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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00014
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: June 26, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00014
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

Full Text































devoted to the Aqricultural, manufacturing and Industrial Interests of Florida and theaSouth.


Vol. 1.-.No. 14.


New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.


Price 5 cents.


Monday, June 26, 1882.


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.


A Handful of Earth.
Here is a problem, a wonder for all to see.
Look at this marvelous thing I hold in my hand !
This is a magic surprising, a mystery
Strange as a miracle, harder to understand.
What is it ? only a handful of earth ;to your touch
A dry-rough powder you trample beneath your feet,
Dark and lifeless; but think for a moment, how much
It hides and holds that is beautiful, bitter or sweet.
Think of the glory of color! T-he red of the rose,
Green of the myriad leaves and the fields of grass.
Yellow as bright as the sun where the daffodil blows,
Purple where violets nod as the breezes pass.
Think of the manifold form of the oak and the vine,
Nut, and fruit, and cluster, and ears of corn;
Of the anchored water-lily, a thing divine,
Unfolding its dazzling snow to the kiss of morn.
Think of the delicate perfumes borne on the gale,
Of the golden willow catkin's odor of spring,
Of the breath of the rich narcissus waxen-pale,
Of the sweet pea's flight of flowers, of the nettle's sting.
Strange that this lifeless thing gives vine, flower, tree
Color and shape and character, fragrance 1oo,
That the timber that builds the house, the ship for the
sea,
Out of this powder its strength and its toughness drew;
Thatthe cocoa among the palms should suck its milk
From this dry dust, while dates from the self-same soil
Summon their sweet, rich fruit; that our shining silk
The mulberry leaves Would yield to the worm's low
toil.
How should the poppy steal sleep from ihe very source
That grants to the grape-vine juice that can madden or
cheer?
How does the weed find food for its fabric coarse
Where the lilies proud their blossoms pure uprear ?
Who shall compass or fathom God's thought profound ?
We can but praise, for we may not understand;
But there's no more beautiful riddle the whole world
round
Than is had in this heap of dust I hold in my hand.
-Celia Thaxter,

South Florida Railroads.
The Tavares Herald says that the railroad
problem in South Florida is getting to be an
interesting one-interesting to the people who
will patronize them as well as to the builders
who will construct them. The average citizen
looks upon a railroad as something designed for
his convenience and profit, and fails to see why
he should be charged more than what he con-
siders a reasonable price for what he may de-
sire to use it for. Railroad companies look
..upon the matter from a business standpoint as
a money-making investment, (and no one ever
yet made money enough) and so between the
two parties there is nearly always an unadjuat-


ed difference of opinion as to what should be
asked and accepted for service performed or
work done. According to the Orange county
Reporter there is now a pretty big "nigger in
the fence" somewhere between the citizens
around Orlando and the management of the
South Florida Railroad, which has recently
been sold to the Reed-Willard syndicate. The
increase ini tariff rates of freight on June 1st
has been met with a growl that betokens a
storm.
The Reporter is neither bashful nor back-
ward in saying its say, and is undoubtedly well
backed up by public sentiment in that locality.
It looks as though the South Florida Railroad
must recede from its last tariff rates of freight,
or that another railroad will be built from Or-
lando to some other point. Steps have been
taken looking towards the re-establishment of
the old freight route from Lake Jessup to Or-
lando by teams, and it is not improbable that
the merchants and others around Orlando are
backed up by some of the St. Johns, River
steamboat lines.
A general disposition, however, is manifested,
to wait and learn if the old or new company
are responsible for the recent advance in rates
of freight.

Will Commertial Fertilizeis Pay?
There is a diversity of opinion on this subject,
both on the points as to whether they will pay
in adding to the production of crops to more
I
than to pay for cost, and as permanent improv-
ers of the soil. We have no hesitation in an-
swering this question in the affirmative. Of
course, they will not always succeed. Dry sea-
sons, improper application, the want of adapta-
tion to the soil and to particular crops, and the
want of proper constituents or improper propor-
tions, frequently produce failure. All these
difficulties, may be remedied by the first ope,
and that may be to a certain degree, by deep
plowing or subsoiling, stirring the land fre-


quently, and keeping down weeds and grass.
The best farmers in Virginia, and I presume
elsewhere, use fertilizers, and those who have
used them judiciously are satisfied with them.
Dry weather is the most frequent cause of dis-
appointment in their use, and some who have
chanced to use them in such seasons have put
the failure to the wrong cause and have pro-
nounced the fertilizer as worthless and a fraud.
The ready extension in the manufacture and
use of these fertilizers is a strong argument in
their favor. In Georgia, one of the most pros-
perous, if not the most prosperous of all the
Southern States, about 100,000 tons are now
annually used. In the selection of these arti-
cles the farmer must use judgment and reflect
tion, must apply to the experience of those who
have successfully used them, and must study
the analysis to find out what they contain which
is necessary for plant-food. At the same time
he should endeavor to understand what analysis
means and for what purpose it is intended ; must
endeavor to know which of these constituents
contained are necessary to the particular crop
to be raised, and which of them his soil most
requires. Phosphoric acid, (Phosphate lime)
whose use has been so extended in late years,
particularly in the form of South Carolina phos-
phate, is important to all soils and to all crops;
of course, more to some than to others. Nitro-
gen (Ammonia) may frequently be dispensed
with,as where turning under green crops has been
practiced or the land contains much vegetable
matter. Potash is usually found in sufficient
quantity in red or chocolate lands, but is essen-
tial on all worn, thin soils. It is essential to
almost all crops, though not so much so as phos-
phoric acid. In the use of the latter it must be
remembered that if contained in a liberal
amount in fertilizers, it will on light lands fre-
quently fire crops, unless applied in a moderate
quantity. One great and overruling considera-
tion in the use of commercial fertilizers is, that
if properly applied and of proper quality, we
can by their action usually get a stand of clo-
ver and the grasses on lands that would not
otherwise produce them.-American Farmer.

GUINEA Cows, or Heifer calves wanted..
Write the Editors of THE DISPATCH.
June 5 '82, tf.


1


r ._____._._ L .-1. .. ._. _. Y ------ -- -- ------ ------------------------- t


INEW #ONE. k.





21 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Condition of Cotton.
From the Report of the Department of Ag-
riculture, for May, 1882:
For the purpose of ascertaining the compar-
ative proportion of the proposed area of the
year usually planted on the 1st of May, and
whether a greater or less proportion had been
put in on that date the present season, inqui-
ries were introduced into the May circular.
An examination of the table shows that in
the Atlantic States planting is more advanced
than usual, and in the district from Alabama to
Texas it is later than usual. The overflow of
the Mississippi has retarded the work in Louis-
iana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Tennessee ;
and strange to say, a lack of water has caused a
delay in Texas, many correspondents report-
ing the land too dry for planting. The pro-
portion usually planted prior to May 1 is .85 per
cent.; in general terms, one-third of the breadth
in North Carolina, one-sixth in Georgia, about
seven-eighths in the Gulf States, and nearly all
in Florida. It is the aim of the planters in the
lower tier of States to have their cotton up and
chopped out by the 1st of May, but the seed-
ing is so extensive, the- desire so intense for a
spread of area, that plowing and planting are
continued through the spring, much as wheat
is seeded in California as long as the rainy sea-
son lasts. This spring planting has been re-
tarded somewhat in the uplands of Alabama
and Mississippi. Another cause of late plant-
ing is the necessity for replanting to replace fail-
ures to germinate by reason of wet and cold
weather.
It will be seen that the difference between
this and usual seasons, on the 1st of May,
amounted to 18 per cent. of the whole breadth
in Louisiana, 10 in Mississippi, 7 in Arkansas,
and 3 in Tennessee, or nearly half a million
acres. Southern Mississippi is protected by a
high bluff on the river which makes the differ-
eitce much less than that of Louisiana, though
the whole country lying between the Yazoo and
the Mississippi is subject to overflow.
Only two-fifths of the Virginia cotton had
been planted, which is 5 per cent. more than
usual at this date. It is included mainly in a
half dozen counties south of Petersburg, which
occupy a cotton soil, which is a continuation of
the cotton belt of North Carolina.
The planting was three-fourths done in the
latter State. It was more advanced than usual,
one-third of the area being in ordinary seasons
unplanted when .May comes in. The early
cotton has been injured in places by frost, and
growth has been retarded by cold, wet weather.


In Nash County it is thought that 60 per cent.
will be replanted, which means at least 15,000
acres. A part of the breadth of Johnston
County will also be planted over. Some cor-
respondents note a decrease of area, others an
increase.
Although the spring is two weeks earlier
than usual in South Carolina, the cotton is by
no means advanced in proportion. Recent cold
weather has been unfavorable, and cut-worms
have injured the stand, Percentage of area
already planted, 85, instead of 87 in average
years.
Planted in Georgia, May 1st, 86 per cent.,
instead of 83. Chopping out has been com-
menced on early fields. Many reports announce
decrease of arrea to be planted. In Bibb
County, "cotton for the first time in fifteen
years is considered a secondary crop." It is


mentioned in several instances that commercial
fertilizers are less used. The crop is mainly
planted, the stand is generally good, and the
plants look well.
In Alabama planting has been delayed some-
what by the wet weather, yet a large part of
the area is up, some of it chopped out, and cul-
tivation commenced. The nights have been too
cool for rapid advancement.
Planting has been retarded in the uplands
and pine woods of Mississippi by rains, and
long held in abeyance on the Mississippi bot-
toms by the overflow, so that 75 instead of 85
per cent. of the breadth proposed is yet planted.
The temperature has been too low and mois-
ture too abudant for the best appearance of
cotton fields.
Louisiana has, of course, suffered most from
the overflow. There is a deficiency of about
one-fifth the area that should have been planted
by the first of May, which is usually about nine-
tenths of the whole acreage. In several counties
very little cotton had been put in at the date of
return. In some counties that which was planted
in March required replanting.
Four-fifths of the cotton of Texas planted-
less than usual on the first of May. Drought
has prevailed in the south arid west, and many
planters have been unable to plow their lands
in season for early planting. The correspondent
in Colorado County says : "Planting is suspend-
ed until we get rain." It is said in Gregg that
"the late frost injured the stand." That which
is up and cultivated is generally looking well.
The first stand was at many points killed or
injured in Arkansas. There is more or less
replanting in progress, and in the overflowed
district planting was delayed for the subsidence
of the waters.
Tennessee planting is nearly all in the usual
state of forwardness, looking fairly well, except
where injured by low temperature and exces-
sive moisture in soils not well drained.
The acreage of cotton will be reported on
the first of June.
Farming at the "Front."
Never before have there been so many people
of all classes taking a strong, direct, personal in-
terest in the agricultural situation and prospects.
Business men, bankers; capitalists, stock brokers,
merchants,mechanics, man ufacturers,operatives,
and day laborers even, are watching the daily
bulletins an'd reports of the weather with espe-
cial reference to how it is affecting the growing
wheat, corn, and oats, and the further planting
of corn. Never before have they seen so clearly
that farming is the real basis of all other busi-
ness, and that upon it rests the prosperity of the
country. They now comprehend the fact that
it was the good crops of 1879, 1880 and 1881,
from the export of which we received so many
hundreds of millions of dollars from other lands,
which changed the financial depression of 1873,


and the years following, into a prosperous activ-
ity extending through all branches of trade and
manufacture. Every extra bushel of wheat or
corn, or pound of meat, cheese and butter that
went to market helped turn the scale. The
hundreds of millions of bushels of grain that
came from the interior to the seaboard, gave
profitable employment to the railroads. These
bought and used more cars, more iron, more
steel, and the makers of these, from the head
director to the lowest laborer, received more
wages and more constant employment, and they
purchased more freely those articles that go to
supply the necessities and comforts of every
day life. This stimulated and increased the
mercantile trade, and made heavier demands


upon all kinds of manufactured commodities.
The farmers who received the proceeds were
able to reduce debts upon their farms; to buy
more and better implements; to pay up their
store debts, and to buy more freely from the
merchants. The merchants and shop-keepers
were in turn able to pay up their debts to
wholesale houses, brokers in manufactures, and
importers, and to buy larger stocks of goods for
cash or on short credits. The carrying of these
goods increased the transportation business, and
stimulated the building of five to ten thousand
miles of new railroad per year. .
This brief glance at some leading points shows
the great and far-reaching influence of pros-
perity to farmers. On the other hand, the un-
favorable winter and spring and the summer
drouths of 1881 cut down the surplus wheat
and corn and meat and dairy products and cot-
ton, may score millions in value. This of
course diminished exports, and has started gold
abroad ; it has decreased the ability of farmers,
and all classes of workers, to buy goods and
manufactures. The decline in the demand for
iron and steel, and the fall in prices, prevent
the payment of the wages asked for, and there
is now prevailing one of the greatest "strikes"
ever known in this country, of laborers who
demand higher pay to meet the increased cost
of living, due in part to the advance in bread-
stuffs, consequent upon the lessened crops of
last year. Is it any wonder that this state of
things has opened the eyes and enlightened the
understanding of that half of the people who
are not engaged in agriculture, and who have
hitherto been inclined to look upon farming as
of inferior importance, and suited for clod-hop-
pers ? Farming has come to the front, and it
is going to stay there.-American Agriculturist
for July.
Wheat and Bermuda.
A correspondent of the Palatka Herald says:
Inclosed please find a few heads of the Dal-
las wheat, grown on old, badly-worn hammock
land in this vicinity, that would not produce
more than ten bushels of corn to the acre, and
although the past spring has been very unfa-
vorable for all field crops, and more especially
for small grain, yet this wheat continued green
during the month of March, when the anti-rust
oat, known in this vicinity as the Alderman oat,
was badly injured, and the Henry oat entirely
destroyed by the drouth. This wheat is recom-
mended by the Department of Agriculture to
be the most anti-rust wheat of any variety, and
I am satisfied from the reports that I have re-
ceived from the several parties to whom I dis-
tributed seed, that this wheat can be grown
here with as much certainty as any grain, and
with as great a yield as the strength of our
lands will admit.
I also inclose a wisp of Berimuda grass, which
I have been trying to grow in the yard for more
than a year, but with little success. I notice,
however, that a sprig has found its way to the
shade of a China tree, where it appears to be per-
fectly at home, and as a shade is what it wants,


I have decided to allow a small field to grow up
in persimmon trees, where I intend planting
Bermuda grass. I have frequently noticed
that corn, cotton, etc., grew as well under per-
simmon trees as in the open field,, and I am
confident that a first-rate Bermuda-grass pas-
ture could be grown on our sand hills by add-
ing a little shade, and nothing would add so
much to the wealth of our vicinity as a luxuri-
ous growth of Bermuda grass on at least one-
half of the fields now in cultivation.

The Coming Crop.
Fortunately, says the Florida Daily Times,
the crop prospects are good and improving-
the report of the Agricultural Bureau for June
being better than that for May. It is true that


A


Iq






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


in the cotton crop the report shows a deprecia-
tion of eleven per cent. below the average of
production; but this is not necessarily a disad-
vantage to the cotton grower. On the contrary,
it is probable that a crop diminished to the
extent indicated would bring more actual
profit to the planter than an output which
should come fully up to the average. It cannot
be denied that the unexampled crop of 1880
was too large for profit to the producer, and its
effects were apparent in the prices received for-
the shorter crop of 1881. There are no great
stocks on hand now and left over, and the pros-
pects of the coming crop are full of encourage-
ment for the South.
For Florida the outlook is particularly en-
couraging. While the total average of cotton
is 27 per cent. less than in 1881, the acreage in
Florida is only one per cent. less and while the
average of condition is only 70 per cent. in
Virginia it is 97 per cent. in Florida. "The
condition is best in Florida," says the official
report of the Agricultural Bureau; and this
renders it certain that whatever may be the
result to the cotton States in general, the com-
ing cotton crop will be a profitable one to Flor-
ida.



Propagation of Plants by Cuttings in Water.
The art of propagating plants by cuttings,
embraces a vast number of very interesting
facts. The method to which we now solicit the
attention of our amateur readers, is rather de-
spised by the professional gardener as being
beneath his skill and attention; nevertheless,
it will show that the instruction which it con-
veys, is in itself amply sufficient to rescue it
from contempt, or rather, to raise it high in the
estimation of the lover of flowers.
The three ensuing months, (June. July, and
August), comprise the period wherein cuttings
succeed most freely ; and for the reason, that
they are then inclined to start into growth and
to obey the increasing stimulus of humidity
and prolonged solar light, thereby forming a
callous and quickly developing roots. During
this period also the necessary transplanting to
their final situation in the garden may be ef-
fected to their least possible disadvantage;
thereby securing that absence of failure in es-
tablishing young rooted plants characteristic of
other months in this climate.
A cutting is prepared by passing a knife
either through, or close to, a joint or leaf;
selecting a growing shoot, firm rather than soft
in texture, for the operation. Almost invaria-
bly it is found that if a young shoot be clipped
off the parent plant and carefully trimmed at
the heel or joint to remove asperities and ren-
der the surface smooth, roots will be produced
much more freely than they would be from
any intermediate part. When a cutting is fixed
in the soil, whether it be in a pot or in the open


ground, the progress of rooting is concealed,
and can only be conjectured by the appearance
of the part that remains above the surface. To
an experienced eye the successful completion is
obvious enough, and steps can be taken, accord-
ingly for subsequent removal, but to beginners
this is not so apparent; the rule to go by is to
observe the accession of growth and protuding
shoots when roots have formed.
A cutting when placed in a wide mouthed
bottle or phial of water, may fail; it may also
decay, but if it is to succeed eventually, two
circumstances will become obvious; first it will
not flag or droop, and second, the water how-
ever long the cutting remain in it, will show
little, if any tendency to become fetid or of-
fensive. It has long been an observed fact that
the oleander will emit roots, if a young green
shoot be placed in a small bottle of water. It
frequently happens that a lively shoot with'the


flower buds becoming visible at its summit, will
take root in a few weeks, and being transferred
to a pot, or to the open ground, will retain and
expand its flowers, forming a beautiful object
in miniature. The same may be said of the cape
jasimine, the wax plant etc. Succulents root
freely, so does the Balsam. Small cuttings of
the cucumber and melon taken at the third
joint from the summits, or indeed from any
part of the plant, rarely fail to root in a few
days.
Multitudes of examples might be cited of
subjects for trial, such as heliotropes, salvias,
petunias, verbenas, thunburgias, begonias, and
soft wooded plants generally, are free rooters
in water.
Among shrubs, we have tried successfully,
abutilons, crape myrtle, hibiscus, bignonias,
clerodendrons and a host of others. To those
who require but a limited number of plants
and who have not the accessories of green-
house, nothing can exceed the facilities the
process of rooting cuttings in phials or botttes
afford. Not to dwell upon instruction to be
derived from the observation of processes which
stand revealed to the eye, we do contend that
as in removing these rooted subjects from their
fluid element, no injury is done to the slightest
fibre or most delicate spongilole, a great object
is attained, for the plants if treated 'with any
degree of skill and dexterity, strike off at once
and establish themselves in an appropriate soil
with the least possible loss of time. A suffi-
ciency of water in propagating plants otherwise,
is an essential element of success, and no cer-
tainty can be relied upon where this element
is lacking. Quite a number of plant cuttings
will endure vicissitudes of treatment and suc-
ceed marvelously whenever stuck in, either in
shade or sunshine. In these cases it would seem
to some people, other procedure cannot well be
recommended. It would appear their system
has antiquity in its favor, and answers its pur-
pose. Not that we contend against it, but to
make assurances doubly sure, it behooves every
one, to give assistance at that most precarious
ceriod of plant life, a cutting without roots in
pourse of formation.-Florida Agriculturist.

About Watering Plants..
Unless one has an abundant supply of water,
so that its use, when once begun, can be contin-
ued, it is better, as a general thing, not to water
at all in the drouth which we so generally have
this month, a mere sprinkling of the leaves is
worse than no watering tit all. Still, we all may
have in the vegetable as well as in the flower
garden certain plants that we would like to
favor. In such cases, instead of watering the
plant, the water should be applied to the soil;
draw the earth away from the plants, forming
a sort of basin around them; then pour on
water gradually, and let it soak around the
*roots." Afterwards return the removed dry
earth to its place, and this will act as a mulch
to keep the roots moist.-American Agriculturist


for July.
Horticultural Dentistry.
About a hundred years ago, a shrewd Scotch-
man in charge of the Royal Gardens at Kew,
near London, in the reign of George III., man-
aged to create a sensation by showing to distin-
guished officials from abroad, as well as to others,
various trees in which large wounds were hand-
somely healing over, and attributing the won-
derful recuperation to a something ivhich he
applied, and of which he held the secret. These
taking stories of Forsythe's-who, had he lived
in our time and country would doubtless have
been made Commissioner of Agriculture-were
retailed with such additions andc estimates as led


211


to a grant of many thousand pounds to him by
the Government on condition of his making pub-
lic the ingredients and proper use of the com-
position for the benefit of mankind. The mixture
was nothing but simple loam and cow-droppings
beaten together, and its use of coarse secondary
to the clearing out of all decayed parts, and to
the stimulus of active growth by culture. Thos.
Andrew Knight, of Downton, Herefordshire,
was then President of the Royal Society, and
published articles showing the absurdity of
Forsythe's claims, but his good pen was no
match for the Scotchman's tongue and red-tape.
The incident served, however, to impress an
important fact in tree treatment. In the proper
amputation of a branch the cut must be smooth,
the bark around must be in healthy condition
and carefully saved so that it may cover the
wound by gradual extension; and a coating
like the air and .water-proof bascilicon plas-
ter or salve of the surgeon must be used
over the cut as a substitute for the wanting
bark or skin. Where this care has been neg-
lected and decay has set in or has proceeded so
far as to make cavities in the trunk the dent-
ist's processes must be imitated-all the decayed
portion scooped clean out and the hollow
plugged with a mixture of loam and cow-dung,
which should be capped with some water-proof
coating.-N. Y. Tribune.

Mocho Palm in Bloom.
Col. Coogler's Mocho palm tree, the only one
growing in the United States, bloomed on
Wednesday last. The bloom is yellow, very
sweet in perfume, and in shape like the tassel of
corn, resembling it only in having pollen cov-
ered branches or fingers radiating from a stem.
The stem is, we suppose, about an arm's length,
bends over with its weight of bloom, and is cov-
ered its whole length by the sheath of the bud,
shielding it like a roof or inverted canoe. About
two hundred fingers were inclosed by the sheath,
each of which is expected to bear a date. It is
a beautiful flower, and a unique curiosity in this
country. We cannot describe it so as to convey
an intelligent idea of its appearance. There are
three more buds yet to bloom on the tree, which
will be fully as large as the one now open. The
perfume of the flower now pervades the air all
around it. The buds and blossom are ituated
in the crown of the tree, where all the reaves of
the palm- family make from the trunk. This
palm tree now blooming is about twenty-five
feet high, trunk fifteen inches in diameter, and
is just eight years old from the seed.
The Mocho palm is a very peculiar variety of
that peculiar family of trees. At the collar of
the tree where the roots connect with the trunk,
the roots look like bamboo or reed-cane stems,
small and closely jointed. The trunk is very
straight and tall, not a leaf or branch except
at the top, bark smooth and at a little distance
has somewhat the color and appearance of the
smooth sycamore. The trunk throughout its
whole length is ringed closely with circle after


circle of keen, sharp thorns, about two and a
half inches long, apparently inserted in the bark.
These thorns stick out everywhere, on leaves,
leaf-stems and body. ThIe top is like a feather-
crowned palm. Long, thin and narrow stems
reach out in every direction, bending over in
graceful curves. From these depend narrow,
flexible leaves, resembling those of the reed-
cane. This is the only tree of the kind in the
United States, as far as we know; so Brooksville
is ahead of all of her South Florida sisters, at
least in one thing: i. e., the Mocho palm.
Probably Col. Coogler can give our readers
some important facts in regard to the history,
nativity, habits, peculiarities, fruit, seed and
uses of this strange and beautiful palm. We
would be glad to publish anything he may have
to write on the subject -Brooksville Crescent,
June 17th.


I





12 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


A. E. TRONE.
SORRENTO, FLA.


I like it very much indeed.
Miss MOLLIE P. WELTY.
LEESBURG, FLA.
At the same time allow me to express my
satisfaction with the able way in which your
paper is conducted, and the fund of information
it never fails to contain. /
G. H. WARING.
KINGSL'EY, FLA.
I am a new comer." Saw your paper Sat-
urday evening. Want it.
R. WEBB.
LOUISVILLE, KY.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
GENTS-The specimen copies of THE FLOR-
IDA DISPATCH received, with which we are well
pleased. So entertaining and instructive a
journal should be highly prized, not only in


Jacksonville, Fla.

A New Rice Cleaner I
LYNN, MASS., June 12, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
A new and much improved machine for
cleaning rice has lately been invented, and is
now being manufactured by Messrs. Wm. A.
Brown & Co., of this city. The main business
of the firm is the manufacture of their patent
Coffee Hullers, which is the best thing in use
for preparing coffee for market. The senior
member of the firm has several times visited
South America, where a great many of their
machines are in use on the coffee plantations.
Mr. Brown has recently returned from Holland,


How "The Dispatch" is Appreciated.
INDIANAPOLIS, IND.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
Inclosed please find the amount of my sub-
scription to THE DISPATCH. I will make you
glad once in return for the many times I have
been made glad by the prompt arrival of your
interesting paper. I did not take kindly to the
change at first, for I had learned to love the
solid little sheet under D. H. Elliott's manage-
ment; but now as I am accustomed to seeing
my little "pet" of former years in its "Metropol-
itan finery," and recognize its broad scope and
aim, I have returned to my first love, as I should
feel quite lost without it.
Our little colony from this place is making
all haste to be ready to immigrate to your "Land
of Flowers" as soon as your rainy season is over.
For the reason that I am soon to become a resi-
dent of your State, "The Labor Problem," by
Agricola, fills me with dismay, especially as I
see he has given utterance to the same gloomy
prospects on that question I was led to suspect
when I was in your State last winter. On the
other hand, the article on "Guinea Cows," cred-
ited to the Atlanta Constitution, arouses pleas-
ant anticipations of plenty of milk and butter;
which, if fully realized, will wipe out the prin-
cipal objection, on which the croakers against
Florida depend for their strongest argument.
Do not fail to tell us all you can find out about
Guinea cows, where they can be bought, etc.
We have had no spring here; but a series of
cold rains, alternating' with clear, cold nights
and slight frosts throughout the entire months
set down in the almanac as spring. However,
it has brought its blessings, as it has been im-:
possible for the spring poet to get in his work.
"It's an ill wind," etc.
Wishing THE DISPATCH long life and pros-
perity, I remain, yours truly,
1 FUTURE EMIGRANT.

EUFAULA, ALA.
The new issue shows plainly that THE Dis-
PATCH is now in the hands of men who know
what they are about, and gives promise of suc-
cess. I shall be glad to welcome it weekly. It
is worth ten times as much as the old issue.
DR. T. W. TOBEY.
ARREDONDO, FLA.
I think THE FLORIDA DISPATCH the best
paper for farmers now published in the State.
W. A. TOFFIEZ.
LAKE COMO, FLA.
I am a poor man, but not too poor to do
without it, at the low price. I liked it before,
and I like it much better now.


PINELLAS, FLA., June 5, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
This section of Florida certainly possesses
the most excellent climate, both for gardening,
fruit-growing, and for invalids, and this applies
equally to summer as to winter weather. We
have had delightful breezes-principally from
the Gulf, thus far into the "heated term." These
winds sweep all the malaria from the land and
otherwise keep us in health and spirits. We
are now on the eve of the showery season, when
the warm earth will almost daily be cooled and
refreshed, vegetation will put on its new clothes
and all nature will rejoice. Our guavas, man-
gos, alligator pears, and other fruits will soon


your own State, but by the country at large.
Aside from its merits 'as a disseminator of gen-
eral useful information on Florida matters, the
modest price of $1.00 a year ought to double
and triple the large circulation it already seems
to have. Please mail a copy for our office use,
commencing with No. 1, present volume. En-
closed find price. Could you furnish 50 copies
of No. 4 with the interview of Gov. Bloxham.
Yours,
H. W. WILKES & Co..
F. L. & I. Agency of Louisville, Ky.
DORCHESTER, MASS.
Thanks for your improved DISPATCH, taking
its place as it does among the quarto sheets of
our useful periodicals. Florida is taking rapid
steps in fruit and vegetable culture and is conm-
ing to the front with an energy which gives
promise of great results. Yours, as ever,
MARSHALL P. WILDER.
ORANGE CITY.
Had. never seen a copy till yesterday. Must
have it right along. S. C. FULLER.
NAYLOR, GA.
I am well pleased with its present form.
THOSE. Fox.
COE'S MILLS, FLA.
I did not pay much attention to the little
sheet, but since you have got it out in a large
and new dress, I have concluded to subscribe.
W. J. FERRELL.
YALAHA, FLA.
I should miss it very much. It is the cheap-
est paper for the money in the State."
T. L. CUNNINGHAM.
CINCINNATI, OHIO.
The excellence of the little paper, "THE
FLORIDA DISPATCH," is pre-eminent. I took a
fancy to it the first time I saw it, because it
seemed to fill, (in a measure) that which was
wanting. From what I know of your State, I
think it is the place for me, and if no prevent-
ing Providence, this time next year will find
me tilling the soil of the Land of Flowers.
MILO BENNETT.
The above are taken promiscuously, and are
not selected, from hundreds of other kind words
spoken by subscribers to THE DISPATCH.
Subscribers have been coming in from Cali-
fornia, Utah, Kansas, Missouri, Texas, South
Carolina, New York, Ppennsylvania, Massa-
chusetts, Vermont, Maine, and, indeed, from
nearly every State in the Union, and some few
from foreign countries. It is very gratifying to
editors and publishers, for the more we get the
better will be the paper. It is already a success ;
but send in your subscriptions, and make it a
grand success. We shall not fail to appreciate
it in the least. Address,
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,


where he has made contracts with the Dutch
proprietors of East India coffee plantations.
The rice machine was invented by thejunior
member of the firm, at the suggestion of parties
interested in rice culture. Several sacks of
rough rice were sent here from the South to
experiment on, and the result is very gratify-
ing. The first set of the noew machinery that
was put into practical operation is now in use
in Baltimore by Messrs. Lyon Brothers & Co.
The first lot of rice that was operated on was
brought frpm Charleston, where, by the machin-
ery in use there, the yield is 20 pounds of clean,
from a bushel of rough rice, worth five cents
per pound. By the new process in Baltimore
the yield is 31k pounds to the bushel ; and it
comes out so much nicer that it is worth five
and three-quarter cents per pound. Altogether,
this makes a saving of about 75 cents per bushel,
or near two cents per pound.
On a machine cleaning 100 bushels per day,
the saving by the new process would be about
$75 per day; at.which rate the new machinery
would soon pay for itself. No matter how cheap
the old machines may be, or how costly the new
ones are, no sensible man would continue to use
the old kind after he had become acquainted
with the new one. It so happens, however, that
the new machinery is not only vastly better
than the old, but it is not more than a quarter
of the expense, the cost being about as follows:
To clean 100 bushels a day would require a 10-
horse power; the huller would cost $500; the
separator $200; the scourer $350; and the
polisher $350, making a total of $1,400. To do
this same work; in a much inferior manner, and
a loss of 331 per cent. by the old method re-
quires machinery that costs from $8,000 to
$10,000.
I inclose in a small package by this mail, a
sample of the rice as cleaned and polished by
the new machinery; it contains all that was
broken. If you will compare this with the
total product of the Jacksonville mill, in which
quite a large per cent. is broken, and sold at
half price, you will appreciate the difference.
I have made some inquiry as to rice cul-
ture in Florida among my acquaintances there.
The yield per acre is usually from three to six
times as great as that of corn on the same land.
But the crop is more difficult to harvest, and
to thresh out, and is more apt to be destroyed
by birds. Threshing machines, similar to those
used in the Northern States for cleaning grain
of various kinds, are, needed in Florida to sep-
arate the "rough rice" from the straw. It seems
a great loss of labor to beat out the grain by
hand; another loss in transporting rough rice
from South Florida to Savannah to be cleaned;
and then back again to the consumer.
J. M. H.

About Tampa Bay.


A""


4


Jo


0





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 1


be ripe-and while we "lie away up on our
backs"-"take it easy," and feast and fatten,
our orange groves are galloping up the road to
fortune at the rate of "two-forty." Our sugar
cane, rice and sweet potatoes will require but
little of our time and we will get a good rest for
a "set-to" in the vegetable work to be started
about September. Already programmes are in
pickle and "air castles" are being magnificently
constructed.
The building boom which prevails here cer-
tainly indicates confidence, and as an earnest
man is a power everywhere, there is every evi-
dence that something in the shape of wealth
will be dug out of what your correspondent
from Kansas says his friends called "pure sand."
Well, what matters it, except for the better,
whether wealth is dug from sand or picked from
rocks? Our fruits and vegetable are very much
appreciated and bring just as big money, and
no one asks or cares where it grew-in sand, in
clay, or muck.
It is certainly amusing to find a man who
wants to buy a nice place in a fine climate with
a most handsome support from it at once, with
immense prospects in the near future, for $1,000
or $1,500! Let me say to this good man, and
to any others seeking "dots," that down here
where the boom is just being felt, a little, that a
place like he intimates would cost about double
his figures and be the cheapest prospective
property in the United States that I know any-
thing of. There is no doubt in the world but
that the best way is to buy a grove ready made ;
in this way one saves his time, which is all he
has of value in life, and gets immediate interest
onr his money; whereas, if he sets a grove, and
waited he might not live to see the fruition of
his hopes; besides, if he counted his labor and
cost of living while the grove was coming on, he
might find that in more than half a dozen ways
it would pay to buy the bearing grove. I will
not argue further, but will leave this space for
a few other remarks.
There are quite a number of beautiful little
places for sale about here. People encouraged
by present success will not be content with do-
ing well. Several hotels and boarding-houses
are much wanted here. How strange that but
few rural, so to speak, accommodation houses
have been opened, in the face of the fact of the
good patronage of those that have been started.
Respectfully, etc.,
WM. P. NEED.

Crops in Alachua.
JONESVILLE, ALACIIUA CO., FLA., )
June 12, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
As no one else writes you any news from this
portion of the Land of Flowers, I endeavor
to scribble you a few lines in regard to the crops
and weather.
We are having too much rain at present, as
it has been raining for ten days, more or less


every day. Corn crops are looking very prom-
ising at this time. The farmers have cut down
their cotton crops in this vicinity from 10 to 25
per cent., and I hope to see it cut yet lower an-
other year, so that our corn-cribs and smoke-
houses can be brought near home, not from the
far-bff West. Let us plant less cotton and more
corn, rice and peas. Rice that was planted
early is looking very fine. Cotton is looking
very well, but is two weeks later than last sea-
son, ow'ng to dry weather in the spring.
Wittl best wishes for the success of THE
FLORIDA DISPATCH, I close. SUBSCRIBER.

Florida and California.
Below we give our readers an extract from a
letter, and a communication, from an old and
valued friend of our boyhood days, whose farm


adjoined ours, in Pennsylvania. As a compari-
son of the two States -California and Florida
-it will, no doubt, prove of great interest to
our readers:
SANTA BARBARA, CAL., June 5, 1882.
My Dear Twins:
I stretch my hand write (not my right hand)
across the Continent to bid you good speed in
your little rarey enterprise-newspapers being so
little rare that I suppose you will see the point
of my joke. If you don't see it, it is no loss to
either of us. I also want to acknowledge the
compliment paid me, and if these whitebacks
will pass current to pay my subscription with
you for greenbacks, all right .(without the w.)
Writing to you, who I chiefly know as "The
Twins," suggested the twin-ship-ness of our two
States, and without, in words, disparaging your
sloppy State, I have insidiously tried to make
your readers see how glorious it is to live in a
dry country.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Florida and California are the twin sisters of
Uncle Sam, separated, to be sure, by a long
distance, but having many points of similarity.
First, they have both been obtained from the
Spanish, the relics of whose civilization, lan-
guage and customs still remain as a fringe to
the social life of the inheritors. Then, too, both
claim an unexceptionable climate; both are
sparsely settled, both are rich in undeveloped
possibilities, and both are washed by the ocean.
But while there are these similarities, the con-
contrasts are probably more emphatic. In cross-
ing Florida, from Fernandina to Cedar Keys, I
noted that the greatest altitude we reached was
150 feet in the whole distance of 150 miles;
here mountain ranges are the rule and level
plains the exception. The Sierras, carrying a
general altitude of about 8;000 feet for most of
their distance, form the eastern wall of this
State, and along its base is a parallel triangle
or valley, whose north end, beginning at Mount
Shasta, is drained by the Sacramento River
flowing south. The south end of the valley,
beginning at the Tulare Lake, is drained by the
San Joaquin, and these two rivers, where they
join at Stockton, break through the coast ranges
and form the San Francisco Bay, and empty
their waters into the Pacific through the Golden
Gates. The coast mountains consist of parallel
ranges, with vallies between, which are, how-
ever, of but moderate extent, compared with
the Sacramento and San Joaquin. South again
of the Tulare Lake, the coast range bends east
and joins the Sierras, leaving the counties of
Santa Barbara, Ventura,Los Angeles, San Ber-
nardino, and San Diego (a region as large as
the New England States) witl a southern ex-
posure, the coast line here making an east and
west trend. This region of Southern California
is much broken up by ranges and spurs having
an altitude varying from 2,500 to 4,000 feet,
the conterminous Los Angeles, San Gabriel and
San Bernardino Vallies being the largest level


area in this section. So much I must say to
express the topography of the two States; and
now for the rainfall. We have here a quantity
varying from nothing in some rare years, up to
25 inches; the general fall here being about 18
inches. This quantity, too, comes only between
November 1 and April 30, leaving six months
of a perfectly rainless season.
The temperature (I am speaking now only of
Southern California) varies from a slight frost
to about 85 in those parts exposed to the sea
and at about its level, while in the high vallies
inclosed in the mountains, there is occasional
thin ice in winter and a high temperature in
summer.
But the twins are alike again in being com-
petitors for the Pulmonary- Exiles, the over-
worked busy men and the nervously prostrated
women of the colder North; and while each of


the twin sisters has its own merits, each has its
disadvantages. I am not a true Barbareno, as
I do not claim this to be perfection, for I con-
fess to fogs, occasional sand-storms and dessi-
cating winds. I confess to the paucity of native
trees, both in quantity and variety; the perpet-
ual iteration of live oak and button-ball be-
ing tiresome. The arid parched look of nature
from June to November is at first gruesome;
but I must believe that our drier, country and
our lack of rank vegetation are advantages not
possessed by Florida. "Comparisons are odi-
ous," is, however, the dictum of our old copy-
books; and there is no need for either sister to
decry the other.
As all persons having a common interest tend
to form themselves into societies (even the "hay
fever" invalids have theirs) I proposed the
Pulmonary Exiles form an organization with
one branch in Florida and one in Southern Cal-
ifornia. The organization of members might
be Masonic-thus-on meeting, the first speaker,
slightly coughing, says: "Ah, how did you
sleep last night ?" The second says: "I had a
poor night; how is your cough ?" This saluta-
tion and answer will do for the first degree or
Entered Apprentice. The ritual for the Fel-
low Craftsmen would be, after going through
the preceding, for the speaker to say: "My
cough is troubling me very much; do you have
night sweats ?" The second speaker ; "Yes;
but I'm getting better very fast." For the third
and last degree, the first speaker says; "My
feet are beginning to swell; I'll have to get a
bigger pair of boots before I go on a long tramp."
Second speaker: "Yes; I understand you were
about to go to a far-off country and not return
again."
You see (returning to copy-book excerpts)
"Familiarity breeds contempt," and so we Pul-
monary Exiles have as much right as the French
waiting for the guillotine-drop ,to amuse our-
selves with our ailments as they to dance on
the eve of execution. EXILE.

Mullet-In the Gulf.
BAY SAINT JOSEPH, FLA., June 9th, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
A few words as to the introduction of mullet
fish into market-Dry salted, or Pickled.
The mullet fish is claimed to be the best for
table use of all the fish that are to be found in
the Gulf of Mexico.* We have them Tll the
year round either dry salted, pickled or fresh,
and we have them in abundance.
Now we want to know why they cannot be
introduced into the interior and take the place
of the mackerel. We claim they are better
and cheaper than the mackerel, and by using
then we develop the resources of our State.
They can be shipped cheapest, in my opinion,
in flour barrels, dry salted; and will keep that
way for several months or all the year, but are
subject to get rusty. They don't spoil when
properly put up, and when ,any one receiving


them dry salted, could remove them and put
them in pickle, in any barrel that will hold
them, with very little trouble ant expense,
when it would add about $2.00 per barrel to the
cost to pickle them at the fishery.
The mullet can be put up in salt at about
$3.00 per hundred ; a flour barrel will hold
about 250, and in this condition they cold be
shipped to any part of the United States and
from any part of the Gulf coast. At present,
the shipments are almost confined to shipping
fresh from Cedar Key, the only accessible point
by railroad, and as they require fast transpor-
tation fresh, the best fishing waters are un-
available. I would be glad to hear from some-
one else on the subject.
F.
[Is not our friend forgetting the Pompano
and Spanish Mackerel.-EDS.]


I




1.. THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Gapes in Chickens.
To understand how gapes may be remedied,
or, which is better, prevented, the nature of the
trouble should be known. Almost all animals
are infested with a parasitic worm, known as
thread-worm, of which the scientific name is
Strongylus filaria, or the thread-like strongly.
This, when fully grown, is very like a piece of
white cotton thread, about two inches long. It
is found in cattle, sheep, pigs, and fowls of all
kinds, and even in the wild partridges, rabbits,
hares, and deer. The mature worm may be
found in the intestines or the air passages ofthe
lungs of older animals. The worms in the in-
testines produce eggs, which are voided in the
dung, and are thus spread over the ground or
become attached to the herbage in the fields ;
then, being picked up by the young animals-
or old ones as well-the eggs are hatched in the
-stomach and make their way up the gullet to
the point where the air passage or throat con-
nects with the gullet. They gather about this
point and some descend into the air passages
and penetrate even into the small bronchial
tubes of the lungs, feeding upon the mucus
which is produced by the irritation they cause
in the membranes which line the tubes. Old
animals, especiallysh ep, are often feverish
from this irritation, which causes constant and
violent coughing, and which interferes with the
respiration, and thus seriously affects the condi-
tion of the blood and prevents the proper nu-
trition of the animal. Young animals which
are thus affected, being weaker and less able to
bear the injury suffered, weaken very fast;
calves and lambs become thin and pale and
droop very fast, breathing with difficulty, and
finally die. Young chickens suffer equally, gap-
ing to relieve themselves from the obstruction,
until they, too, perish. Now, to prevent the
mischief, young animals of all kinds should be
kept from places where the older ones resort,
and calves and lambs should not be pastured
with or after cows or sheep. Young chicks
should be cooped on fresh ground where the old
ones have not been, and are kept away. The
runs of the old chickens, the yards, and the
floors of the houses should be turned over and
fresh earth brought up, and cleanliness in every
way should be observed. For a cure, turpen-
tine is th best remedy. This should be given
in the foil occasionally, and as it is very vola-
tile it rapidly passes into the blood and is ex-
haled from the lungs with the breath, thus pen-
etrating where it will do the most good and
kill the worms, which in young chicks and
other animals are quite small and easily de-
stroyed. To reach the young worms in the
throats of the chicks, the following operation
may be performed: Take a soft feather and
strip off the vanes, excepting a short piece at
the end; dip this in a mixture of sweet oil
and turpentine in equal parts; shake off as
much as possible; hold the chick in the left
hand and insert the feather into the throat


about one inch; give it a twist and withdraw
it, and it will either bring out a knot of the
worms or bring the turpentine into contact with
them and so destroy them ; it will also set the
chick to coughing and help it to dislodge the
worms. But it is far easier to prevent this dis-
ease than 'to cure it.-N. Y. Times.

Chicken Cholera.
There are a great number of "sure cures" for
this malady, although, in spite of them all, fowls
are dying of it every day, often, doubtless, be-
cause the owner has no idea of what sort of
treatment to give the affected birds. -From a
large number of "cures" which correspondents
of the Rural have mentioned in the last few
years, as having proved thoroughly effective in


their own hands, we cull a few of the best:'
Make a mixture of two ounces each of red pep-
per, alum, rosin and flowers of sulphur, and
put into the fowls' food in proportion of a tea-
spoonful to three pints of scalded meal. In se-
vere cases give one-third of a spoonful in a meal
pellet, once a day, to each fowl, and put a small
lump of alum in the drinking water. A Kan-
sas correspondent says he has cured fowls in the
last stage of diseases with the above mixture.
Our correspondent, Mr. H. Hales, places the
ailing birds in boxes of clean straw, and cuts
away such feathers as have become soiled by
their evacuations, and as a means of sustaining
life, feeds them twice a day oat-meal gruel, into
which is put some finely-chopped rue. This, of
course, has to be poured down the throats of the
sick birds. In addition, he sprinkles carbolic
powder upon the straw in the boxes where the
fowls are placed, dusts some into their feathers,
and gives them a teaspoonful or two of water
slightly impregnated with carbolic acid, which
can be obtained of any druggist. The ailing
fowls are kept apart from those in health, and
after the administration of this remedy they re-
cover rapidly. He treated two or three dozen
in this way, and thinks he would have lost all
of them had they not been so treated.
A lady correspondent says she fed bran mash,
in which was a liberal dose of common garden
pepper, feeding every other day for-two weeks,
and had no more loss from chicken cholera.
She says : "Whenever I see a chicken appear
droopy, I give it a dose of pepper, and it is
well."
Another writer says: "To one gallon of sour
milk add a teaspoonful of alum, selt it in shal-
low vessels where the chickens can drink as
often as they choose. We have used it three
years, and none of our chickens die of cholera
when we attend to it in time.-Rural New
Yorker.


Making a Fish Pond.
A correspondent of the Indiana Farmer
writes:
As most people are fond of fish, and the gov-
ernment is furnishing fish to stock ponds with,
perhaps a few suggestions pertaining 'to fish
ponds, their profits, and pleasures, would not
be out of place in your valuable paper.
In the first place you must have a suitable
place for the pond. The best place is along a
creek where springs come out of the bank ; if
the bank is fifteen or twenty feet high, so much
the better. The bank should be on the south
side of the pond. The benefit of having a high
bank on the south side, is that you can look
over the pond and see the fish, if the water is
clear ; if the bank was on the north side you
could not see on account of the reflection of the
sun on the water. The site being chosen, now take
a scraper and scrape out the dirt the size you
want your pond, leaving a small island in the
center ; by all means have a small island in the
center. It would not be complete without an
island, as I will attempt to show further on.
The dirt which is scraped out of the pond
can be used for a dam. It would be best to put
a dam at both ends, one to hold the water for
the pond and the other to turn the creek in
another channel; if the springs do not furnish
enough water, you can fix a gate at the upper
end and let the creek run through ; and when
there comes a rain, close the gate to keep the
muddy water out. The shape of the pond may


be made to suit the owner's fancy, but I suggest
that it be irregular, with capes, and promonto-
ries extending into it. Plant some nice trees
on them, and some cedar on the steep bank on
the south side ; but don't forget that island ;
make it round or oval, gradually tapering to
the top ; plant a cedar tree in the middle of it;
that island will be a thing of beauty by and by.
Now plant water lilies all around the edge of
the pond, but don't put any on that island. A
few stalks of horse-radish may be planted along
with the lilies, as their large leaves form quite
a contrast with the long, narrow leaves of the
lilies. It might be well to plant a couple of
peach trees on the island, as they will grow
luxuriantly there. Generally there are some
trees growing on the bank, like the one on the
south side ; if there are, plant grape vines to
run up one or more of the trees ; it will be a
thing of beauty as well as of profit.
But I almost forgot that island. Buy a pack-
et of petunia seed; it will only cost five cents,
and sow them on the island ; the reason I sug-
gest petunia, is, they are hardy and will form a
compact mass of flowers, and they will come from
self-sown seed, so they only need be sown the
first year. Now your pond is complete. The
next thing is to stock it. Carp is perhaps the
best fish for ponds as they are of good quality
and quick growth. They can be procured of
our fish commissioner, by making due appli-
cation. You must keep all other fish out of
the pond ; so you must arrange your pond with
a gate that you can draw off the water. It is
quite laughable to let the water out of the
pond, and then go around the bank, and chase
the frogs in ; they will make a big jump, ex-
pecting to strike water, but -instead, they land
on solid bottom, turn two or three somersaults
and try to dive ; then becoming disgusted, hop
off as fast as their legs will carry them until
they find a hiding place. If your pond has a
.few deep places in it so you cannot draw all
the water off, and there are some small fish you
wish to get out, take a stick and put one end
in the water and follow'the fish up with it, and
the fish will soon stop, and you can reach down
and catch them. It only takes carp about two
years to grow to weigh three or four pounds,
and then you' can have all the fish you want.
Those peach trees on the island will bear in
three years, and the grape in four years ; so in
a short time you will reap quite a profit from
a piece of land that could not have been put to
any other use. Put a rustic seat in the shade of
one of the trees, and then in your idle hours
you can watch the fish basking in the warm
rays of the sun, and see that island, as it were
out in mid ocean, covered with flowers. All
who can should build ponds, but have an island
in the pond ; an island does not look well in a
round pond, but an irregular shaped one is not
complete without one, if you admire the beau-
tiful. It should be seen to be appreciated.


"Fancy" Cattle and Foolish Prices.
The New York Tribune says: "To the unso-
phisticated observer it is one of the anomalies of
the time that while vicious modern processes
have largely abbreviated necessity for the old-
fashioned c )w, there should still be a brisk and
upward market for that superfluous milk-giv-
ing quadruped upon which benighted butter and
cheese eaters of the past were dependent. The
active mind of the average urban would natu-
rally suggest that the introduction of oleomar-
garine would tend to degrade the gentle rumi-
nants of the green meadows to the shambles,
and oppress the market with a superfluity of


NOW




THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 2


bob-veal. And yet he reads of Shorthorn kine
sold in Chicago a little while ago for from $4,-
700 to $8,500 per head, and he. lately rubbed
the morning mists from his eyes at the break-
fast-table to make sure if he saw aright the sur-
prising figures the daily paper gave of 'combi-
nation' sales in our own city of little Jerseys at
$2,000 each.
"But light is cast upon this mystery by the
idea which the seed-words 'fancy' and 'specula-
tion' suggest. And when it is known that the
ruling passion for 'the pleasing game' is not con-
fined to the purlieus of Wall Street and race-
tracks and pool-rooms, but may be strong even
in usually sedate and highly respectable gentle-
men who press about the ring at a cattle auc-
tion, the apparent conflict of conditions is found
to have no basis in fact-it is fancy, and not
farming. For the high rates paid for true-
blooded Duchesses and the black-muzzled
among Jersey pets bear hardly any more direct
relation to the great practical dairy industry
and the pressing question of oleomargarine
than the outer gingerbread of house ornamen-
tion bears to the solid basis of stone which
sustains the structure.
"If gentlemen of wealth and leisure, or those
who illustrate the old saw about the unwise and
his money, wish, in the excitement of sharp
competition, stimulated by 'hippodroming' and
offers of expensive silver-plate, to pay fat prices
for such an intangible substance as 'pedigree,'
(which they fondly think they see illuminating
the tip-end of each individual fawn-colored hair
of sleek and promising but untried heifers, and
even showing itself in the delicate shadings of
their polished hoofs and horns), there is no law
-except maybe a moral law--against their do-
ing so. If the disease didn't take this form it
might break out in the rabbit aberation or the
fancy for swell dogs or pet poultry or pouter
pigeons, and if wholly repressed in such lines of
activity it might even have to expend its force
on the ill-fed and despondent of the sorrowful
human race. But when agriculturists and well-
informed practical people who carry the heavy
weights of this present world, see accounts of such
cattle sales, they recall the sure outcome of the
folly as exemplified in many experiences in Eng-
land and in our own country, especially at New
York Mills fifteen years ago, and they make the
easy and convincing calculation that probably
no cow ever lived that was really worth a single
thousand dollars-much less five or forty thou-
sand."
Feeding and Watering.
The stomach of a horse is small, (only half
the relative size of that of a man,) and it must
be supplied often and in small quantities. Lib-
eral watering after eating is wasteful, as it
washes the food along too rapidly for perfect
digestion. The cow's stomach is capacious and


complicated, and designed for storage of large
quantities of food. Frequent feeding here be-
comes unnecessary, and causes imperfect diges-
tion. Twice a day is often enough to feed cat-
tle; coarse food remains in the large stomach
from twelve to thirty hours before it is remas-
ticated. Never let any animal become cloyed
by overfeeding, as it is a slow and difficult
trouble to cure. Pigs make a better use of their
food if it is given often-three or four times a
day. The digestive power of all animals is
strong, and coarse fodder may all be utilized, if
fed with other and richer food in due propor-
tion. Calves do best to suck the cow, as the
saliva is then mixed with the milk. By all
means feed animals regularly and well, and
don't have too many feeders.-Ex.


Protecting Horses From Flies.
Dr. J. J. Ridge communicates to The Lon-
don News his plan of repelling flies from horses.
He remarks on the suffering their attacks occa-
sion, and thinks that the irritable state into
which some animals are thus brought is a fre-
quent cause of accident:
"Before harnessing, a mixture of one part of
crude carbolic acid with six or more parts of
olive oil should be rubbed lightly all over the
animal with a rag, and applied more thickly to
the interior of the ears and other parts most
likely to be attacked. This application may
need to be repeated in the course of the day, but
while any odor of the acid remains the flies de-
cline to settle, and the horse is completely free
from all their annoyance. Whether the dread-
ed tse-tse of Eastern Africa would also fight
shy of similarly anointed animals I cannot say,
but it deserves a trial, and if successful would
be an incalculable boon. It might also prove
obnoxious to mosquitoes."'



The True Wife.
Oftentimes I have seen a tall ship glide by
against the tide as if drawn by some invisible
bow-line, with a hundred strong-arms pulling it.
Her sails were unfilled, her streamers were
drooping, she had neither side-wheel nor stern-
wheel; still she moved on stately, in serene
triumph, as with her own life. But I knew that
on the other side of the ship, hidden beneath
the great bulk that swam so majestically, there
was a little toilsome steam-tug, with a heart of
fire and arms of iron, that was tugging it bravely
on, and I knew that if the little steam-tug
untwined her arms and left the ship it would wal-
low and roll about, and drift hither and thither,
and go off with the refluent tide, no man knows
whither. And so I have known more than one
genius, high-decked, full-freighted, idle-sailed,
gay-pennoned, but that for the bare toiling arms
and brave, warm-beating heart of the faithful
little wife that nestles close to him, so that no
wind or wave could part them, would have gone
down the stream and have been heard of no
more.- Oliver Wendell Holmes.

Married Folks Would be Happier
If home trials were never told to neighbors ;
If they kissed and made up after every quar-
rel ;
If household expenses were proportioned to
receipts;
If they tried to be agreeable as in courtship
days;
If each would try and be a support and com-
fort to the other; \
If each remembered that the other was a hu-


man being, not an angel;
If women were as kind to their husbands as
they are to their lovers;
If fuel and provisions 'were laid 'in during
the high tide of summer ;
If both parties remembered that they were
married for worse as well as for better;
If men were as thoughtful of their wives as
they were of their sweethearts;
If there were fewer silk and velvet costumes,
and more plain, tidy house dresses;
If wives and husbands would take some
pleasure as they go along, and not degenerate
into mere toilsome machines. Recreation is
necessary to keep the heart in its place, and to
get along without it is a big mistake.

Laws of Digestion.
1. Food for the supply of the daily wants of


the system is most rapidly and thoroughly di-
gested when taken early in the day, ere the
nervous and secretive forces are exhausted by
toil.
2. Rapid digestion in the early part of the
day contributes to the immediate demands of
motion and enervation.
3. Food for the repair of the continuous wear
and tear of the tissues is in less immediate re-
quest; the completeness of its solution is of
more importance than the rapidity, and it is
best taken toward the evening, when an oppor-
tunity is afforded for its leisurely absorption
during weep.
4. The duration of digestion bears a propor-
tion to the quantity of food eaten.
5. In youth the digestion is quicker, and the
stomach sooner emptied than in grown-up per-
sons. n
6. Rest before meals makes digestion more
complete. Exertion immediately before meals
retards digestion, and exertion immediately
afterward deranges it.
7. Sleep retards digestion, but makes it more
complete.
8. Alchohol retards digestion, and renders it
also incomplete. 0
9. Earnest preoccupation of mind retards di-
gestion, and may even qmute anai it.
10. Water weakens digestion and encourages
the absorption of fatty and saccharine matter ;
but its effect on the complete solution of albu-
men is doubtful.-Housekeeper.

How TO COOK RICE.-Rice is becoming a
much more popular article of food than hereto-
fore. It is frequently substituted for potatoes
at the chief meal of the day, being more nutri-
tious and much more readily digested. At its
present cost, it is relatively cheaper than pota-
toes, oatmel or grain-grits of any kind. In
preparing it only just enough cold water should
be poured on to prevent the rice from burning
at the bottom of the pot, which should have a
close-fitting cover, and with a moderate fire the
rice is steamed rather than boiled until it is
nearly done; then the cover is taken off, the
surplus steam and moisture allowed to escape,
and the rice turns out a mass of snow-white
kernels, each separate from the other, and as
much superior to the usual soggy mass, as a fine'
mealy potato is superior to the water-soaked ar-
ticle.

To EvicT RATs.-A writer in the Scientific
American says: "We clean our premises of the
detestable vermin, rats, by making whitewash
yellow with copperas and covering the stone and
rafters with it. In every crevice in which a rat
may go we put the crystals of the copperas and
scatter in the corner of the floor. The result
was a perfect stampede of rats and mice. Since


that time not a footfall of either rats or mice
has been heard around the house. Every spring
a coat of yellow wash is given the cellar as a
purifier, as a rat exterminator, and no typhoid,
dysentery, or fever attacks the family. Many
persons deliberately attract all the rats in the
neighborhood by leaving the fruits and vege-
tables uncovered in the cellar, and sometimes
even the soap is left open for their regalement.
Cover up everything eatable in the cellar and
in the pantry, and you will soon starve them
out. These precautions, joined to the services
of a good cat, will prove as good a rat exterm-
inator as the chemist can provide. We never
allow rats to be poisoned in our dwelling. They
are so apt to die between the wallA and produce
annoyance."




21 "THE PLORIDA DISPATCH.


JACKSONVILLE, JUNE 26, 1882.

EDITORS:
D. REDMOND, D. H. ELLIOTT, W. H. ASHMEAD.

Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.

RATES OF ADVERTISING.
SQUARES. 1 TIME. 1 MO. 3 MO. 6 MO. 1 YEAR
One........................ $1 00 2 501 $550 $10 00 $ 18 50
Two ........... ........... 200 500 1000 18 00 3400
Three.................. 3 00 7 00 14 00 25 00 46 00
Four ................... 4 00 9 00 17 50 30 00 58 00
Five........................ 4 50 11 00 1900 35 00 5 00
Eight..................... 8 00 1650 3000 5000 100 00
Sixteen.................. 1600 3000 5000 8000 150 00
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words to line) ten cents
per line.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the beat ad-
vertising medium for reaching the. merchants anuffruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.

Special Club Rates with 'The Dispatch."
-- *
Read and Subscribe-It Saves Money and
V1l Paa You.
We have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
following publications, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt of price, for ONE YEAR :
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH AND
- Savannah Weekly News..............$2.50
Florida Weekly Union.................... ....... 2.25
New York Weekly Sun.............................. 1.75
New York Weekly Herald........................... 1.75
New York Weekly Tribune...................... 2.50
New York Weekly Times....... ............... 1.75
New York Weekly World........................ 1.75
Philadelphia Weekly Times............................ 2.50
American Agriculturist............................ 2.00
Country Gentleman...................................... 2.75
Southern Cultivator............................. 2.00
Atlantic Monthly Magazine................. 4.00
Harper's Monthly Magazine................... 4.00
The Qentury Monthly Magazine (Scribner's).... 4.00
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine..................... 3.15
Popular Science Monthly............................. 5.00
North American Review.......'............. 5.00
Harper's Illustrated Weekly................... 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Bazar...... ............ 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Young People............... 2.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly.................. 4.00
Frank Lealie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4.00
Frahik Leslie's Popular Monthly.................... 3.15
Frank Leslie's Sunday Magazine................... 3.15
Scientific American.................. ........ ....... 3.75
Waverly Magazine................................. 5.00
Detroit Free Press.................................. 2.35
The above are among the very best publications-
Remittances should be sent by Check, Money Order,
or Registered Letter, addressed to
ASHMEAD BRO'S,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
As THE DISPATCH is "made up" and ready
for the press on Friday night, or Saturday morn-


ing, all communications and advertisements
should be sent us in the. early part of the week
-not later than Wednesday or Thursday.
WE must still crave the patience of our kind
and attentive correspondents. All shall have a
hearing in good time.
Guinea Cows.
An esteemed subscriber at Live Oak, Fla.,
says : "I have the Guinea cattle, and have had
for several years. I also have the large breed
and a cross of the two, and the Guinea and
"cross are far superior as milkers to the large
breed, and the full-blood Guinea the best of all.
They are always fat, and will eat most anything
you give them; perfectly gentle and kind and
*-1 -'1 1


Kind Words.
We hope we shall be pardoned for printing a
few sentences from late letters of Hon. Mar-
shall P. Wilder, the venerable President of the
American Pomological Society, to the senior
editor and publishers of this paper. Nothing
could be more gratifying to us than the ap-
proval of this grand old leader, not only in the
advancement of American pomology, but all
other good works; and we trust the FLORPDA
DISPATCH may continue worthy of the gener-
ous praise which President Wilder bestows :
BOSTON, May 15, 1882.
Senior Editor.of Florida Dispatch :
MY OLD FRIEND:
By the FLORIDA DISPATCH, I ail happy to
notice that you are officially and otherwise at
work in the good cause of promoting the science
of the soil. We have for a long time been co-
laborers in the field, and although I am almost
84, (four score and four), I keep up my interest
in these matters as strong as ever. I watch
everything new in fruits and flowers, and still
continue my efforts in the production of new
varieties.
Our old American Pomological Society, now
in its 34th year is prospering wonderfully; and
the volume of Transactions of the 18th session,
(held at Boston last fall), is the best yet of its
series. You were once an officer of the Society,
and I wish you could have seen the old
heroes in the cause, together; who had
come from all parts of our vast territory.
"Your FLORIDA DISPATCH is .already a fine
paper, and promises to take rank with our most
useful journals.
To the Publishers :
GENTLEMEN-"Permit me to say that I
am much pleased with the new form of the
FLORIDA DISPATCH. With the ability, dis-
cretion and enterprise now manifested, it will
take its place in the front rank with the rural
publications of our land.
I am also glad to see the list of your agricul-
tural and kindred societies, in whose officers I
recognize the names of some with whom I have
been acquainted. Florida is making great ad-
vances in pomology.
Yours very truly,
MARSHALL P. WILDER.

July Magazines, Etc.
Harper's Magazine, for July," has a fine
portrait of Emerson, with a sketch of the poet-
philosopher, by Julian Hawthorne, The paper
entitled "Glimpses of Great Britons," by Henry
W. Lucy, is embellished with 15 or 20 presum-
ably correct portraits of such British leaders
as John Bright; the Duke of Argyle; Marquis
of Hartington; the Marquis of Salisbury; Sir
Stafford Northcote; the Earl of Derby ; Lord
Selborne; Chas. S. PArnell, etc. The other


articles of note in this excellent number are:
"Lying in State in Cairo ;" "Spanish Vistas ;"
"The Old Ship-Builders of New York;" "Franz
Liszt (with portrait(; "Shandon Bells ;" "The
History of Wood Engraving," etc. Price, $4
per year ; single numbers 35 cents.
The North American Review opens with
a paper of much interest and value, entitled
"Emerson as a Poet," from the' pen of our great-
est living essayist, Edwin P. Whipple. This
masterly critique occupies 26 pages of the
Review, and while it is easy to discern the ten-
der touches of a life-long friend and admirer in
all that Mr. Whipple writes of Emerson and
his grand poems, the great essayist and true
critic never forgets his art nor his obligation to
deal justly as well as generously by the dead


paper, which will be keenly enjoyed by the bet-
ter class 6f readers, everywhere. The other
articles, worth enumerating are: "The Busi-
ness of Office-Seeking," by Richard Grant
White; "Hydraulic Pressure in Wall Street;"
"The Things Which Remain ;" by Gail Hamil-
ton ;" "False Taste in Art," etc. The beauti-
ful, heavy, calendered paper and distinct, clear
typography of the North American Review make
it a luxury to tried or feeble eyes, and we never
fail to find in it at least one or two articles
greatly to our liking. Price, $5 per year ; sin-
gle numbers 50 cents. 1
The Atlantic Monthly has a new poem-the
last ever penned-by Longfellow. It is entitled
"The Bells of San Blas," and is full of that
simple, quaint, tender, sweetness, so character-
istic of the writer. We find also, "The Mate of
the Daylight," a plsant little New England
story, by Sarah Orne Jewett; "Studies in the
South,"-part 5; "Strange as Death ;" "Doc-
tor Zay," etc. Single numbers 35 cents; $4
per year.
Lippincott, for July, is, as usual, fresh and in-
viting. Not so large, copious and cumbrous as
some of its compeers, but always well and judi-
ciously filled, and marvellously cheap, at 25
cents. The present number has some beautiful
illustrations of fish and fishing, in Vermont;
"Fairy Gold," a new story;. "The Coal Mines
in the 'State of Dade'," in Georgia; "The Ti-
ger of the Sea ;" "Like Cures Like;" "The
Greater Wrong ;" "Walks with Bryant," etc.
The Century; the Eclectic; and the Popular
Science Monthly, for July, also received-a little
too late for special notice ; and all the foregoing
may be ordered from Ashmead Bro's., Jack-
sonville, Fla.
Transactions of the "Massachusetts Horticultu-
ral Society," for the year 1881, part 2.-We
have received from our old pomological friend,
Robert Manning, Secretary of the Massachu-
setts Horticultural Society, the able and valua-
ble report for 1881, in which we find much of
interest to fruit-growers, horticulturists and
florists everywhere. Among the premiums
awarded by this cosmopolitan Society, we notice
certificates of merit to gentlemen of California,
for collections of oranges, raisins, etc., which is
a gratifying evidence of the wide scope and
catholic tendency of the old parent association,
which was founded over 50 years ago, and has
been a blessing and a benefit not only to the
State of its nativity, but to the whole country.
Printing Presses.-The Illustrated catalogue
of printing presses issued by C..KB. Cottrell &
Co., No. 8 Spruce Street, New York, is one of
the most beautiful specimens of typography,
press-work and fine paper that we have ever
seen; and is deserving of the attention of pub-.
lishers and printers throughout-the Union.
Crop Reports for the month of May, 1882,
from the Department of Agriculture, Atlanta,
Ga., shows gratifying progress min our sister
State in all the leading crops, such as cotton,


corn, rice, wheat, oats, sorghum, sugar-cane,
potatoes, etc. The crop of peaches, apples,
grapes etc., is reported as below the average;
but the general "agricultural outlook" is re-
garded as favorable, and "farmers write more
cheerfully than usual." The report adds : "The
determination on the part of the farmers of the
State to adhere to the policy, adopted this year,
of producing more food for man and beast at
home, seems to be firmly fixed. This is the one
thing needed to insure abundant and perma-
nent prosperity to the people of the State. A
heavy responsibility rests upon the farmers of
Georgia. .They have learned wisdom by expe.
rience and will prove equal to all demands upon
them."
BEES AND HONEY :-or The Mannavemenrt


..





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. ,21.


ter, was faulty in this respect. Under its gen-
eral headhgs of "Timely Topics," "Fruit Cul-
ture," "Farm and Garden," "The Stock
Grower," 'he Household," and "General
Miscellany," vere great heaps of valuable facts
and bits of knowledge; but they were not well
labeled and inIexed, and their value is nearly
lost to the world, Take, a single instance by
way of illustratibi. A person wants to know
something about he pecan nut. In order to
find what the editor ,had to say, or had selected
on the subject, in arv volume, one must read
through the department of Fruit Culture, occu-
pying over thirty ptges in twelve different
'places, and the chants are that not one in a
hundred of those who wVld most value the in-
formation will ever find 1, while if the name of
the nut had been inserted' the index, it would
often be found and referred\ to with profit, so.
long as the volume should ast. A friend of
mine at New Smyrna has m\ne an index to the


Thomas G. Newman, editor of the "American
Bee Journal," Chicago, Ill.
The third edition of this work has been care-
fully re-written by the author, for the informa-
tion of the many who are' now becoming inter-
ested in the pursuit of bee-keeping. It con-
tains 160 profusely illustrated pages, is "fully
up with the times" in all the various improve-
ments and inventions iif this rapidly develop-
ing pursuit, and presents the apiarist with
everything that can aid in the successful man-
agement of the honey bee, and at the same time
produce the most honey in its best and most at-
tractive condition. Chief among the new chap-
ters are "Bee Pasturage a Necessity," "Man-
agement of Bees and Honey at Fairs," "Mar-
keting Honey," etc.
Price, bound in cloth, 75 cents; in paper cov-
ers, 50 cents, postpaid.
Cement Cisterns, &c.
REDLANDS, SUWANEE Co., EASt FLA.
Editors Florida Dispatch :
GENTLEMEN-I have.read "H's" endorsement
of sand cemented cisterns, in your highly valu-
able paper, under date April 24th. I can with
the highest regard for veracity, indorse his
statement, if it required any "further proof"
and go a little further, to say, I have had these
cisterns, cemented, in almost altogether clay
lands, clay on average from surface to three
feet deep, in the last twelve years. I am using
these cisterns now, in good condition.
Crop items-Oats ; this cereal is a poor crop,
with few exceptions, so far as I have seen;
corn, badly injured by a recent heavy fall of
water ; cotton, grassy ; pinders and peas like-
wise ; cane and potatoes ordinary.
Respectfully,
W. C. COLLINS.
"The Florida Dispatch."
LYNN, MAss., June 12 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch: -
You have certainly struck a rich vein of
gold-bearing literature in THE DISPATCH. The
points which the public appreciate in a periodi-
cal are: First, clean, white paper; second,
large, new type, with lines properly leaded. so
that the eyes are not so badly strained in read-
ing it; third, giving a heading to every item
that one would care to refer to again, so that it
may be readily indexed, and easily found by
aid of the index.
It always puts me into mourning when I read
a valuable item, or recipe, with no handle or
ring to it, by which it can be held or hung up
in sight to be used again. There is very little
use ii having tools or facts stored away, if we
never 'an find them when we wish to use them.
The Seni-Tropical, that most excellent of all
Florida periodicals, or Southern, as to that mat-


am already fomed; an all de white men and We figure the katydil. It andits song, of
"col'od gemlems" ob Volushey lies ariv at de "Katydid and Katy didn't," is familiar to every
same ,pinion. one.
Dis county am on de improve, not only am
de orange and de lemon tree-lemon tree,-
ob de 'm'ported variety, don't oberlook dat-- MANDARIN, FLA., May 22, 1882.
bein sot out amasi'n some ob our growers I Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
coberin 'all de lan in sight wid trees till it looks GENTLEMEN : I have read that, in the North,
like de citrus fambly am gwine to shade de hole to keep the borer from peach trees, they scratch
kentry ; but our social, our political and our away the earth for-about two inches and give
temporial welfare am taking dat stan dat the tree, round, a coat of coal-tar, about four
marks de rise an de advancement ob cibiliza- inches wide, two inches above and two inches
tiom. under-ground. Now, I would like to ask,
Fo, mo dan 4 momfs pass we's had a unpre- through your paper, if this would not work for
cedin dry spell, an if de ol01e man know p'rsim- the same purpose with orange trees.
ons from hale-stones, dem wedder profits am Respectfully, H. HAMMANT.
de cause ob it. I's ob de'pinion dat dis art- REPLY.-We have no doubt that the plan
'fisial wedder making am a gran sw'ndle, an I's
writ a letter to president Arther to da~t effect, suggested by our correspondent would do admi-
axin fer a "discontinuation ob de i'econstruxion rably for all borers which attack the crowns or
ob de l'erments, practis in dese mod'rn times trunks of trees.
by no count profits, so determental to tilers ob As far as our own observations go, in regard to
de soil-'specially all ober de lan."
Now dat de rain am come sweet 'taters is the orange-tree borer, we find it does not attack
bein sot out by de mile. ` Mutton corn am ripe. the crown or trunk, but generally begins opera-
so am de pesky coon an de 'possom. Oranges tions in a partly decayed limb or trunk, after-
haff size, prospex fer a big crop not very wards penetrating into the living part.
promise, Pine-apples and guabas soon be on characteristic of the majority
de table-an de water-mellions !--recon dat We believe it is characteristic of the majority
word am a hole cheone-am on de run fer 4th of cerambycid beetles to lay their eggs in de-
ob July, our crap am rudder limited but de cayed or decaying limbs or twigs, which hatch-
Meth'dist minister's cornfield am kivered wid ing produce the so-called borers.
"scaly barks" ob de bes quality.-I's 'thority on
de million question-so yer see de discount on
de crap I handle dis year will be on de minis-
ter's side ob do fence. Half pass 8 fim I's
gwine to ke cornfield.
Sen de D'SPATCH 'long regler for I depends
on de Kernols directions for July-de principle The orange-tree borer is the larva of a cerain-
mellion momf. "BOMBO."
mellionP S. 10.30-Just aB wd a cor-sack bycid beetle. Those who have never seen it can
P. S. 10.30-Just ariv wid a corp-sack and a
belly full ob "scaly barks." Loss the set-down gain a good idea of his physiognomy from our
piece ob my panc do by dat fool dog. B. cut, made from a living specimen.


I.


0


-- - L


three volumes, which may be printed some
time.
Of course it remains to be seen how copious
an index THE DISPATCH is to have; but I beg
of the editors to make it possible to have such
an index, by continuing to give every item a
heading.
Allow me to add that I have never wholly.
despaired of the revival of the Semi-Tropical;
but must confess that since the improvement of
THE DISPATCH my hope has gradually grown
fainter.
There have been Qnly three reasonably warm
days here this summer; people wear their win-
ter clothing, and when they ride out wear their
overcoats.
There is a considerable interest-taken here in
Florida affairs ; several Lynn families are liv-
ing in Florida, and others intend to remove
tlhre in the fall. J. M. H.

Bombo's Postal Card.
VOLUSHEY Co., June 1882.
Editors Florida Dispatch:
Ever since de D'SPATCH adoptedd its present
fowm I's been guine ter drap you a postal kerd
'bout de prospex ob ole Volushey, but not till
de rany season sot in hes circumstances repug-
irant to de ole man, permitted de use ob my
buzard quill.
Fo' de las ten years I's been trying to fine out
whar de ledin agricultural paper ob de State
was located, but now as de D'SPATCH sojourns
in de "Hotel City," de 'clusion to my queery


Meteorological Report.
Weather for week ending July 23, 1882.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION, }
SIGNAL SERVICE, U. S. A., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Therm. ~' Wind. "

DATE. 2 b 0


Saturday 17...... 29.92193 77 84.0 7 0.00 S 9 Fair.
Sunday 18....... 29.90,94 76 86.7 62.7 0.00 SW 8 Fair.
Monday 19...... 30.07!92 791 5.7 62.0 0.00 SW 110 Clear.
Tueitday 20......1 30.06 94 73 84.7 72.7 0.95 S1 7 Fair.
Wednesday 211 30.12 93 76 84.31 74.0 0.00 SW 12!Fair.
Thursday 22...1 30.12 9174 82.0 72.7 0.'25 |SW 5 Fair.
Friday 23........ 30.10 88 75 80.7i 71.3 0.00 NE i 4 Clear.
Highest barometer 30.17, lowest 29.85.
Highest temperature 94, lowest 73.
NOTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Observer U. S. A.
Correspondence.
KINGSLEY, FLA., June 9, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
DEAR SIRS: Inclosed I send some orange
leaves. Can you inform me what sort of insect's
work it is attached to them, and oblige, yours
truly, E. N.- PERRY.
REPLY.-The slate-colred objects arranged
around the margin othe o`ge leaves are the
eggs of the katydid, Microcentues retinervis-
Burm. For description of habits see "'Orange
Insects," page 52.




318 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Pine-Apples, Bananas, Cocoanuts, &c.
The schooner Illinois, Capt. Henderson, ar-
rived here on Sunday evening, June 11, from
Lake Worth, Fla., with a cargo of three thou-
sand pine-apples and 100 bunches of bananas-
the greater part of which were from Mr. E. N.
Dimick's place, on Lake Worth. The reporter
of the Union says that Mr. Dimick,.who was a
passenger on the schooner, "presented us yester-
day with a couple of fine pines-as large as we
have ever seen. He says that the country
around Lake Worth is building up very rap-
idly; in fact, there is a regular boom there,
which promises to continue as long as there is
an acre of good land in the vicinity of the lake
for sale. The citizens there are turning their
attention to cocoanut culture. There are now
about 15,000 trees growing on and near the
banks of the lake, and no less than 30,000 trees
will be set out during the present summer. Be-
sides the cocoanuts, the numerous orange groves
and pineapple and banana fields are being en-
larged every year. Last winter a great many
Northern persons visited thl lake. Quite a
large number of these were so well pleased
with the locality that they purchased lands
which they contemplate improving. One of
the great drawbacks to that section is the want
of accommodations for visitors, but this will be
obviated by next winter. Mr. Dimick is now
constructing a large two-story .hotel 52x100.
The hotel is situated on a high bluff so as to
command a splendid view of the lake for a
distance of twelve miles, either north or south.
It is only three-fourths of a mile from the ocean,
of which a splendid view can be had from the
second story of the building. The hotel is rap-
idly approaching completion, and Mr. Dimick
is here for the -purpose of buying a portion of
the furniture,-together with earthen and hard-
ware. He has chartered a schooner, which will
leave here on Thursday with a full cargo of the
above material. Mr. Dimick also informs us
that transportation facilities will also be increas-
ed at an early day, and that arrangements are
now being made to place one or two good steam-
ers on the river to run from Titusville to Worth
Creek Rapids, near the lake.
Profits of Orange Growing.
Every little while we see an article going the
rounds of our Northern exchanges regarding
the profits of orange growing, and a large por-
tion of them are as erroneous and far-fetched-
either in one direction or the other-as can be.


We have given many examples in the Journal
heretofore on the subject, and now give another.
The Loeser:Kennerley grove across the river
has shipped fully 300,000 oranges this last sea-
son. A portion, reaching the early market,
sold readily for $7 and $8 per box; a good
many were sold on the dock here at $5 per box,
while the balance were shipped and sold at from
$15 to $20 per 1,000, net. The yearly expense
for superintendent, labor, picking and shipping
fruit, etc., is about $1,400-not over $1,500 at
the utmost. There are 84 acres in all belong-
ing to the property, but only 20 acres are now
cleared. There are 2,000 trees in all; 1,000
bearing. Next year there will probably be


1,500 trees bearing, yielding a crop of 500,000
to 700,000 oranges. Every year additional
trees are being set out; 500 perhaps, annually,
so in reality the net increase of the value of the
property almost pays for all the expenses of
carrying it on. Very little fertilizer is used,
and that mostly composts. Potash and bone
are used to some extent. The original grove,
say of 300 trees, is about twelve years old. It
originally was a wild one, and the oldest trees
are the buds on the sour stumps. All the trees
are budded now; some have borne fruit two
years from the bud, though three or four years
is the average. The grove is dh fine hammock
land just across the river from the city, and in
the winter season is visited by hundreds of our
visitors. Altogether it is a very valuable
property and illustrates well what profit can be
realized from an orange grove with care and at-
tention.-Putnam County Journal.

Great Apple Crop at the North.
A late Country Gentleman says : During a
recent ride through a large portion of the State,
we could not fail to be struck with the enor-
mous masses of apple blossoms wherever there
were trees. The promise is of a great crop and
a vast surplus. Many thousand bushels will be
wasted if the fruit ripens as well as in other
seasons, unless efficient efforts are made to se-
cure a foreign market, and to manufacture
large quantities at home into evaporated fruit,
or into apple jelly or vinegar.
It is to be hoped that the supplies which are
sent to Europe will be selected and put up in a
manner creditable to the fruit-growers of this
country, and that somvmeans may be devised
to distinguish such growers and shippers as do
the work in an honorable and skillful manner,
from those who by carelessness and fraud do a
lasting injury to themselves and to others, as
was too frequently the case in 1880.
A question of importance is asked many
times in this connection, "How can we prevent
this uneven bearing in alternate years, so as to
have a fair supply every season ?" In answer,
there are three remedies. One is to cultivate
the ground well so as to keep up the vigor of
the trees to such a degree that the abundant
crop the even year will not exhaust the trees
and prevent bearing the odd year. This rem-
edy, although operating more ox less in all
cases, is uncertain or incomplete. The second,
manuring the trees at the right time, is more
efficient. The best time to apply the manure
-which must of course be broadcast-is on the
surface in autumn or during winter, giving the
trees when they start in spring so much vigor
that the abundant crop the same year will not
check the force of the trees and prevent bear-
ing the following season. If the manure is ap-
plied in spring or early in summer and worked
into the surface soil, it would have a similar


tendency in less degree. Liquid manure, ap-
plied now to the whole surface through a
sprinkler, would probably answer nearly as
well as winter-spread manure, and is well worth
trying by those who have facilities for this pur-
pose. The third and most certain way of chang-
ing the bearing year, is to prevent a crop this
season, by which all the strength of the growth
will be thrown into the young shoots for a crop
next year. The best time is when the trees are
in blossom, because they are easily seen ; and
the best tool for the purpose is a pair of com-
mon sheep shears. The work should be done
when the trees are young, for two reasons-the
labor is much less, and the change is more
likely to be permanent. We find that it re-
quires a man three hours to shear off all the
blossoms from a tree fifteen years old and large
enough to bear twelve bushels, and only ont


hour for a young bearing tree seven or eight
years old. The value of the crop on either,
during a scarce year, is much more than the
cost of the labor. The work may be done
when the young apples are as large as cherries,
but they are not so easily seen as the blossoms.
For the Preservation of Wood.
A new preserving process has been invented
in France by M. Jacques. He first impreg-
nates the timber thoroughly with a simple solu-
tion of sjap, mixed with an acid-preferably
phenic acid. This causes the fermentation, in a
few days, within the wood, of a fatty acid, which
is insoluble in water, and impregnates the remot-
est fibers. The reaction of the acid on the soap
does not take place until a portion of the water
has evaporated. It is claimed that more per-
fect impregnation can be had in this way than
with creosote, and there is no danger of the
washing out of the preservative from the ex-
posed surfaces, as when sulphate of copper is
used. The government commission on technical
railroad operation in France is said to favor
this process.-The Metal. Worker.
GRAPES.-From statistics recently published
by the Department of Agriculture at Wash-
ington, we learn that there are now 185,583
acres of grapes grown in the United States.
Wine from the product of these vines, is made
to the amount of 24,453,857 gallons, having a
market value of $13,426,174.87. California, of
course, leads, having one-sixth of the area,
yielding nearly two-thirds of the wine. New
York comes next, having 12,643 acres, though
but little is made into wine, the grapes find
ready sale in the market; only 584,148 gallons
are made. Rhode Island only returns 55 acres,
while Illinois from 3,810 acres makes over a
million gallons of wine. Missouri, Ohio, Geor-
gia and New Mexico are leading wine-making
sections. Colorado cuts no figure at all in the
report, but the day is coming when grape cul-
ture will be one of their prominent industries.
MANURES AND PLANTING.-The publishers
of the Rural New Yorker, who are experimental,
as well as practical farmers, have this to say on
various matters of interest to the bucolic reader:
They say that sod ground is best for corn.
Farm manure should be harrowed in, not
plowed under deeply, as has been the practice
of some farmers. Fertilizers should be spread
broadcast and harrowed in, and not put in the
hill, as of all methods this is ii the end the
most wasteful and ineffectual. Fertilizers are
spread with less waste when first mixed wit,
damp soil, otherwise the finest dust may 5e
blown upon other fields. Plant in drills instead
of hills. Never use the plow or cultivate


deeply after the corn is planted, but keeP the
surface mellow by shallow and frequent ciltiva-
tion. The doctrine of severe, or even aiy, root-
pruning is not accepted at the "Rura Farm."
Some very heavy crops have been :aised by
attention to the above methods.
HOT MILK AS A RESTORATIVE.-Milk that
is heated to much above 1000 Fahenheit, loses
for the time a degree of its sweaness and its
density; but no one fatigued by-ver exertion of
body and mind who has ever experienced the
reviving influence of a tumble of this beverage,
heated as hot as it can be siyjed, will willingly
forego a resort to it because )f its having been
rendered somewhat less acceptable to the pal-
ate. The promptness wDh which its cordial
influence is felt is inded surprising. Some
portions of it seem to beligested and appropri-
ated almost immediateW.


11
lk


NOW





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


VERMIN ON STOCK.-A strong decoction
made from sassafras roots is commended for
killing lice on horses atnd cattle. In applying
it take an old cloth and wash the animal so as
to wet the hair and hide thoroughly. Apply
either warm or cold. No injury will be done
to the animal, and the lice will be effectually
killed.

ONE of our cheapest and best fertilizers,
properly used, is muriate of potash. It is so
strong that unless it is very evenly distributed
there is danger of injuring the crops. Whether
it is to be used as a top dressing of meadows or
on ploughed land it is always safer and more
advantageous to mix it thoroughly with four or
five times its weight of dry muck or soil previ-
ous to application. All potash salts should be
applied as early in the season as possible, that
the spring rains may diffuse them through the
soil. Three or four hundred pounds should be
used per acre.

THINNING FRUIT.-Hon. Marshall P. Wil-
der, President of the American Pomological
Society, says the great importance of properly
thinning out fruit trees when bearing redund-
ant crops' is more and more apparent. To pro-
duce fruit that commands a good price in mar-
ket it has become an absolute necessity. This
is seen especially in that intended for exporta-
tion ; apples of good fair size and properly
packed commanding in the English market
fully double the price of those which had not
received such care.

Agricultural, Ilorticultural and Pomological
Associations.
Florida Fruit-Growers' Association-Office at Jack-
sonville-D. Redmond, President; W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; W. H. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding Sec-
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee-Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, 0. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official organ-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA STATE GRANGE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICES.-Master, Wm. H. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Wm. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B. F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Field-
ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. H. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate
Keeper, Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Wm. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T. W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H.
Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs,. Florida; Geo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Umstead, Hous-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at -Jacksonville.-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J. C. Greeley, Treasurer.
Directors-J. H. McGinniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro, P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney. Annual meeting-
Last Friday in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; O. E. Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. O. Taylor, Secretary and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Florida.-President, A. B. Bartlett, Georgetown; Vice-


Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. Hawkins, Lake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George; George W. Thorn, Treasurer,
Georgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
mond, Fort Gates.
Picolata Agricultural and Horticultural Society.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, W. N. ParKer, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugn, Corresponding Secretary,
N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., Recording Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer. Meets first Saturday in each month.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. Mathers, Second Vice-President; B.
W. Powell, Corresponding Secretary; B. F. Jordan, Sec-
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical Fruit Growers' Association of Monroe County,
Florida.-Home office, Myers, Florida; F. A. Hendry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson,
President; Thomas Tillis, First Vice-President; J. B.
Sutton, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary; J. M. Barco, Recording Secretary;
L. W. Hamlin, Assistant Recording Secretary.


Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Association.-
John Bradford, President, BradfordvilUe, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida.
Pinellas, Florida, Fruit Growers' Association.-D. W.
Meeker, President; Win. P. Neeld, Secretary.
Central Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida.-Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
Evergreen Horticultural Society, Dunedin, Florida.-
J. W. Matchett, President; W. Tate, Vice-President;
Geo. L. Jones, Secretary.
Decatur County Fair Association, Bainbridge, Geor-
gia.-Maston O'Neil President; I. Kwilecki, Secretary.
Lake Wier Agricultural and Pomological Society (of
Marion County, Florida).-Captain J. L. Cainy, Presi-
dent; Dr. L. M. Ayer, Corresponding Secretary.
Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Higgins, Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Association, Albany,
Georgia.-L. E. Welch, President; T. M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
Sumter County Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation.-D. L. Hubbard, President, Leesburg; W. C.
Dodd, Recording Secretary, Leesburg; A. P. Roberts,
Corresponding Secretary, Leesburg.
Florida Central Agricultural Society.-Thos. F. King,
President Gainesville; -, Secretary, -n
; W. K. Cessna, Corresponding Secretary, Gaines-
ville.
Archer Agricultural Association.-W. B. Lipsey,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine, Secretary; Dr. J. C. Neal,
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President; John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewis, Treasurer, Tallahassee.
Indian River Agricultural and Pomological Society.-
A. P. Cleveland, President; W. H. Sharp, Secretary,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
Association.-R. J. Mays, President; Frank W. Pope,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
Orange County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred. L. Robertson, Corresponding
Secretary.
Gadsden County Fair Association.-Jesse Wood, Pres-
ident; W. H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R. Harris,
Second Vice-President; J. W. Kendricks, Secretary; E.
C. Lou, Treasurer.
South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion, Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
which we may have fallen in the naming of officers, &c.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH ?]




LAW BLANKS

FOR SALE BY

ASHMEAD BROTHERS,

JScTCoS'BilleA, KSla.



JUSTICES' BLANKS.


I


P
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A





C
A


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.A.TT.~

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0- -t


ZZO sTs- EACH
livil Action, original and copy ......... 2
1eplevy .............................................. 5
PCE T-A-S......................................... 2

3ea ce ...................................................... 2
Appeal, criminal, ........................ 5
civ il.......................................... 5
Appearance ........................................... 5
tlaim e..... ...................................... 5
eplevy ................................................ 5
)efendai t's Bond in Replevint........... 5
kttachment......................................... 5
:D. na l Pr op r....................................... 2
arnishment ..................................... 2
ettachment......................................... 2
personal Property................................ 5
)f Execution................................. 2
leplevy, Personal Property............... 5
?eace ..................................................... 5
eTace.....T.. .............................. 2
AC=MvX=1T=, Writ....................... 2
TM:ZE7-S (Commitment).................. 2
" E ....... ............................................. 2
. = -A-. 'W' ........................................... 2.
?eace .................................................... 2
search ............................ .................... 5
affidavit for Search Warrant ......... 5
CT.TTIO T ................... ..................... 5
IAD. rT of SO L--' -rM 2
I :-'rIC.A.TE Ow "" 2

CIRCUIT COURT BLANKS.


Z'T'ZL-- EACH
Juror's Summons.................................. 2
Writ of Attachment (original and
copy ..............................................
Subpoenas ..................... ...................... 2
in Chancery.......................... 2
Sum m ons ............................................. 2
and Garnishment............. 2
Writ of Replevy........ ....................... 5
Masters' Deeds....................... .............. 5
Commissioners' Deeds......................... 5
C"EZI NI..A.Ia-
Grand Juror's Subpoenas................ 2
Witness' ...................... 2
Capias ................................................... 2
A ttachm ent......................................... 2


PER
DOZ
15
30
15

15
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
15
15
15
30
30
30
15
15
15
15
15
15
30
30
.30
15
15


PER
DOZ


15
15
15
15
15
30
50
15
15
15
15


PBOBATE COURT BLANKS.
PER
=)I=..As.T o.s-- EACH DOZ
Administrators' Bonds..................... 5 50
Letters of Administration.................. 5 50
Letters Testamentary........................... 5 50
Guardians' Bonds................................ 5 50
Letters of Guardianship. ............. 5 50
Warrant of Appraisment................... 5 50
Citation for Administration............. 3 30
Oath of Administrator........................ 3 30

UNITED STATES COMM'RS BLANKS.
PER
C'V7rZ .A.. C ZIZ"L.A.-- EACH DOZ
W warrants ........................... .................. 5 30
Com m itm ent...................................... 5 30
Com plaint............ ........................... 5 30
Witness' Recognizance...................... 5 30
Prisoners' ....................... 5 30
Subpoenas ............ ............................ 2 15
Order to Pay Witness...................... 2 16

MISCELLANEOUS.
PER
EACH DOZ
B ills of Sale...................................................... 5 30
M aster's Sale........................ ........................... 5 50
Warranty Deeds (cap size, heavy paper)...... 5 50
6 parchment paper.... 10 75
Quit-Claim Deeds (cap size, heavy paper)...... 5 -50
parchment paper... 10 75
Mortgages, heavy "...... 5 50
Z parchment .... 10 75
Chattel Mortgages heavy ... 5 50
Release of Mortgage............ ....................... 5 50
Bond for Title..... ........... .............. 5 30
Leases .... ........................... *.......... 5 50
Powers of Attorney......................................... 5 50
Promissory Notes,Draft and Receipt Books,
100 to book ................................................... 35
Protests .............................. ........ 5 50
Bills of Lading, Shipping Receipts...... 3 to
sheet................. ............. ................. 5 50
Shipping Articles.. ...................................... 10 1 00
coastwise'......................... 25
Shippers' M anifests.......................................... 5 50
part of cargo................ 10 75
Coastw ise ........................................ 5 50
Outward foreign Manifests, small size .......... 50
4 6" large size.......... 10 75
Seaman's Discharge (books of 100,) ................ 2 00
Import Entry Blanks................................ 5 50
Charter Parties ................... ........................... 5 50
Marriage License................................. 10 75
Certificates-all sizes and prices.......

PRICES OF WrITING PAPERS.
Legal Cap and Foolscap Paper, 10 lb.............per ream $3 00
12 Ib 3 60
14 4 20
6" 16 4 80
(extra size and
quality) 18 lb...... ........................................... 8 00
Parchment..................................................... 9 00
(Discount to the trade.)
Note Paper (first class) 4 lb.........................per ream $1 00
S" 5 1................................. 1 50
"4 6 ................................. 6 1 80
Letter 10" ................................. " 300
12" .......................... " 360
14 ............................... " 4 4 20
Lyon's Parchment Note Paper (thin).......... 2 00
.. .. .. (medium)........ " 3 00
(thick)............. " 3 50
Discount to the trade.)

PRICES FOR PRINTING.
Note Heads (% sheet, printed to order) 6 lb.....per 1000 3 25
Letter 10" 425
12" "' 4 85
Envelopes (white or buff, good quality, print-
ed to order,) 5 size " ".............. " 350
6 size .............. " 3 75
Bill H eads (sm all).............................................. 8 00
" (medium)......................................" 3 25

Notarial Seal Presses (made to order)...................... 5 00
Notarial Seals (red, green and blue,) No.21. 1%
Sinches.... .............................per 100 20
Notarial Seals (red green and blue) No. 23, 2
inches...............................................................per 100 25
Notarial Seals (red, green and blue[ No. 26, 2%
inches....................................................... 30
Notarial Seals, gold and silver, No. 21, 1%
inches.............................................................. 25


Notarial seals, gold and silver No. 23, 2 in. " 53
,, No. 26, 2.. " 50
Lawyers' Seals, A. & B......................................... 15

-Rubber Stamps manufactured right in our establish-
ment -all sizes and prices
Index to the Decisions of the Supreme Court of
Florida ............................................................ ..... 3 00
McClellan's Digest......... .. .....7 00
Ordinary Law Books bound to order in best sheep,
single volum es.............................................,......... 1 75
Sent to any address upon receipt of price. A lib-
eral discount will be given to dealers to sell again, or to
those wishing to purchase in quantity.
If you want any Printing or Binding done, you
should send to us. We send out nothing but first-class
work, and at reasonable prices. Prices furnished, upon
application, for anything in our line.
Respectfully,
ASHM1EAD BROS.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


219







'O f THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


-An English mechanic has invented a horse-
shoe composed of three thicknesses of cowhide
compressed into a steel mould and subjected to
a chemical preparation. It will last longer than
the common shoe, weighs only one-fourth as
much, does not splitthe hoofs, requires no calks,
and is very elastic.

-The Census Bureau has issued a revised
bulletin showing that the population of the
United States in 1880 was 50,155,783 ; area in
land surface, 2,900,170 square miles; number
of families, 9,945,916 ; number of persons to a
family, 5.04; number of persons to a square
mile, 17.29; number of dwellings, 8,955,812;
dwellings to a square mile, 3.02; persons to a
dwelling, 5.60 ; acres to a family, 186.62 ; acres
to a person, 37.01. The Indian Territory and
tracts of unorganized territory aggregating 69,-
830 square miles, are not included in the area
given.





Vegetable Quotations.
FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE, )
315 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, June 21, 1882.
Receipts of vegetables and fruit at this port via Florida
Dispatch Line and Southern Express Company, week
ending 20th inst., 2,700 packages; watermelons, nine
car-loads.
Watermelons slow of sale at from $25 to $40 per hun-
dred; the demand continues light, and is dependent
largely on the-weather.
Tomatoes in good demand, good stock selling freely
from $2.50@3 per crate.
Egg-Plant, $1@1.50 per crate.
Georgia peaches of good size and quality selling read-
ily from $1.50@3 per small (i bushel) crate. Considerble
inferior fruit in market and bringing 5"c..'t .tl.
SRespectfully,
C. 1). OWENS,
General Agent.

,Jacksonville Wholesale Prices.
Corrected weekly, by JONES & BO WEN, Wholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.
SUGARS-Granulated ....... ............................ 10%
W hite Ex. C............. ..................... 10
G olden C............................................. 8
Pow dered............................................. 11
Cut Loaf........ .............................. .. 11V
COFFEE, Rio-Fair............... ......................... 11
G ood ............................................. 11
Choice ... ................................. 12
B est ............ ............................ 13
Java O. G......... ........................25
M ocha .............................. .... ....... 35
Peaberry............. .......................... 18
M aracaibo............. .......................... 18
Any of above grades roasted to order
FLOUR-Snow Drop, best.............................. 9 00
Oreole, 2d best................................... 8 00
Pearl, 3d best....................................... 7 75
M EATS- Bacon..................................................... 13
Hams (Merwin & Sons)........................ 16%
Shoulders.............................................. 12
HOMINY-Pearl, per bbl..................................... 5 40
MIEAL- per bbl.................................................... 5 40
LARD-Refined in pails................................ 13
BUTTER-Very best, kegs (on ice)..................... 29
CHEESE-Full cream .......................................... 15
H alf cream .... .................. ............ 12's
TOBAcCO-Shell Road................................... 55
Florida Boys, 11 inch 5's.................. 6
Florida Girls, bright twist, 14 to lb.. 50
Smoking in packages, 8 to lb........... 32
SOAP AND STARCH-Colgate's 8 oz., per box.. 3 50
Peerless, 8 oz., per box.... ............... 3 50
Starch, lump, per lbf...... ..............51@6c
HOPS, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS-
Hops, per lbf............................................ 15@22c
Agers Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz.......... 60c
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
doz. 1 lb................ ................ 2 25


Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. 1 lb. 2 25
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. Y lb2..... 2 70
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. V lbf...... 1 50
COUNTRY PRODUCE.


Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl., new....................
CHICKENS, each..................... ..........................
EGGs-Per doz.................................
HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lb., first class
Country Dry Salted, per lb...................
Butcher Dry*Salted, per lb ..................
Damaged Hides..... ....................
Kip and Calf, 81bs. and under................
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb........................
Deer Skins Salted, per lb...... ..............
FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter........... ............................. ......
Raccoon, each.......................................
W ild Cat, each......................................
Fox, each ................................................
BEESWA X-per Ib.................................................
WOOL-Free from burs, per lb..............................
B urry, perlb..........................................
GOAT SKINS-Each per lb...................................
Flour and tobacco are lower to-day.


3 50
25@45
15@18
13
9@11
9@110
6
10
35
26@30
1 50@4 00
5@15
10@20
5@15
20
17@22
11@15
10


Ocean Steamship Company.


SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.




The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, June 3d, 8:00 a. m.
CITY -OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, June 7th, 11:00 a. inm.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, June 10th, 1:30 p. inm.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, June 14th, 5:30 a.. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, June 27th, 8:00 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, June 21st, 10:00 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, June 24th, 12:00 noon.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, June 28th, 4:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, July 1st, 6:00 p. m.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
H. YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agent of Line, and C. R.R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
II. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS,
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. Y.


ROCK LEDGE HOMEl GOVE


LANDS
SUITJ


Orange
In lots to s


solbtma, PauRtn
Send for circular to

WHITNEY

Sat
june 26-tf


FOR SALE I FOR SALE.
S 1 HAVING secured Deeds to the Gomez Grant of 12,180
acres of land, embracing Jupiter Island,
ABLE FOR THE ELDORADO OF FLORIDA,"
and wishing to make it The Pine Apple Bonanza-the
P. G rov e s very winter garden and fruitery of United States," in-
I e duces me to sell
AMY I1OME AND GRO VE
nuit, in the town of that will yield perhaps next year one quarter million Or-
anges. Trees 5, 8 and ten years from bud. Delightful
Srclimate, perfect health, good water, rich hammock land
on the
[1MI CO It GREAT INDI3N RIVER;
dubbed "our smoke-house," affording finest fish, oys-
ters, green-turtle, bathing, rowing, and transportation.
,om OL T HOntGEQ Apply to CO. SURVEYOIR,
UiLJJ 1UULJG, I June 19 to July 10. Rock Ledge, Florida.
1eine4.,c n


LbUlliiqa, rua UuaI. V.,


HOMES IN THE SUNNY SOUTH.


Horticultural Products. SPLENDID OFFER TO SETTLERS

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
A French gentleman who, for years engaged in Horti- 40 Hours from New York City: 108 Miles
cultural pursuits, can furnish references from the best
houses in this country and Europe, desires to correspond from Savannah.
with owners of cleared clay or swamp lands in Key
West or vicinity, regarding the planting of certain JIor-
ticultural products, which may be' procured from vari-
ous West India Islands Guinea, Venezuela, Columbia, So-t, .L I-eo Fial Ma for
Mexico and Central America.
These plants, after arriving at maturity, may be ex- Sae "by
ported to the Northern United States, England, France,
Belgium Germany, Italy arid Switzerland, where an un- m
limited demand guarantees large and sure profits. J TICER,
. The gentleman has had experience in most of the
countries named above and can insure an unlimited de- Genmore, WarP Co., Ga.
mand for the products, could the proper soil for their June 19-tf
cultivation be found. Address
L. R., care of George Pierson, Esq.,
june 26-it P. 0. Box 365, St. Augustine, Fla. $3 5


P ..*L* TO
FIRST-CLASS ORANGE AND VEGETABLE LAND.
Also river front, with 90 Choice Orange trees nearly New York and Return.
ready to bear. I
The above property adjoins the Magnolia Hotel at
Magnolia, Florida. Address,
W. T. THOMPSON, Good to Novem ber 1.
(Box 111,)
to july 1, '82 Green Cove Springs, Florida.
M 1EAILS AN-TD STATrEROOlIMS ON
AT. MANDARINi FLORIDA. STEAMEIES'INCLUDED.
20 FORTY-ACRE TRACTS only 12 miles from Jack-
sonville; extra good land, well located, between river F m Savannah via Charleston, Wilming-
and J., St. A. and H. R. R. R. Price, $10 per acre. Will From Savannah via arson, mm-
sell on monthly payments of $12.50. These lands will in- ton, Weldon, Portsmouth, thence hbythe
crease in value, being located in an already prosperous o, rsou, y
town, making a paying investment at small outlay. elegant Steamships of the Old Dominion
Maps can be seen at No. 41 East Bay Street. elegant eam e ld D mi
to nov 21, '82. GEO. R. REYNOLDS.
Jacksonville, Fla. Line to New York.


0. L. KEENE,

MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,


Laces, Worsteds,

AND A FINE LINE OF


67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE.- - - FLORIDA.


to feb 20, '82


PASSENGERS leaving Savannah SUNDAY, MON-
DAY, TUESDAY and FRIDAY at 4:15 p. m,, arrive at
Portsmouth MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY,
and SATURDAY, making close connections with
steamers, arriving in New York the next evening.
WNo Delay in Going or lReturning.
For tickets 'and further information, apply to Wm,
BREN, S. T. A,, 22 Bull Street, Savannah, Ga., and
Ticket Office S., F. & W. Railway Depot,
S. C. BOYLSTON,
G. P. A.
June 19 to July 10.

PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


r


Oda dt offof 4 M C ni#




THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


221


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE.




Rates on WATERMELONS in Car Loads of 20,000 Pounds.


T0 T Aa:S2 "E EF" ECT r". 0A tZl 2 .0-1, IeQ2.


To-


Atlanta .................................................................................................................................
Augusta..................................................................................................................................
Bal tim ore.................................................................................. .........................................
Boston .................................................... .......................................................................
Bristol, Tenn................................. ........................................................................................
Charleston, S. C.................................................................. .................................................
Colum bus, Ga.................................. ................................................................................
Chattanooga, Tenn...............................................................................................................
Cincinnati, 0................................................................. ..................................... ......
Cairo, Ill......................................................................................................................
Colum bus, 0...........................................................................................................................
Cleaveland, 0O.......................................................................................................................
Chicago, Ill................................................. .......................................................................
Dalton, Ga..........................................................................................................................
Evansville, Ind..................................................................................................................
Indianapolis, Ind............ ................................................................................................
K noxville, Tenn................................................................................................................
Louisville, Ky ......................................................................................................................
M acon, Ga.......................................................................................................................... .
M ontgomiery, Ala...............................................................................................................
M obile, Ala................................................................................................................... .........
M em phis, Tenn ................................................................................ ............ .............
Nashville, Tenn..................................................................................... ........................
New Orleans, La..........................................................................................................
New York, N Y..............................................................................................................
Peoria, Ill...............................................................................................................................
Philadelphia, Pa....................................................................................................................
Rom e, Ga................................................................................................................................
Savannah, Ga........................................................................................................................
St. Louis, M o......................................................................................................................
Terre Haute, Ind................. ................................................................................................


From Florida Than-
Fr om Jacksonville, sit Railroad, except Florida Transit Rail-
Callahan and Live Ocala and Points be- road, 0 c ala and
Oak. yond. Points beyond.


$ 6000 $ 8500 $ 9000
55 00 80 00 85 04
100 00 125 00 130 00
10000 12500 130 00
90 00 115 00 120 00


36 00
60 00
70 00
80 00
90 00
100 00
100 00
110 00
70 00
80 00
90 00
84 50
80 00
45 00
60 00
70 00
80 00
75 00
80 00
100 00
110 00
100 00
70 00
2200
90 00
100 00


61 00
85 00
95 00
105 00
115 00
125 00
125 00
135 00
95 00
105 00
115 00
10950
10500
70 00
8500
95 00
105 00
100 00
105 00
125 00
135 00
125 00
95 00
47 00
115 00
125 00


66 00
90 00
100 00
110 00
120 00
130 00
130 00
140 00
100 00
110 00
120 00
114 50
110 00
75 00
9000
100 00
11000
105 00
11000
130 00
140 00
130 00
100 00
52 00
120 00
130 00


Florida Central and
Western Railroad.


S 8000
75 00
119 00
119 00
11000
5600
8000
9000
10000
110 00
120 00
12000
130 00
9000
100 00
110 00
104 50
10000
6500
8000
9000
100 00
9500
10000
119 00
130 00
119 00
9000
41 00
110 00
12000


Excess of 20,000 pounds will be charged for pro rata, provided the weight loaded does not exceed the capacity of the car, as marked thereon. If cars are not
marked with the capacity thereof, the weight of load must not exceed 20,000 pounds. All excess of load above capacity of the cars will be charged for at double rates.
Melons must be loaded and unloaded by the owners. Shipments of Melons will be receipted for only as "Shipper's Count." This Line will not be responsible
for deficiency in quantity loaded in the cars, nor for damage resulting from improper loading. Shipments via Florida Dispatch Line will not be required guaranteed
or prepaid.
D. H. ELLIOTT, Gen'l Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla. JAS. L. TAYLOR, Gen'l Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE in connection with ATLAN XO COAST LIME.


Rates on TWaternmelons in Car Lioads of 20,000 in Cents per 100 Ibs.


To take effect May 20th, 1882.


To- F



B a ltim o re................................................................................................................................
Boston...... ............................................. .....................
N ew Y o rk ......................... .......................................................... . ..... .. .
Providence .... ........... .. ................ .......... .... .............
P h ila d elp h ia............................................................................................................................
P ortsm south V a........................................................................................... ....................
P etersb u rg V a ........................................................................................................................
Richmond, Va.............................................................
W ilm in gto n N C ..................................................................................................................
Washington, D. C. (via Portsmouth).................................................................................
Shipments via "ATLANTIC COAST LINE" must be prepaid to destination.
will be charged at double rates.


om Jacksonville
and Callahan.


Cts.
.63Y
.68 2
.68
.68%
.68
.48Q
.48Y
.481
.38M
.63 Y


Florida Transit and
Peninsula Railroad, Florida Transit Rail-
except Ocala and road, 0 c a l a and
Points beyond. Points beyond.

Cts. Cts.
.76 .78%
.81 .83Y
.81 .831
.81 .83%
.81 .83%
.61 .63%
.61 .63%
.61 .631
.51 .531
.76: .78%


Florida Central and
Western Railroad.


Cts.
.73
.78
.78
.78
.78
.58
.58
.58
.48
.73


20,000 lbs. will be the minimum rate charged for. All excess of capacity of cars


--






22 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
-0
MTir, ANTSS & MINERS

TRANSPORTATION COMPANY!






The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail -
From BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH

EVERY FIVE DAYS,
and from SA-VANNAH for BALTIMORE, as follows:
Thursday, June 1st, at 5 p. m.
Tuesday, June 6th, at 11 a. m.
Monday, June 12th, at 3 p. m.
Sat urday. June 17th, at 8:30 a. m.
Thursday June 22d, at 11 a. m.
Tuesday, June 27th, at 3 p. m.
Monday, July 3d, at09 a m.
The t re ttrat-class in every respect, and every
attention ill be given tbopassengers.
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $15,
Including Meals and Stateroom.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points Jn the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Baltimor k
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
: JAS. B. WEST & CO., Aaents.

Savannah, January 8th, 1878. 30-tf


SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA




WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1882,
Passenger Trains will run over the Waycross Short
Line as follows;


;Fast Mail.
Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at................. 9:00 a. m.
Arrive Jacksonville at ............ 5:40 p. m.
Leave Callahan at........... ......... 9:44 a. m.
Arrive Waycross at.......................11:57 a. m.
Arrive Jesup at.............................. 1:40 p. inm.
Arrivekat Brunswick at................. 6:00 p. inm.
Arrive Savannah at.............. 3:40 p. m.
Arrive Charleston at........ .. 9:10 p. m.
Arrive at Augusta at................... 5:20 a. in.
Arrive Macon at......... .......... 7:50 p. m.
Arrive Atlanta at.......................... 3:50 a. m.
Arrive Louisville at................................
Arrive Cincinnati at......................................
Arlive Washington at................... 9:30 p. inm.
Arrive Baltimore at.....................12:25 p. m.
Arrive New York (limited express)...........
Arrive New York P.R. R.............. 6:45 a. m.
Arrive St. Louis at...... ....................
Arrive Chicago at........... ...............
TIME.
To'Savan nah... ......................
To New York.......................................
To Washington........ ......................
To Chicago ...................................................
To St. Louis.....................................................


Jack'lle Ex.
Daily.
5:40 p. m.
8:15 a. m.
6:45 p. m.
9:15 p. inm.
11:25 p. inm.
5:30 a. inm.
2:35 a. nm.
9:05 a. inm.
1:30 p. m.
7:00 a. m.
12:50 p. m.
8:00 a. m.
7:00 a. m.
9:10 a. inm.
12:05 a. inm.
3:50 p. im,
5:20 p. inm.
7:00 p min
7:00 p. mn

6:40 hours.
45:45 hours.
36:30 hours.
49:00 hours.
49:00 hours.


THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
a,.tJacksonville to Savannah.
AW-Jacksonville to Louisville.
a k Jacksonville to Washington.
*.Jacksonville to Cincinnati.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
'-iui y furnished at mOderate rates.
Snfsengers taking Savannah sleeper can remain in the
car until 7 o'clock a. m.
Parlor and Drawing-Room Car on morning train
from JacKsonville through to Savannah, connecting
daily with through Pullman sleeper for New York.
The Dining Car attached to the train between Savan-
nah and Charleston affords supper to passengers going
North, and breakfast to those coming South.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to Montgomery and New Orleans
take the evening train.
Pas en ers from line of Transit Railroad take the
tratih at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. m. and arriving at Savannah at 2:35 a. m., or train
at Jcksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vannah at 3:40 p. m.
Comnecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore. -
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
*Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, at Depot Ticket
Office. J. E. DRAYTON,
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*] Ticket Agent.


HUAU & CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF

FINE KEY WEST CIGAR S
-AND-

WHOLES.ALE LE.AF (E.ALE(S.


Proprietors of Factories Nos. 29, 61 and 81, District
of Florida,
Jacksonville, Florida,
The Most Extensive Manufacturers in the State.
lyr to april 23, '83.

D. G. AMBLER. .T. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida2
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as

AMBLER'S BANK.
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf


Sportman's Emporium.





W. C. PITTMAN,
No. 3 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0----
Guns, PIistols, Rifles andi Cutlery,
Sliooting and Fishing T'ackle.

SHELLS LOADED TO ORDER.
1 yr to April 23, '83



DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,

GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carrjge Glass.
GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Enmery Papers, &,c.
AGENT FOR

PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIRE TEST.


Johnson'8 Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, .1 artinez and Longwman's
Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
to mar25,8, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

[4-347.]
2>Totice for 7P1a'blication.

LAND OFFICE AT GAINESVILLE, FLA., May 3, 1882.
OTICE is hereby given that the following named
settler has filed notice of his intention to make final
proof in support of his claim, and that said proof
will be made before T. E. Buckman, Clerk Circuit Court
at Jacksonville, Florida, on Saturday, June 24th, 1882,
viz.: Jacob Robinson, Duval County, homestead entry
No. 561, for the Nw Y of Nw V4, section 6, township 3s,
range 27e.
E.He names the following witnesses to prove his con-
tinuous residence upon, and cultivation of, said land,
viz.: Calvin Hughes, Samuel Anderson, Andrew Sess-
ions, Lee Clark, all of Jacksonville, Florida.
L. A. BARNES,
May 8 tf Register United States Land Office.


A FEW CHOICE LOTS OF FIFTEEN OR MORE
acres, river fronts, affording attractive and lovely
building sites, and admirably suited to the growth of
oranges, figs and other Florida fruits, may still be ob-
tained on reasonable terms.
."HOLLYWOOD" is south of "Point La Vista," on
the eastern shore of the St. Johns River, four miles from
Jacksonville. For circulars, maps, terms, etc., address
D. REDMOND,
apr 3-tf Box 257, Jacksonville, Fla.




-AND-
FRU IT AND VEGETABLE
REPACKING AND
COMMISSION HOUSE,
Has closed till NOVEMBER. Present address,
may 12, '83. MACON, GA.

...... THE JONES


HVntilat4i TfHssos

AND



ARE THE



AND

BEST IN THE WORLD.

Forsaleby 1>R. J. C. L'ElTNGIE,
Wholesale Druggist, Jacksonville, Fla.
Send for Circular. mar 25-tf

ST. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
---
CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.



OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
1 yr to April 23, '83

VIEWS OF FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In Boolk FormI, ontaining- 1e

Souvenir of Florida, (small size)................25c.
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size)............ ....................... ....... 25c.
Souvenir of Jacksonville,( large size).................50c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine,(large size)............... 50c.
Stereoscopic Views, per Doz. $1.O0.
Address

ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

3-iISTE BI^O. S


Soluble Ground Bone,
THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

FERTILIZER FOR ORANGE TREES.

Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.
Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTER & BEAt,
Agents for the State of Florida.


&-Analysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


to sept 26, '82


-~-----^-------------- --




THE FLORIDA DISPATCH 22_
,.*


COMMISSION


MERCHANTS.


Sou.tlaerr ruit aznd. vreg-etables a Specialty.-
03 6 and :3"2 North Delayware Avenue, Philadelphia.
to jan 6, '83

JONES d& BODWEr,


WHOLESALE GROCERS,
AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


DRY HOP YEAST CAKES,


60Uc, PER


Boston anl Savannlh Stualms il Line


F. S. CONE, A. H. MANVILLE, E. A. MANVILLE,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer

Lake George, Florida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums
Peaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, and over one hundred varieties of the Citrus.
ORANGE T E AND LfEEMO(1)N TRIE3ES a specialty.
Catalogue free. to apr 17, '83

ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]

J. A. BARNES & CO.,
FRUIT AND PRODUCE


DOZ. any house south of Baltimore. Remem-
ber my only Florida address.
GEO. HUGHES,


S NO -DROP PATE T F LOJ to June 26, 8 Cor. Bay and Ocean, Jacksonville; Fla.


First Kacd~s o Finest Qluality

Dairy Butter from 35 to 37c. per Lb.,

=ept in. tble I.arg-est refrigerator in. thle state,

No. 7 West Bay Street, - - Jacksonville, Florida.
To sept 27, '82



Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide.

H. D. BOUNETHEAU, PROPRIETOR

N 0 R D Y K E FLORIDA lHEIyIgAL OIL AND SOA P WORKS,


MILLS
-MANUFACTURE-

FreshGround
FEED, GRITS,
MEAL,
(Bolted or unbolted.)
Pearl Hominy.
GRAIN, HAY, COAL AND
WOOD-YARD.


MANUFACTURER OF
Lubricating and Boiler Compounds, Compressed Soaps, Car and
axle grease.
ALSO SOLE MANUFACTURER
of the best Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide extant-
0mEZ-A-T~rmE TzEmEE E3 MUT.LSIONT i
made from Whale-Oil Soap combined with other powerful ingredients known
to be most effectual for destroying the Scale and other insect pests and
parasites of the Citrus family. It will also put the tree in a healthy and flour-
ishing condition. Prepared for immediate use. Perfectly harmless to the
youngest tree or plant. In packages of from 25 to 300 pounds. Price, 10 cents
per pound. Discount to the Trade. 1i- Full directions for use accompany
each package. Address
H. BOUIETHEAU.


to july 31 '82


P. O. BOX 984, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
-0
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
O -
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers for June are appointed to sail as follows:
JUNIATA, June 3d, at 7:00 a. inm.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, June 10th, at 1:00 p. m.
JUNIATA, June 17th, at 7:00 p. inm.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, June 24th, at 12:00 m.
Days and hours subject to change, without notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, WM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.


PIANOS ANDORGANS
-A. "E. C. M:"EBELL,
15 East Bay ,'aeksonvillc.
QOLD ON INSTALLMENTS, AT LOWEST PRICES-
brafich of Ludden & Bates, Savannah-EXACTLY
SAME PRICES AND TERMS, Sheet Music, Strings
and small instruments of all kinds. Send for cata-
logues, prices and terms. TUNING AND REPAIRING
a specialty. My tuner will make regular tours through
the State, and my customers will thus have my repre-
sentative at their doors, a great advantage to purchasers
of instruments, to sept 26, '82

O. L. KEENE,.
MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,

Laces, Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF


67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, - - FLORIDA.
to feb 20,'82
M. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the
of the Marshall House. Screven House.
lTHE HAIRNETT HOUSE,
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARNETT & GEORGE, Proprietors.
RATS, $2 PER DAY.
This favorite family Hotel, under its new manage-
ment, is recommended for the excellence of its cuisine.
hoffelike comforts, prompt attention and moderate
rates. to sept 4,'82
SEND $1.50 TO

iOLjT'S 3:. AEVCAO"
35 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.,

And get a bottle of Richmond's Samaritan Nervine.
Cures Nervous Disorders, Dizziness, Vertigo, Seminal
Weakness. The only sure cure for Epileptic Fits.
Address HOLT'S PHARMACY.
to aug 20, '82


RUBBER


STAMPS


Are manufactured right in our establishment in the
best manner and at the shortest notice.
4- Send in your orders.
ASHMEAD BROS.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
M ay 1-tf "


ACER'S


___


_ __


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND


ONLY DIRECT LINE BETWEEN
SAVANN-AH AND BOSTON.
Transhipment and extra handling saved. No danger
of fruit being frozen. Cars are unloaded at the steam-
ship wharf in Savannah, avoiding drayage.
CABIN PASSAGE, $18.
SAILING FROM SAVANNAH.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, June Sth, at 12:30 p. m.
Seminole, Thursday, June 15th, at 6:00 p. inm.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, June 22d, at 12:00 nm.
Seminole, Thursday, June 29th, at 6:00 p. m.
Chase. W. Lord, Thursday, July 6th, at 11:00 a. m.
Seminole, Thursday, July 13th, at 5 p. m.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, July 20th, at 10:30 a. inm.
Seminole, Thursday, July 27th, at 4 p. m.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
44-tf Savannah, Ga.

DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
The largest stock in the State. Country
buyers will consult their own interests
by corresponding with me. All orders
promptly filled at prices to compete with


- - ----- --




324- THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


A Good Investment!
-0


In the County of Hernando, East of Brooksville, the
county seat, and near the
Tropical Fllorida -. E.,
which is now actively building, two tracts of land. The
first contains two hundred and forty (240) acres in a body;
the second contains eighty (80) acres. These tracts both
touch Upon a ELake of about 150 acres area; are
well timbered with pine suitable for lumber; the second
about half a mile southeast of the first; between them
lies a cultivated farm. These lands are well adapted to
Oranges and Other Fruits, being of good
soil, with little underbrush, and are easily cleared. They
were selected by LHon. Walter GVwynn, Ex-
Treasurer of the State of Florida, and they may be relied
upon as being what is represented. These lands are in a
part of the State that is rapidly settling up
and offer a good field either for an investment in Flor-
ida real estate, or for orange groves and the like.
Price and terms will be so arranged as to be satisfac-
tory to the purchaser. Apply to
WALTER B. CLARKSON,
Box 877. Jacksonville, Florida.
In corresponding, please Mention this paper.
to August 29, '82.

RICH'D H. MARKS'

OEANE COUNTY LAND AGENCY,
SANIFORD, FLORIDA,
Agent in Orange County for
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMPLY.
BUYS AND SELLS

Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission,
ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
june 12-tf
-! K! D A D 1 is a new town in Orange
W INTER PAR i County Florida eighteen
miles south of Sanford, on the South Florida Railroad,
with a frontage of two miles upon three beautiful Lakes.
WINTER HOMESin the midst of Orange Groves, for
Northerners, is the main idea. For Pamphlets and
Maps giving particulars, address
CHAPMAN & CHASE,
Winter Park, Orange Co., Fla.
to uly 17, '82

S THElI


DAILY TIMES.


THE TIMES is the official paper of the city and the
leading paper of the State. It has the largest circulation
in Florida, and reaches all parts of it. It is not merely
a local newspaper, but aims to advocate the interests
and promote the prosperity of Florida as a whole.
Its reputation outside the State is very high. It has
taken rank among those journals whose columns are
looked to for news, and whose comments are quoted
with respect throughout the country.
Its editors have had wide and varied experience in
journalism North as well as South; its advertising pa-
tronage is liberal and of the best character; and its re-
sources, financial and other, are ample. It will furnish
Florida with a live, progressive, outspoken, and reada-
ble newspaper, the peer of any.
ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.
THE TIMES has secured by special contract the full
despatches of the ASSOCIATED PRESS. Besides that
its Editor is Agent of the Associated Press for the State
of Florida, which gives him great advantages in obtain-
ing the freshest and most important State news.


SPECIAL DESPATCHES.
With representatives in the leading news centres of
the country, THE TIMES is well served in addition to
the regular Press reports. During the past winter it has
received a very large number of telegraphic "specials."
CORRESPONDENCE.
Its regular correspondence from Washington, New
York and Boston, is of noteworthy excellence; and its
State correspondence has attracted much attention.
This feature will be extended and improved; and to
this end correspondence containing news or items of
information of any kind is solicited from all quarters.
"OLD SI. "
In addition to his editorial work, Mr. Small will write
regularly for THE TIMES, and in its Sunday issues the
famous "Old Si" will disseminate wisdom in chunks
to the Florida public.
TERM (strictly in advance): One year, $10; Six
months, $5; three months, $2.50; one month, $1. sent
one month on trial for 50 cents.
Remittance should be made by draft or post-office
order, or in a registered letter. Address
^, JONES & SMALL,
to sept 26,'82 Jacksonville, Fla.


I-


1-u"1E T:'I"TrE eoVE 0Tf:TD EOTE, 3.3S50 per ron,
(Guaranteed IPure.)

COTrrOT SEED "VIEAL, $38 per Ton,
(100 Pound Bags.)

COTTON SEED I-TTI.I. .ASI-, $27 per Ton,
(The Best ]Potash in TUse.)
20Q Qsolels Conoli Peas for Sale.
STOCKBRIDGE FERTILIZERS for Orange Trees and vegetables, for sale by
.1. 1 E. IAIArlT,
tojan 6, '83 Jacksonville, i'la.



S. B. HUBBARD &Co0.
JACKSONVILLE FJLORIDA,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN

HARDWARE, STOVES, DOORS, SASH, BLI N DS,
PAINTS, OILS, PUMPS, LEAD AND IRON PIiPE,
SUGAR- MILLS, RUBBER AND LEATHER BELTING,
STEAM AND GAS-FITTING, PLUMBING AND TINSMITHING,
AGGRKICULTURA3L I. 1PLEMVIENTS of all kinds,
HIAZARTUD'S IPO WVDER,
BAR1B D FENCE WILRE,
Agents for S. L. Allen. & Co.'s -A.RD:ME TOOLS.
to june 11 '83 *a6 Send for Price List and Catalogue. j


BUY THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

-0

GOULD & CO.'S


F ER TIL I Z ER
-AND-


Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange Growers and Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, con-
tains potash, lime, phosphoric acid, ammonia and the other essential elements of Plant Food, making a corn
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & Bro.'s, and other high-priced Fertilizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity, and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $1 per barrel, $32 per
ton.
All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.
MESSRS. GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-I used one-half ton of your Fertilizer, in connection with the same amount of Baker & Bro.'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same .quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gave as good results as the others, which are much higher priced fertilizers-costing
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $51.50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12, 1881.
LEESBURG, SUMTER CO., FLA., March 6, 1882.
GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed your
agents at this point (Messrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer;
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its fostering care, I having had the honor
to win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer be r and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer "kills two birds wl' one stone," inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies,
at one and the same time. I bave been testing it in the field, garden and orange grove for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues, whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For mry part, I ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. if I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork.
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOURT.


to aug 27, '82


GOULD & CO.
NO. 6 W. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


A. N. DOBBINS & BRO.,
A. N. BOBBINS &100 BEARING ORANGE TREEB,
___f h^ v Sarrounding a handsome residence in Jacksonville,
rC f ---fig" halt-mile from the centre of business on Bay Street.
j \ House has seven rooms neatly finished in natural
wood, with kitchen and servants' rooms, store room,
mand Plenty of closets. Good stable and carriage house,

j -" ".PURE W ATER,
"> /'^ '^ _- Good neighborhood-(ALL WHITE.) Lot is 210x157 feet,
100 Ora.n e Tx-ees,
N, } 12 to 16 years old, large and thrifty. Also,
N V ; ',


GRIn Locksmiths gnlflStncil anfttors,
24 LAURA STREET,
JACKSON VIJLLE - FILOREIDA,
Qunsmithing done in all its branches.
G IRON SAFE WORK.
Special rates on Stencil Cutting, by mail. Address,
to June 12'83, (P. 0. Box 833.)


Pecans,


Etc.


Splendid chance for any one desiring a lovely home in
Florida, and a bearing grove.
For price and terms, apply to
J. HI. NORITON,
Jacksonville, Florida.
State that you saw this advertisement in THE FLORIDA
DISPATCH. June 12, '82-tf


~31 l;i~ZYl~~gs -3