<%BANNER%>

USF UNF



Florida dispatch
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00013
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: June 19, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00013
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

Full Text





























pricuhltura, Mtanufacturin d and Industrial Interests of Florida and the South.


Vol. 1.--No. 13.


New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.


Price 5 cents.


Monday, June 19, 1882.


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.


Florida Forage Plants, Etc.
Our old and valued correspondent, Dr. Z. H.
Mason, of Apopka, Orange County, writes thus
in a late Florida Methodist:
In my communication "No. 2," I stated that
't.he grasses of the North and West do not suc-
Need here. From this the reader must not infer
'that we are destitute of grasses and forage
plants. Large droves of cattle live all the year
upon the native grasses in the woods, on the
savannas and prairies, and are never fed, ex-
cept occasionally a cow that has been taught to
eat dry food and drink slops while a calf.
I know of but one grass that can be used to
form grass-plots or pastures, and that is the
"Bermuda ;" but those of us who have moved
from Georgia or Alabama, and have had expe-
rience with it, naturally dread to see it intro-
duced into this section, because when it has
once obtained a hold in the soil, is almost im-
possible to eradicate. Like a conquering army,
it takes full and complete possession, crowding
out nearly everything else. There are two kinds,
one a fine leaf and dwarf habit, and another
with wider leaf, which on good ground, grows
high enough to mow. We have a native grass,
called "Maiden-cane," which makes a good pas-
ture, propagates itself by the roots in the same
manner as the Bermuda, makes a coarse hay,
and is a perfect pest in cultivated grou nd.
Oats, cut green before the grain matures, is
often cut for hay, and pea-vines are also exten-
sively used for the same purpose, especially the
"Conch," which can be cut in July for hay,
when it will rattoon and yield a heavy crop of
peas in the fall. The straw of rice is relished
by stock, and should be cultivated by every
farmer. "Beggar-lice" weed makes a good hay,
and is eagerly eaten by all kinds of stock. The
various kinds of millet do well, and are cut
both for hay and feeding, green. The "Cat
tailed" variety is preferred for sweetness and
rapid growth. "Guinea-grass" has been intro-
duced from the West Indies, and "Para-grass"
from South America, which are doing well in
this section. A new grass-"Teosint"-from
Brazil, is being tried, and if it proves true, in
regard to it, as some assert, "that the yield from
one plant is so great, that it is sufficient to feed a
pair of cattle for twenty-four hours," we have


obtained a forage plant that will supersede all
others in South Florida.
As food for man, hogs and fowls "Cassava"
is pre-eminent, being easily raised, is produc-
tive, and can be prepared in so many ways for
the table as to make it almost a necessary arti-
cle for those who have given it a fair trial, and
being a home product, saves many a dollar in
the family expenses. Sweet potatoes can be
planted in April and May, and a stand-over
crop in August, which will be ready to dig in
March and April, and in this way, have an al-
most continuous supply of this nutricious food.
Irish potatoes are planted in December, for
spring use, and when a heavy mulching is used,
may be planted almost every month in the year.
If the proper soil is selected for a garden,
which must be rich, or made so by heavy manur-
ing, every family may have a constant succession
of vegetables. Beets, onions, lettuce, parsnips and
carrots must be planted in the fall. All the vege-
tables raised at the North, so far as they have
been tried, succeed here.' During summer, is
our scarce time for vegetables, as without shade,
many of them sun-scald. We plant twice a
year-in the fall and early in the spring. At
our county fair, held in the month of February,
one party exhibited thirty-six varieties of vege-
tables, raised on his garden near Apopka City.
There are some fruits that are not suited to
our latitude. The apple, becomes an evergreen,
is dwarfed in size, blooming and fruiting nearly
all the year; the fruit is small and worthless.
The same may be said of the quince. Gooseber-
ries and currants mildew and rot. Many varie-
ties of Northern grapes are failures here, while
others do well. The banana should be planted
in every house-yard; its lIrge, graceful pen-
dant leaves makes the plant ornamental, and
impresses the mind with the idea, that there is
coolness beneath its shade. The culture of the
pine-apple and guava, should not be neglected
by the new settler. From the guava is prepared
many appetizing dishes. While writing about
some of the good things we raise in Orange
County, I must not forget to say a word in fa-
vor of the luscious figs, strawberries, dew-
berries and huckleberries.
From the foregoing, it will be seen that this
far-off Southern land is not a barren sandy
waste, but does produce many of the necessa-


ries of life as well as luxuries. These, with our
delightful climate, make it a pleasant place to
dwell in, having something more to commend
than pleasant breezes, mild climate, orange
trees and semi-tropical scenery. We invite
those in other States, who wish to avoid the dis-
comforts of a Northern winter, to visit this por-
tion of the State, and test our climate.

A KICKING HORSE.-The Country Gentle-
man says: "You have an inquiry how to pre-
vent a horse from kicking when he gets the line
under his tail. Not being able to say how to
prevent the kicking when he gets the line under,
I can tell you a good plan to prevent the get-
ting of the line under his tail. It is simply to
take a good stout twine string, about 18 inches
long, and after doubing the hair back from the
end of the tail of the horse, simply tie the mid-
dle of the string to his tail ; then bring the
ends around the single-tree, giving him room to
switch his tail some, but keeping it down so as
to prevent the annoyance. I have done this
for forty years when I had a horse that was
troublesome in the getting of his tail over the
line, and find it very effective. Do not fail to
loose the tail before unhitching.

MAKING FLOUR BY ELECTRICITY.-Flour
was formerly made by simply grinding wheat
at one operation to the finest possible flour, and
then separating by sieves the flour from the
bran, necessarily grinding in much of the bran
with the flour and discoloring it, while much
of the very best material was separated with
the bran and lost. The later common method
is to grind very coarsely the wheat several
times, using strong blasts of air between each
grinding to separate the bran from the granu-
lated interior portion, and at last crush it to
flour, relieved of all the bran. The new elec-
tric method consists in passing the middlings
under revolving hard rubber cylinders,, electri-
fied by contact with sheepskin. The particles
of bran fly up to meet the rubber, from which
they are turned off in a side channel, the puri-
fied middlings, freed from bran, passing through
rollers to become fine flour.


n


__


Wu~otied~ta the





L4 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Manuring in the Hill or Drill.
The scarcity and value of manure and the
cost of fertilizers are such as to enforce the
greatest economy in their use by farmers. While
it is true that heavy manuring pays, as a rule,
and that the cost of the seed and labor of culti-
vation bear a smaller ratio to the produce in
proportion as the crop is increased; yet the
necessary expenditure for this high fertilizing
is not always, and, in fact, seldom, within the
reach of farmers. Market gardeners must highly
fertilize their soil; it is a necessary, and, in fact,
indispensable part of their business to produce
the largest possible product, because their land
is either purchased or rented&at very high prices,
and bears a very much larger value than ordi-
nary farm land. Market gardens often cost
$1,000 per acre, and rent frequently for $50
per acre, or even more than that, and no man
can profitably cultivate such land except in the
highest manner and by the use of a large work-
ing capital. Farmers, however, must feel their
way and scrutinize very closely their outlays;
and this is most important in regard to the use
of manures and fertilizers. Therefore the ques-
tion, "How should manure be applied-in the
hill or the drill, or spread and plowed under ?"
is one that is worthy of careful consideration at
this season of planting.
Some light has been recently thrown upon
this subject by a Bavarian cheniist, who quotes
from the recorded observations of the South
American traveler, Von Martins, to the effect
that the roots of plants in fertile soil are very
small and short, while those of plants that grow
in sterile soil are much longer; and it has been
observed in the rich Amazonian forests that the
trees which have been washed from banks dur-
ing floods have very small roots in propor-
tion to their size. It is in fact precisely with
plants as it is with the foragers of an army who
gather the supplies required by the soldiers. In
a rich and well-stored country, where provisions
and forage are abundant, a few men can gather
all that is required, and in a narrow space, and
without spreading far ; but in a poor country
it is necessary for many men to scatter far and
wide to secure a sufficient supply. If, then, the
soil is poor, the roots must reach far for the sup-
port of the plant, but if the ground is rich and
fertile, the roots will be confined in a small
space. Without going into the collateral ques-
tion of how far it is useful and beneficial to a
crop to force the roots to thus spread in search
of plant-food, and thus act more energetically
in dissolving and appropriating the mineral ele-
ments of the soil itself in addition to what food
has been provided in the shape of manure or
fertilizers, it may be sufficient here to consider
the bare subject of the text, as to whether a
farmer can raise as large a crop by manuring
in the hill as when he spreads the manure broad-
cast and plows or harrows it in, or leaves it in


the form of a top-dressing and on the surface.
Now, all farmers know very well that the
closer the manure is to the seed, the more
quickly the young plant starts into
growth, and the more vigorous is the growth.
Also, that some plants-potatoes might here be
specially mentioned-confine their roots very
closely to the spot in which they are planted,
and unlees the soil is remarkably fertile, a bet-
ter yield is produced when the manure is kept
within easy reach of the roots. It is reasonable
to suppose that a plant that can find all the
nutriment it requires for its vigorous growth
within a foot of ground, will not send any roots
beyond that space; because in nature labor and
work are never thrown away, and no indirect
methods are used when direct ones are effective.
Further, we may be sure that in such a case all
the food supplied in the confined space will be


consumed by the plant up to its full capacity
for turning it to good account. If we can, then,
hit the precise quantity required by a full crop,
not a pound more need be given; and so far
the economy of the use of manure or fertilizer
will be complete. It is obvious that in such a
consideration the benefit or advantage of a fu-
ture crop cannot enter, and the manuring will
be intended for the one special crop alone, and
not for a rotation.
In regard to potatoes, we might calculate on
the basis of a yield of 150 bushels per acre, and
a manuring of seven tons to the acre, which is
equal to about three pounds of manure to each
hill. One hundred and fifty bushels or 9,000
pounds of potatoes, and seven tons of manure
contain the following elements, viz:
Nitrogen, Potash, Phosphoric
Pounds. Pounds. Acid, Pounds.
The potatoes ......................30 50 16
The stalks........................ 9 8o 3
The manure.................... 70 88 37
But it must not be forgotten that the ma-
nure will not be wholly consumed and some will
be left, but as fresh manure is not, as a rule,
used for potatoes, and only that which is mod-
erately rotted, the unavailable portion will not
be more than one-fourth at the most, and more
especially as in hill manuring the plant takes
up more of the manure than when it is spread.
throughout the soil. So that we find 7 tons of
manure used in the hill is amply sufficient ma-
nuring of a crop of 150 bushels of potatoes
with an average growth of tops, while we are
well aware that 14 tons spread broadcast would
not be any more than a moderate manuring.
And this is without making any allowance for
the inherent fertility of the soil. Of course,
the same result is applicable to the use of fer-
tilizers and special potato manure.
In regard to corn it might be useful to make
a similar calculation and tabulate the figures
for comparison, taking an average good crop of
50 bushels of shelled grain. There would then
be
Nitrogen. Potash. Phosphoric
Pounds. Pounds. Acid. Pounds.
In 50 bushels of corn............48 11% 18
In 2Y2 tons stover..................24 48 26Y
In 7 tons of manure............70 88 37
Here we see a difference between the exactions
of the crops, which is existing chiefly in the
large drafts made upon the manure by the sto-
ver. And this difference may very easily ac-
count for the frequent disappointment experi-
enced when the yield of corn is compared with
that of potatoes, and both crops are grown
with the help of artificial manures.
It is frequently heard among farmers who
have thus grown these crops that while potatoes
did well with the fertilizer, the corn was not
equally benefited. It might have been lost
sight of that the two and a half tons of dry
corn-stalks, equal to 8 or 10 green, demand
very much more nutriment than one ton of
green potato vines, and this demand is rarely
met by extra allowance of fertilizer. The de-


mand is seen to be for phosphoric acid chiefly ;
and while seven tons of manure would supply
the potash, it would not contribute enough
phosphoric acid. This fact furnishes a key to
the necessary kind of manuring, and suggests
how the demand should be met, viz.: by super-
phosphate of lime or a fertilizer rich in this ele-
ment, applied in the hill or drill in sufficient
quantity to meet the requirements of the crop.
One hundred or 150 pounds per acre of such a
fertilizer containing 10 per cent. of phosphoric
acid, would go far to meet this need, while 250
pounds would fully supply it and leave a sur-
plus to provide for the usual deficiency in the
feeding capacity of the plant or the manure.
With regard to the corn crop, it should not
be forgotten that there is usually a sod plowed
under and some home-made fertilizer used in
the hill, and that these help somewhat, but not
possibly to a large extent, because the sod is not
nearly decomposed at the maturity of the crop,


and the usual home-made fertilizer, poultry ma-
nure and wood-ashes, is deficient in the required
phosphoric acid. For a large crop, it is seen,
then, that a liberal assistance to the manure,
when this is supplied in the usual small quan-
tity of a forkful to the hill, should be given,
and that 250 or 300 pounds, which is equal to
a small handful or large spoonful to each hill,
is the right quantity for an acre. The same
facts and conclusions apply to Fall grain, and
with the drill fertilizing at the time of sowing
is the only one that can be practiced, because
as fertilizers are very soluble, and wheat or rye
roots cannot spread very far in the two or three
months of growth before vegetation is arrested
for the Winter, the valuable elements might
escape and be lost by washing of the soil by
surface water or by drainage. When, therefore,
a Fall grain crop is sown upon manured or
unmanured land, and fertilizers are used in the
drill, 100 to 150 pounds per acre is sufficient
for that occasion, and the greater part of the
allowance should be reserved for top dressing
in the Spring.
The whole subject is one well worthy of study
by intelligent farmers. The above remarks
are offered as hints and suggestions rather than
as recommendations, although the writer should
say that he has been and is inclined to the prac-
tice of broadcast manuring and fertilizing both.
The present season his corn and potato crops
are each manured and fertilized partly in each
manner, with a view to testing the advantages
of either method.-N. Y. Times.
No Fences.
In his admirable address before the State
Agricultural Convention of Georgia, at Augus-
ta, Col. A. P. Butler, Commissioner of Agricul-
ture of South Carolina, held that the agricultur-
al interests of the country were so much greater
than the stock, that the latter must give way
to the former. The cost of boundary fences
alone, in South Carolina, was $13,090,410 kept
up at an annual cost of $2,565,361. The aboli-
tion of fences in South Carolina amounted to
two years remission of all the taxes in the State.
He thought the abolition of fences would be
equally advantageous to Georgia. He had no
doubt that the annual cost of building and
maintaining fences in Georgia amounted to, if
it did not exceed, the value of all the stock in
the State. The no fence law had now become
so popular in Anderson County, where it was
first adopted, that not a voice can be found in
favor of its repeal. The no fence law encour-
aged the breeding of better stock. He believ-
ed that the general adoption of the no fence
law would greatly promote the interests of agri-
culture.
Campbell County, Ga., has adopted the "no
fence" system, and under its provisions a case
has been brought in a Justice's Court. The News
Letter reports the following as the facts in the
case : Mr. Joseph E. Brown is a tenant on Mr.
Creel's place. Miss Fannie Vincent and W.
R. Vincent, who live on adjoining lands, had
some cows which trespassed on Mr. Brown's


land. He took them up and impounded them,
and notified the parties to come after them and
pay the expenses and take them away. Misses
Fannie Vincent and Ella Thomas went over
and drove the cows away, without Mr. Brown's
consent, and without offering to pay damages.
Brown came to town and sued out possessory
warrants for the cattle, and the Sheriff went
up and arrested the parties and brought them to
town to try the case. After hearing the evi-
dence in the case the Court decided to restore
the possession of the cattle to Mr. Brown. The
parties will now have to either pay the costs of
the suit and the damage and expenses of keep-
ing the cattle or pay costs of this suit and give
bond for the expense and damages to be as-
sessed at the next regular session of the Jus-
tice Court.





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


The cow's udder is generally swollen for sev-
eral days after the calf is dropped. Unless the
swelling is very obstinate do not use any lini-
ment on the udder. Be careful to draw all the
milk and then rub the udder with the palm of
the hand. Do not give highly stimulating food.
Never milk a cow while she is eating her
grain ration. Above all never give her any-
thing to eat in order to keep her quiet while
you are milking. She will soon learn to ex-
pect it and will not stand unless she has some-
thing-to eat.
If the teats are cracked wash them clean and
then.be sure to wipe them perfectly dry. Have
some tallow melted in a cup and fill the cracks
with the warm tallow. The teats will soon be
well.
Many farmers make a great mistake by put-
ting their cattle out on grass too soon in the
spring. Perhaps their feed is short and they


T'etatineilt of Calves and Milch Cows.
BY JOHN M. STAHL.

I have found the following the best way t
manage the early feeding of a calf: Allow it t
be with its mother all the time for the first tw
days after birth. The mother's udder should
be milked dry night and morning. On the their
day separate the cow and calf, putting there
together during the night and for half an hou
at noon. When the calf is ten days old take i
away from the mother for good. Allow it to g
ten hours without food. Then take it a bucke
of milk and it will generally drink without
trouble. If not, dip your finger in the milk anm
place it in the calf's mouth. When it suck
your finger, lower your hand into the milk, an
the calf will suck up the milk. As soon as thi
calf has learned to drink put a little meal o
bran into the bucket; just a little to give it th(
taste. In two or three days more put a hand
fnl of bran in the bottom of the bucket whei
the milk is drank out, and let the calf drink a
it. Keep bran or meal, oats and hay always,
near the calf, where it can stray up to it. Giv(
it very little, but change it often. It is wonder
ful how soon it will learn to eat, and how it wil
thrive.
It is better to teach the calves to drink, thai
to allow them to run with the cows. The latte]
plan soon spoils the mothers for milkers; il
makes their teats sore; and the longer the cal:
is allowed to run with the mother the harder ii
is to wean it.
When the object is to teach the calf to drink
it should not be taken from the mother when
too young. It took me some time to learn this
I would take the calf away when it was only
two or three days old and often had trouble in
teaching it to drink. Since I have allowed the
calf to suck till it was ten days old, I have had
very little trouble.
The best time for calves to be dropped is in
the very early spring. Then by the time grass
comes they are ready to eat it. They should
have a pasture for themselves alone. It should
be so large that they cannot keep it eaten down,
and it should be mown every month so that the
pasture will not get dry and hard. Calves
should have milk till four months old-no longer
as they are taught to eat. I think a mixture of
bran and oats the best feed for young calves,
and they should have all they will eat of it for
the first year.
In feeding bran it is better to feed the bran
dry and give it before the milk. Do not give
a calf all the milk it will drink. Warm the
milk to about seventy or eighty degrees. If
they are taught to eat hay and oats-as they
can be taught-they will not suffer from diar-
rhoea.


ness that are really necessary for the benefit of a store. It was a weak effort to build up a
the people. Their action in electing Senators "community" on a sort of co-operative plan. Of
would be governed by good common sense and course this part of the business has been a
a desire for the welfare of themselves and the ridiculous failure. To say the colony has fail-
masses, and hence they would select men of ed is true. A good part of the community are
great force of character, ability, honor and ad- still there, and some of them, having gotten
vanced ideas. rid of the meddlesome Mr. Boyle, are prosper-
In the selection of Congressmen, men of dig- ing. It is unjust folly to lay the fiasco at
nity, influence and intelligence should be Rugby to the land. The soil and surroundings
elected. These should be earnest advocates of are superior to those enjoyed by the Swiss at
the rights of the commonwealth, and of such Greutli or the Germans at Cullman. There
force of character as business men and largely was too much organization, too much meddling
interested property holders, that their demands by bosses. The way to settle our great stretches
would compel respect and receive that atten- or table land is to first secure good titles to
tion and response which the wants of the sec- large tracts and sell farms to Swiss and Ger-
tion require. The bummer and personal popa- man immigrants at nominal prices, selling in
larity element should be eliminated from the alternate quarter sections. Such an enterprise
body politic. Jobbers, ambitious demagogues by a well managed stock company would real-
and speculators should be forced to disappear ize the fortunes of its projectors and immensely
from the field. Gentlemen above reproach benefit the country.


I!


. I


fa


are compelled so to do or else purchase; or else must be elected to fill and adorn these places.
the high price of feed induces them to turn the Such will command respect and receive recog-
cattle out to grass and sell the surplus. Cows nition of right from all parties.
are generally turned to grass first; because to With regard to the requirements and need,
o these reasons are added the further inducement of the vast domain of rich and fertile lands
o that grass makes milk and superior butter. But for whose protection andl relief from constantly
o such pasture does great harm. There is very recurring accidents the aid and protection of
d little danger of letting the grass grow too big. the general Government is invoked by the dwel-
I like a little blue grass for early pasture. It lers in the Mississippi Valley, A perfect and
d comes on very early and is more solid than certain method by which this region can com-
n other grasses.-Indiana Farmer. plete4 secure this action on the part of Con-
r 0ar gress, is for Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi
t Farmers in Congress. and Louisiana to elect men to the National
o A profound and decidedly well-spread inter- Legislature on the one special idea of using and
t est in agricultural matters has lately agitated mploying theiradvanfluetage a votes referfor secur-
t the country to an extent that assures the crea- pact delegation of this kind in Congress, no
d tion of a Cabinet position for the administra- matter what the political opinions of the individ-
s tion of this department of the General Govern- uals are if actuated by this sole idea, they can
d ment. The vast amount of public attention command the legislation and support which
this region requires. If, too, the electoral tick-
e which the matter has elicited, forces very promi- et in each of these States was elected to vote
r nently upon all thinking people the necessity for that candidate for the Presidency who
e of making material advances in everything would agree to perform this requirement, a ma-
- that pertains to this- great and increasing inter- trial change would very quickly be made in
n est in the development of the material and in- the vast resources of this wonderfully fertile
region. Its capacity for producing substantial
t dustrial resources of all sections. The situation wealth for the country at large, and the neces-
s makes us think of numerous ways in which the sity of forcing into subordination the minor
e country generally may be benefited to the full- subjects and doctrines of the present ideas of
1 est extent possible. As politics form the key- political parties, demand a course and plan
stone of the Government of this country, and such as is herein outlined by the Planter's Jour-

nal. The influence and results it would gain
is the most important leading feature of every- would so far outbalance all of the dogmas and
r body's thoughts, and the genius, labor and measures usually advocated by the prominent
t amusement of the people are freely expended parties of the age, that the latter would appear
f in working out the various phases of the phil- in a very contemptable light when compaTed to
t osophy and practical effect of party doctrines; the worth, grandeur and usefulness of the for-
the situation necessarily attracts serious atten- mer.-Planter's Journal.
, tion.
Upon careful investigation, we find that ofonies of Immigrants.
the 76 Senators in Congress 57 are lawyers and Golonies of Immigrants.
r one is a farmer; of the 293 Representatives and The Chattanooga Tradesman speaks wisely in
i Delegates 197 are lawyers and 11 are farmers. the following remarks on colonization schemes.
Thus out of 369 Congressmen 254, or over two- It says: "All attempts to colonize on the plan
I thirds, belong to the profession of law, and a tried at Rugby and in other similar instances,
paltry dozen to the profession of agriculture, must, of necessity fail in this country. Our in-
i As regards the importance of the two vocations stitutions develop individualism. Our people
to the general welfare, or the numbers engaged will not endure a boss, care-taker, guardian. No
in them, which deserves the larger representa- more will other people put up with these, once
tion ? they have imbibed the spirit of our institutions.
It is not the province or mission of this pub- The German settlements at Greutli, Tenn.;
location to discuss politics, or take a partisan Cullman, Ala.; Braunfels, Texas, have all
place. But there are questions in which the been highly successful. Greutli, on an inferior
Welfare of the planters, whose interests it domain, and with greatly inferior facilities of
Guards, protects and champions, are deeply in- transportation to those enjoyed by the Rugby
volved, and which urge it to take a decisive people, has flourished from the start, while the
stand on what it deems a matter of right, latter has literally died aborning. Greutli
With regard to the selection of State Legisla- was a simple gathering of hardy, intelligent
tors, it certainly would be well to choose a frugal Swiss, who preferred to live near each
majority of successful agriculturists, whose in- other for mutual advantages, social, education-
terests are largely employed in the development al, religious, etc. There was no head man, no
of these kinds of resources. Such persons will best man, no guardian, no colony, in short, in the
naturally legislate promptly, and not be dis- usual acceptation of that term. At Rugby a
posed to loaf at the capital any longer than is settler must go to the boss if he wanted to fell
necessary to make whatever laws and do busi- a tree, abate a nuisance, build a house or ooen


__





Lge THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


FLORIDA CARP.-Since the distribution of
carp by the United States Fish Commissioner,
in this section, something over a year ago, noth-
ing has been heard concerning them until just
recently. Mr. Ledwick Johnson, of Sorrento,
has a small pond stocked with them, and while
sauntering on the bank a week or ten d-a, ago,
he saw one of them. In estimating the size of
it he says: It was 12 or 14 inches long and
would measure at least three or four inches
across the back, and weighed at least seven
pounds. It is a pretty fish, with beautiful spots
Son the back and side. These fish, when given
out, were about two inches in length, and this
one has been in the pond about 14 months,
showing the rapid growth they make. We
would like to hear reports from any one who
has this fish.-South Florida Journal.
FLORIDA WHEAT.-Mr. John A. Wilson,
who is farming upon the place of Mr. S. P.
Buie, brought to town on Monday a fine bundle
of wheat, pronounced by experienced wheat
growers to be excellent. It grew from seed sent
to Mr. Buie by the Agricultural Department,and
planted about the 20th of January. Mr. Buie's
farm is about four miles west of town, and is
what is known as sandy land, but it produces
good crops, except oats. This shows that wheat
may not be affected by the same diseases that
befall oats, and that our light soils are capable
of producing heavy crops of wheat, even in sea-
sons of drouth, for the present spring has been
very dry in this locality.-Lake City Reporter.
-Ten years ago, P. N. Bryan, of this place,
located on a pine-land homestead for the pur-
pose of making a home as well as an orange
grove. Possessing little of this world's goods,
besides health, strength, and a wife, he kept
steadily at work, attending to his trees to the
best of his ability, until the result was a model
grove of 200 trees, which, it is thought by all
who visit the place, cannot be excelled in the
State. This premium grove he has recently
sold to Miss M. Constant, of Springfield, Ill.,
who is now having 600 stumps added to her
grove. She has also sold several 10 and 20-
acre lots of the 160 acres included in the pur-
chase, to Northern people, arid all.of which are
to be improved ere long. Now, at the end of
ten years, Mr. Bryan finds himself in possession
of $8,000 cash, several hundred head of cattle,
a horse and mule, and a family of promising


children, which is a pretty good showing for
that length of time-at least we think so.-
South Florida Times.
HANDSOMELY SAID !-The Volusia County
News, of Enterprise, very "cleverly" and good-
naturedly remarks: "The Sanford Journal
heads it columns this week with the words,
Boom, Boom, and then goes on to say that San-
ford will be the terminus of three railroads.
Well, if it is impossible to have a city on this
side of the lake, the next best thing will be to
have a large town at Sanford, and when that
city shall have attained Chicago-like dimen-
sions, the business men, fleeing from the bustle
and flurry of metropolitan life, will seek the
cool and delightful north side of Lake Monroe
to erect residences upon."


-Mr. John P. Roberts is one of the most pro-
gressive and successful planters of Leon County.
He lives four miles west of Tallahassee, and has
a 100-acre corn-field that will produce, in the
opinion of competent judges, over fifty bushels
of corn per acre.-Tampa Tribune.
-Mr. S. L. Jones brought to this office a day
or two since, some wild cotton which grows
spontaneously at Rocky Point, in Old Tampa
Bay. In color it is of a slight yellow cast. A
new and valuable variety of cotton might be
produced from this wild variety by cultivation.
-Tampa Tribune.
FLORIDA LAWNs.-The grass that E. R.
Trafford recently put in his yard is spreading
rapidly, and he will have a beautiful lawn in
front of his house. It has been reported, and
is pretty generally believed all over the North
that, we cannot have grass in Florida. We had
a letter of inquiry on the subject last week.
There are a half-dozen different grasses in the
State that make beautiful lawns.-South Flor-
ida Journal.-[Please name five or six of these
lawn grasses, and oblige THE DISPATCH.]
FLORIDA MARL.-A new and important in-
dustry is being built up on Lake Jessup, in
Orange County. The fine beds of marl which
have been discovered along the south shore of
the lake are being utilized, with fish from the
lake, in the manufacture of a fertilizer. A com-
pany has been organized, and buildings erected
on Bird Island in the lake, a mile and a half
from the main land. Fish are taken from the
lake in great quantities each morning. They
are at once sorted and the choicest sent to mar-
ket. Those unfit for table use are killed, then
thrown into an immense tank and steamed.
When cooked they are pressed into solid cakes
and dried until the mass is as hard as wood. It
is afterwards ground with a quantity of marl,
when the whole becomes a valuable fertilizer.
ANOTHER RAILROAD.-Another railroad to
run from a point near Deep Creek, on the St.
John's River, near Lake Harney, to or near
Titusville, on the Indian River, with a branch
at or near Indian River to a point on Hillsbor-
ough River or Mosquito Lagoon, and through
the country to Volusia and Brevard, has been
incorporated by Messrs. H. S. Haines, G. W.
Haines, W. B. Watson, C. B. Fenwick, E. Sta-
ples, John Sauls and H. J. Faulker. We were
informed recently that the road would be pushed
rapidly to completion, and that the engineers
would commence to locate the line about the


20th inst. The road is to be known as the At-
lantic Coast, St. John's and Indian River Rail-
road Company.- Union.
WHAT THEY WANT.-The St. Augustine
Press says that a man comes to Florida and
desires to purchase a place, but he wants to
find comfortable buildings with attractive sur-
roundings, shade and fruit trees, for which he
is willing to pay. Small places will answer if
they are dressed up. These purchasers had
rather buy these things than make them. They
have money to do the one and no time to do
the other. A few broad spreading water oaks,
or mulberries, a bower of grape vines raised 10
or 12 feet from the ground, and an acre of well-
grown fruit trees, will command tip-top prices,


while few men are going to buy a place where
the house is away back from the road, and the
well sunk beside the marsh and only supplied
with surface water, the yard swept clean and
the sand, glaring like the sands of Sahara. It
is no use .to talk about rich hammocks, corn
crops, and cotton, this man wants comfort and
pleasure, rest, not work. A few hours spent in
locating and planting trees, which time will
make attractive and valuable, pay bigger money
than corn-fields in Florida. A good business
can be made in fixing up places to sell; but
first of all, roads must be located ; not these
thirty-feet cow-paths, but broad avenues, with
broad-topped shade trees and foot-paths on each
side. Neat cottages, with a flower garden, and
pleasant walks, and the orange, lemon, lime,
shaddock and grape-fruit trees near, all well
kept, a well of cement, so located that no drain-
age from the kitchen can reach it, are the things.
For such places you may ask, and get your own
price, when an unfitted place will not be taken
at any price.


(Edited by Dr. A. S. Baldwin.)
Evil Results to Health of Ladies from Fash-
ionable Dress.
At a lecture in London, under the auspices
of the National Health Association, the lecturer,
speaking of the dress of women, said that there
could be no doubt that, among fashionable
ladies, physical errors with regard to dress,
promoted palpitation of the heart, torpidity of
the liver, indigestion, degeneration of the mus-
cles covered by the corset, and consequent
weakness of the body, adding that the spine,
not being properly supported, subsided down-
wards, sometimes forming a lateral curviture.
He condemned high heeled shoes as distorting
the foot, injuring the knee and the hip, and
throwing the body generally into an unnatural
position.

From Sanitary Engineer, May 25.-A move-
ment was inaugurated in Brooklyn, last week,
to promote the planting of trees on the streets
and public places of the city. At a meeting at
the Academy of Music, Ex-Mayor John Hun-
ter, presiding, the best method to effect the ju-
dicious and systematic setting out of trees was
discussed, and it was finally decided to appoint
a committee of seven to consider a plan of or-
ganization for an incorporated society, as rec-
ommended by Mr. S. B. Duryea.
SMALL-POX AND BEER.
Under the above head, the Cincinnati Gazette
has an editorial which begins as follows:
"The almost total restriction of the small-pox
to those districts of the city which are inhabi-


ted by the German opponents of vaccination
is the best possible refutation of the anti-vacci-
nation theories of late so persistently urged.
The alleged fact that beer drinkers are especi-
ally liable to the disease seems also to be es-
tablished. The excessive use of beer, as is well
known, disorganizes important internal organs
and overtaxes and clogs all the excretory ducts.
The blood is thus turned into a semi-putres-
cent condition which invites and greatly facil-
itates the inroads of the dread disease. More
than half a century ago Sir Astley Cooper
called attention to the frequency with which the
beer-fattened draymen of the London brewer-
ies fell victims to the slightest injuries. Though
fat and rosy and apparently healthy, a splinter
from a barrel, or a slight scratch, often proved
fatal, and if cured at last, the patient was ex-
ceptionally slow in recovering. Copious draughts




THE FLORIDA DISPATCH "9


of beer may not tell as severely as whisky upon
the nervous system, but they kill as surely, and
almost, if not quite as speedily."
"The Boston Herald gives two cases of ar-
senical poisoning in Cambridgeport, from sleep-
ing in a room newly papered. The room was
occupied two successive nights by the different
persons, each of whom became ill with vomit-
ing and purging. A portion of the wall-paper
was analyzed and arsenic was detected."
CASES OF DIPHTHERIA.
The Philadelphia Medical Times, of April
12th, has a leading editorial entitled "New Re-
searches in Diphtheria," in which some account
is given of the results of the recent investiga-
tions of Dr's. West and Furman, under the
auspices of the National Board of Health. From
it we quote:
"A number of experiments were made upon
the effects of boiling the membrane, and it was
proved that if the heat was maintained for only
four or five minutes the contagious power was
not always destroyed, but that when the boiling
was continued for fifteen or twenty minutes, or
longer, inoculation with the virus always failed
to produce any local or general effects. Cul-
ture experiments with this innocious virus
showed that the boiling had killed the micrococci,
which entirely refused to grow. It is scarcely
necessary to point out the confirmation this
leads to the belief that the micrococci are the
causes of the disease."
"Another important observation was made by
Dr. Furman. The pigs of a family living
in an isolated position in the forest were fed with
slops from a room where three or four children
were sick with the disease. Several of the pigs
sickened and one died, at the autopsy of which,
made by Dr. F., although the larynx and re-
spiratory passages were found entirely free from
disease.he found the lower end of the ocsophagus,
the stomach and upper duodenum was coated
with a very thick false membrane loaded with
micrococci aud containing the other anatomical
elements of a true diphtheritic membrane."
In the blood, as well as in the spleen and bone
marrow the micrococci were very numerous and
in their behavior conformed in all respects with
those in malignant human diphtheria. Inocu-
lation of rabbits with the membrane from the
stomach of the pig produced sickness and death
with symptoms and local and general lesions
similar to those caused by the human membrane.
This observation is very important as showing
the local nature of diphtheria in its onset, and
especially so as raising the suspicion that the
fatal swine plague of the West has a close rela-
tion with diphtheria."



Meteorological Report.
Weather for week ending July 16, 1882.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION. )
SIGNAL SERVICE, U. S. A., JACKSONVILLE, PLA. )


Therm. Wind.

DATE. | | )


Saturday 10...... 29.8738273' 76.5 85.7 0.50 SW 5!Fair.
Sunday 11....... 29.893 88 75 80.0 76.3 0.17 S 2 Fair.
Monday 12......12997W87 72 79.7 74.0 0.08 NE 6 Fair.
Tuesday 13...... 30.093 8374! 78.0 72.71 0.00 NE 7 Clear.
Wednesday 14 30.139 84 71 78.7 66.3i 0.00 E 2 Clear.
Thursday 15...!30.081 91169 83.0l,'60.0 0.00 SW 4 Clear.
Friday 16w...... 129.987 94 75 86.0 60.7 0.00 SW 4 Clear.
Highest barometer 30.15, lowest 29.83.
Highest temperature 94, lowest 69.
NOTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Observer U. S. A.
[EXTRACT FROM No. 113, A.]
Meteorological Summary for May, 1882.
PUNTA RASSA, FLA., June 1, 1882.
Monthly mean of barometer, 30.004; highest, 30.174, on
20th; lowest, 29.851, on llth; monthly range, 0.323.
Monthly mean of temperature, 76.7; highest, 900, on
8th; lowest, 640, on 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th; monthly range,
260 greatest daily range, 20.50, on 3d ; least, 5.50, on 12th.
Monthly mean dew point, 65.7.


Monthly mean humidity, 70.5 per cent.
Prevailing wind direction, east.
Total monthly movement of wind, 7,505 miles.
Maximum velocity of wind and direction, 28 miles,
southwest on 12th.
Total rainfall, 2.51 inches.
Number of clear days, 7.
Number of fair days, 18.
Number of cloudy days, 6.
Number of days on which rain fell, 13.
Dates of solar halos, 23d. 29th, 30th.
Dates of lunar halos, 23d, 29th.
Dates of zodaical light, none.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 6:40 a. min., for month, 9.7 miles, east.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 2:40 p. m., for month, 12.5 miles, west.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 10:40 p. m., for month, 10.0 miles, east.
Winds of 25 miles per hour and over (dates wind direc-
tions and velocities) 11th, 27 miles, southwest; 12th, 28
miles, southwest.
W. J. EVANS,
Sergeant Signal Corps, U. S. A.
KEY WEST, FLA., June 1, 1882.
Monthly mean actual barometer of three telegraphic
observations, 29.988.
Monthly mean reduced barometer of three telegraphic
observations, 30.008.
Highest barometer and date, 30.163 on 3d; lowest and
date, 29.876 on 26th; range, 0.287.
Monthly mean temperature 80.00; highest and date.
90.80 on 30th; lowest, and date, 68.80 on 26th
Monthly range of temperature, 22.00; greatest daily
and date,14.00 on 1st; lowest and date, 5.2 on 25th.
Monthly mean humidity, 69.30.
Monthly mean dew point, 67.10.
Prevailing wind direction determined from the three
telegraphic observations, east.
Prevailing wind direction determined from five daily
observations, east.
Total rainfall or melted snow, 7.46 inches.
Average depth of unmelted snow on ground at end of
month, none.
Total movement of wind from 11 p. m. to 11p. m., 6,607
miles.
Maximum velocity and direction 24 miles southwest
and northeast; date, 12th and 26th.
Number of foggy days (q), none.
Number of clear days on which rain or snow fell, 3; on
which no rain or snow fell, 6.
Number of fair days on which rain or snow fell, 6; on
which no rain or snow fell, 12.
Number of cloudy days on which rain or snow fell, 4;
on which no rain or snow fell, none.
Number of days on which rain or snow fell, 13; on
which no rain or snow fell, 18.
Dates of auroras and times of beginning and ending,
none.
Dates of solar halos, none; of lunar halos, 31st
Dates of zodiacal lights, none; of frost, none.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 7 a. m., for month, 7.2 miles, and east.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 3 p. m., for month, 9 miles, and east.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 11 p. min., for month, 9.2 miles, and east.
Gales of 25 miles per hour and over (dates, wind direc-
tions and wind velocity, none.
Number of fair sunsets, 16.
Fair sunsets verified, 15 ; not verified, 1.
Number of foul sunsets, 15.
Foul sunsets verified, 9 ; not verified, 6.
Number of doubtful sunsets, none.
LEE M. MELBOURNE,
Sergeant Signal OCorps, U. S. A.

The New Silk Industry.
The gre atest incentive to engage in silk cul-
ture is the knowledge that there is a home mar-
ket for $15,000,000 worth of floss, which Amer-
ican manufacturers are obliged to import from
foreign lands. The other consideration is, that
silk culture furnishes women and children in
the rural districts, with a congenial occupation
that does not require constant attention, and so
will not interfere with household duties.
In view of these facts the Women's Silk Cul-
ture Association of Philadelphia was organized
two years ago, for the purpose of calling the
attention of the women of the country to the
opportunity given them to establish a new in-


dustry, both suitable and profitable ; and also
to give the proper instructions to all desiring to
engage in silk culture.
The success of this pioneer association is re-
markable ; there has been aroused a wide
spread interest in the cultivation of cocoons,
that must go on increasing until the aim of the
association is fulfilled.
This fact was more forcibly presented at the
last meeting of the association, at which the
display of cocoons was very fine and interest-
ing. The chief feature of the exhibition was the
display of specimen cocoons by the twenty-six
contestants for the Strawbridge & Clothier pre-
miums. The first one of which, by the way,
was carried off by Mrs. Rebecca Taylor, (moth-


er of the late Bayard Taylor), who is over 82
years of age, and a sufferer from paralysis.
The association announces that through the
liberality of Messrs. Strawbridge & Clothier,
the well known dry goods merchants of Phila-
delphia, it is again enabled to offer to the silk
culturists the sum of five hundred dollars in
ten premiums, as follows: first premium, $100;
second premium, $75; third premium, $65;
fourth premium, $60; fifth premium, $50; sixth
premium, $45; seventh premium, $40; eighth
premium, $30; ninth premium, $25; tenth pre-
mium, $10. For these premiums any resident
of the United States may contest. From the
ten largest amounts of cocoons, one pound will
be taken, without selection, and the test of
reeling applied ; the quantity and quality will
be the conditions for premium. Application
for competition must be endorsed and the
amount of this year's cocoons raised by the cul-
turist, testified to by some responsible person.
Stock must be sent not later than December
1, 1882.
Anyone with sufficient land to grow a few
mulberry trees can add the rearing of silk
worms to the daily care and find it a source of
pleasure and profit. The work occupies but a
small portion of the year, and a child can at-
tend to the daily gathering of leaves and feed-
ing the worms. If a supply of mulberry leaves
cannot be had, an ossage orange hedge will an-
swer every purpose. The osage orange leaf is
admirable food for the silk worms, from which
they spin splendid silk.
A very interesting event of national interest,
connected with this subject of silk culture, has
just occurred in Philadelphia. The Women's
Silk Culture Association selected silk from
twenty-six families living in fourteen States ;
had it spun on a "Yankee" reel, made into a
web of twenty-eight thousand threads of silk,
and woven as a brocade on a Jacquard loom,
requiring three thousand six hundred needles
to form the original and striking design. This
is the first brocade ever woven in America of
American sillk ; and probably the heaviest in
texture of any brocade ever woven. It is
known as the Garfield dress, and it is the in-
tention of the association to present this magni-
ficent fabric to Mrs. James A. Garfield.

She Does Her Own Work.
Does her own work ? Does she? What of
it ? Is it any disgrace ? Is she any less a true
woman, less worthy of respect than she who
sits in silks and satins and is vain of fingers
that never labor ? We listened to a person the
other day, who, speaking of a newly-wedded
wife, said sneeringly, "Oh! she does her own
work." The words, and the tone of contempt
in which they were uttered, betokened a nar-
row, ignoble mind, better fitted for any place
than a country whose institutions rest on hon-
orable labor as one of the chief corner-stones.
They evinced a false idea of the true basis of


society, of the true womanhood, of genuine
nobility. They showed the detestable spirit of
caste or rank, which a certain class are trying
to establish-a caste whose sole foundation is
money, which is the weakest kind of rank
known to civilization. Mind, manners, morals,
all that enters into a good character, are of no
account with these social snobs. Position in
their stilted ranks is bought with gold, and
every additional dollar is another round in the
ladder by which elevation is gained in their
esteem and society.

GUINEA Cows, or Heifer calves wanted.
Write the Editors of THE DISPATCH.
June 5 '82, tf.

BUDDING TREES.-ANDREW CALLA-
HAN, PRACTICAL and SCIENTIFIC BUDDER,
will bud and warrant trees, on reasonable terms.
Orders may be left at Ashmead Bros. tf.


I





S THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
*11


SWEET POTATOES.
---- ^
Varieties, Modes of Culture, &c.
I will not undertake to tell in what country
the sweet potato was first discovered, or where it
originated, as that question is too aesthetic for
my present consideration. I will, however,
remark that the first I ever saw was on Dau-
fuskee Island, about the year 1825, when I was
about eighteen inches high, more or less.
But whether they originated in Asia, Africa,
Europe, the islands of the Pacific, Atlantic or
Indian Ocean, or America, it suffices for our
present purposes to affirm that it is a thing of
huge proportions and immense magnitude, es-
pecially as food for man and beast ; but of all
the crops our soil is capable of producing there
is none that is less appreciated or that deserves
greater consideration. My earliest recollections
of the manner of its cultivation was by run-
ning off three feet rows and throwing up high
ridges with turning plows; and, as the height of
the rows were considered the acme of perfec-
tion in preparation for successful cultivation,
the hoe was then used to draw up the ridges,
which were made as high as possible. The
plants were then set from eight to twelve inches
apart, and from this ridge-which was kept in-
tact throughout, as much as possible, and cul-
tivated mostly with the hoe-was generally
gathered, in the fall, a lot of long, stringy po-
tatoes, entirely different from those raised at
the present day. With this expensive method
of cultivation but few were raised, and they of
the following varieties :
1. The Spanish, a long, irregular shaped,
hard to keep, which was propagated only by
planting the small ones, but nice for the table.
2. The Buck, a pale red potato, yellow on
the inside-not so good for table.
3. The old Yellow Yam, which to this day, is
considered par excellence.
4. The Pumpkin potato, that has a pale yel-
low on the outside, and the color of the pump-
kin on the inside, nearly resembling what is
now called the California yam, but was not the
same potato.
The above and the Poplar Root Spanish were
all the varieties that were cultivated up to
twenty years ago, when the Bermuda potato
came about. This is a perfectly red potato on
the outside and white on the inside; a hard
potato to raise and hard to keep, but as food
for the table is the best. Next came the Ne-
gro Killer, a very prolific variety, red on the
outside and white on the inside, different in


shape from the Bermuda, not so good for the
table, but more prolific and better for stock.
Now we find the St. Domingo, an early
prolific variety, adapted to poor soil-sandy or
otherwise-and, for all purposes, the best I have
tried, as they keep better, are more easily prop-
agated, will do best of any on thin soils, but
are sometimes surpassed on rich soil in produc-
tion by a reddish potato called the Hayti,
which is equally as good for stock, but not
early or so good for the table. Also the Cali-
fornia yam, which is not so prolific as the two
former, but generally considered superior for
the table. The last variety, the Providence
potato-introduced by our Commissioner of


Agriculture, Col. J. T. Henderson-is of the
same family as the St. Domingo and Hayti, and
is claimed to be earlier than either, but not so
easily propagated, as the slips are not so hardy.
The leaf is smaller, tubers round, of a yellow-
ish cast, and a good potato on account of its
being so early and being a better table variety
than either of the other two. But it requires a
richer soil than the St. Domingo, and will bear
to be planted in closer rows, as it has but little
vine, which grow short and stout. It is useless
to sayI anything of the old yellow yam. Its
qualities for the table are unsurpassed and
rarely equaled; and since the introduction of
other more prolific varieties, our lands seem to
refuse to yield satisfactory crops, and we have
discarded all but the St. Domingo and Provi-
dence. We generally plant about two acres to
the mule, and on thin soils fertitize with about
200 pounds of ammoniated guano to the acre
and on which we could not expect more than
3 bushels of wheat, 6 or 8 of oats, and about 5
of corn, we generally gather (if seasons are
suitable) from 100 to 150 bushels of fine pota-
toes to the acre. These are housed in banks
containing from 30 to 50 bushels, covered with
pine straw a thickness of several inches, and
then three feet boards (new ones are best) an d
stood on end all around the hill, and joints bro-
ken as particularly as we would the roof of a
house, and on which we throw dirt to the depth
of 12 to 15 inches, and doing up close to top of
the hill, leaving open a small air-hole for only
a few days.
I feed milk cows, oxen, horses and mules,
sheep, hogs and our family (black and white)
on potatoes ; feeding horses, when not at work,
two feeds a day ; if at work, one feed, with corn,
oats or peas for the other meals, and I have
come to the conclusion, that for all these pur-
poses, our land cannot be planted in any thing
that will make so certain and as great amount
of food per acre, as the sweet potato ; and I
would say that it will treble in value (in pro-
portion to the amount of fertilizers used) any
other agricultural production that we have
tried, not excepting artichokes, chufas, ground
peas, turnips, or any other production for which
our soil is adapted, or that has been cultivated
on similar soils in any portion of the world.
But I have abandoned the old high ridge hoe
culture that was in vogue in our boyhood days,
and for the last twenty-five years have been
planting them in rows from 4 to 41 feet wide,
plants 24 to 30 inches apart, on fiat ridges
thrown up with a long four or five inch scooter
put in the ground as deep as possible, and find
a loose soil with a good clay under it best
adapted for their production, and yielding po-
tatoes that eat better, and keep better, than on
soils with sandy foundation. I cultivate as I
do cotton, leaving the soil as near level as pos-
sible, as they stand drouth better, and yield
better crops. As the crop is cultivated almost
entirely with the plow, scrape or sweep, it is not
much more expensive than the same area in
corn. In planting, I open the ridge with a small


scooter plow and push the slips or vines the
depth required, into the soil with a narrow
board 21 inches wide, and three feet long, press-
ing the heel of the foot down firmly on each
one as it is set (which is very essential, caus-
ing them to live better). To be successful in
making potatoes depends as much on their
proper cultivation, as the fertility of the soil on
which they are grown. In fact, a great mis-
take is frequently made in planting them on
soils that are too rich, as they in such cases,
make a large quantity of vines and but few
potatoes. Deep preparation and shallow culti-
vation is the idea from my experience. To save
them, dig when ripe, and, if after frost has
killed the vines, they should remain several
days in the ground before they are dug, avoid
cold winds on them after they are dug, as they


are damaged as much, or more, from wind as
by frost, if it is cold. Uniformity of tempera-
ture and dryness is ail that is essential in pre-
serving them through the winter and spring.
To be of great benefit in feeding to hogs-
whether while rooting the patch or fed after
they are dug-they should have at the same
time either peas, ground peas, chufas, corn, or
acorns, which are nearly as valuable as corn,
and which I contrive to have convenient to
every large potato patch. Potatoes are laxa-
tive, acorns are binding-the two together
make the best of fat producing food. I gener-
ally raise 1,000 pounds of pork to the plow,
and it is fattened principally on potatoes, with
acorns, gleanings of pea fields and a few ground
peas. My artichokes I give to my stock hogs,
after potato patches are rooted out. Fed to
horses or mules they are worth as much as corn,
and never have yet seen either made sick by
eating themn.-Southern World.

Poultry and Eggs.
A correspondent of The Poultry Yard writes
the editor as follows:
From the fourth annual record of the Cum-
berland Valley poultry yards we deduce two
propositions : 1. That the Plymouth Rock is the
best fowl for general purposes. 2. That unless
a variety of fowls lays at least 120 eggs per hen
per annum that variety is not profitable to
keep for eggs alone, where the price of eggs for
a good part of the year ranges as low as 10
and 12 cents per dozen.
Our record does not vary from last year's in
the order of layers, as shown in The Poultry
World of August, 1881; but some varieties
show a larger increase over last year's records
than others. The order in which they stand
is: 1, P. Rocks, with an average of 130.1 eggs
per hen per annum; 2, White Leghorns, 102.5;
3, Brown Leghorns, 102; 4, Light Brahmas,
83.4; 5, Partridge Cochins, 80; and the aver-
age number of eggs laid per hen of all varieties
is 99.6, an increase of the general average over
last year of 11.6 eggs per hen.

Fowls, Owls and Crows.
One nuisance is the owl, who is on hand after
dark as the hawk comes by daylight. Put a
live chicken in a cage and tie a dead one to a
stake near by. Then set two or three steel
traps near the stake and cover closely with
chaff or leaves. The owl makes a strike for the
caged chicken; failing in this he goes for the
dead one on the stake, which does not give
way easily. Then, as he drops down, the
friendly trap takes him in its loving embrace,
and you can finish his course in the morning.
Many people do not know that crows are
sometimes more destructive to young chickens
than hawks. It is true that as a general thing
crows will not carry off chickens, but when
their depredations begin one crow seems to tell


all the others till all the crows in the neighbor-
hood make chicken hunting their chief busi-
ness. They become on such occasions so bold
as to approach very near dwellings. During
one season we were unable to rear chickens at
all excepting by keeping them confined till
as large as quails. The cheapest covered
runs that we could contrive were made of lath.
The height was 21 feet at the peak, the tri-
angular shape adapting it for use in connection
with the "A" coops and securing the greatest
economy in materials and time.-Poultry World.

-I cannot afford to be irritable or captious,
nor to waste all my time in antics. If I should
go out of church whenever I hear a false sen-
timent, I could never stay there five minutes.
But why come out? The street is as false as
the church, and when I get to my house, or to
my manners, or to my speech, I have not got
away from the lie.


.1~.1..~~.~~~- .--..~.-. ..... ..-.. -.^.. ;-- - ------ ---





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 1O
--'J L ON


Florida Muck.
My attention has recently been called to an
article from the Journal of Chemistry, of Bos-
ton, in which the position is flatly taken, that
"Muck is not a manure, and moreover, it can-
not be made into plant-food by any expense of
time and labor which the farmer can afford to
apply to it." Without disputing the point with
a Massachusetts chemist or a Boston savant, we
insist upon the right to disagree with such in
relation to the deposits of the marshes in South
Florida. In the first place, our sandy lands are
as a rule deficient in vegetable matter, but we
have with us beds which are composed almost
exclusively of the rank vegetation which grows
in our marshes and ponds, and which often float
ashore in high water, and are cast on dry land.
These are nearly free from sand and other sili-
cious material, except the very small percent-
age which enters into the composition of the
plants themselves, because they have grown in
clear water.
The experience of those who have used these
mucks in South Florida, as well as in all places
of the same geological formation along the coast
as far north as Long Island, has proved, that if
this muck is not "plant-food" in its natural
state, it can be made such when mixed into our
sandy soil. And when we apply another pro-
duct to our lands, the marls, found extensively
with the 'mucks, lands before considered almost
barren become sufficiently rich to produce sugar
cane in the greatest perfection. Liebig once
taught that if any manure, as barnyard ma-
nure, was burned and the ashes applied to the
soil, just as good results would ensue as if the
manure itself were applied. But the experience
of practical men has proved that the great
analytical chemist was mistaken, and he was
compelled to retract his position. There is rea-
son to believe that Dr. Nichols may also be
mistaken.
Not only do the rank vegetations of South
Florida grow in still, clear water, but myriads
of animal existence grow with them and are
incorporated with them in decay. These are
undisputed food for plants, and require no other
preparation or expense than an application to
the soil. But our agricultural chemist con-
cedes that even his lean Massachusetts muck,
from 2,000 pounds of which 1,800 pounds is
water, "gives 200 pounds of dry humas at the
barn." We have muck in this country, which
will yield 1,000 pounds of dry humas, and shall
insist that because Massachusetts has not such,
ours is not to be discarded. He further con-
cedes that it contains "nitrogen and carbona-
ceous elements." It could not well be of vegeta-
ble origin and not contain these, and in the
sandy soils where these elements are deficient,
they make plant-food. Further, we are told,
it "has a certain value, (nothing else has greater
value,) as an absorbent of liquid manure, and
it may pay to dry it for that purpose."
If this were its sole value, it should be a suf-


ficient reason for its use. Every gardener
knows and understands that if he can -bed his
horse and cattle on dry muck, he thereby se-
cures his best fertilizer, for the growth of his
plants of all sorts. In the South, farmers have
a practice of penning their cattle on lands which
they design for some special crop, as the gar-
den, during the night time, and of burying
their droppings in the soil. But these droppings
are only the refuse of the vegetation consumed
by the cattle during the day. The same may
be said of their liquid manures, richest of all.
The cow has added -nothing to the value as
plant-food, but rather has taken away. Why,
then, condemn muck from which nothing has
been taken ? Until it is proven that the chem-
ist's laboratory is a better analyzer of plant-food
than the plants we desire to grow, practical
men will be most likely to choose these last as


their teachers, mute though they be; and so
long as muck gives good results it will be used.
-Judge J. F. Knapp, in Farm and Garden.

What Florida Offers.
A movement is now on foot among the ex-
pressmen of the United States, looking to the
organization of a stock company for the culti-
vation of oranges in Florida. A correspondent
of the Express Gazette outlines the scheme as
follows:
An association is to be formed, exclusively of
expressmen, representing 1,000 shares, each
share to be assessed $1 per month for five years,
excepting for the first month, when $1 per share
will be added to defray the expenses of print-
ing, postage, etc. No more than five shares to
be issued to one person, the money thus raised
to be invested in property in the State of Flor-
ida, suitable to the culture of. oranges, as the
board may select, the purchase to be made at
the expiration of the first year. Property to
the value of $50,000 to be purchased, paying
$12,000 down, balance to be paid yearly, or semi-
yearly, as the board shall decide; $10,000 to be
held as a reserve fund for paying taxes, salaries,
interest, etc.; the proceeds from the products to
be used in making improvements. No perma-
nent organization will be effected until the close
of the first year, then all who have their money
invested will be anxious to see the society suc-
ceed. The officers then elected will be the same
as is usually chosen to govern similar bodies.
Stockholders will be notified in sufficient time
before the election, so that all may have a
voice. The collecting of assessments and all
other necessary labor will be performed for the
first year by one person known as secretary,
who will receive and immediately deposit the
amounts from each share, with some reliable
bank, subject- only to the order of the board of
officers to be chosen as mentioned. The said
secretary will have published in the Express
Gazette each month, a statement from said bank,
to the effect that the amounts so received by
him were deposited.
The amount invested will not be so large but
most any employee can take one share at least,
others the full limit. It will be a valuable in-
vestment if but one-half can be realized that is
assured. Persons desiring to join the associa-
tion will please send their name and address,
and also the amounts for the shares desired, to
R. W. Wales, Secretary, Toledo, Ohio, who will
issue temporary certificates for each share, to
be replaced with others signed by the officers
to be elected at the expiration of the first year.
This is open to all express employes, and as
there is a large number ready to take the
shares, it will be advisable to apply at once.
The only objection we see to this project is
the great number of persons who are to become
interested and the small amount of individual
investments. It would be better for five to ten
men to combine in such a venture, and let each


one represent a larger pecuniary interest. This
would keep the object aimed at more conspicu-
ously in the minds of the parties interested, in
fact, make it the aim and object of their efforts.
They would keep the project better in hand;
and would know at all times the exact condi-
tion of their venture. By employing a reliable
and competent man to take charge of their pur-
chase, and give their trees constant attention,
there would be no danger of failure, and the
results certainly would be altogether satisfac-
tory. By this plan, not only expressmen, but
railroad men, postal clerks, all sorts of men
-who work for salaries, could have a savings
bank of their own, owned and controlled by
themselves, which would not only accumulate
a compound interest, but would double up the
principal invested every year from the time it
was fairly inaugurated.
There is no State in the Union which offers


such inducements for this sort of co-operative
effort as Florida does to-day. By small com-
binations more can be accomplished than by in-
dividual effort. Men of salaries can save their
surplus and put it where it will secure a com-
petence to them and their families in a few
years. A mechanic who is thrifty and prudent
can make a five acre grove while he is follow-
ing his avocation in the North. Railroad and
expressmen can, by prudence, do the same
thing, and in a few years their five acre grove
will bring them an income of a thousand dol-
lars a year. Where and in what else can they
secure so much for so little.- Orange County
Reporter.

Agricultural Fairs, and their Advantages.
The Capital, Topeka, Kansas, makes the fol-
lowing remarks on this subject :
The inception of an agricultural fair puts
in motion the best elements of farm life. It
stimulates a laudable ambition with reference
to the locality interested. If it is a township
fair, the township at once has a reputation at
stake ; if it is a county fair, then the county
comes in to be sustained ; if it is a State fair,
the whole State is to be represented ; and, in
every case, all individuals interested in the good
name of the township, county or state, feel con-
cerned about the success of the fair. It has
the effect to organize the working powers of
every community.
A fair is an advertisement for the commu-
nity interested, and for every individual person
who participates. If the general display is
good, it gives a good reputation to the people
interested ; and in detail, every single exhibi-
tor has opportunities for showing his own skill
and success in his specialty if he have any.
Every exhibitor meets hundreds of new ac-
quaintances, and he learns to talk to them. He
becomes a public man for the time being.
This association with his fellow men, and in
connection with his own vocation, affords to the
farmer many opportunities of improving him-
self socially, and for acquiring information that
would never come if there were no fairs. Their
educating advantages are seen on every hand.
Not only the farmer himself, but his family
and friends are benefited. They become part-
ners in his gains, and share in his success.
Fairs operate to make men and women bet-
ter, larger hearted, more liberal ; they give men
larger and better views of life and labor ; and
better than all, they educate farmers and their
sons and daughters to regard farm life more
favorably. Many farmers look upon their call-
Ing as common, and without attractions. This
is a fatal error with some. Fairs correct this
evil. They elevate the standard of labor, and
help make farming appear to be what it really
is, the most independent, manly and honorable
of callings.

Mental Effort Needed in Farming.
The farmer who works with his mind as well


as his hands will attain the largest measure of
success. He has much time for reading and
thinking. The long winter evenings are his,
and even in the summer he can snatch a few
moments several times a day for reading, and
thus furnish his mind with new suggestions for
thought. The reading should be such as will
assist in solving the perplexing questions which
are continually asked as to the renovation of
fields, rotation of crops, application of fertilizers,
results of cultivation, management of farm stock,
fruit-culture, and the like.

-"One or more homeless mortals can find a
cheerful home, neat rooms, table and appoint-
ments the best; terms reasonable; seriously-
disposed people not wanted; funny folks half-
price. 52 West 47th St.-N. Y. Tribune Adv't.


II U-IIP I I




wOO THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Phe 4loridda Jis4ah.

JACKSONVILLE, JUNE 19, 1882.

EDITORS:
D. REDMOND, D. H. ELLIOTT, W. H. ASHMEAD.

Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.

RATES OF A.DVEITISING.o


SQUARES. 1 TIME.


1 MO. 3 MO. 1 6 MO. 1 YEAR


One........................ $ 1 00 $250 $550 $1000 $1850
Two........... ........... 200 500 1000 1800 3400
Three ..................... 3 00 7 00 14 00 25 00 46 00
Four.................... 4 00 9 00 17 50 30 00 58 00
Five........................ 4 50 11 00 19 00 35 00 65 00
Eight..................... 8 00 16 50 3000 50 00 100 00
Sixteen.................. 1 16 00 30 00 5000 80 00 150 00
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words to line) ten cents
per line.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the best ad-
vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.

"THE CHANNEL CAT !"-Do not fail to read
the entertaining and characteristic letter of our
good friend, Gen.Spinner, in present number.

PEEN-TO P EACHES.-Mr. Pace, of Starke,
tells us that Mr. Webb, of Kingsly Lake, Clay
County, sent a peck of Peen-To peaches to New
York and received in return for net proceeds
$2.55.
THE PIOSCOPE is a little instrument for test-
ing the richness and purity of milk. It weighs
only about an ounce-is not liable to leak, and
can be carried in the vest pocket. It can be
had for 50 cents, per mail. Address: Eimer &
Amend, No's. 205, 207, 209 and 211, Third
Avenue, New York city.

LET Us HAVE THIS LAW !-Michigan has a
very stringent law for the protection of small
birds, which forbids the killing of a robin,
night-hawk, whippoorwill, finch, thrush, lark,
sparrow, cherry bird, brown thrasher, wren,
martin, oriole, woodpecker, bobolink, or any
other song bird, under a penalty of $5 for each
bird killed, and for each nest robbed, ten days
in the county jail.

SPEAKING of cows, a correspondent of the
N. Y. Tribune, says that he is convinced by an
experience of near fifty years "that it is well to
tie the legs of every heifer, no matter how gentle,
for a short time, say a week or ten days, as a
part of her discipline and training when being
learned to milk. She will never forget it when
a large strong cow, and then if her teats get
scratched or chapped so that she must be tied
to be milked, she will submit with a very good
grace."

SHARPEN YOUR TOOLS !-Here (says an ex-
change,) is a little arithmetical problem which
we find in an exchange : If with an old hoe a
man can do but four-fifths as much work in a
day as he can with a new one, labor costing
$1.50 per day and a new hoe 65 cents, how


much will he have gained at the end of two
and a half days by using the old one ? The
moral of the answer is plain. If you would
have gqod work and quick work, have good
tools and keep them clean and sharp.


WHEN TO CUT SORGHUM FOR FORAGE.-A
correspondent of Coleman's Rural truly says
that when the seed-tufts are fairly out and in
bloom, which is before the shell of the cane has
become very hard, or the cane sugar is devel-
oped, cut your forage ; as the glucose in
its nature is easier of digestion than cane,
sugar or sucrose. It was in this that
our eastern ensilage experimenters made
a mistake in our opinion, both in sorgo
and maize; they let it get too ripe, being anxi-
ous to get cane seed and ears of corn. The
shell of the cane hardens rapidly after the seed
is in the dough.
THE publishers' thanks are due to Mr. C.
Bell, Rockledge, Indian River, Florida, for a
royal-sized pine-apple, weighing over eight
pounds.
Mr. B. says: "I send you a sample pine-apple
grown in my front yard. We estimate 7000
apples per acre and plants to set three acres,"
and further says: Rockledge lands planted in
pines pay $700 per acre." This is a splendid
showing, and lands in that favorite region must
ultimately prove bonanzas for their owners.
Ye of the boreal region What think you
of this and the old non-productive Florida sand
hills, now ?
To Correspondents.
A number of interesting and highly valued
communications, received too late for present
issue, will appear in our next.

Peaches-Luscious and Large.
P. J. Berckmans, Esq., of Fruitland Nurse-
ries, Augusta, Ga., will please accept our thanks
for a generous supply of several of the leading
varieties of early peaches, such as Amsden,
Alexander, Beatrice, etc., all of which were
delicate and high-flavored, and all very similar,
if not identical, in appearance, size and flavor.
They were highly appreciated and enjoyed.
Our kind neighbor, Dr. G. W. Davis, also
handed us the largest and handsomest speci-
men of the "Honey" peach we have ever seen.
It measured eight inches the "long way" and
six inches around; and was, in quality simply
delicious !-a mouthful of delicate, yet high-
flavored "preserves."

Ever-Bearing Raspberry.
GRIFFIN, GA., June 13, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:


I inclose you a sprig of raspberry which I
bought for the "ever-bearing," but find they do
not bear at all! They bloom every year and
make forms, as you see in this, and then it stops.
Can anything be done to make them bear ?
Yours truly, J. N. HARRIS.
[We fear there is no remedy for your rasp-
berry troubles, only to move the plants six or
eight degrees farther north. We have never
been able to succeed with this fine and delicate
berry in the lower South-though the "Mam-
moth Cluster" and other "Black Caps" do
pretty well in the mountains of Georgia and the
Carolinas.]-EDS.
FRUIT-DRYER FOR SALE.-An excellent
"American Fruit-Dryer"-capacity 50 bushels
per day-may be had cheap. Address EDI-
TORS OF DISPATCH, Box 257, Jacksonville,
Fla.


THE "CHANNEL CAT."

What Gen. Spinner Knows About This Fine
Fish, Etc.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., June 12, 1882..
My Dear Colonel:
When, some days since, we met on Bay street,
I undertook to tell you what I knew about cat-
fish, but our conversation was interrupted. You
then asked me to write out what I had intended
to say, and to send it to you.
This is in compliance with your request:
Some years ago, I detected, (as I then ex-
pressed it,) our good friend, Col. Spratt, fishing
for, and catching catfish. Knowing him to be
a good sportsman, I was astonished at what I
then thought his vulgar employment. I laughed
at him, and said to him that even "our Anglo-
Saxon fellow-citizens of African descent" would
be indignant if fishes of that species fastened to
their hooks; and that I had noticed they al-
ways killed them, by knocking them off their
hooks with a club that they carried with them
for that purpose. The Colonel assured me, that
the kind of catfish that he was fishing for and
catching, were salt water fish, entirely unlike
the black catfish that is the common scavenger
about our city wharves; that he had tried them,
and found them a m6st delicious article of food.
Soon after that, being at Philadelphia, I went
on an excursion on a steamer up the Schuyl-
kill, where I noticed, as we passed, a large
house on the shore, having a sign the whole
length of the building, with letters as large as
cart-wheels the legend on which was, "CATFISH
AND WAFFLES !" I thought of the Colonel's
experiences, and on enquiring, found that it was
a famous resort of epicures, who patronized the
place on account of the catfish delicacy, and
that the popularity of the place was due to this
kind of catfish, and the manner of serving them
to the guests from the city. I then recollected
having eaten, at Vienna, in Austria, the Silure,
or the Silureus glassis of the Danube, which is a
catfish, and how I relished it, and how highly
it was prized all over the continent of Europe.
More recently, being at Mayport, with an
empty stomach, I called on "mine host," Bur-
rows, for a fish dinner. Among the fish that he
had on hand, he mentioned salt water catfish.
Again recollecting what Col. Spratt had told
me, and my other experiences in regard to this
fish, I chose it fried for dinner. I have had reason
ever since to be thankfill that I did. Never was
a dinner enjoyed with greater gusto. For the
superior skill in cooking all kinds of fish, for
which friend Burrows is famous, and on account


of my keen appetite, I then referred my relish
for this fish. But I have since, after repeated
trials, found this particular kind of catfish su-
perior, (to my taste,) to any other fish that is
taken in the waters of the St. John's River.
I was now led to examine the whole subject
in regard to the great family of Siluridoe, and
found that the genera, and species of this fish
are very numerous-running all the way up
from the most repulsive and disgusting, to the
most graceful, cleanly and delicate kind of all
fishes. The last adjective is particularly appli-
cable to their table quality.
In Johnson's Cyclopaedia, will be found un-
der the head of Catfish, the following: "The sea
catfish (Galeicthy's marinus,) is kindred to the
above genus and is a fine fish for the table." ,
Genio C. Scott, who knows as much of the


I





T FL_ ORID DISPATCH. 201.


good-for-food fishes of our country, saving al-
ways Seth Green, as any other man, in his
charming book entitled "Fishing in American
Waters," says, in treating of catfish: "There is
ne called the "Lady Cat," or "channel eat"-
sh, which tenants the Missouri River, and is
not only a great table luxury, but one of -the
most gamy fishes of the West. Of the particu-
lar catfish under consideration he says: "The
estuary catfish is an oviparus abdomiuld, and
one of the recent visitants to our coasts and
estuaries from the Bahama Banks. The first
rays of the dorsal and pectorial fins are rigid ;
second dorsal adipose; head broad and depressed
on.the top, with small catfish eyes placed far
apart; long antennae; two distinct nostrils at
end of nose, with ear vents at the side, below
the eyes. It is without scales, and its blue back
mellows to pink sides, and white abdomen. Its
colors and brilliant sheen are like the Spanish
mackerel's, without its spots. It is leather-
mouthed, and the mouth small, armed with a
cushion of fine, needle-pointed teeth round the
borders of both jaws, showing that it may for-
age on crustacea, and the inhabitants of the
waters generally. An individual 20 inches
long, weighs scant two pounds, and it seldom
attains to a greater weight than 10 pounds, and
from its great delicacy it resembles both the
Lady Cat of the Missouri River, and the Span-
ish mackerel of the Atlantic Coast. Though
generally captured in fykes, it is a bottom-biter
to the angle, with menhaden or shedder-crab
baits."
The fellow who threw away a trout that had
taken his bait, with the remark-"I want none
such-when I go a-catting, I cat," knew more
than the thousands who have laughed at his
supposed folly: for the salt water catfish is vastly
the superior to the so-called "trout" of our waters,
and to my taste more delicate as a pan-fish than
any other that visits the St. John's River.
Now, my dear Colonel, what I desire is, that
if on investigation you shall find, what, I feel
sure you will, that this peculiar so-called cat-
fish, is the very best pan-fish that swims in our
waters, you will "write him up," and give him
the good character that is due in one of your
good articles in THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. Let
our people understand that they are rejecting
and throwing away as worthless, the most deli-
cious and delicate of all our fishes, on account
of his remote relationship to the common black
catfish that patrols our wharves. The two are
no more alike, than are the savory pike and the
gar; or our delicious mullet and the miserable
sucker, that you and I know, of the Mohawk
River.
Now, before you write one word in favor of
my favorite fish, do you go out to the "Rock,"
in front of your place, and take a mess of these
fish. Skin them, place them in batter, roll
them in cracker crumbs, and fry them in red-
hot boiling lard, and then, on eating of them, you
do not pronounce them a most superior fish, you
will not be the man I take you to be, and you
will not be in sympathy with
Your old Mohawk friend,


F. E. SPINNER.
Col. D. REDMOND, Jacksonville, Fla.
Dwarf Oranges-Date Palms-Blowing out
Stumps, &c.
FEDERAL POINT, FLA., June 9, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
Your description of Dr. Kenworthy's dwarf
orange trees appears to be exciting considerable
interest among some of your readers. It is a
pretty conceit, and a few such objects would be
highly interesting and ornamental among shrub-
bery, even if not desirable for orchard culture.
I would suggest that, as a stock for dwarfing,
perhaps the citrus trifoliata may be better than
the Otaheite. It has the advantage of being


hardy enough to bear the cold of a much higher
latitude than the orange. As the name im-
plies, the leaf is three-fold, like that of the
strawberry or clover, with a winged petiole
just below the point of division. It is not a
member of the orange tribe, strictly speaking,
but is placed by Gallesio among the agrumi of
India, a class of plants that closely resemble
the orange. I procured from John Saul, of
Washington, a few stocks upon which to bud
the Citrus Japonica or Kum-quat, which is said
to succeed better upon them than upon the or-
ange. They do not as yet appear to have been
offered by our Florida nurserymen.
In your issue of June 5th, among Gen. San-
ford's importations, mention is made of twenty
date palms, twelve years old. It would seem
from this, that in Florida, the date must grow fas-
ter than on the Riviera. I have a treejust twelve
years from the seed which measures sixteen feet
from the ground to the tip of the highest leaf-
six feet from the ground to the bud from
whence the leaves spring, and is as large around
as a barrel. Such a specimen would be too
bulky and weighty to be easily imported from
Europe.
In your issue of May 15th, the Cayenne
cherry, (Eugenia Mitchelli), is pronounced too
tender to be grown in the vicinity of Jackson-
ville. This tree or rather shrub will bear a
greater degree of cold than many persons are
aware of. One specimen on my grounds stood
out in the open air during the freeze of Dec.
30th 1880, when the mercury touched 24' and
remained below the freezing point twelve hours.
The effect was merely to nip the tender ends of
the branches. The fruit is about the size of a
cherry, juicy and pleasant, and like the guava
and some other tropical fruits, its novel flavor
is not always relished on the first trial. The
bush is bright and elegant in foliage and blos-
som, as indeed are all the Eugenias.
Lately in your columns, enquiry was made
about blowing up stumps with dynamite. Mr.
Renz,'of Connecticut, who has a place here,
has lately sent downna lot of the cartridges to
his agent to be used in extracting stumps, so
we shall soon be able to judge of its effects by
practical experience. It is not expected that
the stump will be lifted into the air by the force
of the explosion, but so shattered that'its .re-
moval by burning or drawing, will be a com-
paratively easy matter. E. H. HART;
A Sylvan Paradise-A Lady's Letter.
DAYTONA, VOLUSIA CO., FLA., June 8,1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
A young Miss, who lately left our town in
disgust, said that it was too dull here ; there
was so little to look at, no funeral processions!
or shows of any kind, and she could not live
here !- so we hope those people who like to live
where funeral processions are not the principal


feature of the place, will please take notice.
I have spent many years in each of four North-
ern States, and have lived here nearly seven
years, and this is decidedly the healthiest. place
I ever lived in. Every day brings the advent
of the railroad nearer; civilization, intheshape
of the peddler and the lightning-rod man has not
reached us. The tramp has never found his way
here, and we imagine the wilderness between
us and the St. John's, will keep him away for
some time.
Our citizens have been refreshing themselves
with watermelons and pineapples, for two
weeks. Most of the pineapples are brought
from Indian River, although some very fine
ones have been raised here. Orange trees set


-out last winter have suffered from the dry
weather of the latter part of the winter. Now,
we are having cool, pleasant weather, with fre-
quent showers, and we sometimes wonder if any-
where can be found a finer climate than this.
More land has been sold here this season than
ever before. The two church organizations,
Episcopal and Congregational, have each been
presented with a lot for building; the former
from Charles E. Jackson, the latter from Lau-
rence Thompson. Each society intends to build
the coming winter. Miss Cross, the Principal
of Daytona Institute, has secured a block of
four beautiful lots on Ridgeway Ayenue, for a
permanent school building. The business of our
town is increasing and the out-look is in every
way encouraging. We appreciate your excel-
lent paper, and "none name it but to praise."
W. S. A.
Artichokes.
For a few years past I have been experiment-
ing with artichokes of the Red Brazilian va-
riety. I had seen them recommended as an an-
tidote for hog cholera and wonderfully good
and great in many other respects; so I wanted
to try for myself and find how much truth there
was in these statements.
I find them to be about as easy to raise as
corn or potatoes but much more prolific. Have
been planting in hills about as far apart as
corn is usually planted, and have been raising
from one to two pecks to the hill without extra
care or coaxing. Hogs, cattle, sheep and horses
are very fond of them. I have never fed them
exclusively to any thing to see -what the effect
would be, but do not think they are very rich
in fattening properties. But I think they are
most excellent and healthy as a change of food
for hogs when they are getting all the corn they
will eat.
Turnips, beets, potatoes or pumpkins make a
very good change of food where corn or grain
of any kind is the principal food; but none of
these is so sure a crop, nor as cheaply produced,
nor as easily kept as artichokes. They will re-
main fresh and nice through the coldest weather,
in the ground just where they grow: They will
even lie on the ground through the coldest
winter and be ready to grow as soon as the
weather is warm enough in the spring. But if
they lie in a dry place they will shrink and
not be relished by the stock as well as if left in
the ground.
I have never fully tried them for milk cows,
but believe they would be good to produce milk,
as they are very juicy and about a sweet as a
turnip.
I have a lot where I raise early corn and
vegetables and then feed hogs there in the fall.
A part of the lot was in artichokes last year
and iri this part they are coming voluntarily.
I have planted every third row in the balance
of the lot in artichokes 'this year, and next year
I expect to have "volunteers" over the whole
lot. Hogs vill not get them out so clean but


what there will be enough to seed the ground.
They grow a little higher than ordinary corn
and branch out so as to make a very dense
growth. They are mature enough to turn hogs
on about the last of September.
I believe the time will come whe lhey will
become as common as corn or potatoes.-
I. V. K., in Indiana Farmer.
FISH GUANO.-We find the following in the
N. Y. Weekly Times, and it seems to answer
the question asked us recently by a subscriber :
"The fish are stewed in large vats, heated by
steam,.and then pressed to extract the oil, the
refuse cake is dried and broken in mills provid-
ed with revolving arms, which beat it to a pow-
der. It is then packed in barrels for sale. It
is rich in nitrogen and phosphoric acid, contain-
ing about 9 per cent. 'of the former and 13 per
cent. of the latter.


I C


T3HE L .DA.D S A C,


201





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Best Feed for Hens.
Considerable difference should be made in
the feed of poultry according to their breed.
The Brahmas, Cochins and their crosses are
quiet lazy sorts, and consequently fatten more
easily than such as are more fond of roving
around at considerable distances from the house,
such as the Leghorns, Hamburgs, Games, etc.
Little corn or Indian meal should be fed to the
former, except in the coldest weather, and then
we only make it about half their rations. In
spring and autumn we give them all they are
inclined to eat during the day, a pudding made
of one-third Indian meal and two-thirds wheat
bran, with a sprinkling of whole oats late in
the afternoon on the ground in their yard, or
near their house, for them to scratch and pick
up just before going to roost. In summer we
make the pudding of only one-fourth Indian
meal, and three-fourths wheat bran. In this
about half a gill of pure strong brine is mixed
to each gallon. A little brine is very healthy
in the food for poultry, but it must not be taken
from the meat barrel. A tablespoonful of sul-
phur is excellent to mix once a week in the
pudding, as this keeps lice out of the hens, and
in addition is healthy for them. So is the same
quantity of pure wood ashes, or a gill of fine
charcoal dust. The hens ought to have a grass
plot to run on. If this cannot be had, give
them some boiled vegetables or raw cabbage
leaves. In summer grass can be cut for them
and put in their yard. Lettuce and spinage
are excellent when other green feed is not to
be had, and we cultivate this in our garden
especially for them. For the more active breeds
of fowls we give a greater proportion of Indian
meal in their pudding. If this can be mixed
up with skim milk, it will be all the better for
the production of eggs. Whole wheat is also
an excellent egg producer.- Christian Union.

Cost and Profit of Oil Mills.
Merry & Fish the extensive buyers of seed
cotton in New Orleans, estimate that the capi-
tal required for a successful mill is about $30,-
000, the machinery costing $20,000, and the
balance being needed for buildings and work-
ing capital. This would have a capacity, if
worked during the twelve months, of about
10,000 tons of seed, or if for six months, 5,000
tons. The first product of the seed is the lint
left on it by the gins, which average 22 pounds
to ton of seed, and sells at 5 to 7 cents a pound
for cotton batting. The next product is the
hulls, which are used for fuel, and which yields
70 pounds of ashes per ton. These ashes are
very rich in potash, and bring $12 per ton.
The mills yield thirty-five gallons of crude oil
to the ton. This sells at the mills at 35 cents
a gallon. After the extraction of the oil, the


seed gives 700 pounds of oil cake, which sells at
$20 per ton.
According to this calculation, therefore, each
ton yields in cash:"
Lint, 22 pounds, at 6 cts............................................*$ 1 43
Ashes, 70 pounds...................................................... 45
Oil, 35 gallons, at 35 cts.... .................................... 12 25
Oil Cake, 700 pounds, at $20 a ton........................ 7 00
Total yield................ ...................................... $21 13
Estim ated cost, ton........................................... 10 00
Estimated profit, ton.........................................$11 13
Five thousand tons, at $11.12 per ton, would
make a gross profit of $55,650. This certainly
looks very flattering, and leaves a wide margin
for expenses and dividends.
There are now fifty-seven mills in operation
in the South, from the practical experience of
which the above figures are taken.

-Do not provoke a fight with an under-
taker; remember, he is noted for laying peo-
ple out.


Compost and Bones.
In the report of the Agricultural and Me-
chanical College at Auburn, Ala., the best
formula which has been found useful, in their
own practical experiments on the farm, as well
as the experience of planters, who have used it
with great success on the red lands of Alabama
and Georgia, are here appended. For both
corn and cotton, take 100 bushels cotton seed,
100 bushels stable manure, and one ton of dis-
solved bone-select a level place under shel-
ter-spread out ten bushels of stable manure
to depth of three inches. Upon this, sprinkle
evenly 100 pounds dissolved bone. Upon this,
spread ten bushels of cotton seed, made thor-
oughly wet, and over them again sprinkle 100
pounds dissolved bone. Continue the rotation
till your quantities are exhausted, and then
cover with a layer of rich earth, five or six
inches deep. Allow it to remain till ready for
use (four to six weeks will do), and cut verti-
cally down and mix well. For cotton, apply
from 10 to 20 bushels to acre in drill and bed
on it. For corn, a large handful beside the
hill. Be cautious in wetting thoroughly your
cotton seed, and buying a first-class dissolved
bone.
The same authority says that when bones are
burnt they lose about 30 per cent. of organic
matter containing much ammonia. It is, there-
fore, a waste of a valuable fertilizing ingredient
to burn them. But whole bones are very
hard to pulverize, and without pulverization,
are difficult to reduce, Hence, the loss of am-
monia is often suffered in order to more speedily
obtain the use of the bone. To reduce bones
with sulphuric acid, is a tedious, troublesome,
and expensive job to the individual planter;
hence, he must resort to some other way of
making them soluble. The following is pre-
scribed by a high authority, and we recommend
it to every farmer who has ,a few hundred
pounds of old bones on his plantation : Break
100 pounds of bones into small fragments, and
pack them in a light cask, with 100 pounds of
good wood ashes which have been previously
mixed with 25 pounds oi dry water slacked
lime, and 12 pounds of powdered "sal soda,"
(" washing soda "). Twenty gallons of water
will saturate the mass, and more may be added
as required. In two or three weeks the bones
will be soft enough to turn out on a floor and
mix with two bushels of good soil.

-COTTON SEED OIL.-The extent of the
possible demand for the products manufactured
out of Southern cotton seed is a question of
moment. Prof. Steele tells us: "There are no
grounds;" notwithstanding "the extraordinary
activity in the direction named," for fear of
overdoing the matter. The demand is very,
very far above the supply."
The uses creating the present demand for


this seed product would seem to promise a de-
mand wide enough to consume our whole seed
supply, enormous as this bids fair to be. Should
our annual product reach seven and a half mil-
lion of 50 pound bales, which we may now
look for, this would indicate an annual seed
supply of 3,375,000 tons, which at $12 per ton
would a-mount to $40,500,000 for raw seed and
128,000,000 gallons of crude oil, worth 40 cents,
$51,200,000.
-The more quietly and peacefully we get
on the better-the better for neighbors. In
nine cases out of ten the wisest policy is, if a
man cheats, stop trading with him; if he is
abusive, stop his company; if he slanders you,
take care to live so. no one will believe him;
no matter who he is, or how he misuses you,
the wisest way is to let him alone; for there is
nothing better than a cool, calm, quiet way of
dealing with wrong we meet with.-Florida
Methodist. .0


Agricultural, Horticultural and Pomological
Associations.
Florida Fruit-Growers' Association-Office at Jack-
sonville-D. Redmond, President; W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; W. H. Ashmead,,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding Sect'
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee-Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, 0. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official organ-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA STATE GRANGE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICES.-Master, Wm. H. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Wm. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B. F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Field-
ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. H. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate
Keeper, Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Win. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T.W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H.
Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Geo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Umstead, Hous-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville.-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J. C. Greeley, Treasurer.
Directors-J. H. McGinniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro, P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney. Annual meeting-
Last Friday in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; 0. E. Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. 0. Taylor, Secretary and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Florida.-President, A. B. Bartlett, Georgetown; Vice-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. Hawkins, Lake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George; George W. Thorn, Treasurer,
Georgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
mond, Fort Gates.
Picolata Agricultural and Horticultural Society.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, W. N. ParKer, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugn, Corresponding Secretary,
N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., RecQrding Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer. Meets first Saturday in each month.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. Mathers, Second Vice-President; B.
W. Powell, Corresponding Secretary; B. F. Jordan, Sec-
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical Fruit Growers' Association of Monroe County,
Florida.-Home office, Myers, Florida; F. A. Hendry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson,
President; Thomas Tillis, First Vice-President; J. B.
Sutton, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary; J. M. Barco, Recording Secretary;
L. W. Hamlin, Assistant Recording Secretary.
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Association.-
John Bradford, President, Bradfordville, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida.
Pinellas, Florida, Fruit Growers' Association.-D. W.
Meeker, President; Wm. P. Neeld, Secretary.
Central Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida.-Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
Evergreen Horticultural Society, Dunedin, Florida.-
J. W. Matchett, President; W. Tate, Vice-President;
Geo. L. Jones, Secretary.
Decatur County Fair Association, Bainbridge, Geor-
gia.-Maston O'Neil, President I. Kwilecki, Secretary.
Lake Wier Agricultural and Pomological Society (of
Marion County, Florida).-Captain J. L. Cainy, Presi-
dent; Dr. L. M. Ayer, Corresponding Secretary.
Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Higgins Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Association, Albany,
Georgia.-L. E. Welch, President; T. M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
Summer County Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation.-D. L. Hubbard, President, Leesburg" W. C.
Dodd, Recording Secretary, Leesburg; A. P. Roberts,
Corresponding Secretary, Leesburg.
Florida Central Agricultural Society.-Thos. F. King,
President. Gainesville:; Secretary,


SW. K. Cessna, Corresponding Secretary, Gaines-
ville.
Archer Agricultural Association.-W. B. Lipsey,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine, Secretary; Dr. J. C, Neal,
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President; John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewis, Treasurer, Tallahassee. -
Indian River Agricultural and Pomological Society.-
A. P. Cleveland, President; W. H. Sharp, Secretary,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
Association.-R. J. Mays, President; Frank W. Pope,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
Orange County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred. L. Robertson, Corresponding
Secretary.
Gadsden County Fair Association.-Jesse Wood Ptes-
ident; W. H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R.-Harris,
Second Vice-President; J. W. Kendricks, Secretary- E.
C Lou Treasurer. f
South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical AAsocia-
tion, Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
which we may have fallen in the naming of officers, &c.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH ?]


202


- --- -------------- ------ ---- ~ - ~--~--~----~~-~~~ --- --~-----"- --5 `-. -.


I I I I I II II I I, I ~ I -





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


The Forestry Convention,
Recently held in Cincinnati, Ohio, was at-
tended by a large number of influential gen-
tleqmen, well known for their devotion to the
practical sciences and higher economics : A
constitution was adopted which provides that
the name of the organization shall be the
American Forestry Congress, and that its ob-
ject shall be to encourage the protection and
planting of forest and ornamental trees and to
promote forest culture. An initiation fee of
$2 shall be required and the annual dues shall
be $1. After this year the Presidents of State,
Territorial and Provincial Associations shall be
Vic-Presidents of the Congress. The United
States and Canada are divided into eleven dis-
tricts, according to climate and vegetation.
George B. Loring, Commissioner of Agricul-
ture, on taking the chair, made an address, in
which he said: "In conclusion, let me urge upon
this association the most careful consideration
1of the topics before it-the use of forests ; the
influences, injurious and beneficial, of forests;
the educational means by which we may become
acquainted with forestry work ; to what extent
can the land owner enter profitably upon the
business of tree planting and forest culture ?
What legislation can the States best adopt for
the increase and preservation of their forests ?
How shall the general Goyernment provide
for the planting of forests on its public lands ?
What is the precise extent of forest waste ?
What is the comparative value of various tim-
ber trees ? How shall we secure wind breaks on
the prairies ? By what chemical process can we
preserve our timber used in building and fenc-
ing ? And what forest trees are best adapted to
various localities ?"*

Games-and How They Change.
Games have districts, like other things, where
these are used or where those are not intro-
duced. A concern in this State formerly made
twenty-five or thirty thousand sets of croquet
in a year. None are made by this firm to-day.
The shutting down of some croquet manufacto-
ries is not due wholly to the lack of demand.
Competition has helped. The better sets of
croquet are not in so good demand as the
cheaper ones. Those who bought the high-
priced ones buy now lawn tennis, so that the
better.manufactories have little encouragement
to continue. On the cheaper kinds they can-
not compete.


In Maine and other places very cheap cro-
quet sets are turned out in the winter at very
light cost. Some come from green wood, and
when the croquet implements become seasoned
mallets will have crooked handles, balls will be
flat, because they will shrink only across the
grain, and will check and split. The best balls
were-made of the wood that surrounded and
held knots. Therefore the cheap croquet sets
spoilt the trade for better ones, and those who
made the latter turned to something else.
The game that leads this year and the one
that is making friends every day is lawn tennis.
Manufacturers are making fifty per cent. more
lawn tennis implements than they were last
year. The demand for them has increased every-
where, and Pawtucket factories, of which there
are three, find quick sales for all they can
make. Probably one hundred workmen in
Pawtucket and Central Falls are engaged in
the manufacture of lawn tennis and other games.
*


The price is reduced so that all persons are ac-
commodated. Making the game general may
help its advance for a time, but when "every-
body" plays lawn tennis, then some new game
must be discovered for those who took tennis at
its height of price.-Providence Journal.

-One of the medical journals says: "There
is no limit to the ingenuity of a hysterical wo-
man when once she commences to deceive."

-Money and time are the heaviest burdens
of life, and the unhappiest of mortals are those
who have more of either than they know how
to use.

-The perfection of conversation is not to
play a regular sonata, but like the zEolian
harp, to wait the inspiration of the passing
breeze.-Burke.

-The man who never failed is a myth. Such
a one never lived, and is never likely to. All
success is a series of efforts in which, when
closely viewed, are seen more or less failure.

-"It is not necessary for a man to be poor
to be honest." Certainly not. But it seems
sort o' half way necessary for a man to be poor
if he is honest. A distinction with quite a dif-
ference, it will be seen,

The twilight hours like birds flew by
As lightly and as free;
Ten thousand stars were in the sky,
Ten thousand in the sea.
For every wave, with dimpled face,
That leaped upon the air,
Had caught a star in its embrace
And held it trembling there.


LAW BLANKS

FOR SALE BY

ASHMEAD BROTHERS,





JUSTICES' BLANKS.


EACH
Civil Action, original and copy ......... 2
R eplevy ................................................ 5
S CE T.A.S ......................................... 2

P eace ..................................................... 2
Appeal, criminal,.................................. 5
civil...................................... 5
A appearance ........................................ 5
C laim .................................................... 5
R eplevy ................................................ 5
Defendant's Bond in Replevin........... 5
Attachm ent.......................................... 5
r. .. ..D-..-i'i'". ..s....................................... 2
Garnishment............................... 2
A ttachm ent.......................................... 2
Personal Property........................... 5
Of Execution........ .......................... 2
Replevy, Personal Property............ 5
P eace............................................. ........ 5
a a-e..S.:....3 T............................. 2
-A.TIA EE. '., Writ................. 2
::rTTZ' ::Z-"7 (Commitment)............. 2
.'T.:Z ..................................................... 2
.2-. : E .-.- .T. .......................................... 2
P eace ..................................................... 2
Search ................................................... 5
Affidavit for Search Warrant............. 5
2 OC. T. 0 3T ........................................ 5
.A-^^Zl-oA.vz of1TGs Xjo r'M C-=" 2
zem 7r1W.a.r, of -" 2
0 '.:MTZI:IIC.A.T. E O7" "" 2

CIRCUIT COURT BLANKS.

-rv mmi- EACH
Juror's Summons................................. 2
Writ of Attachment (original and
copy ............................................ 2
Subpoenas ............................................. 2
4 in Chancery........................... 2
Sum m ons .................... ........................ 2
and Garnishment.............. 2
Writ of Replevy.................................. 5
Masters' Deeds ...... ....................... 5
Commissioners' Deeds......................... 5
Grand Juror's Subpoenas................ 2
Witness' ..................... 2
Capias ................................................... 2
A ttachm ent.......................................... 2


PER
DOZ
15
30
15

15
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
15
15
15
30
15
30
30
15
15
15
15
15
15
30
30
30
15
15


PER
DOZ
11
15
15
15
15
15


15
15
15
15


203


PBOBATE COURT BLANKS.

m. a-,TS, CS.-- EACH
Administrators' Bonds................... 5
Letters of Administration.................. 5
Letters Testamentary............... 5
Guardians' Bonds .............................. 5
Letters of Guardianship................... 5
Warrant of Appraisment.................... 5
Citation for Administration............. 3
Oath of Administrator........................ 3


PER
DOZ
50
50
50
50
50
50
30
30


UNITED STATES COMM'RS BLANKS.
PER
c rV7Laj .TZ O 3zw.4L.- EACH DOZ
Warrants ........................................ 5 30
Com m itm ent........................................ 5 30
Com plaint............................................ 5 30
Witness' Recognizance............... 5 30

Prisoners' ....................... 5 30
Subpoenas ............................................. 2 15
Order to Pay Witness........................... 2 16

MISCELLANEOUS.


EACH
Bills of Sale .................................................... 5
M aster's Sale................................................... 5
Warranty Deeds (cap size, heavy paper) ..... 5
"6 parchment paper.... 10
Quit-Claim Deeds (cap size, heavy paper) ..... 5
parchment paper... 10
Mortgages, 1 heavy "...... 5
Moraes, parchment .... 10
Chattel Mortgages heavy "... 5
Release of Mortgage..... ............................ 5
Bond for Title................................................... 5
L eases ............................................................. 5
Powers of Attorney.................................... 5
Promissory NotesDraft and Receipt Books,
100 to book.... ........................... ..... 35
P protests ........................................................... 5
Bills of Lading, Shipping Receipts...... 3 to
sheet................................... ....................... 5
Shipping Articles........ .................. 10
44 4 coastwise ............................ 25
Shippers' Manifests........................................... 5
6 4 part of cargo.................... 10
Coastwise ................................. ........ 5
Outward foreign Manifests, small size ............
4" large size.......... 10
Seaman's Discharge (books of 100,) ...........
Import Entry Blanks.................................... 5
Charter Parties ................................................ 5
M marriage License............................................. 10


PER
DOZ
30
50
50
75
50
75
50
75
50
50
30
50
50

50
50
1 00

75
50
50
75
2 00
50
50
75


Certificates-all sizes and prices.... .

PRICES OF WRITING PAPERS.
Legal Cap and Foolscap Paper, 10 1b.............per ream $3 00
S" 12 fb 3 60
14 4 20
i" 16 4 80
(extra size and
quality) 18 lb.................................................................. 8 00
Parchm ent .......................................................... 9. 00
(Discount to the trade.)
Note Paper (first class) 4 lb..... ................per ream $1 00
S" 5 ................................. " 1 50
6 ................................. " 1 80
Letter 10" ............. ............................. " 3 00
12" ................................ 3 60
14" ................................. I 4 20
Lyon's Parchment Note Paper (thin)................ 2 00
4 ,i t,(medium)........ 3 00
... t 4 "(thick)............." 3 50
Discount to the trade.)

PRICES FOR PRINTING.
Note Heads ( sheet, printed to order) 6 Ib.....per 1000 3 25
S 7 ".... " 3 50
Letter 10" 4 25
12 4 85
Envelopes (white or buff, good quality, print-
ed to order,) 5 size "............. " 350
6 size ............. " 3 75
Bill H eads (sm all)............................................... 3 00
it" (m edium )........................................... 3 25

Notarial Seal Presses (made to order)................. 5 00
Notarial Seals (red, green and blue,) No.21. 1%
inches....................per 100 20
Notarial Seals (red green and blue) No. 23, 2
inches...............................................................per 100 25
Notarial Seals (red, green and blue[ No. 26,2%
inches............................................................ .. 30
Notarial Seals, gold and silver, No. 21, 1 i
inches.................................................................... 25
Notarial seals, gold and silver No. 23, 2 in. " 53
,, No. 26,2%.. " 50
Lawyers' Seals, A. & B......................................... 15

Rubber Stamps manufactured right in our establish-
ment -all sizes and prices
Index to the Decisions of the Supreme Court of
F lorida ...................................................................... 3 00
M cClellan's Digest ........................ ..................... 7 00
Ordinary Law Books bound to order in best sheep,
single volum es.............. ........................... ........ 1 75
Sent to any address upon receipt of price. A lib-
eral discount will be given to dealers to sell again, or to
those wishing to purchase in quantity.
If you want any Printing or Binding done, you
should send to us. We send out nothing but first-class
work, and at reasonable prices. Prices furnished, upon
application, for anything in our line.
Respectfully,
ASHWMEAD BROS.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


--




MAI THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


-There is talk of getting up a colony in this
section to emigrate to Florida, if advices from
that State soon to be received, prove to be suf-
ficiently alluring. Those who passed the winter
in that State from this county have no end of
praise of the salubrity of the climate and fertili-
ty ofthe soil. The beautiful fresh water lakes
that abound so numerously in that State fur-
nish magnificent sites for residences along their
margins. The rigors of a Northern winter are
unknown in that balmy climate--Adelphi,
Ohio, News.




Vegetable Quotations.
FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE, )
315 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, June 14, 1882. f
Receipts of vegetables and fruit via the Florida Dis-
patch Line and Southern Express Company, week
ending 13th inst., vegetables, 2,100 packages; watermel-
ons, four car loads; peaches, 300 crates and three refrig-
erators.
Market for peaches is dull and not very satisfactory,
those shipped in crates selling from 10c.@$1 per small
crate in refrigerators, 75c.@$1.50 per small crate.
Watermelons slow of sale at $40 per hundred, for South
Georgia and Florida; arrivals of 10th inst. not fully dis-
posed of; weather has been too cold and backward.
Tomatoes in demand. South Georgia and Florida
bringing $2.50@3 per crate.
Cucumbers, South Georgia, $1@1.50; Charleston and
Savannah, $1.50@2.25 per crate.
Respectfully,
C. D. OWENS,
General Agent. .

fJacksonville Wholesale Prices.
Corrected weekly, by JONES & BO WEN, Wholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.


SUGARS-Granulated ....................................
White Ex. C..................................
G olden C.............................................
Pow dered ..........................................
Cut Loaf....................... ...................
COFFEE, Rio-Fair.......... ..............................
G ood ............................................
Choice ........ .............................
B est ..............................................
Java 0. G.........................................
M och a ............................... ..................
Peaberry........... ...............................
M aracaibo .............................................
Any of above grades roasted to order
FLOUR-Snow Drop, best...... ... ...................
Oreole, 2d best.......................................
Pearl, 3d best.............................. .........
M EATS- BaconI.....................................................
Hams (Merwin & Sons)......................
Shoulders.................. ...........................
HoMINY-Pearl, per bbl....................................
M EAL- per bbl...............................................
LARD-Refined in pails.....................................
BUTTER-Very best, kegs (on ice).....................
CHEESE-Full cream........................................
Half cream............................ ............
ToBAcco-Shell Road ....................................
Florida Boys, 11 inch 5's..................
Florida Girls, bright twist, 14 to lb..
Smoking in packages, 8 to lb...........
SOAP AND STARCH-Colgate's 8 oz., per box..
Peerless, 8 oz., per box............................
Starch, lump, per lb.............. ............
HoPS, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS-
H ops, per lb..............................................
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz..........
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
doz. 1 lb..................................................
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. 1 lb.
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. flb.....
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. Q ft......
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl., new........................
CHICKENS, each..................... .............................
EGGS- Per doz.....................................................
HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lb., first class
Country Dry Salted, per lb...................
Butcher Dry Salted, per lb....................
Damaged Hides...........................
Kip and Calf, 8lbs. and under................
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb....... ..................
Deer Skins Salted, per lb...... ...............
FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter......................................................
Raccoon, each.......................................
Wild Cat, each.......................................
Fox, each ...............................................
BEESWAX-per lbt................................................
WooL-Free from burs, per lb ..... ..................
Burry,per lb ...........................................
GOAT SKINS-Each per lb...................................


10%
10
l8Y
11

12r
13
25
35
18
18
9 25
850
8 25
13
16Y2
12
5 40
5 40
131
32
15
12Y2
55@56
40
50
45
3,50
3 50
51y2@6c
15@22c
60c
2 25
225
2 70
1 50



350
25@45
18@20
13
9*11
9@10
6
10
35
26@30
150@4 00
5@15
10@20
5@15
20
17@22
11@15
10


Bacon advancing rapidly-buyers will do well to
make their purchases now. Flour market has been
very unsettled for the past week, on account of specula-
tions in wheat market.


SILK AND HONEY.
BEST ITALIAN BEES, QUEENS, Etc.,
at greatly redUtped prices. An average profit of $69.63 per
colony, net. A salary of $2,963.00. Also eggs for rearing
cocoons for American silk-a new and important indus-
try. Send at once.
CHAS. R. MITCHELL,
Hawkinsville, da.
11, 13, 15, 17-p.


Ocean Steamship Company.


SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.




The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, June 3d, 8:00 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, June 7th, 11:00 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, June 10th, 1:30 p. m.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, June 14th, 5:30 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, June 27th, 8:00 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, June 21st, 10:00 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, June 24th, 12:00 noon.
GATE CITY. Wednesday, June 28th, 4:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, July 1st, 6:00 p. m.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
H. YONGE, G. M. SORRIEL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agent of Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS,
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. Y.


IRST-CLASS ORANGE AND VEGETABLE LAND.
Also river front, with 90 Choice Orange trees nearly
ready to bear.
The above property adjoins the Magnolia Hotel at
Magnolia, Florida. Address,
Wv. T. THOMPSON,
(Box 111,)
to July 1, '82 Green Cove Springs, Florida.

SPECIAL CLUB RATES WITH


THE DISPATCH!


READ AND SUBSCRIbE!


IT SAVES MONEY, AND WILL PAY YOU!

We have made arrangements with the publishers
and will club THE DISPATCH with any of the
following publications, which will be mailed promptly
upon receipt of price, for ONE YEAR :


ROCK LEDIGE HOME GROVE

FOR SALE.
HAVING secured Deeds to the Gomez Grant of 12,180
acres of land, embracing Jupiter Island,
THE ELDORADO OF FLORIDA,"
and wishing to make it "The Pine Apple Bonanza-the
very winter garden and fruitery of United States," in-
duces me to sell
M V11 HOME A1ND GRO VE
that will yield perhaps next year one quarter million Or-
anges. Trees 5, 8 and ten years from bud. Delightful
climate, perfect health, good water, rich hammock land
on the
GREAT 1INDIAN RIVER;
dubbed "our smok'e-house," affording finest fish, oys-
ters, green-turtle, bathing, rowing, and transportation.
Apply to CO. SURVEYOI,
June 19 to July 10. Rock Ledge, Florida.



iOIlS IN THEl SUNNY SOUTU
0-
SPLENDID OFFER TO SETTLERS


40 Hours from New York City : 108 Miles
from Savannah.


THE FLORIDA DISPATCH AND
Savannah Weekly News .................. .$2.50 l1-0 rea a.CIS
Florida Weekly Union................................... 2.25 So t -eorga aids fo:
New York Weekly Sun............................. 1.75 Sale bo"y-
New York Weekly Herald............................. 1.75
New York Weekly Tribune.......................2.50 J. M. STIGCER,
New York Weekly Times............................ 1.75
New York Weekly World............................. 1.75 Glenmore, Ware Co., Ga.
Philadelphia Weekly Times.......................... 2.50 June 19-tf G
American Agriculturist................................. 2.00
Country Gentleman.................................... 2.75
Southern Cultivator............................ 2.00
Atlantic Monthly Magazine.......................... 4.00 TO
Harper's Monthly Magazine........................... 4.00
The Century Monthly Magazine (Scribner's).... 4.00 T '1 -
Lippincott's Monthly Magazine..................... 3.15 New Y Ork and Return.
Popular Science Monthly............................ 5.00
North American Review................................ 5.00
Harper's Illustrated Weekly........................... 4.00 Good to Novemlber 1.
Harper's Illustrated Bazar............................ 4.00
Harper's Illustrated Young People................ 2.00
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly.................. 4.00 MEAMLS AND SrTAPTEROOU MS ON
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Chimney Corner...... 4.00 T'EAlME RS INC LUDED.
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly.................... 3.15
Frank Leslie's Sunday Magazine ....................83.15
Scientific American..................................... From Savannah via Charleston, Wilming-
Waverly Magazine.................................... 5.00 ton, Weldon, Portsmouth, thence by the
Detroit Free Press...................................... 2.35 elegant Steamships of the Old Dominion
The above are among the very best publications-
Remittances should be sent by Check, Money Order, Line to New York.
or Registered Letter, addressed to
AS EAD Ro PASSENGERS leaving Savannah SUNDAY, MON-
.A~lHM:E D B O ~ DAY, TUESDAY and FRIDAY at 4:15 p. m., arrive at
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Portsmouth MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY,
and SATURDAY, making close connections with
steamers, arriving in New York the next evening.
AT MANDARIN, FLORIDA. Wo Delay in Going: or Returning.
20 FORTY-ACRE TRACTS only 12 miles from Jack-
sonville; extra good land, well located, between river For tickets and further information, apply to WM.
and J., St. A. and H. R. R. R. Price, $10 per acre. Will BREN, S. T. A., 22 Bull Street, Savannah, Ga., and
sell on monthly payments of $12.50. These lands will in- Ticket Office S., F. & W. Railway Depot.
crease in value, being located in an already prosperous S s. c IBOYVLST'ILON
town, making a paying investment at small outlay. *
Maps can be seen at No. 41 East Bay Street. G. P. A.
to nov 21, '82. GEO. R. REYNOLDS. June 19 to July 10
Jacksonville, Fla. June 19 to July 10.
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
A SODA WATER APPARATUS for sale VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
cheap. Apply to M. GONZALES, PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
It 33 East Bay St. TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. E


s


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE.




Rates on WATERMELONS in Car Loads of 20,000 Pounds.


TrO T0A :EC:E Err ECT 1V.TA""m" G0tlX, 11a2.


To-


Atlanta ........................................................................ ..........................................................
Augusta..................................................................................................................................
Baltim ore...............................................................................................................................
B o sto n .................................................................................................. .................................
Bristol, Tenn..........................................................................................................................
Charleston, S. C.....................................................................................................................
Colum bus, Ga........................................................................................................................
Chgttanoora, Tenn..... ..........................................................................................................
Cincinnati, 0............................................................. ......................... .................
Cairo, Ill.................................................................................................................................
Colum bus, 0...........................................................................................................................
Cleaveland, 0.........................................................................................................................
Chicago, Ill.............................................................................................................................
Dalton, Ga..............................................................................................................................
Evansville, Ind..... ............................................................................................................
Indianapolis, Ind............ ............................................. .................................................
K noxville, Tenn..... .........................................................................................
Louisville, K y.... ..............................................................................................................
M acon, Ga..............................................................................................................................
M ontgom ery, Ala........................................................................................ ......................
M obile, Ala.............................................................................................................. .........
M em phis, Tenn .....................................................................................................................
Nashville, Tenn......................................................... ........................... ........................
New Orleans, La.................................................................................. .......................
New York, N Y.............................................. .................................................................
Peoria, Ill...........................................................................................................................
Philadelphia, Pa................................................. ..........................................................
Rom e, Ga...............................................................................................................................
Savannah, Ga...................................................................................................................
St. Louis, M o...... .........................................................................................................
. Terre Haute, Ind................. ..................................................................................................


Fr o m Jacksonville,
Oallahan and Live
Oak.


$ 6000
55 00
100 00
100 00
90 00
36 00
60 00
70 00
80 00
9000
100 00
100 00
110 00
70 00
80 00
9000
84 50
80 00
45 00
60 00
70 00
80 00
75 00
80 00
100 00
110 00
100 00
70 00
22 00
90 00
100 00


From Florida Tran-
sit Railroad, except
Ocala and Points be-
yond.

$ 8500
80 00
125 00
125 00
115 00
61 00
8500
95 00
105 00
115 00
125 00
125 00
135 00
95 00
105 00
115 00
109 50
105 00
70 00
8500
95 00
105 00
100 00
105 00
125 00
135 00
125 00
95 00
47 00
115 00
125 00


Florida Transit Rail-
road, Ocala and
Points beyond.


$ 9000
85 00
130 00
130 00
120 00
66 00
9000
10000
110 00
120 00
130 00
130 00
140 00
100 00
110 00
120 00
114 50
110 00
75 00
9000
100 00
110 00
105 00
110 00
130 00
140 00
130 00
100 00
52 00
12000
130 00


Florida Central and
Western Railroad.


$ 8000
7500
119 00
119 00
110 O0
5600
8000
90 00
10000
110 00
120 00
120 00
130 00
9000
100 00
110 00
104 50
100 00
6500
8000
9000
10000
95 00
100 00
119 00
18000
119 00
9000
41 00
11000
120 00


Excess of 20,000 pounds will be charged for pro rata, provided the weight loaded does not exceed the capacity of the car, as marked thereon. If cars are not
marked with the capacity thereof, the weight of load must not exceed 20,000 pounds. All excess of load above capacity of the cars will be charged for at double rates.
Melons must be loaded and unloaded by the owners. Shipments of Melons will be receipted for only as "Shipper's Count." This Line will not be responsible
for deficiency in quantity loaded in the cars, nor for damage resulting from improper loading. Shipments via Florida Dispatch Line will not be required guaranteed
or prepaid.
D. H. ELLIOTT, Gen'l Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla. JAS. L. TAYLOR, Gen'l Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE in connection with ATLPANTIS C COA "ST L 1N.


Rates on Watermelons in Car Loads of 20,000 in Cents per 100 Ibs.


To take effect May 20th, 1882.


Florida Transit and
T o From Jacksonville Peninsula Railroad, Florida Transit Rail- Florida Cetral and
and Callahan. except Ocala and road, 0 c a 1 a and Western Railroad.
Points beyond. Points beyond.

Cts. Cts. Cts. Ots.
B altim ore ........... ...................................... ..................... .... ......... ........ ..... ................. 638 .76 .78 .73
N ew Y ork...... .................................................................... .68 .81 .83 .78
Providence.....68.81.83 .78.................................................................68 .81
P h iladelph ia................................ .......... ...... ................................... ............................. .68 .81 .83 .78
P ortsm ou th V a............................. .......................................................................................48 .61 .58
P etersburg, V a............................................... ........................................... ...................... .48V .61 .63 .58
R ich m o n d V a ......................................................... ............................................................... .48 .61 .63 .58
W ilm ington, N C ........................................................... ......... ........................................ .38 .51 .53 .48
W ashington, D. C. (via Portsm outh)........................................ ........ ......... ............... ......... 63% .76 .782 .73
Shipments via "ATLANTIC GOAST LINE" must be prepaid to destination. 20,000 lbs. will be the minimum rate charged for. All excess of capacity of cars
will be charged at double rates.


-1


I


. I





308 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
--
MERCHANTS & MINERS

TRANSPORTATION COMPANY!


The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail
From BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH

EVERY FIVE DAYS,
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE, as follows:
Thursday, June 1st, at 5 p. m.
Tuesday, June 6th, at 11 a. m.
Monday, June 12th, at 3 p. m.
Saturday. June 17th, at 8:30 a. m.
Thursday, June 22d, at 11 a. m.
Tuesday, June 27th, at 3 p. m.
Monday, July 3d, at 9 a. m.
The steamers are first-class in every respect, and every
attention will be given to passengers.
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $15,
Including Meals and Stateroom.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Baltimore.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
column.
JAS. B. WEST & CO., Aaents.
Savannah, January 8th, 1878. 30-tf

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA




WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1882,
Passenger Trains will run over the Waycross Short
Line as follows;


:Fast Mail.
Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at.................. 9:00 a.m.
Arrive Jacksonville at................. 5:40 p. m.
Leave Callahan at.................. 9:44 a. m.
Arrive Waycross at......................11:57 a. m.
Arrive Jesup at................ 1:40 p. m.
Arrive at Brunswick at................. 6:00 p. m.
Arrive Savannah at................... 3:40 p. m.
Arrive Charleston at.............. 9:10 p. m.
Arrive at Augusta at............ 5:20 a. m.
Arrive Macon at .......................... 7:50 p. m.
Arrive Atlanta at ......................... 3:50 a. m.
Arrive Louisville at................................
Arrive Cincinnati at......................................
Arrive Washington at... ............ 9:30 p. m.
Arrive Baltimore at.................. 12:25 p. m.
Arrive New York (limited express)...........
Arrive New York P. R. R............. 6:45 a. m.
Arrive St. Louis at.................................
Arrive Chicago at..........................................
-TIME.
To Savannah...................................................
To New York............................. ................
To Washington............................. .................
To Chicago.....................................................
To St. Louis................................ ......


Jack'lle Ex.
SDaily.
5:40 p. m.
8:15 a. m.
6:45 p. m.
9:15 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
5:30 a. m.
2:35 a. m.
9:05 a. m.
1:30 p. m.
7:00 a. m.
12:50 p. m.
8:00 a. m.
7:00 a. m.
9:10 a. m.
12:05 a. m.
3:50 p. m,
5:20 p. m.
7:00 p m
7:00 p. m

6:40 hours.
45:45 hours.
36:30 hours.
49:00 hours.
49:00 hours.


THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
tS..Jacksonville to Savannah.
4^-Jacksonville to Louisville.
A^Jacksonville to Washington.
,A.Jacksonville to Cincinnati.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
Passengers taking Savannah sleeper can remain in the
car until 7 o'clock a. m.
Parlor and Drawing-Room Car on morning train
from JacKsonville through to Savannah, connecting
daily with through Pullman sleeper for New York.
The Dining Car attached to the train between Savan-
nah and Charleston affords supper to passengers going
North, and breakfast to those coming South.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to Montgomery and New Orleans
take the eyening train.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville. Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. m. and arriving at Savannah at 2:35 a. m., or train
at Jacksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vannah at 3:40 p-m.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Bagg.ge checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, at Depot Ticket
Office. J. E. DRAYTON,
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*] Ticket Agent.


HUAU &. CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF

FINE KEY WEST CIGARS
-AND-

WHOLESALE LEAF (DE ALERS.


Proprietors of Factories Nos. 29, 61 and 81, District
of Florida,
Jacksoniville, Florida,
The Most Extensive Manufacturers in the State.
lyr to april 23, '83.

D. G. AMBLER. J. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON
"Ba..T E2EI S.
Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as

AMBLER'S BANK.
ITRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
A Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf


A FEW CHOICE LOTS OF FIFTEEN OR MORE
acres, river fronts, affording attractive and lovely
building sites, and admirably suited to the growth of
oranges, figs and other Florida fruits, may still be ob-
tained on reasonable terms.
"HOLLYWOOD" is south of "Point La Vista," on
the eastern shore of the St. Johns River, four miles from
Jacksonville. For circulars, maps, terms, etc., address
D. REDMOND
apr 3-tf Box 257, Jacksonville, Fla.

W. II. PILLOW'S

JTRAWBRIRRY SHIPPIN AGENCY
-AND-
FRUTJIT AND) VEGETABLE
REPACKING AND
COMMISSION HOUSE,
Has closed till NOVEMBER. Present address,
may 12, '83. M1.ACON, GA.

THE JONES
THENEl TrS
TRUSS. Yelli1ato Trlssos


AND


S PP-FOR TERSv
ARE THE

EAS TAN, D AES

AND


Sportman's Emporium. BEST IN THE WORLDI.


W. C. PITTMAN,
No. 3 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0-
Guns, Pistols, Rifles and Cutlery,
Shooting and Fishing aT'ackle.

SHELLS LOADED TO ORDER.
1 yr to April 23, '83



DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,

GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE,. COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emery Papers, &e.
AGENT FOR

PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIRE TEST.
Johnson's Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, Martinez and Longman's
Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
to mar25,88, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

[4-347.]
1Totice fox -a-Tblicstiori.

LAND OFFICE AT GAINESVILLE, FLA., May 3, 1882.
NlOTICE is hereby given that the following named
settler has filed notice of his intention to make final
proof in support of his claim, and that said proof
will be made before T. E. Buckman, Clerk Circuit Court
at Jacksonville, Florida, on Saturday June 24th, 1882,
viz.: Jacob Robinson, Duval County, homestead entry
No. 561, for the Nw Y of Nw 4, section 6, township 3s,
range 27e.
S.He names the following witnesses to prove his con-
tinuous residence upon, and cultivation of, said land,
viz.: Calvin Hughes, Samuel Anderson, Andrew Sess-
ions, Lee Clark, all of Jacksonville, Florida.
L. A. BARNES,
May 8 tf Register United States Land Office.


For sale by DR. J. C. L'ENGLE,
Wholesale Druggist, Jacksonville, Fla.
*t-Send for Circular. mar 25-tf

ST. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.


OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
1 yr to April 23, '83

VIEWS OF FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In Book Form, Containing 12
Views Each.
Souvenir of Florida, (small size)..................... 25c.
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size)............ .................................. 25c.
Souvenir of Jacksonville,( large size)................. 50c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine,(large size).............50c.
Stereoscopic Views, per Doz. $1.50.
Address

ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
JACIKSO NVILLE, FLA.




Soluble Ground Bone,
THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

mRTILIZER FOR ORANQI TR TIII8

Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.
Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTER & BEAN,
Agents for the State of Florida.


ag-Analysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, mIarch 25,1882.


to sept 26, '82


I I I


I-




THE FLORIDA DISPATCH


n


MERCHANTS.


So'uthLern. P3ruit acndL Vegetaboles a Specialty-
3206 and 3928 North Dela-ware Avenue, Philadelphia.
to jan 6, '83

JOWES S' BOWLEB,


WHOLESALE GROCERS,
AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


DRY HOP YEAST CAKES,


60c. PER


DOZ.


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND

SNOW-DROP PATENT FLOUR.

Pirst I-Tardcs on Finest Q ality

Dairy Butter from. 3 to 37c. per Lb.,

=ept in. t3l.e Largest Mefrigerator in. the State,
No. TWest Bay Street, - - Jacksonville, Florida.
To sept 27, '82


Orange Tree
A . m a ft 5%


Wash and Insecticide.


H. D. BUUNIe.H-lt.AU, KUrUKI. ITU


NORDYKE

MILLS
-MANUFACTURE-

FreshGround


FLORIBA CHEMICAL OIL AND SOAP WORKS,
MANUFACTURER OF
Lubricating and Boiler Compounds, Compressed Soaps, Car and
Axle grease.
ALSO SOLE MANUFACTURER
of the best Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide extant-
O:EN.-., rE3 T=EE EMIT3TLSION !
made from Whale-Oil Soap, combined with other powerful ingredients known
to be most effectual for destroying the Scale and other insect pests and
parasites of the Citrus family. It will also put the tree in a healthy and flour-
ishing condition. Prepared for immediate use. Perfectly harmless to the
youngest tree or plant. In packages of from 25 to 300 pounds. Price, 10 cents
per pound. Discount to the Trade. 4J- Full directions for use accompany
each package. Address
H. D. BOUNETHEAU.


AND


to july 31 '82


P. O. BOX 984, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
-0
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
-04
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers for June are appointed to sail as follows:
JUNIATA, June 3d, at 7:00 a. inm.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, June 10th, at 1:00 p. m.
JUNIATA, June 17th, at 7:00 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, June 24th, at 12:00 m.
Days and hours subject to change, without notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, WM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.


Bosll anir Savlannah stlomshi Line


F. S. CONE, A. H. MANVILLE, E. A. MANVILLE,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Sdperintendent. Treasurer

4% Lake George, Florida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums
Peaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, and over one hundred varieties of the Citrus.
ORA-NGE AND LEMON 'ITREEI S a specialty.
Catalogue free. to apr 17, '83

ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]

J. A. BARNEOS & CO.,
FRUIT AND PRODUCE


JACKSONVILLE,
to feb 20, '82


S- LORIDA.


M. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the
of the Marshall House. Screven House.
TILE 1 IIABRNETT HIOUS E-,
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARNETT & GEORGE, Proprietors.
RAT _S, $2 PER DAY.
This favorite family Hotel, under its new manage-
ment, is recommended for the excellence of its cuisine.
homelike comforts, prompt attention and moderate
rates. to sept 4,82

SEND L1.-0 TO


35 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.,
And get a bottle of Richmond's Samaritan Nervine.
Cures Nervous Disorders, Dizziness, Vertigo, Seminal
Weakness. The only sure cure for Epileptic Fits.
IAddress HOLT'S PHARMACY.
to aug 20, '82


RUBBER


STAMPS


Are manufactured right in our establishment in the
best manner and at the shortest notice.
4i-Send in your orders.
ASHMEAD BROS.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
May 1-tf


207


ACER'S


lb"d


~. i -.y.Y-I.L~Y - -I -Y -I~. I-I -^ -LL ~~--WLC~~)~--~-I)i--YLI-L-L-YYY~-~~


I I .


ONLY DIRECT LINE BETWEEN
SAVANNAH AND BOSTON.
Transhipment and extra handling saved. No danger
of fruit being frozen. Cars are unloaded at the steam-
ship wharf in Savannah, avoiding drayage.
CABIN PASSAGE, $18.
SAILING FROM SAVANNAH.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, June 8th, at 12:30 p. m.
Seminole, Thursday, June 15th, at 6:00 p. m.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, June 22d, at 12:00 m.
Seminole, Thursday, June 29th, at 6:00 p. m.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, July 6th, at 11:00 a. m.
Seminole, Thursday, July 13th, at 5 p. m.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, July 20th, at 10:30 a. inm.
Seminole, Thursday, July 27th, at 4 p. m.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
44-tf Savannah, Ga.

DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
The largest stock in the State. Country
buyers will consult their own interests
by corresponding with me. All orders
promptly filled at prices to compete with
any house south of Baltimore. Remem-
ber my only Florida address.
GEO. HUGHES,
to june 26, '82 Cor. Bay and Ocean, Jacksonville, Fla.

PIANOS AND ORGANS

15 East Bay Jacksonville.
QOLD ON INSTALLMENTS, AT LOWEST PRICES-
U branch of Ludden & Bates, Savannah-EXACTLY
SAME PRICES AND TERMS, Sheet Music, Strings
and small Instruments of all kinds. Send for cata-
logues, prices and terms. TUNING AND REPAIRING
a specialty. My tuner will make regular tours through
the State, and my customers will thus have my repre-
sentative at their doors, a great advantage to purchasers
of instruments, to sept 26, '82

0. L. KEENE,
MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,

Laces, Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF

ID Lestaytreet,ornerLauraS
67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,


FEED, GRITS,
MEAL,
(Bolted or unbolted.)
Pearl Hominy.
GRAIN, HAY, COAL 2
WOOD-YARD.


I


COMMISSION


I


%k N~lmmIr AI r % 9%rr%1r"Mo #Wr





SOS THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


A Good Investment!
-0-


In the County of Hernando, East of Brooksville, the
county seat, and near the
Tropical "loridc e :E.,
which is now actively building, two tracts of land. The
first contains two hundred and forty (240) acres in a body;
the second contains eighty (80) acres. These tracts both
touch Upon a Lake of about 150 acres area; are
well timbered with pine suitable for lumber; the second
about half a mile southeast of the first; between them
lies a cultivated farm. These lands are well adapted to
Oranges and Other Fruits, being of good
soil, with little underbrush, and are easily cleared. They
were selected by HLon. Walter Gwynn, Ex-
Treasurer of the State of Florida, and they may be relied
upon as being what is represented. These lands are in a
part of the State that is rapidly settling up
and offer a good field either for an investment in Flor-
ida real estate, or for orange groves and the like.
Price and terms will be so arranged as to be satisfac-
tory to the purchaser. Apply to
WALTER B. CLARKSON,
Box 877. Jacksonville, Florida.
In corresponding, please mention this paper.
to August 29, '82.

RICH'D H. MARKS'

ORANGE COUNTY LAND AGENCY,
SAk.1FOItiD, FLORIDA,


BUYS AND SELLS
Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission,
ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
june 12-tf
WINTER PARK is a new town in Orange
W!IN I T --V r PA t [County, Florida, eighteen
miles south of Sanford, on the South Florida Railroad,
with a frontage of two miles upon three beautiful Lakes.
WINTER HOMES in the midst of Orange Groves, for
Northerners, is the main idea. For Pamphlets and
Maps giving particulars, address
CHAPMAN & CHASE,
Winter Park, Orange Co., Fla.
to july 17, '82
THE
FLORIDA

DAILY TIMES.

:p=ROS3E- 0r'VTTS.
THE TIMES is the official paper of the city and the
leading paper of the State. It has the largest circulation
in Florida, and reaches all parts of it. It is not merely
a local newspaper, but aims to advocate the interests
and promote the prosperity of Florida as a whole.
Its reputation outside the State is very high. It has
taken rank among those journals whose columns are
looked to for news, and whose comments are quoted
with respect throughout the country.
Its editors have had wide and varied experience in
journalism North as well as South; its advertising pa-
tronage is liberal and of the best character; and its re-
sources, financial and other, are ample. It will furnish
Florida with a live, progressive, outspoken, and reada-
ble newspaper, the peer of any.
ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.
THE TIMES has secured by special contract the full
despatches of the ASSOCIATED PRESS. Besides that
its Editor is Agent of the Associated Press for the State
of Florida, which gives him great advantages in obtain-
ing the freshest and most important State news.
SPECIAL DESPATCHES.
With representatives in the leading news centres of
the country, THE TIMES is well served in addition to
the regular Press reports. During the past winter it has
received a very large number of telegraphic specials."
CORRESPONDENCE.
Its regular correspondence from Washington, New
York and Boston is of noteworthy excellence; and its
State correspondence has attracted much attention.
This feature will be extended and improved; and to
this end correspondence containing news or items of
information of any kind is solicited from all quarters.
"OLD SI. "
In addition to his editorial work, Mr. Small will write
regularly for THE TIMES, and in its Sunday issues the
famous "Old Si" will disseminate wisdom in chunks
to the Florida public.
TERM (strictly in advance): One year, $10; Six
months, $5; three months, $2.50; one month, $1. sent
one month on trial for 50 cents.
Remittance should be made by draft or post-office
order, or in a registered letter. Address
JONES & SMALL,
to sept 26,'82 Jacksonville, Fla.


1r=um rl"rW GROT7Ir7D "OlnE, 3S.50 o er mon,
(Guaranteed iPure.)

cOTTONT SEED 1V4EA^3L., $36 per rTon, i
(100 Pound Bag's.)

COTTON SEEID rCTLL T.JIJ SI, $27 per Ton,
(The Best Potash in Use.)
20 :B-Shloels 0o0=o1 "eas for Sale.
STOCKBRIDGE FERTILIZERS for Orange Trees and vegetables, for sale by
J. 1D. I1 AR T,
to jan 6, '83 Jacksonville, I'la.



S. B. HUBBARD. k
JACKSONVILLE FOARIDA,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN

HARDWARE, STOVES, DOORS, SASH, BLI N DS,
PAINTS, OILS, PU31MPS, LEAD AND ItON PIPE,
SUGAR- MILLS, RUBBER AND LEATHER BELTING,
STEAM AND GAS-FITTING, PLUMBING AND TINSMITHING,
AGRICTJLTUIRAL ITIPPL3E1MAENlTS of all kinds,
AAZARD'S&AR" I) PENCE IVp IIE,

tAgoe1'ts3 for S. L Alle AtC.' s --aIDET a.eTOOLS.
tojune 11 '83 Wi Senld for Price List and C atalogue.


---

GOULD & CO.'S


FERTILIZER
-AND-


Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange Growers and Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, con-
tains potash, lime, phosphoric acid, ammonia and the other essential elements of Plant Food, making a corn
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & Bro.'s, and other high-priced Fertilizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity, and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $4 per barrel, $32 per
ton.
All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.

MESSRS. GOULD & CO.:
Gentlemen-I used one-half ton of your Fertilizer, in connection with the same amount of Baker & Bro.'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gave as good results as the others, which are much higher priced fertilizers-costing
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $51.50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12, 1881.
GOULD & .:LEESBURG, SUMTER C., FLA., March 6, 1882.
Gentlemen-Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed your
agents at this point (Messrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its fostering care, I having had the honor
to win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer better and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer "kills two birds with one stone," inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies,
at one and the same time. I bave been testing it in the field, garden and orange grove for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues, whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For my part, I ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. if I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork.
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOUTRT.


to aug 27, '82


GOULD & CO.,
NO. 6 W. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


A. N. DOBBINS & BRO., 00 BAN RAN
Surronn(ling a handsome residence in Jacksonville,
S halt-mile from the centre of business on Bay Street.
House has seven rooms neatly finished in natural
a wood, with kitchen and servants' rooms, store room,
hk 25 and plenty of closets. Good stable and carriage house,
PURE WATER,
SGood neighborhood-(ALL WHITE.) Lot is 210x157 feet,
has
(IA? \100 Or-ange Trees,
r ^12 to 16 years old, large and thrifty. Also,
SG| -a-pes,

1in l, bLocikMithl mnfl Stoilcil 1uttpfS rPe, i is,
Splendid chance for any one desiring a lovely home in
24 LAURA STREET, Florida, and a bearing grove.
JACIKSON VITLE - FI OI--)A, For price and terms, apply to
Qunsmithing done in all its branches. J. H. NORTON,
G IRON SAFE WORK. Jacksonville, Florida.
Special rates on Stencil Cutting, by mail. Address, State that you saw this advertisement in THE FLORIDA
to june 12'83, (P. 0. Box 833.) DISPATCH. june 12, '82-tf


Agent in Orange County for ..... .. . .
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMP'Y. BUY THE BEST AND CHEAPEST


--