THE PLO RIbA D1SPATr(JHO


place of meeting on the second Saturday in
June. J. M. DIEFFENWIERTH,
Secretary.





PlymIIIth Rocks l a' PoKi flcks
FO SALE..
A few pairs at reasonable prices. Address,
T. GRAHAM ASHMEAD,
Williamson, Wayne Co.,
to July 10 NEW YORK.

T I:STrmm = B .O.'S

Soluble Ground Bone,
THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

FERTILIZER FOR ORANGE TREES,
Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.
Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTEnR & BEAN,
Agents for the State of Florida.


AI analysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


to sept 26, '82


RICH'D H. MARKS'

O ANG COUNTY LAND AGENCY,
SAN1FORD, FLORIDA,
'LIID'LANP ANDWIMPROVEMENT COMPLY.
BUYS AND SELLS
Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission,
ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
june 12-tf
WIN TER PARK is anew town in Orange
WIN I N LTR PAR County, Florida, eighteen
miles south of Sanford, on the South Florida Railroad,
with a frontage of two miles upon three beautiful Lakes.
WINTER HOMES in the midst of Orange Groves, for
Northerners, is the main idea. For Pamphlets and
Maps giving particulars, address
CHAPMAN & CHASE,
Winter Park, Orange Co., Fla.
to july 17,'82

A Good Investment!
0-

In the County of Hernando, East of Brooksville, the
county seat, and near the
Tropical Plorida E. E.,
which is now actively building, two tracts of land. The
first contains two hundred and forty (240) acres in a body;
the second contains eighty (80) acres. These tracts both
touch Upon a ITake of about 150 acres area; are
well timbered with pine suitable for lumber; the second
about half a mile southeast of the first; between them
lies a cultivated farm. These lands are well adapted to
Oranges and Other limits, being of good
soil, with little underbrush, and are easily cleared. They
were selected by I1on. Walter Gwynn, Ex-
Treasurer of the State of Florida, and they may be relied
upon as being what is represented. These lands are in a
part of the State that is rapidly settling up
and offer a good field either for an investment in Flor-
ida real estate, or for orange groves and the like.
Price and terms will be so arranged as to be satisfac-
tory to the purchaser. Apply to
WALTER B. CLARKSON,
Box 877. Jacksonville, Florida.
In corresponding, please mention this paper.
to August 29, '82.
GUINEA COws, or Heifer calves wanted.
Write the Editors of THE DISPATCH.
June 5 '82, tf.


Ocean Steamship Company.

SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.



The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, July 1st, 6:00 p. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, July 5th, 10:00 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, July 8th, 12:00 noon.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, July 12th, 4:30 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, July 15th. 6:00 p. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, July 19th, 9:00 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, July 22nd, 11:00 a. m.
GATE CITY. Wednesday, July 20th, 3:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, July 29th, 5:00 p. m.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight, received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
H. YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agentof Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS,
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. Y.

0o,ooo 0. OCK LEDGE HOME GROVE

Loolto Pear TrO8s alil Ciu s FOR SALE.
FOR SALE AT HAVING secured Deeds to the Gomez Grant of 12,180
FOR SA Aacres of land, embracing Jupiter Island,
to Aug21 Ii2ie LT rsery. THE ELDORADO OF FLORIDA,"
and wishing to make it "The Pine Apple Bonanza-the
S B s T ot r very winter garden and fruitery of United States," in-
duces me to sell
Also, 400 Bsliols b LOUOlltO Fo11s MV Y VOME ANDo eno E
for sale. Only offered for 20 days. The public is invited that will yield perhaps next year one quarter million Or-
to come and see "The Wonder of the Age." Trees 10 anges. Trees 5, 8 and ten years from bud. Delightful
years old holding up 25 bushels of the nicest fruit climate, perfect health, good water, rich hammock land
known to the American people. on the
Address, GREATJVT INDIAN RIVER ;
H Ddubbed "our smoke-house," affording finest fish, oys-
H. H. SANFORD Proprietor, ters, green-turtle, bathing, rowing, and transportation.
DIXIE NURSERY, Apply to CO. SURVEYOR,
June 19 to July 10. Rock Ledge, Florida.
to July 10 THOMASVILLE, G A..

Pine Apple Plan is ll1S IN TE INY S0ITH.
Packed and Delivered at Rockledge. --
From 4 to 6 inches in length, per 100..........................$ 100 SPLENDID OFFER TO SETTLERS
Ten inches and over................................................. 3 00


J1AS. IWL. IIITE.
Rockledge, June 20, 1882. (It)

SILK AND HONEY.
BEST ITALIAN BEES, QUEENS, Etc.,
at greatly reduced prices. An average profit of $69.63 per
colony, net. A salary of $2,963.00. Also eggs for rearing
cocoons for American silk-a new and important indus-
try. A',.,n at once.
CHAS. R. MITCHELL.
Hawkinsville, da.
11, 13, 15, 17-p.

LANDS FOR SALE
SUITABLE FOR

Orange Groves,
In lots to suit, in the town of

8atlsma, Itnam l CoDoty, lrifla.
Send for circular to
WHITNEY, GOLD & HODGES,
Satsuma, Nashua P. 0.,
june 26-tf FLORIDA.


4U Hours from New York City: 108 Miles
from Savannah.

So tli b Ceorgia LT ad.s for
Sale 1b3-
J. M. STICKER,
une 1f Glenmore, Ware Co., Ga.


TO

New York and Return.

Good to November 1.

MEAITS A.ND SrTATEROOMS ON
STEAMERS INCLTJUDED.

From Savannah via Charleston, Wilming-
ton, Weldon, Portsmouth, thence by the
elegant Steamships of the Old Dominion
ninL efn Newr Yov rk


"70MJ S & JE- ". LAIM LUJ i V I .
f.IRST-CLASS ORANGE AND VEGETABLE LAND. PASSENGERS leaving Savannah SUNDAY, MON-
Also river front, with 90 Choice Orange trees nearly DAY, TUESDAY and FRIDAY at 4:15 p. m., arrive at
Steady to bear. Portsmouth MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY,
The above property adjoins the Magnolia Hotel at and SATURDAY, making close connections with
Magnolia, Florida. Address, steamers, arriving in New York the next evening.
W. T. THOMPSON, No Delay in Going or Returning.
(Box 111,)
to july 1, '82 Green Cove Springs, Florida. For tickets and further information, apply to WM.
BREN, S. T. A., 22 Bull Street, Savannah, Ga., and
Ticket Office S., F. & W. Railway Depot.
AT MANDARIN, FLORIDA. s. c. BOYLSTON,
20 FORTY-ACRE TRACTS only 12 miles from Jack- G. P. A.
sonville; extra good land, well located, between river June 19 to July 10.
and J., St. A. and H. R. R. R. Price, $10 per acre. Will __
sell on monthly payments of $12.50. These lands will in-
crease in value, being located in an already prosperous PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
town, making a paying investment at small outlay. VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
Maps can be seen at No. 41 East Bay Street. PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
to nov 21, '82. GEO. R. REYNOLDS.CONFER A FAOR BY N0
Jacksonville, Fla. TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


I





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 23


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE.




Rates on WATERMELONS in Car Loads of 20,000 Pounds.


TrO T0r.S E E'='EPT t A 2 0 .tl, 1.882.

lFrom Florida Trdn- R ceta n
Fro m Jacksonville, sit Railroad, except Florida Transit Rail- Florida Central and
.O-- Callahan and Live Ocala and Points be- road, 0 c a a and Western Railroad.
Oak. yond. Points beyond.

A tlanta ................................................................................................................................ $ 60 00 $ 85 00 $ 90 00 $ 80 00
A ugusta.................................................................................................................................. 55 00 80 00 85 00 75 00
B altim ore.............................................. .......................................................................... 100 00 125 00 130 00 119 00
B oston ................................................................................................................................. 100 00 125 00 130 00 119 00
B ristol, T en n....................................................................................................................... 90 00 115 00 120 00 110 00
C harleston, S. C.............................................................................................................. 36 00 61 00 66 00 56 00
Colum bus, G a........................................................................................................................ 60 00 85 00 90 00 80 00
Chattanooga, Tenn....... .......... ..............................0:........................................................ 70 00 95 00 100 00 90 00
Cincinnati, 0 ......................................................................................................................... 80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
Cairo, Ill................................................................ ...........01......................... ....90 00 115 00 120 00 110 00
Colum bus, 0 ................................... ...................................................... ..................... 100 00 125 00 130 00 120 00
Cleaveland, 0 ....................................................................................................................... 100 00 125 00 130 00 120 00
C hicago, Ill.......................................................................................................................... 110 00 135 00 140 00 130 00
D alton, G a............................................................................................................................. 70 00 95 00 100 00 90 00
Evansville, Ind..................................................... ............. .. 80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
Indianapolis, Ind.......................................................................................................... 90 00 115 C00 120 00 110 00
Knoxville, Tenn.......................................... ........................... 84 50 109 50 114 50 104 50
Louisville, Ky................................................................. 80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
Macon, Ga.......................................................................... 45 00 70 00 75 00 65 00
M ontgom ery, A la.................................................................................................................. 60 00 85 00 90 00 80 00
M obile, A la........................................................................................................................... 70 00 95 00 100 00 90 00
M em phis, T enn ..................................................................................................................... 80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
N ash ville, T enn .................................................................................................................... 75 00 100 00 105 00 95 00
N ew Orleans, La..................................... .. ..................................................................... 80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
N ew Y ork, N Y ..................................................................................................................... 100 00 125 00 130 00 119 00
P eoria, Ill............................................... .......................................................................... 110 00 135 00 140 00 130 00
P hiladelphia, Pa................................................................................................................... 100 00 125 00 130 00 119 00
R om e, G a............................................................................................................................... 70 00 95 00 100 00 90 00
Savannah, G a.................................... .......................................................................... 22 00 47 00 52 00 41 00
S t. L ouis, M o.......................................................................................................................... 90 00 115 00 120 00 110 00
Terre H aute, Ind......................................... ....................................................................100 00 125 00 130 00 120 00
Excess of 20,000 pounds will be charged for pro rata, provided the weight loaded does not exceed the capacity of the car, as marked thereon. If cars are not
marked with the capacity thereof, the weight of load must not exceed 20,000 pounds. All excess of load above capacity of the cars will be charged for at double rates.
Melons must be loaded and unloaded by the owners. Shipments of Melons will be receipted foi only as "Shipper's Count." This Line will not be responsible
for deficiency in quantity loaded in the cars, nor for damage resulting from improper loading. Shipments via Florida Dispatch Line will not be required guaranteed
or prepaid.


D. H. E LLIOTT, Gen
'
1 Agent Florida Dispatc la.


JAS. L. TAY LOR, Gen
1 Freight Agent, Ga.


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE in connection with ATLA NTn O A& T XE---.
IZates on Watermelons in Car Loads of 20,000 in Cents per 100 lbs. To take effect May 20th, 1882.


To-



Baltim ore................................................................ ........... .............. ...........................
Boston............................... ............ .......................... ...... .................. .... .........
N ew York.........................................................................................................................
Providence ........ ..................................................................................... ...........................
Philadelphia...........................................................................................................................
Portsm south, Va.............................................. ..................................................................
Petersburg, Va...................................................................................................................
R ichm ond, Va........................................................................................................................
W ilm ington, N C.................................................................................................................
W ashington, D. C. (via Portsm outh)...................................................................................
Shipments via "ATLANTIC COAST LINE" must be prepaid to destination.
will be charged at double rates.


0
U


Florida Transit and
mn Jacksonville Peninsula Railroad, Florida Transit Rail- Florida Central and
id C(tllaun. except Ocala and road, Ocala and Western Railroad.
Points beyond. Points beyond.

GOs. Cts. Cts. Cts.
.6312 .76 .78Y .73
.688 .81 .831 .78
.68Y2 .81 .83 .78
.68Y .81 .83Y .78
.68% .81 .83 .78
.481 .61 .63i/ .58
.48Y .61 .63 .58
.48Y .61 .631 .58
.3825 1 .53 .48
.632 .76 .78 .73
20,000 lbs. will be the minimum rate charged for. All excess of capacity of cars


'NAXMM





3 THE PLO IDA DISIPATCH.


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
--0
MERCHANTS & MINERS

TRANSPORTATION COMPANY!


The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail
From BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH
EVERY FIVE DAYS,
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE, as follows:
Monday, July 3d, at 9 a. m.
Saturday, July 8th, at 1 p. m.
Thursday, July 13th, at 5 p. am.
Tuesday, July 18th, at 9:30 p. m.
Monday, July 24th, at 1 p. m.
Saturday, July 29th, at 5 p. m.
Thursday, August 3d, at 10 a. m.
Tuesday, August 8th, at 1 p. m.
Monday, August 14th, at 8 a. m.
Saturday, August 19th, at 10 a. m.
Thursday, August 24th, at 2 p. m.
Tuesday, August 29th, at 8 a. m.
The steamers are first-class in every respect, and every
attention will be given to passengers.
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $15,
Including Meals and Stateroom.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Baltimore.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quickdispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
column.
JAS. B. WEST & CO., Agents.
Savannah, January 8th, 1878. 30-tf

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA




WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.


HUAU & CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF

FINE KEY WEST CIGARS
-AND-

WHOLESALE LEAF OE.ALErRS.


Proprietors of Factories Nos. 29, 61 and 81, District
of Florida,
Jacksonville, F'lorida,
The Most Extensive Manufacturers in the State.
lyr to april 23, '83.

D. G. AMBLER. .T. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as

AMBLER'S BANK.
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf


A FEW CHOICE LOTS OF FIFTEEN OR MORE
acres, river fronts, affording attractive and lovely
building sites, and admirably suited to the growth of
oranges, figs and other Florida fruits, may still be ob-
tained on reasonable terms.
"HOLLYWOOD" is south of "Point La Vista," on
the eastern shore of the St. Johns River, four miles from
Jacksonville. For circulars, maps, terms, etc., address
D. REDMOND,
apr 3-tf Box 257, Jacksonville, Fla.

W. II. PILLOW'S

TRA1WBEIRRY SHIPPING AEINCY
-AND-
FRIUIT ANID VEGrETABLE
REPACKING AND
COMMISSION HOUSE,
Has closed till NOVEMBER. Present address,
may 12, '83. 1MACON, GA.

THE JONES
SWPRTVENS

VRntilateog Trnss6





ARE THE

.zSIST., S a IFES 'T,

AND


Sportman's Emporium. BEST IN THE WORLD.


W. C. PITTMAN,
No. 3 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


-0-
PN AND AFTER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1882, Gn,
Passenger N rains wFTER i over the Waycross Short Ttols, ifles and Cutlery,
Line as follows: Shi ootin arndxl vSn ci T er-1


:Fast Mail.
Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at................ 9:00 a. m.
Arrive Jacksonville at............... 5:40 p. m.
Leave Callahan at. ................. 9:44 a. m.
Arrive Waycross .....................11:57 a. m.
Arrive Jesup at.... .................... 1:40 p. inm.
Arrive at Brunswrck at................. 6:00 p. m.
Arrive Savannah at.................... 3:40 p. m.
Arrive Charleston at.................... 9:10 p. m.
Arrive at Augusta at...... .... 5:20 a. m.
Arrive Macon at.............................................. 7:50 p. m.
Arrive Atlanta at.......................... 3:50 a. m.
Arrive Louisville at......................................
Arrive Cincinnati at......................................
Arrive Washington at................... 9:30 p. m.
Arrive Baltimore at....................12:25 p. m.
Arrive New York (limited express)........ ...
Arrive New York P.. R. R............. 6:45 a. nm.
A rrive St. Louis at......................................
Arrive Chicago atn..........................................
TIME.
To Savannah...................................................
To N ew York.................................................
To W ashington.............................................
To Chicago.....................................................
To St. Louis....................................................


Jack'lle Ex.
Daily.
5:40 p. m.
8:15 a. m.
6:45 p. m.
9:15 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
5:30 a. m.
2:35 a. m.
9:05 a. m.
1:30 p. m.
7:00 a. m.
12:50 p. m.
8:00 a. im.
7:00 a. m.
9:10 a. m.
12:05 a. m.
3:50 p. m,
5:20 p. m.
7:00 p m
7:00 p. m

6:40 hours.
45:45 hours.
36:30 hours.
49:00 hours.
49:00 hours.


THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
ta.Jacksonville to Savannah.
i-Jacksonville to Louisville.
a 1-Jacksonville to Washington.
:..Jacksonville to Cincinnati.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
Passengers taking Savannah sleeper can remain in the
car until 7 o'clock a. m.
Parlor and Drawing-Room Car on morning train
from Jacsonville through to Savannah, connecting
daily with through Pullman sleeper for New York.
The Dining Car attached to the train between Savan-
nah and Charleston affords supper to passengers going
North, and breakfast to those coming South.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to Montgomery and New Orleans
take the evening train.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. n. and arriving at Savannahl at 2:35 a. mi., or train
at Jacksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vannah at 3:40 p. m.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, at Depot Ticket
Office. J. E. DRAYTON,
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*] Ticket Agent.


SHELLS LOADED TO ORDER.
1 yr to April 23, '83



DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,

GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emery Papers, &c.
AGENT FOR

PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIRE TEST.

Johnson's Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, Martinez and Longman's
Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel.
to mar25,8, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

[4-347.]
ITotice for 7=P-ablic tio_-.

LAND OFFICE AT GAINESVILLE, FLA., May 3, 1882.
OTICE is hereby given that the following named
settler has file'Tnotice of his intention to make final
proof in support of his claim, and that said proof
will be made before T. E. Buckman, Clerk Circuit Court
at Jacksonville, Florida, on Saturday, June 24th, 1882,
viz.: Jacob Robinson, Duval County, homestead entry
No. 561, for the Nw Y of Nw 14, section 6, township 3s,
range 27e.
.9'He names the following witnesses to prove his con-
tinuous residence upon, and cultivation of, -said land,
viz.: Calvin Hughes, Samuel Anderson, Andrew Sess-
ions, Lee Clark, all of Jacksonville, Florida.
L. A. BARNES,
May 8 tf Register United States Land Office.


For sale by D)R. J. C. L'E GTGL:E,
Wholesale Druggist, Jacksonville, Fla.
*W-Send for Circular. mar 25-tf

ST. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0-
CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.



OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
1 yr to April 23, '83

VIEWS OF FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In Book Form, Containing 12
Views Each.
Souvenir of Florida, (small size).................... 25c.
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size)...................................................... 25c.
Souvenir of Jacksonville,( large size).................50c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine,(large size).............50c.
Stereoscopic Views, per Doz. $1.50.
Address

ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
JAC KSONVILLE, 3FLA.




Soluble Ground Bone,
THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

FEtRTILIZIR FOR ORANGE THEHX,

Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.
Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTER, & BEAN,
Agents for the State of Florida.


AmWAnalysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


to sept 26, '82




TRiE FLORIDA DISPATCH 23


F. S. CONE, A. H. MANVILLE, E. A. MANVILLE,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer

Lake George, Florida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums
Peaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, and over one hundred varieties of the Citrus.
ORANGE ANID LE13MCON TREES a specialty.
Catalogue free. to apr 17, '83

ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]
J. A. BARNES C.

FRUIT AND PRODUCE

COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
So'u.thern. :r'uit and. "Vegfetaboles a Specialt-y.
3206 and 32S North Dela-ware Avenue, Philadelphia.
tojan 6, '83

JO!IES d3 BOWEMr


WHOLESALE GROCERS,
AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


ACER'S


,DRY HOP YEAST


CAKES,


60c. PER


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND


Boston anll 3av annIa Xtoagmhii LItB





ONLY DIRECT LINE BETWEEN
SAVANNAH AND BOSTON.
Transhipment and extra handling saved. No danger
of fruit being frozen. Cars are unloaded at the steam-
ship wharf in Savannah, avoiding drayage.
CABIN PASSAGE, $18.
SAILING FRO(I SAVANNAH.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, July 6th, at 11:00 a. m.
Seminole, Thursday, July 13th, at 5 p. inm.
(Chas. WV. Lord, Thursday, July 20th, at 10:30 a. m.
Seminole, Thursday, July 27tl, at, 4 p. m.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
44-tf Savannah, Ga.

DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
The largest stock in the State. Country
buyers will consult their own interests
by corresponding with me. All orders
promptly filled at prices to compete with
any house south of Baltimore. Remern-


D OZ. her my only Florida address.
GEO. HUGHES,
to june 26, '82 Cor. Bay and Ocean, Jacksonville, Fla.


SNOW-DROP PATENT LIOUR. PIANOS AND ORGANS


First E~~~a3.s o3n 0 inest Qlality

Dairy Butter from 35 to 37c. per Lb.,

Tept in. tble Lia rgest efrigerator in th.e State,

No. 7 West Bay Street, - - Jacksonville, Florida.
To sept 27, '82


Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide.

H. D. BOUNETHEAU, PROPRIETOR

N OR DY K E FLORIDA MIAL OIL AND SOAP WORK,


MILLS
-MANUFACTURE-

FreshCround
FEED, GRITS,
MEAL,
(Bolted or unbolted.)
Pearl Hominy.
GRAIN, HAY, COAL AND
WOOD-YARD.


MANUFACTURER OF
Lubricating and Boiler Compounds, Compressed Soaps, Car and
Axle grease.
ALSO SOLE MANUFACTURER
of the best Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide extant-
0RMA M.rTOM E3 TI EE EMC'U iTLSIO4T i
made from Whale-Oil Soap, combined with other powerful ingredients known
to be most effectual for destroying the "Scale and other insect pests and
parasites of the Citrus family. It will also put the tree in a healthy and flour-
ishifng condition. Prepared for immediate use. Perfectly harmless to the
youngest tree or plant. In packages of from 25 to 300 pounds. Price, 10 cents
per pound. Discount to the Trade. 'r Full directions for use accompany
each package. Address
H. I). BOUNETHEAI.


P. O. BOX 984, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


to july 31 '82


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
--0--
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
-0
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers for July are appointed to sail as follows:
JUNIATA, July 1st, at 6:00 p. in.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, July 8th, at 12:00 noon.
JUNIATA, July 15th, at 5:00 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, July 22d, at 11:00 a. m.
JUNIATA, July 29th, at 5:00 p. m.
Days and hours subject to change, without notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, WM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savanriah.


.A.. ". C.AMP E EL/L=B"S."r ,,
15 lEast I3ay TJaLcksonville.
SOLD ON INSTALLMENTS, AT LOWEST PRICES-
branch of Ludden & Bates, Savannah-EXACTLY
SAME PRICES AND TERMS, Sheet Music, Strings
and small instruments of all kinds. Send for cata-
logues, prices and terms. TUNING AND REPAIRING
a specialty. My tuner will make regular tours through
the State, and my customers will thus have my repre-
sentative at their doors, a great advantage to purchasers
of instruments, to sept 26, '82

M. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the
of the Marshall House. Screven House.
riTHE HAIRNETT HOUSE,
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARNETT & GEORGE, Proprietors.
RATES, $2 PER DAY.
This favorite family Hotel, under its new manage-
ment, is recommended for the excellence of its cuisine.
homelike comforts, prompt attention and moderate
rates. to sept 4,'32

O. L. KEENE,
MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,

Laces, Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF
11^ M' -i 141 "K1 .7=_ ,a,_' ,-"s
67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to feb 20, '82


SEND "1.5o0 TO


35 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.,
And get a bottle of Richmond's Samaritan Nervine.
Cures Nervous Disorders, Dizziness, Vertigo, Seminal
Weakness. The only sure cure for Epileptic Fits.
Address HOLT'S PHARMACY.
to aug 20, '82

RUBBER STAMPS
Are manufactured right in our establishment in the
best manner and at the shortest notice.
ga-Send in your orders.
ASHMEAD BROS.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
May 1-tf


I




0 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


A. N. DOBBINS & BRO., PTE FIlE GOUTTnD BOE, $3S-5o per Ton.,
(Guiaranteed Purxe.)


Guu, Lgcksmiths anfqstoncil nttors,
24 LAURA STREET,
JACIKSONVILLE - FLORI1)A,
unsmithing done in all its branches.
IRON SAFE WORK.
Special rates on Stencil Cutting, by mail. Address,
to june 12'83, (P. 0. B3ox 833.)


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100 BIARIN ORANGE TREES,
Surrounding a handsome residence in Jacksonville,
halt-mile from the centre of business on Bay Street.
House has seven rooms neatly finished in natural
wood, with kitchen and servants' rooms, store room,
and plenty of closets. Good stable and carriage house,
PURE WATER,
Good neighborhood-(ALL WHITE.) Lot is 210x157 feet,
has
100 Orange Trees,
12 to 16 years old, large and thrifty. Also,
Grapes,
Figs,
JPecaons,
Etc.
Splendid chance for any one desiring a lovely home in
Florida, and a bearing grove.
For price and terms, apply to
J. I-. ]NORTO1N,
Jacksonville, Florida.
State that you saw this advertisement in THE FLORIDA
DISPATCH. june 12, '82-tf
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


SOTTON SEE3D VIE-AL, $38 per Ton.,
(100 Pound Bags.)

COTTON SEE3D LZ--ZTML,- A -SH, $27 per Ton.,
(The Best Potash in Use.)
20 Bu~islels Conrcl- E:eas for Sale.
STOCKBRIDGE FERTILIZERS for Orange Trees and vegetables, for sale by
J. E. 1HART,
to jan 6, '83 Jacksonville, Fla.


ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,

PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS

PRINTERS AND BINDERS,
AND DEALERS IN

TOYS AND FANCY ARTICLES.


NEWSDEALERS.-We keep all the latest Daily and Weekly Papers from Boston, New York, Philadelphia,
Baltimore, Chicago, St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, New Orleans, Charleston, Savannah and Jacksonville, and
take subscriptions to all publications at publication price. Orders by mail promptly attended to.
LIST OF BOOKS ON FLORIDA.
FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, INVALIDS AND SETTLERS (Barbour, Profusely Illustrated)...............Price $1 50
FLORIDA: ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE AND HISTORY (Lanier)................................................................Price 1 50
GUJDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paper.................................................................................................Price 10
FAIRBANKS' HISTORY OF FLORIDA...........................................................................................................Price 2 50
G U ID E TO JA CK SON V ILLE ...............................................................................................................................Price 25
TOURISTS AND INVALIDS REFERENCE BOOK OF WINTER TRAVEL..............................................Price 75
SOUTH FLORIDA, THE ITALY OF AMERICA....... ...............................................................................Price 25
DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition)enlarged and improved...............................................Price 50
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edition, enlarged and improved).........................................Price 1 00
ORANGE INSECTS-Illustrated (Ashm ead, .....................................................................................................Price 1 00
ORANGE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA, by A. T. Garey, (cloth)...............................................................Price 1 25
A MANUAL OF GARDENING IN FLORIDA (Whitner)................... Price 50
COLTON'S M AP OF FLORIDA..................................................................Price 75
COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-the best)........................................... ......................................Price 1 25
NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF ST. JOHN'S RIVER.......................................................................... Price 25
McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST OF LAWS OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep, postage extra).....................Price 6 00
INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA..........................Price 3 00
Any of the above books mailed on receipt of price.
O IR A N E V A P S................................................................................ 10x10, 4c.; 11x1l, 17c.; 12x12,20c.
LAW BLANKS.
W ARRANTY DEEDS, per dozen........................................................... .................... ............ ...............Price 50
QU IT-CLAIM DEEDS, per dozen................................................................................................................... Price 50
M OR TG A G E S per dozen................................................................................................................................ Price 50
NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, made to order............................................................................................Price $5 00
We publish a full line of Law Blanks for Lawyers and Justices of the Peace. Price-list mailed on application.
Special prices to large buyers. Adddress
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
feb 12-tf 21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


BUY THlE BEST AND CHEAPEST

-0---

GOULD & CO.'S


FERTILIZER
-AND-
i2bTSECT E2TEI3I3^I-A-TOIS,

Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange Growers and Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, con-
tains potash, lime, phosphoric acid, ammonia and the other essential elements of Plant Food, making a com
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & Bro.'s, and other high-priced Fertilizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity, and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $4 per barrel, $32 per
All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.


MESSRS. GOULD & CO.:
Gentlemen-I used one-half ton of your Fertilizer, in connection with the same amount of Baker & Bro.'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gave as good results as the others, which are much higher priced fertilizers-costing
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $51.50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12, 1881.
LEESBURG, SUMTER Co., FLA., March 6,1882.
GOULD & CO.:
Gentlemen- Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed your
agents at this point (Messrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer,
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its fostering care, I having had the honor
to win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer better and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer "kills two birds with one stone," inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies,
at one and the same time. I have been testing it in the field, garden and orange grove for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For my part, I ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. if I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork.
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOURT.


to aug 27, '82


GOrUULD UU.,
NO. 6 W. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


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