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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00012
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: June 12, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00012
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

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Devoted to the A~ricultural, Manufacturing and Industrial Interests of Florida and the South.


Vol. 1.--No. 12.


New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.


Price 5 cents.


Monday, June 12, 1882.

The Parasites of Tubercular Diseases. merous, and containing spores. The sputum of
Dr. Robert Koch has recently announced patients not suffering from phthisis give nega-
the discovery of the bacilus tuberculosis. The tive results'. Animals inoculated with fresh
parasites are minute rod-like bodies, formed sputum containing bacili, were rendered tuber-
in greatest numbers when the tubercle process cular with as much certainty as if they were
is going on with the highest activity. Koch inoculated with millidry tubercle. The viru-
found the parasites in a number of cases of lence of the sputum was however in no degree
tubercular diseases of various organs, and hav- lost by drying. Guinea pigs were as readily
ing cultivated them in culture fluids produced rendered tubercular by sputum which had been
tubercular diseases in dogs and rats by inocu- dried for eight weeks, as by the inoculation of
lation. fresh sputum. Hence it may be inferred that
In commenting on the discovery, the Medical sputum dried on the floor, clothes, etc., retains
News says that the evidence is conclusive. the virulence for a long time, and inhaled as
"It only remains to develop from the cultiva- dust, may set up the disease.
ted parasite tuberculosis in man to complete It is conceivable that the maintenance of vir-
the cycle of evidence, and to establish Koch's ulence depends on the presence of spores in the
discovery amongst the great facts of medical bacili, but the formation of spores clearly goes
science. Prof. Tyndall maintains the genuine- on in the animal body and not as in the case of
ness of these observations, and is fully alive to the anthrax bacilus out side it. "It is proba-
their trancendant importance. He calls atten- ble that the bacili do not get into the system,
tion to them in a letter to the London Times. even when inhaled, unless they can develop in
"No one can fail to be profoundly impressed stagnant secretion, or unless the loss of the
with the painstaking skill of the discoverer, epithelium facilitates their ingress, otherwise it
and the far-reaching consequences of the discov- is difficult to understand the low degree of
ery. In the facts laid before our readers, may infectiveness of phthisi&s These admirable re-
be the solution of the problem so long regarded searches of Koch, and the important facts he
as insoluble-the cause of tuberculosis. If has discovered, can scarcely fail however, to
Pasteurs' culture experiments have led to the bring to the reader's mind the paramount dis-
discovery of a method by which the poison of tinction which must always be drawn between
splenic fever is rendered harmless, and the dis- the value of the facts ascertained by experi-
ease prevented by the timely inoculation of the ment and that of the more or less hypothetical
modified virus, may we not hope that the time is application of those facts to the far more com-
not far distant when the ravages of consumption plex problems of disease.
will be prevented by the inoculation of a modi- The doctrine to which Koch appears to in-
fled bacilus ? cline, that every case of phthisis is the result
Another quotation, from the Lancet of April of a distinct extraneous infection, is difficult
29th ult. ; the review in which, concludesthus: to reconcile with the potent influence ofhered-
"most cases of tuberculosis commence in the ity, and with the occurrence of phthisis in
respiratory tracts, and the infective material apparently absolute disconnection with previ-
first developed in the lungs and bronchial ous cases, especially when we consider the se-
glands. Hence it is probable that the germs verity with which even probable infection oc-
enter the system by the inspired air, adhering curs under the most favorable conditions for it.
perhaps to the particles of dust which are car- These and many similar facts suggest the can-
ried along with it. How they get into the air tion that is necessary in drawing conclusions
may be conjectured from the enormous quan. regarding the part played by the germs in the
tity of organisms which are found within propagation of the disease. They suggest the
phthisical cavities, and which must be expec- aptitude or inaptitude of the soil may be as
torated in the sputum. Koch has indeed ex- specific and as important as the organism which
amined the sputum in a large number of cases grows in it. These experiments are certain to
of phthisis, and in about half the specimens ex- be prolific of a vast increase in our knowledge,
amined he found bacili, in most cases very nu- and let us hope in our power also. The nu-


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.

merous questions they suggest will, doubtless,
soon engage the attention of experimental in-
quirers."

FAST STEAMBOAT TIME.-On Thursday of last
week the "Mary Powell" made the trip up the
Hudson River from New York to Rondout, 95
miles, in 4 hours and 17 minutes, beating h.er
best previous time by 10 minutes. This is t the
rate of 221 miles an hour, and included the time
taken in making eight landings.

COMMERCIAL VALUE OF METALs.-The
Leadville Index gives the commercial value
per pound of rare and common metals, as fol-
lows: Indium, $2,520; vanadium, $2,520; ru-
thinium, $1,400; rhodium, $700; palladium,
$653; varalum, $576.58; osinlum, $325.28;
iridum, $317.44; gold, $301.46; platinum,
$115.20; thallium, $108.77; chromium, $58,
manesium, $56.50; potasium, $23; silver,
$18.25; cobalt, $7.75; cadmium, $6; bismuth,
$2.63; sodium, $2.50; nickel, $2.50; mercury,
42 cents; antimony, 14 cents; tin, 22 cents;
copper, 20 cents; arsenic, 10 cents; zinc, 6
cents; lead, 5 cents; iron 2 cents.

SAY WHAT You MEAN.-Let your friends
know that you love them. Do not keep the
alabaster boxes of your love and tenderness
sealed up until your friends are dead. Fill
their lives with sweetness. Speak approving,
cheering words while their hearts can be thrill-
ed by them. The things you mean to say when
they are gone say before they go. The flowers
you mean to send for the coffins send to bright-
en and sweeten their homes before they leave
them. If my friends have alabaster boxes laid
away, full of perfumes of sympathy and affec-
tion, which they intend to break over my
dead body, I would rather they would bring
them out in my weary hours and open them,
that I may be refreshed and cheered by them
while I need them. I would rather have a bare
coffin without a flower, and a funeral without an
eulogy, than a life without the sweetness of love
and sympathy. Let us learn to annoint our
friends beforehand for their burial. Post-
mortem kindness does not cheer the burdened.
Flowers on the coffin cast no fragrance back-
ward over the wveary days of our lives.


-- -I I----II





.78 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Ashes from Cotton-Seed Hulls.
We give the following from Prof. Stubbs's
report in the State Mechanical College of Ala-
bama, and in response to the inquiries of a sub-
scriber ("E. M.") of Mandarin, Fla.:
ALABAMA AGRICULTURAL AND)
MECHANICAL COLLEGE,
AUBURN, ALA., January 18, 1882.
Mr. Geo. G. Duffee, Mobile, Ala.:
DEAR SIR: Your letter relative to analysis
of cotton-seed hull ashes, and their comparative
value with ashes of hard wood, received. Some
time since, a sample of ashes taken from the fur-
nace of the oil works in Montgotnery, was ana-
lyzed with the following results:
Sand and Soluble Silica........ 19.38 per cent.
Phosphoric Acid..................... 9.34 at 9.50 per cent.
Potash...................................... 15.56 at 15.68 percent.
Other substances not separated.
In above, the phosphoric acid and potash,
(the only ingredient which gives a commercial
value to the ash), were determined twice.
Subsequently a sample was sent me from the
oil works at Selma, by their President, Geo. 0.
Baker. A partial analysis of this gave of
Phosphoric Acid.............................................10.75 per cent.
Potash............................................................14.70 per cent.
Sand and Soluble Silica..................20.23 per cent.
In this latter analysis, of the 14.70 per cent.
of potash obtained, 10.70 per cent. was soluble
in water. The remainder was soluble in strong
acid. The phosphoric acid is always in the. in-
soluble form in all ashes. These are results ob-
tained of the ashes obtained from the furnaces,
where cotton-seed hulls are mainly used as fuel.
Of course these ashes, as large amount of silica
present indicates, are not the pure ash of the
hulls. Theoretically, they contain a larger per-
centage of both of these valuable ingredients
than are found here. These ashes showed that
they were mixed with sand, charcoal, wood
ashes, etc.
From these analyses we may assume without
much error, that the ashes from cotton-seed
hulls, as obtained from the furnace, contain of-
Phosphoric Acid..................... ..............10 per cent.
P otash ....................................... .............................15 per cent.
Of the potash present 10 per cent. may also
be assumed as being readily soluble in water,
and, therefore, available to plants. We have
no way in Alabama to determine the commer-
cial value, of a fertilizer, as we have no law to
regulate the price, quality or sale of commercial
fertilizers, and, therefore, have to go out of the
State to find a tariff by which to estimate the
value of a ton of ashes of cotton-seed hulls. The
Commissioner of Agriculture of Georgia, assigns
no value to insoluble phosphoric acid, saying in
his report: "Insoluble phosphoric acid is not
available as a plant food, especially if derived
from phosphate rock, but if derived from ani-
mal bone is valuable if immediate results are
not desired." Georgia, therefore, does not help
us as to the phosphoric acid in our ashes. A
value of 6 cents per pound is assigned to pot-
ash soluble in water. Prof. Johnson, in his
report of Connecticut Experimental Station,


values insoluble phosphoric from 31 cents per
pound in fine ground phosphate to 6 cents per
pound in fine bone and fish guano. Other chem-
ists have given an average value of insoluble
phosphoric acid 4.5 cents. If we take 5 cents
per pound as the probable value of our insolu-
ble phosphoric acid and 6 cents per pound for
soluble potash, we have in a ton-
200 pounds Phosphoric Acid, 5 cents................................$10.00
200 pounds Soluble Potash, 6 cents.............................. 12.00
Commercial value of ton.......................................... $22.00
No value is here given to insoluble potash. If
we give to phosphoric acid a value of 4 cents
per pound, we will reduce the price per ton to
$20. You will see, therefore, that the price
charged per ton, $20, by the mills in your city,
is not far from the commercial value adopted by
some of our States. Common hard-wood ashes
contain of potash from 6.10 per cent., phosphoric
acid 1.50 to 4 per cent. The average of house-


hold ashes,-where hard wood is burnt, is proba-
bly not far from 81 per cent. potash, and 5 per
cent. phosphoric acid. A bushel will weigh 48
pounds. The value of potash and phosphoric
acid remaining as above, a bushel would con-
tain-
407 pounds of Potash at 6 cents................................ $24.42
96 pounds of Phosphoric Acid at 5 cents.............. 4.80
$29.22
and would be worth 30 cents per bushel.

The Lemon in South Florida.
Mr. J. G. Knapp, of Limonia, Hillsborough
county, says : "Except, perhaps, on a nar-
row belt next the Gulf, winds requiring
tree-belt protections do not prevail, in this
county at least. Lemon trees have been grown
in this county by the early Spanish settlers,
and after more than thirty years these trees
are as large and thrifty as the sweet orange
seedlings beside which they have grown, and
equally productive in fruit. In flavor they as
much exceed the lemons in Europe as do our
oranges. In richness, acidity and quantity of
juice, they are only excelled by the limes,
which, still more impatient of frosts, are found
everywhere in this county. These trees reared
from seeds of foreign and imported fruits, run
back to the native trees of India in size, yet
produce fruits with skins as smooth and nearly
as thin as the limes of this region, and not less
solid and juicy.
"I have tested a fruit weighing .ten ounces
from a seven year-old seedling tree raised by
C. W. Wells, of Tampa, being one of 500
which the tree produced, by cutting it in thin
slices, placing it in a pitcher and turning boil-
ing water over it; after twelve hours the water,
with the lemon still in it, was used for a lemon-
ade, and none of the bitter principle (citrine)
could be detected, though the lemon oil was
all drawn out. The fruits of all these seed-
lings, allowed to ripen on the trees, reach the
size of our largest oranges ; and I have heard
no other objection to them but their size and
rounded form. They are, indeed, much larger
than the European lemons, which are gathered
for the market, 'green, when of a particular
size,' and passed through 'a series of iron rings,
indicating the numbers by which they are
sized for packing.' Every buyer is aware that
the price of lemons is governed by the ize of
the fruit, hence it* is reasonable to conclude
that the extra size of our lemons should ope-
rate in their favor instead of being an objec
tion. *
"All things considered, there can scarcely
remain a doubt but in all the Gulf coast region,
south of the 28th parallel, wherever the land is


sufficiently dry, the lemon may be grown in
perfection and with great profit, without receiv-
ing any protection from winds or frost; and
from this freedom from a great expense, and
the sie and qualityof of our fruits, we shall be
able to compete for the markets of the United
States and the world."
It is evident that the natural conditions of
Florida are far more favorable to the produc-
tion of these valuable fruits than those of any
other country. That an industry, which is sure
to vastly increase the wealth of the State is
destined to steady and successful growth, no
intelligent observer can doubt. In treating of
this and of all other subjects pertinent to the
Southern States, the writer aims to speak with
fairness to the end, that should any one be led
to act on it, may be based upon a candid state-
ment of facts.--The South.


-Five wagons and eleven passengers passed
through Sumter County, Florida, recently, seek-
ing a home in Hernando County. They had
come all the way from Wisconsin by wagons.
-The Floridian says that Col. J. W. Childs,
Special Agent of the United States Land Office,
and Captain H. T. Blocker, Special Agent for
the State, on Monday commenced the investiga-
tion of swamp and overflowed lands between
Tallahassee and Indian River for indemnity to
the State, and will prosecute the work as fast as
possible.
FLORIDA GUANO.-Mr. J. B. Collins showed
the Tallahassee editors a sample of guano from
his recently discovered bed in Hillsborough
County, South Florida. The bed covers an area
of five acres and is about eight feet deep in the
deposit. Millions and millions of sea birds con-
gregate there every night to roost, and have
been, probably, for a hundred years.
-One of our livery men who uses large quan-
tities of corn, informs us that he has not pur-
chased a bushel of shipped corn this year, nor
don't expect to. He says that many of our
farmers are selling corn and he experiences no
difficulty in purchasing as much home-made as
he needs. Every year our farmers are increas-
ing their provision crops, and the time is not
far distant when Leon County will make at
home all the provisions she consumes, and a
great many other things besides.-Land of
Flowers.-[Now let us have plenty of Florida
raised hay and fodder.]
-The schooner Palma arrived from Routan
on Thursday morning last with only a small
cargo of fruit on board. Captain Thbmpson
states that a drouth of several months at Rou-
tan and its vicinity, has completely destroyed
the "banana and plantain crops, as well as the
cocoanuts. The want of rain prevents the lat-
ter from falling; hence, instead of 30,000 cocoa-
nuts, as he expected, could only procure 13,000,
and bananas in the same ratio. We regret that
he made a broken voyage, as his usual fruit
cargo at this time would have sold well.-Key
of the Gulf, 27th.
WILD OLIVES.-One of our Florida ex-
changes says that a gentleman recently lost a
fine young cow from eating a handful of wild olive
leaves that some one had cut off their trees and
thrown into the street. Several of his calves
ate also of the leaves and came near dying.
The wild olive is a deadly poison, and persons
trimming up the trees in their yards should be
careful not to throw the branches out where cat-
tle can get at them, for the cattle eat them read-


ily and die on the spot. [The poisonous tree
alluded to is not the "wild olive (Olea Ameri-
cana.) It is the wild evergreen cherry or Ce-
rasus Caroliniana, often called "mock orange,"
"lauria mundi," etc. It is one of our most beau-
tiful evergreens; but like the oleander and
yellow jasmine, quite poisonous. The true wild
olive is perfectly harmless, and can be used as a
stock upon which to bud or graft the European
olive (Olea Europa;) and we may also add that
the "poison oak," and "poison ivy," is neither an
oak nor an ivy, but a sumach, Rhus toxicoden-
dron.-EDs.]
Continued on page 185.




THE FLORIDA DISPATCH


Diversity of Southern Products.
The possibilities of a country must be meas-
ured by its natural capabilities. No country
can attain to enduring prosperity which does
not possess the endowments of nature in some
form and the ultimate attainments of any
country must be measured by the value of
these primary and inalienable gifts. Tempo-
rary causes may delay, but no power can defeat
these supreme forces, which are inevitable in
S ie niatural possessions o0 the South are not
only of great magnitude, but they are repre-
sented in so great a variety of products as to
give scope to human effort in any field. This
is owing to diversity of soil and climate, and is
a condition, the full benificence of which is yet
to be realized. That it is destined to render
the country fruitful to an extent which must
make it rich and prosperous, no careful observer
of events can doubt. This result is sure to come
from the employment of the means, which is
persistent and intelligent labor. In a far less
hospitable climate and in defiance of a hard
and ungrateful soil, men have extracted a live-
lihood. What then must be the results where
all the forces of nature have conspired to aid
their labors.
Small as have been the achievements of labor
in the South, they have verified in their results
the reward which comes to those who bestow it,
and as the genial climate and the yielding soil
invite the co-operation of man, there is an in-
herent fitness in his compliance. And this is
in accordance with the tendency of events and
with the vast economic advantages that must
follow.
That labor may find the most congenial field,
it should be able to see a diversity, and this is
precisely the condition of affairs as they exist
in the South. He who wishes to plant cotton
has generations of precedents to assure his suc-
cess; he who would raise the cereals has soil
and climate suited to every grain; he who sees
in early vegetables large returns, can find no
better place to carry out his plans; the orange-
grower and, in fact, all who find pleasure and
profit in the culture of the citrus family, will
seek in vain for a more promising location in
which to gratify their tastes. In every depart-
ment pertaining to tilling the soil, is presented
the broadest range for experiment with the
most reasonable prospect of success.
Whatever is adapted to the soil and climate,
whether reared by the hand of man or coming
forth spontaneously, is produced in the greatest
exuberance and perfection. The vast forests
of the South-those grand natural products-
are, and must continue to be for years to come,
a source of great revenue. Sad as it is to see
the country denuded, it is to be hoped that the
reaction which is taking place, may soon en-
force the planting of a young tree for every old
one that is cut down. The value of the South-
ern forest is certain to appreciate steadily. The
magnitude of the consumption of timber, and
its rapid disappearance from the more impor-
tant sources of supply, is fast turning attention
to the valuable treasures of the South.


There are still other products whose value is
not comprehended for the reason that they are
concealed in the earth. The extent of the min-
eral wealth of the South is a subject of which
so little is known that no adequate conception
of it exists. The limited investigation that is
afforded discloses possessions rich, varied and
extensive. The mineral products already
brought to light are such as to give some ear-
nest of what must be the state of the country
under an advanced and adequate system of de-
velopment.- The South.

PERSONS OMDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


Saw-Dust and Moss.
LOUISVILLE, KY., May 27, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
As a cheap and abundant fertilizer for the
sandy orange ground of your State, could not
saw-dustbe utilized to good advantage ? also the
articles decay quck-ly and leave a valuable
vegetable constituent, integrated with the sand
that would add greatly to its fertility ? Do you
know if either or both have been tried, if not, I
would suggest to the readers of your excellent
paper that they try them, both for fruit and
vegetables; it can do no possible harm and will
cost but little to make the test. I give the hint
for what it may be worth. Respectfully,
H. W.
REPLY.-Saw-dust is not of much value, per
se, as a fertilizer, but has sometimes been used
on heavy clays to lighten and merate the soil. It
is also used in stables as an absorbent of the
valuable liquids which would, otherwise be
wasted. The "Spanish Moss," (.Tillandsiausne-
oides,) has been profitably used in raising the
-Irish potato, and can, doubtless, be composted
with lime to advantage.-[EDs.

ARROW-ROOT.
How to Cultivate, Etc.
FOREST HOME FARM,
NEW SMYRNA, FLA., May 27, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
In your issue of the 22d, J. R. W. writes to
know "how to cultivate arrow-root," and I will
try to answer him by giving him my experience.
Over four years since a lady friend gave me one
root to plant. As I had never seen any grow-
ing and knew nothing in regard to its culture, I
made inquiries of my neighbors and soon came
to the conclusion that they knew more about it
than I did, to-wit: Nothing. When the sea-
son for planting came, I broke it into four
pieces, each about two inches in length, and
planted one in a hill about eighteen inches
apart. It soon came up and I hilled same as
corn, twice. In the fall, when the leaves showed
signs of dying, I dug the roots, dried and stored
in a dry place. Next spring I had my ground
prepared d planted and treated the same as
before, anmdti the fall had over two barrels of
choice roots and over one barrel "nubbins."
The next spring I prepared the ground in
March, the same as for sweet potatoes, making
the ridges large and flat, and planted the "nub-
bins," which, with the suckers which came up
from the piece planted the previous year, gave
me all I wanted. Then I dug, after the sweet
potatoes, and dried in the sun and placed in bar-
rels in a dry place. I find by ridging the roots


are more easily gathered. I prepare the ground
and plant same as sweet potatoes, placing pieces
of root two inches in length, twelve inches apart,
and hill up and cover the weed twice during
the season. Dry the roots in the sun for an hour
or more, then put in barrels and place in a dry
location. If you wish to make starch, grate and
wash the same as for cassava. What you do
not wish to grate feed to hens. I find it excel-
lent food for fattening them. Some- say it is
good for hogs, but of that I cannot say, for I do
not keep "razor-backs." My land is new pine
land and I get good paying crops. I am ex-
perimenting with a view of putting in an acre
or two and would be glad to hear from others.
Yours truly, GEO. J. ALDEN.


i7&


qp,


duced into France in 1815, by M. Noisette, a
Parisian nurseryman. It is dwarf in habit, al-
most thornless, branches pendulous, roots fibrous,
leaves very smooth and glossy, four inches in
length by one and three-quarters broad, leaves
concave on upper surface from side to side, ab-
sence of leaflet on petiole.
The fruit is small, being about one inch and
three-quarters in length, by one and a third in
diameter; with prominent rumpled knob or
tubercle at calyx end; surface of fruit strewn
with small, irregular impressions; skin thin and
charged with a pungent essential oil; flesh deeper
in color than the skin; juice very unpleasant,
resembling a mixture of thejuice of the lime and
bitter orange of Seville.
C. J. KENWORTHY.


- ` I - -I


~I


More About the Dwarf Orange Tree.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I was gratified to find that my experiment in
dwarfing the orange met with your approval;
and I am disposed to add a few remarks to what
you have already stated. The propagation and
cultivation of my orange bushes is a mere prac-
tical application of the principles published by
worimi, tngianid,r'n nis work entitilet the "inim-
ature Fruit Garden ;" written to guide culti-
vators in the culture of dwarf pears, apples and
cherries.
I experimented with several stocks, and fin-
ally decided to adopt the Otaheite. Its roots
are fibrous and plentiful; and in its earlier
stages of growth it is like the Paradise or Dou-
cin stocks, very vigorous; but soon settles down
to business. My bushes are grown on sandy
soil, with a subsoil of pure white sand. For four
years the land was used as an asparagus bed,
and during that period it received but one light
dressing of manure. On the same land, six
years ago, I planted standard orange trees six-
teen feet apart, and my bushes are growing be-
tween them five feet apart. You, Mr. Editor,
will certainly agree with me, that my bushes
have not been fairly treated. If my bushes had
been planted in new and fertile soil, I feel assur-
ed that the product of the first year would have
been much greater. I have raised from seed a
truly Lilliputian variety of the orange, and I
have reason to believe, that it will supersede
the Otaheite as a stock for bushes.
Some of your readers will cry out cui bono,
and ridicule orange bushes, as English garden-
ers ridicule Rivers' apple bushes; but to-day
apple bushes have become an institution, and
produce larger and finer apples than can be
gathered from standard trees. This morning I
carefully examined my orange bushes, and I will
persecute you with figures:
The bushes are 20 in number.
Thirteen out of the 20 are in fruit.
Number of fruit on bearing bushes is: 80, 79,
41, 35, 20, 17, 16, 10, 10, 4, 3, 3, 1. -
Average number of fruit on bearing bushes,
24.
Average number of fruit on bearing and non-
bearing bushes, 154.
Distance of bushes apart, 5 by 5 feet.
Number of bushes per acre, if planted 5 by 5
feet apart, 1,742.
Product per acte first year of bearing on av-
erage of 15& per bush, 26,000.
Twenty-six thousand oranges at $15 per 1,000,
$390.
All who are conversant with the culture of
dwarf apples, pears and cherries, will admit
that they are productive and profitable, and
my limited experience with my bushes, leads me
to believe that they will produce large crops at
an early day. As it may possibly interest some
of your readers, I. will furnish a few facts in
connection with the Otaheite orange.
According to Risso and Poiteau, it was intro-


NEW




THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


MARKET GARDENING.
The Dispatch Reports, Etc.
A subscriber writing from Ellenton, Florida,
May 31, says:
"Besides the cultivation of oranges, I desire
to plant fifteen or twenty acres of vegetables for
the Northern markets. The country round
here is fhst developing itself into one of the great
vegetable-growing sections of Florida. As I
intend trying my hand at the business next sea-
son, I would like to obtain one or two of the best
text books on the subject.
"Allow me to say that THE DISPATCH is a
very prolific paper in the way of fresh news on
the subjects of agriculture and horticulture. II
desire to make a suggestion, however, as to your
|market (quotations for vegetables: In addition
to your regular quotations from New York you
also give (in No. 2) the quotations of Gibson
& Rockwell for the five cities-Cincinnati, (Chi-
cago, Philadelphia, New York and Baltimore.
Please continue, if possible, the quotations from
all of the five citi's--as we use them in compar-
parison-cspecially during the vegetable sea-
son. If these latter quotations, with perhaps
Atlanta (Ga.) included, can be kept up, THE
DISPATCH will be almost perfect.
"Truly yours, P."
[Our friend's suggestion in regard to full
market reports from the great cities is a good
one, and we will endeavor to furnish such re-
ports. We are grateful for the kindly interest
and good opinion of such men as our cor-
respondent, "P," and hope to hear from him
often.-EDs.]

LOUISIANA ORANGES.

Mode of Selling the Crop, &c.
Ex-Governor WARMOTH, of Magnolia Plan-
tation, Lawrence, P. 0., Louisiana, writes us as
follows, under date of May 31st :
"If reports are true, the orange-growers of
Florida get better prices for their crop than we
do here in Louisiana. If not putting you to
too much trouble, I would like to know how
your orange-growers sel, their fruit. Do they,
(as we do here, as a rule,) sell their fruit on the
trees to persons who pick, ship and sell abroad?
or do they pick and ship themselves ? If they
do sell to other persons on the trees, what is con-
sidered an average price? Are they sold by
the tree or by the estimated number ?
"We sell our crops on our trees-sometimes
for years ahead-I sold my crop for three years,
for $4,000, per annum, in advance, and I have
sold it for the next three years for $5,000 per
annum, payable one year in advance, which is
equivalent to about $5,800 per annum. I have
about 4,000 good bearing trees. My neighbor,
Mr. Brandish Johnson, has 10,000 bearing trees.
He sold his crop on the trees year before last
for $12,000. This was considered a good sale


here, but it was a very poor one if the Florida
reports are true. I have no doubt of their re-
liability, for they come to us in such well au-
thenticated form and from so many reliable
sources.
"I would like to know how you do it in Flor-
ida, so as to be able to do it myself.
"The Italian fruit dealers in New Orleans
buy our crops, pick and ship them throughout
the country.
"I am afraid my letter has already grown
too long, but I will thank you for such informa-
tion as you may please to give me.
"Very truly,
"H. C. WARMOTH.
REPLY.-A great many of our orange grow-
ers sell to packers, who make a regular business
of sorting, culling, packing and shipping oranges


to the Northern and Western markets. The
fruit is carefully picked at the grove, packed in
boxes, (sometimes, not often, in barrels,) and
i consigned to the packer and shipper at Jacks'on-
ville or some other shipping point. Here the
oranges are unpacked, carefully sorted and
sized, wrapped in manilla paper, repacked by
experts, in uniform boxes, and shipped to their
destination. The grower generally receives from
$1 to $2 per hundred for fair fruit, at the grove,
roughly packed ; while the packer and shipper
realizes a considerable advance on this price for
selected fruit, and generally manages to "quit
even" on the "culls" and damaged specimens.
Many large growers prefer to pack and ship
their own crops, having excellent and conven-
ient packing-sheds, train railways running
through their groves, machines for grading and
sizing the fruit, wrapping paper with the name
of the grower, and sometimes of the variety of
fruit printed thereon, etc. Others, sell in bulk,
by the boat or cart-load to dealers in Jackson-
ville, Palatka, Lake City, Gainesville, etc.; but,
few, if any of 'our Florida orange-growers sell
their crops uncounted on the trees, as is the
custom on the river "coast" of the Mississippi.
We have here, none of the "Dago," (Diego?)
"Sicilian" or Italian traders so common in New
Orleans, whose luggerss" and other trading wa-
ter-craft may be seen lining the levees of the
Crescent City from the beginning of the water-
melon to the close of the orange season. The
gambling propensity-the passion for "games
of chance," and the disposition to dabble in
"futures" is very strong in that race of men;
hence they have the "faith" and "nerve" to buy
up large crops two or three years ahead and to
"back their judgment" by advancing large
sums of money on fruit in future! No such
"operators" are to be found in Florida, so far as
we know; nor do we think the system could
find favor with our people. It has strong ad-
vantages and disadvantages for both parties;
but our plan of receiving pay only for what we
grow and furnish, seems to us the fairest and
best. The range in price-from $10 to $20 per
thousand, for gathered oranges, at the grove,
may be considered as embracing the extremes;
and $12.50 to $15 per thousand, "one year with
another," the average.-[EDS. DISPATCH
Florida's Silk Claim.
JACKSONVILLE, June 6, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
GENTLEMEN: Our "little" Florida, as we
sometimes call her, is not a boastful State; but


she is entitled to all that is legitimately "her
own ;" in these days of interest in silk culture
and silk manufacture, she is not willing that
her claim and right on that subject should be
overshaodwed by the wings of States that can
soar higher and stronger. I think I read in
THE DISPATCH some time ago, many of the facts
relating to the silk industry in Georgia and
Carolina in pre-revolution times. Those facts
showed what the mothers and daughters of our
South-land did in those days in this refined in-
dustry. But I wish to note that in the present
generation a Florida lady raised and wove the
silk for a dress for herself and a vest for her
husband; that these garments were worn and
admired; and as this was in Tallahassee, where
the ladies knew what nice fabrics were, there
must have been something of the excellent in


this work. This was between thirty and forty
years ago. I allude to the silk fabric made by
Mrs. H. T. Blocher, of Leon County. The fact
can be more thoroughly attested when neces-
sary. So that the dress to be presented by the
Woman's Silk Culture Association of Philadel-
phia, to the distinguished American lady with
whom all hearts sympathize, is not thel first
made in this country. With her full share in
the pleasure of bestowing the compliment, "lit-
tle Florida gives due notice that one of her
fair women, unaided, made the first American
silk gown. D).

Crop Reports.
FLEMINGTON, FLA., June 3, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Crops in this section come up well, generally,
but have suffered severely for rains, which have
come too late to give much over half a crop of
corn. Cotton is looking better than usual. I
Stands of cotton generally even and good.
Orange growers mostly report a scarcity of
fruit. Yours truly,
M. BACHELDER.
Vermin on Poultry.
We have received from Dr. R. Bachmann,
an old and experienced German physician re-
siding in LaVilla, a suburb of this city, some
packages of his new preparation for destroying
vermin on poultry, accompanied by the follow-
ing note of directions, etc.:
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I take the liberty of sending you an article
for the extermination of lice on poultry, as also
fleas on dogs. This is to be used internally and
mixed with the feed; acting as an alterative on
the blood and skin, producing thereby an ex-
halation, which is repelling to lice and fleas on
poultry, dogs and other animals. It has been
satisfactorily tested, and as I am aware you
have quite a quantity of poultry, would like
you to thoroughly test its merits.
Directions :-For twelve fowls add a table-
spoonful of the powder to the feed, for three suc-
cessive mornings; stop three days, then repeat
for three days more; stop three days again, and
then give the third or last dose. At the same
time, scatter lime where your fowls roost, and
you will be free from poultry lice.
Hoping that you will have time and inclina-
tion to give it proper attention, and that the re-
sults will prove altogether satisfactory, I
remain, etc.,
RENATUS BACHMANN, M. D.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Otaheite Orange Stocks.
A subscriber, at Yalaha, Sumter County,
Fla., writes:
"When you published the facts about the
Otaheite Dwarfs of Dr. Kenworthy, you forgot
to mention where the Otaheite wood could be


obtained; hence this card, and I fear a thou-
sand more from other sources asking you the
same question. I am really excited on the
question and want Otaheite wood, badly.
Respectfully yours,
G. W.M."
REPLY.-We did not "forget" to tell where
a supply of Otaheite could be obtained, be-
cause we did not know. We have written sev-
eral of the green-house nurserymen of the
North, and failed to procure any just now,
though we have the promise of a lot in the fall.
It may be well to state, here, that a very well
informed florist and plant-propagator of this
city objects to the Otaheite as a stock for dwarf
oranges, on the ground of its liability to injury
by frost. It must be admitted *at the Otaheite


I80


- -ir I I "''


- -- ---------- --






THE FtO1IIDA DISPATCh. j-~i


is about as tender as the lemon and lime, but as
the buds should be put in as near the ground as
possible; and as the head of the little tree
covers, spreads over and protects the short
trunk, leaving at most, only a few inches ex-
posed, (which short trunk can be wrapped in
bagging or swathed in straw,) we do not think
the danger from frost is eminent, in the open
air, even here; while south of 290 or as house-
plants, at the North, the objection has no force
whatever. Mr. P. J. Berkmans, of Augusta,
Ga., may be able to supply a few stocks of the
Otaheite; as may, also, the Manville Nurseries,
at Lake George, Florida. Write also to A. I.
Bidwell, Jacksonville.
STATE IMMIGRATION OFFICE,
JACKSONVILLE, June 6, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch :
Gentlemen: I have had several calls for the
Orange County pamphlet, from a notice in the
Dispatch that the same can be obtained at this
Office. Please state that the State pamphlets,
those of Sumter, Clay, Columbia, Suwannee,
Leon, and Orange, and Dr. Kenworthy's pam-
phlet on the Climatology of Florida, and the
information comprised in the interview with
Gov. Bloxham, can be obtained free on appli-
cation, with postage enclosed for pre-payment
for those requested, by mail. Any other county
pamphlets, which may give special local infor-
mation, will be distributed from this Office when
I am furnished with them.
Monroe and Alachua have issued pamphlets,
and copies are expected at the Immigration
Office for distribution.
I have received drawings of the machinery
for making cotton seed oil, with explanations,
which those interested may examine by calling
at the Office.
C. DREW,
State Agent of Immigration.

-Next to rice, Indian corn is used by a
larger number of people than any other grain.
-If you have a good thing you want to sell,
advertise it. If not, keep as quiet about the
matter as possible.
-James Gorden Bennett has given the
widow of Captain De Long, the ill-fated com-
mander of the Jeannette, $50,000 in Govern-
ment bonds. Other members of the crew are
also provided for.
-In Russia the sunflower has a practical, if
not an alsthetical, value. It is cultivated for
the oil it yields. The oil is used in cooking, as
well as in lamps, and for making soap and
paint.
-Some of the finest walnut trees in the
mountains of North Carolina have been sold at


$40 each just as they stand in the woods, the
purchasers reserving the privilege to take them
away within a certain number of years.
--A new and improved excavator used in
the construction of the Panama Canal will re-
move 480 cubic meters of earth and rock in a
single day, filling ten teams of a dozen wagons
each. They have six of these excavators at
work, and are pushing on the enterprise very
rapidly.
-The largest trees know are probably a
eucalyptus amygdalina, or "peppermint tree,"
growing in Dandenong district of Victoria,
Australia, which is said to measure 370 feet to
the starting point of the crown, and 417 feet to
the top, and another specimen of the same spe-
cies, mentioned by Baron Ferdinand von Muel-
ler as having attained the height of 480 feet.


Meteorological Report.
Weather for week ending July 9, 1882.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION
SIGNAL SERVICE, U. S. A., JACKSONVILLE, iFLA.


Saturday 3........ 30.01 8674 779.3! 79.3 0.06 SW 4 Windy.
Sunday 4...... 30.3 86176 78.3 77.7 0.04 SW 1Windy.
Monday 5........ 30.13 83 73 77.3 55.7 0.00 SW 4 Fair.
Tuesday6.... .. 30.19 80!69 72.3 52.0 0.00 N 3,Fair.
Wednesday 7.. 30.17 84 651 75.0 63.0! 0.00 SE I 5 Fair.
Thursday8.... 30.09 79 70 74.7 76.0 0.41 SE 1 Cloudy.
Friday 9.......... 29.91 78 72175.0 &85.71 0.10 SE 4 Cloudy.
Highest barometer 30.23, lowest 29.86.
Highest temperature 86, lowest 65.
NOTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Observer U. S. A.
Meteorological Summnary
For May,1882, from Form 113 "A" Station, Cedar Key, Fla.:
Monthly mean actual barometer, three telegraphic ob-
servations, 30.014.
Monthly mean reduced barometer, three telegraphic
observations, 30.034.
Highest barometer and date, 30.237 on 18th; lowest, 29.827
on llth; range, .410 inch.
Monthly mean temperature 75.20; highest, 900 on 7th;
lowest, 54 on 14th; monthly range, 36.
Greatest daily range, 250 on 18th: lowest, 50 on 12th.
Monthly mean humidity, 67.30.
Monthly mean dew point, 62.8.
Total rainfall, 1.71 inches.
Average depth of unmelted snow on ground at end of
month, none.
Total movement of wind from 11 toll p.m., 7,106 miles.
Maximum velocity and direction 28 miles per hour,
southeast and south, on 6th and 11th.
Number of foggy days, none.
Number of clear days on which rain fell, 1; on which
no rain fell, 9.
Number of fair days on which rain fell, 7; on which no
rain fell, 11.
Number of cloudy days on which rain fell, 2; on which
no rain fell, 1.
Number of days on which rain fell, 10; on which no
rain fell, 21.
Date of auroras. No auroras.
No solar halos. No lunar halos.
Zodiacal lights, none. Frost, none.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 7 a. m., for month, 9.5 miles per hour east.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 3 p. m., for month, 11.9 miles per hour, west.
Average hourly velocity and prevailing direction of
wind at 11 p. m., for month, 10.5 miles per hour, east.
GALES OF 25 MILES PER HOUR AND OVER:
7th. Southeast-26 miles per hour.
11th. South-28 miles per hour.
13th. West-27 miles per hour.
26th. Northeast-26 miles per hour.
31st. South-27 miles per hour.
Prevailing wind direction determined from the three
telegraphic observations, east.
Prevailing wind direction determined from five daily
observations, east.
Number of fair sunsets, 27.
Fair sunsets verified, 21; not verified, 6.
Number of foul sunsets, 4.
Foul sunsets verified, 2 ;not verified, 2.
Number of doubtful sunsets, none.
Percentage of verifications, 74.2.
FRED. W. MIXER,
Prw. Signal Corps, U. S. A.

The Germination and Vitality of Seeds.
Dr. Richard E. Kunze, has collected a num-
ber of facts respecting the germination and
vitality of seeds, in an essay which was read by
him before the Torrey Botanical Club last
December. Some seeds, to grow, must be
planted immediately on maturity. Familiar
examples are those of the elm and maple, the
oak, and most of our common nuts. The seeds
of the larkspur (Delphinium formosum), of some
gentians, and of Angelica, partake of this char-
acter. Spanish chestnuts and filberts, however,
have been sent, enveloped in wax, to the
Himalayas, and plants from them are now
growing there. Seeds of the Victoria regia
had to be transmitted from America to Eng-
land in water before the first plant was raised
that came to perfection. Bosse, a German hor-
ticulturist, says that, when seed is to be kept
for any length of time, it should be left in its
natural covering. Other means of protection


are sometimes available to preserve perishable
seeds. Acorns will keep, packed in the hard
ground, for centuries, and many seeds may be
safely kept or transported in honey. Some
seeds, like those of the Cucuvbitacece, the bal-
sam, stock, and wall-flower, improve with age
to a certain extent. Many seeds are capable of


preserving their vitality for years, under ordi-
nary conditions of dry exposure. Experiments
by M. Alphonse de Candolle indicated that
woody species preserved the power of germina-
ting longer than others, while biennials were at
the opposite end of the scale, and perennial
herbs lost their vitality sooner than annual
ones. Of three hundred and sixty-eight species
of seeds fifteen years old, that he sowed, only
seventeen germinated, and but few of the spe-
cies came up. The seed of radish has grown
freely at fifteen years; that of Sida Abutilon
at twenty-five; those of melon and tobacco at
forty; that of the sensitive-plant at sixty. A
committee of the British Association reported
in 1847, after seventeen years of examination,
that the Leguminosai, considered as a family,
appeared to possess more vitality than any
other; next came the Malvacece, Tiliacece, and
Croton, of the Euphorbiacece, among those kinds
whose seeds grow after ten or more years. Ap-
parently well authenticated instances of seeds
that have grown after having been preserved
from a remote antiquity are not rare. Plants
have been raised from seeds found along with
coins of the Emperor Hadrian, in an ancient
barrow in England-Medicago and a heliotrope
from a Roman tomb, fifteen or sixteen hundred
years old, where they had been put in a bag
under the head of the corpse for a pillow. The
genuineness of some of the specimens of so-
called Egyptian wheat" has sometimes been
questioned, but Mr. M. F. Tupper obtained
plants from grains which Sir Gardiner Wilkin-
son took from a previously unopened mummy-
case, and gave to Mr. Pettigrew, who gave
them to him. Rose-seeds and doura-seeds, the
genuineness of whose ancient Egyptian origin
is equally well authenticated, have grown, the
former with Mrs. Governor Wood, at Quincy,
Illinois, the latter with the Rev. Albert Hale,
of Springfield, Illinois. Professor John Henry
Carroll, of the College of Archaeology and
JEsthetics of the City of New York, has raised
Indian corn from seed taken from a Peruvian
mummy supposed to be twelve hundred years
old.-Popular Science Monthly.

A NEW TIME AND DISTANCE REGISTER.-Mr.
E. R. E. Cowell, of the Pullman Palace Car
Co. of this city, has invented and patented a
contrivance for registering the distance travel-
ed by railroad cars which promises to attract no
little attention. He calls it a "mileage and
speed indicator." It has been running a few
days on the Michigan Central and gives the
best satisfaction, working accurately. It differs
from the ordinary speed register in that it is
electric and not run by gearing connected with
the car axle. A casting called the commutator
is screwed on the car axle, one-half being a con-
ductor and the other a non-conductor of electri-
city. In contact with this is a metal brush, and as
the axle revolves the electric circuit from the bat-
terv in the car connected with the metal brush is


alternately made and broken. Four hundred
and eighty "breaks" in the circuit cause an in-
genious clockwork in the car to register one
mile of distance. The uses to which this device
can be put are numerous. The ordinary
indicators are used to check the rash im-
pulses of freight conductors to run over the reg-
ulation speed, but these machines have not been
put on passenger cars, as they are too compli-
cated, troublesome and expensive. Mr. Cowell's
device is neither, and could be used to settle
the question of how far cars are run by the
lines which use them, as well as in many other
ways which will suggest themselves to railroad
men.-Detroit Post and Tribune.
-Members of the Florida Southern Railroad
are now in Europe making such negotiations as
will conduce to pushing their railroad forward
to completion. It is proposed to put 500 miles
of road under contract in the near future.


1S1


THE FILORIDA DISPATCH.~






3 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


turpentine purposes. In our opinion, this state
of things presents a serious aspect. The im-
mense profits now realized in the manufacture
of turpentine have induced innumerable small
operators to engage in the business, and they
will most probably overdo it to such an extent
that they will not greatly benefit themselves and
will damage the timber very seriously for lum-
ber purposes.
There is no finer wood known than yellow
pine, combining, as it does, strength and dura-
bility with pliability. It is easily worked, pos-
sesses great strength, and its lasting qualities
are wonderful, especially in hot climates. Im-
mense quantities of it are shipped to South
America, the West Indies and Europe, while
considerable amounts are sent to the eastern
coast of Africa, and some even to Australia.
It behooves our people, if it be possible, to pro-
tect the yellow pine forests and make them
valuable for as long a period as possible. When


THE YELLOW PINE OF GEORGIA.

The Supply not Inexhaustible-Protection
against Its Useless Destruction De-
manded-Its Great Value to the
State and Nation.
Editor Southern Lumberman :
The vast proportions to which the great lum-
ber interest of Georgia have grown are deserv-
ing of more than passing attention, and the
rapidity with which the yellow pine of the State
is disappearing is not only a matter of serious
concern to Georgia, itself, but a subject of na-
tional importance as well. The estimate of the
standing pine in the State is about seventeen
thousand million feet. The cut for the year
ending May 31, 1880, reached very nearly
three hundred million feet. The proper care
and handling of the timber now standing, its
economical manufacture, the utilizing, as far as
possible, the whole supply, saying all waste, and
the protection of the forests from the terrible
devastation which is now going on, are matters
of the gravest importance. If attention could
be directed to the preservation of the forests, it
would be of vast advantage to the State and to
the whole country.
By taking for granted the correctness of the
estimate of seventeen thousand million feet of
timber now standing, at the present rate of ex-
portation it will be seen that we have about
fifty years' supply ahead of us; but if the lum-
ber business increases in the future as it has in
the past, it will fall far short of this estimate.
There are a great many serious causes at work,
aside from its manufacture into lumber, which
are destroying the timber of Georgia very rap-
idly, and which will reduce not only the amount
of timber on the lands before we can hope to
have mills in operation sufficient to supply all
demands, but injure materially that which may
be left standing. We do not think the estimate
of the Census Bureau, that there are seventeen
thousand million feet of yellow pine standing
in Georgia, is correct. Our own idea is that
ten thousand million feet will cover all the
available pine in the State.
The turpentine industry has been very prof-
itable for the past few years, and as men of
small capital could embark in the business,
there are vast forests boxed for turpentine pur-
poses which must be almost entirely lost to the
lumber interest before there can be any possi-
ble chance of cutting the timber on them, as a
large amount will be so much damaged as to
render it almost entirely valueless for lumber
purposes.
When we realize that it does not cost much to
box the timber for turpentine, and while the
Business is as profitable as it has been for the
past few years, it is really alarming to the lum-
ber interest. Spirits of turpentine, the chief
production of this industry, has nearly doubled
in value, and lands are in great demand for


Georgia has a mine of wealth far greater in
value than her gold fields in her timber growth,
if she only utilizes it properly. Seventeen thou-
sand million feet of timber at the present mar-
ket value, on shipboard at any of our ports,
wonld represent a capital of $350,000,000, and
certainly, if the lumber interest of the State
is worth this vast sum, the turpentine interest
(which has advanced nearly 100 per cent. in
value in the last few years, while lumber has
advanced only 30 per cent. during the same
time) is worth an equal amount, which would
make the total value of these two great sources
of wealth $700,000,000, which sum far exceeds
the total valuation put upon all the property of
every kind in the State. Still, we will venture
to say, that in the list of our taxable property,
the lumber interest is almost the smallest in
valuation.
I When we consider these facts and figures,
it should forcibly impress us with the idea that


we reflect that where the timber is once cut off
the lands it cannot be replaced for ages, the
great importance of protecting the forestsbe-
comes very apparent. But how to do this is an
unsolved problem. The damage done by the tur-
pentine interest to the lumber interest is mani-
fested in various ways. In the first place, a
great many of the trees are almost entirely
girdled by putting in so many boxes, and the
scarrifying they receive, in order to increase
the flow of turpentine, renders them more lia-
ble to destruction by fire, and consequently
many of them are annually destroyed in this
way. Then again, our experience here in Geor-
gia has been that being thus boxed the trees
are much more liable to suffer from the terrible
storms which frequently occur in this latitude,
more than one-half of the trees which have
been boxed being blown down, while but few
unboxed trees are destroyed by storms. The
boxing greatly weakens the trees and they be-
come very shaky and unable to resist the power
of the winds, and consequently there is about
three times as much refuse lumber produced in
sawing such timber as there is made from
trees that have not been boxed. Of course,
this could be remedied to some extent, if it were
possible to cut the timber just as soon as it has
been exhausted for turpentine purposes, say in
two or three years after first boxing. In this
case the loss from the above causes would not
be so'serious. But it is very apparent that this is
almost impracticable, as there are many sections
where the timber is now being used for tur-
pentine purposes that will not be sought for
lumber uses for ten or twenty years, or even
longer. It is certainly deplorable that such
immense tracts of fine timber should be sub-
ject to such terrible devastation, but the almigh-
ty dollar is slipping into the hands of the
enterprising turpentine manufacturers more
rapidly than into those of the saw-mill men.
While we cannot question the right of every
man to use his timber as he sees best, and for
his own profit, yet we cannot but regret the
apparent necessity for such vast wealth being
so rapidly destroyed. There is greater danger
to the lumber interest from the turpentine busi-
ness than any one would at first suppose, and
we call the attention of the public to the facts
we have stated in the hope that some action
may be taken which will result in benefit to
both industries. If it were' possible to enact
and enforce a law forbidding any one cut-
ting more than two boxes to a tree, perhaps suf-
ficient vitality might be left in the trees to keep
them alive for many years, or until they could
be utilized for lumber. Then again, we think
the turpentine and lumber interests should be
operated jointly, that is to say, by the same
parties, so that the timber might be utilized for
lumber immediately after the turpentine is se-
cured, and before it deteriorates or is destroyed
by fires and wind storms.


Judge Bridewell, at Beauregard, had 75 or 80
beautiful carp in his pond, but as a big turtle
was seen in it, suspecting' the fellow might be
depredating on his young fish, the water was
drawn off, and nearly half of his carp had
been devoured. Rev. J. W. McNeil found one
carp in his pond and that showed marks of
violence from the depravations of turtles.
Young carp are the biggest fools among the
finny tribe. If the weather turns cool, they
stick their heads into the mud and a turtle comes
along and eats them up.
The only remedy to keep these carp-eaters
out of your ponds, is to fence them around
with a plank fence. If it only reaches two or
three feet from the ground, it will answer, as
turtles can't climb. If they are not in the
ponds already, they can easily be kept out by
this simple method.-So. Stock Journal.


m


I


some steps should be taken to save to the State
the source of this great wealth until it can be
properly utilized and profitably handled, in-
stead of allowing it to be destroyed and wasted,
as in our judgment is now being done. Under
the present plan of operations it will not be
many years before the yellow pine lands of
Georgia will be doubled and trebled in value to
what they are at present, and they are now
nearly 100 per cent. higher than they have been
for years past. No better opportunities present
themselves for profitable investments than do
these lands, properly selected, well located, and
titles looked after carefully. If capital could
be directed this way, these lands would soon
become so valuable that their value would com-
pel the protection of the timber on the prin-
ciple that "self-preservation is the first law of
nature."
The Savannah, Florida and Western Rail-
road, a corporation tributary to Savannah, taps
nearly the whole of this pine belt, and under
its present management bids fair to bring more
lumber to market for years to come than any
other one road in the State. This road has been
liberal to manufacturers, giving them ample
facilities for handling their lumber, inviting
capital and population to the country, and will
in all probability, within the next few years
reap the benefits resulting from its liberal man-
agement. If they continue the same policy
which they have pursued in the past, they will
enable the lumbermen along their lines to com-
pete with any State or port. In fact, they can
make money under their present management,
and their patrons can make money, whilst al-
most any other State or port would lose. This
road has advanced the lumber interest more
than any other road in the South has done,
and is now building immense wharves at Sa-
vannah, putting on cars of large capacity, and
buying heavy locomotives to facilitate the bus-
iness. Under its present plan of operations,
this company will probably receive in the com-
ing years $30,000,000, of freight money from
the lumber business alone.
At the present time the lumber interest is
being vastly overdone, and must necessarily
suffer a reaction in the near future. There are
a great many small mills being built, and large
ones are doubling their capacity, or increas-
ing it to such an extent that such a result is
but natural ; and if history repeats itself-as it
nearly always does-it is probable that the
safest investments for lumber purposes are the
lands lying tributary to the Savannah, Flor-
ida and Western Railroad, as it taps the finest
timber belt of Georgia and Florida.
We think we have touched upon every point
that would interest your readers, and trust they
may be profited by our correspondence.
R. B. REPPARD.
SAVANNAH, GA., May 12,1882.

Carp and Turtles.


I.


I


ml=k




THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. L


crumbled bread sopped in milk, oat meal or
barley meal cake, with milk, and cooked corn-
meal and nettle leaves chopped fine, to which
milk may be added. When they are from three
to four weeks old, barley or oats thrown into
water may be given for a change. The great
thing in pushing the birds along is always to
have some food in their crops, and when they
become tired of one kind of food, at once change
it, and so induce them to eat, as the more they
consume the faster they grow, and the earlier
they are fit for the table.
At six or seven months old a well-kept duck
makes a toothsome viand for the best of tables.
Myriads of them are readily sold in the fall at
remunerative prices, and all through the cold
season they are in constant cash demand in our
city markets.- Cor. Poultry Journal.


Raising Ducks.
While plenty of water is not objectionable
except in the case of the very small and young
ducklings, hundreds can be annually raised
where the water has to be supplied artificially.
Where there is a small stream near the house it
can be used for the ducks, or enough of it can
be diverted from its source to make a small
artificial pond, which is, perhaps, the best.
There are hundreds of farmers who might
raise large flocks of ducks annually if they
would make the effort, and the profits could not
help but be satisfactory if the birds were prop-
erly managed. As ducks get most of their liv-
ing off the grass, they are profitable to raise
where there is no small fruit raised which they
can get access to. Any little low shed-like
houses will do for ducks, and the only thing to
keep them properly is to keep the place clean
and well supplied with straw or fine hay as a
bedding.
The domestic duck is not disposed to be an
exemplary sitter. She requires more care when
she sits, for, as she cannot go to her food like
the hen, attention must we paid to place it be-
fore her, and she will be contented with it,
whatever its quality. It has even been re-
marked that when ducks are too well fed they
will not sit well; but even if they do, another
serious objection is brought against them, and
that is, when the eggs are hatched the duck
mother will strike a bee line for the first pond,
puddle or stream, with her brood, regardless
of consequences, and is apt to stay in the water
until the young ducklings are "wet through ;"
then many of them die of chills and cramps.
All these reasons often induce poultry-keep-
ers to have duck eggs hatched by hens, and be-
ing more assiduous than ducks, these foster-
mothers take an affection for the young to
watch over, which requires close attention, be-
cause as these are unable to accompany them
on the water, for which they show the greatest
propensity as soon as released from the shell,
they follow the mother hen on dry land and get
a little hardy before they venture into the wa-
ter without any guide.
Ducks are easily kept from the shell. After
They have passed the critical period like chicks
and poults, they are industrious foragers, and
thrive rapidly. Their keen appetites, capatious
craws, and strong digestive organs, enable them
to assimilate any kind of coarse or refuse food.
It is best to restrict them in their liberty until
they are four or five weeks old, and supply
them up to that time with very little, if any,
more water than they need for drinking pur-
poses, and there will be several more ducks
raised.
Their food for the first few weeks may be


were re-weighed at the Sixtieth Street yards, in
the presence of their owner, Mr. T. C. Eastman,
and several other gentlemen, and their aggre-
gate weight was 222,870 pounds, an average ,of
1,410, showing an average shrinkage per head
of only twenty pounds. The usual shrinkage,
under the old system of transportation, is from
70 to 100 pounds per head. All of. Mr.
Eastman's cattle were in fine condition yester-
day. They will be shipped for Europe per
steamer Holland in a few days. The improved
cars, which are owned by the New York Live
Stock Express Company, will be sent to Maine
some time during the week for the purpose of
taking a load of fancy cattle to Chicago.-New
York Times, May 30.
Gardening on the Erie.
Travelers along the line of the Delaware Di-
vision of the Erie have noticed of late some


LIGHT HARNESS.
Discard the Blinders.
A correspondent of the New York Tribune
asks and answers: "Is there any need of having
blinders on horses ? I doubt it, if the horses are
trained properly in the beginning. I have
known of many horses that traveled as well
without them, and I believe much better. The
shying and sudden fright of horses in harness is
undoubtedly due to this practice of hood-wink-
ing their eyes. The facial bones are thrown out-
ward at the eye-sockets, thereby enabling the
horse to see nearly as well behind as before him.
When blinders are used the range of vision is
limited, and the horse is allowed only a small
space to peep out, and that, too, not in the di-
rection of true vision. Objects do not appear
distinct or natural, and what wonder is it that
the horse starts when he discovers what seems
to him, because of indistinctness, some strange
monster. Horses will run day after day in
pastures among rocks and stumps, and manifest
no signs of fright, yet when driven in harness
by these same objects will shy. This clumsy
contradiction of nature is also a potent means of
bringing blindness to thousands of horses in our
land by retaining the heat and dust that accu-
mulates about the eye. There are many im-
provements yet to be made in harness. We
load our horses with too many trappings. One-
quarter of the expense incurred is for useless
straps, buckles and trimmings. The more light
the harness can be made with reference to
strength, the more ornamental it will be. The
loads our horses are obliged to draw are enough
without loading them down with harness."
Rapid Transit for Live Stock.
A train of ten improved stock cars, contain-
ing 158 head of fine Western cattle, arrived at
the Sixtieth Street yards in this city at 11:40
o'clock Sunday night. The train left Chicago
Friday noon and ran to Buffalo on slow time,
but from Buffalo to New York a speed of from
thirty to forty-five miles per hour was main-
tained. This is said to be the quickest trip ever
made by a live-stock train. The improved cars
enable each animal to occupy separate stalls;
each stall is provided with flexible gates, so that
the animals can lie down and move about without
coming in contact with each other. There are
also facilities for watering and feeding the stock
without unloading. The weight of the 158 cat-
tle, just before leaving Chicago, was 226,098
pounds, an average of 1,430 pounds per head.
Early yesterday morning the entire 158 head


Bearing Too Soon.
To allow premature bearing in newly plant-
ed or young and feeble trees, is to prevent their
making free and healthy growth, and it is plain
that a good year's growth is worth much more
than a few specimens of fruit. It has been
proved that even blossoming is at the expense
of wood-growth, and the first thing a florist
does when he buys a new plant which he wishes
to propagate for sale is to wring off every
flower, and stop every effort in that direction as
soon as it is visible. Flowering and fruiting
are the beginning of a decline of life in the
vegetable as in the animal world, and the
greater vigor and size that has been attained
before this declining course sets in, the longer
will it require before the fruit producing power
becomes exhausted and the plant or tree or vine
perishes, worn out.-N. Y. Tribune.


quite successful attempts at improving the
grounds about the stations. It is an improve-
ment that the traveling public will welcome and
one that will find much favor from the citizens
living at the various points alluded to.
The credit for the innovation is due to Su-
perintendent Neilson, of the Delaware Division.
In talking over the matter last fall with Mr.
Beckwith, the Delaware Division plumber, it
was ascertained that an old building, usel ess for
any other purpose, could be turned into a green-
house with but a trifling expense, as the neces-
sary piping, etc., was around in abundance
among the old material and debris of great shops
like the Erie. At Mr. Neilson's suggestion the
Union published his request that persons hav-
ing surplus plants that would be only thrown
away would confer a favor by donating them to
the new green-house. The popularity of the
new idea, for the Union stated the purpose of
the request, was shown by the number of per-
sons sending word to call for plants. Many
more were offered than could possibly be used,
and the variety was great enough to satisfy the
most exacting taste. The sum of $60 was ex-
pended for pots, and that comprised the cash
outlay for the whole affair. As a result, this
spring Mr. Neilson has a collection of plants
that he estimates would have cost him $1,500
if bought in market, but which have cost as
above-a mere nothing.
Early this spring a piece of land between the
tracks, west of the depot, triangular in shape,
was neatly enclosed with a wire fence, and has
been sodded, save three parts of it, which are
now being filled with beautiful flowering and
foliage plants. Similar decorations have been
constructed at Lackawaxen, Narrowsburg, Cal-
licoon and Hancock, and it is hoped to add De-
posit to the list.-Port Jervis Union.
Oat Meal.
Mr. V. P. Kimball, the manufacturer of the
celebrated Watertown, N. Y., oatmeal, gives
the following directions for cooking oatmeal:
Half a pint of oatmeal to a quart of boiling
water, one small teaspoonful of salt. Boil
steadily an hour, in a farina kettle, or a cov-
ered tin pail set in a kettle of boiling water.
Cook it the day before, and heat for break-
fast by placing it in the pail again, in boiling
water, or in a steamer over hot water. Oat-
meal fried-One pint of oatmeal to three pints
of boiling water, two small teaspoonfuls of salt.
Boil an hour stirring occasionally. When cold,
cut in slices and fry slowly on a hot griddle
with pork fat or beef drippings. A delicious
breakfast dish. The finer meal is better for
frying. For infants and children-Oatmeal is
invaluable in the nursery, being especially nu-
tritious for children. For infants, boil two
ounces of the meal in two quarts of water for
an hour. When cooked, pass through a tin
strainer and dilute with milk ; can be used in a
nursing bottle.







4 TH E FLORIDA DtSPATC .


M,


cannot tell you who has that breed for sale, at
present. Those who have will, probably, ad-
vertise in the fall.
J. B. P.-The book you need, in addition to
Prof. Whitner's little "Manual of Gardening
for Florida," is "White's Gardening for the
South. The latest edition costs about $2, and
can be furnished by Ashmead Bros., the pub-
lishers of this paper. We prefer good, sound,
vigorous sour stocks for budding the sweet or-
ange. We cannot, from our own experience,
decide "whether the seedling orange, in the
long run, produces better than the sweet seed-
ling budded." "Quien Sabe ?" (as we used to
say, in Mexico.)


JACKSONVILLE, JUNE 12, 1882.

EDITORS:
D. REDMOND, D. H. ELLIOTT, W. H. ASHMEAD.

Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.

RATES OF ADVERTISING.
SQUARES. 1 TIME. 1 MO. 3 MO. 6 MO. 1 YEAR
One..................... $ 1 00 $250 $550 $1000 $18 50
Two..... ....... ..2 o00 500 1000 1800 3400
Three..................... 3 00 7 00 1400 2500 4600
Four...'................. 4 00 900 17 50 30 00 5800
Five..................' 450 1100 1900 35 00 6500
Eight................... 800 1650 3000 5000 100 00
Sixteen................... 16 00 30 00 5000 8000 150 00
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words to line) ten cents
per line.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the best ad-
vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.

Answers to Inquirers.
J. R. P.-See Dr. Kenworthy's article, in our
present number.
Lucy J.-The three varieties of the native
Florida Lily, about which you inquire, (accord-
ing to our accomplished florist, Mr. Arnold
Puetz,) are the Atamasco,. white, tinged with
pink ; the Zephyranthus Treatie, pure white;
and the Z. rose, a beautiful pink. They are
found naturally in low grounds, but can be
readily transplanted, and will grow almost any-
where.
B. L.-Write to Capt. L. L. Varnadoe,
Thomasville, Ga. Hle is "headquarters" for the
Le Conte (pronounced Le Count) Pear. This
pear ripens, at Thomasville, generally, from the
10th of July to the 15th of August. Our Jack-
sonville fruiterers can supply you with a limi-
ted quantity. The greater portion of the crop
is shipped to the North.
Col. C. C. Y.--Thanks for your note and
subscription. We have no Southern work on
the subject at all comparable to White's "Gar-
dening for the South."
M.-Your full name and address must be
sent the editors before we will even think of
publishing your communication. We took oc-
casion, last week, to intimate that THE DIs-
PATCH is a medium for the freest discussion on
all subjects within its scope, but that the edi-
tors must not be held responsible for the opin-
ions of their correspondents.
T. J. O.-We will endeavor to publish a cut
and description of the fowls hereafter. We


well developed, and are by far the finest speci-
mens we have ever seen raised in Florida. We
were delighted to receive them, and it is very
gratifying to us to be able to write thus, for we
have heard many say good corn could not be
raised here; and a general impression to that
effect is prevalent throughout the State.
Mr. Kroeger has conclusively demonstrated
that this impression is erroneous, and that as
fine corn can be raised here as at the North.
The conundrum will hereafter be: What can't
Florida raise ?
GUINEA Cows, or Heifer calves wanted.
Write the Editors of THE DISPATCH.
June 5 '82, tf.
A SODA WATER APPARATUS for sale
cheap. Apply to M. GONZALES,
It 33 East Bay St.


J. L., Maitland, Fla.-We do not know of
any Rabbit breeders in the South. Write to
Poultry World, Hartford, Ct. ; Poultry Bulle-
tin, New York ; Poultry Monthly, Albany,
N. Y. Money received and paper sent.
J. R. E.-Will publish the article you desire
on the pot-culture of the citrus family, here-
after.
A. T. R.-Write W. B. Lipsey, Archer, Flor-
ida, for the Chinese Quince trees and Peen-To
Peach.
J. R. F.-See a late number of THE Dis-
PATCH for an exhaustive article on the manu-
facture of cotton seed oil, &c.
Geo. Fox, Cincinnati, Ohio.-Mr. A. I. Bid-
well will send you the desired catalogue.
J. P. L.-We send you the number of THE
DISPATCH desired, but the demand for back
numbers has nearly exhausted our supply. See
Dr. Kenworthy's very interesting and instruc-
tive account of his little orange "bushes," in
present issue, p. 179.
0. S.--The cheapest manual of Southern
gardening is the little work of Prof. Whitner.
Ashmead Bros. will mail it to you for 50 cents.
R. J.-The article is not exactly in our line,
and is too long for our limited space.
S. J. F.-If there are any breeders of "Pure
Jersey cattle," who "offer them for sale," in
Florida, we see no evidence of it in our ex-
changes or in the advertising columns of THE
DISPATCH.
B. M.-We do not regard the Teosinte as
valuable as the "Cat-Tail Millet"-nor do we
know of any other green forage plant equal to
this millet on rich and well-prepared land.
There is no use planting it on any other kind
of land.
J. F. H.-Manuscripts received, with thanks,
and we shall print a portion at least, in our next.

Sweet Corn and Tomatoes.
The junior editor desires to extend his sin-
cere thanks to Mr. Chas. Kreoger for some fine
specimens of tomatoes and several superb ears of
sweet corn raised on the truck farm of Mr. R.
Kersting, situated about a mile from town.
The tomatoes were large, smooth and firm, of
a very fine flavor, and worthy representatives
of this refreshing vegetable.
The corn is the variety known as Stowe's
Evergreen. The ears are large, with kernels


Leovy attributes this exemption to a thorough
mulching of the soil, which protects them from
the intense heat of summer as well as winter's
cold. We consider the experience of the gen-
tleman as well worthy the attention of all in-
terested in the culture of the orange, especially
where the orchard is situated on very sandy
soils. We see by our Florida exchanges that
persons living in the orange districts of that
State have made the same discovery. So that
mulching bids fair to play no unimportant part
in orange culture.
BUDDING TREES.-ANDREW CALLA-
HAN, PRACTICAL and SCIENTIFIC BUDDER,
will bud and warrant trees, on reasonable terms.
Orders may be left at Ashmead Bros. tf.


Shipping Watermelons.
Requisitions for cars should be made to the
railroad agent at the station from which the
shipments are to be forwarded. If the destina-
tion is some distant point requiring through car,
ample notice should be given in order that a
suitable car may be procured.
"Tavares."
This young and enterprising city of the
Orange County lake region, is said to be the
liveliest little place of its size in the State. It
is only five months old, and has over 300 in-
habitants. The founders of Tavares-Col. A.
St. Clair-Abrams and Judge Summerlin-are
Southern men, and they feel justly proud of the
success which has thus far attended their efforts
in improvising a city out of the "raw material"
of the wilderness, with something of the Alad-
din lamp celerity. Tavares has already an
excellent and sprightly newspaper-the Herald
-of 28 columns ; street cars! a sash and door
factory; a magnificent hotel, in progress, etc.
Desirable town lots are held at $100 per front
foot! And the whole settle-ment is fairly
"booming" with that confident energy and dash-
ing enterprise which always insures success.
Three times three for Tavares !
Precocious Orange Trees, Etc.
The Orlando Reporter says that, growing on
the place of Dr. W, S. Townsend, at Lake Irma,
is an orange tree, the seed of which was planted
on the 15th day of June, 1876. On the first
day of January following, when the tree was
about six inches high, it was set out in its place
in the grove. The tree is now seven and a half
inches in diameter at the ground, and is in full
bloom. This is what high pine land will do in
South Florida.
Dr. Geo. W. Davis, of Jacksonville, (south
side of the river,) has a tree of the Mediterra-
nean Sweet orange, budded eighteen months
ago, which shows forty (40) good, fair, well-de-
veloped oranges, now, and a great many have
fallen off-and it is not a dwarf either.
A Surinam plum plant which was presented,
at the State Fair in Gainesville, 1879, by Mr.
A. I. Bidwell, to Dr. Wall, of Tampa, is now
bearing fruit in the garden of the latter.
MULCHING THE ORANGE,-The N. O. Com-
mercial Bulletin says that Col. Henry J. Leovy,
who is extensively engaged in orange culture
at Pass Christian, Miss., informs us that his
grove of some 5,000 trees escaped any serious
damage from the cold of two seasons ago. Col.





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Press," deserves more than the passing notice
we gave it a few weeks since. It is a neat vol-
ume of 644 closely printed pages, devoted to
practical hints for modern homes, and contain-
ing new ideas upon aquariums, ferneries, birds,
cabinets, children's amusements, fancy work,
plants and flowers, home decoration, house
.furnishing, housekeeping, health, knitting and
crochet, painting, music, useful and ornamen-
tal needlework, laundry, toilet, and hundreds of
minor home subjects ; with a full and complete
treatise on cookery, &c., &c. As we said, pre-
viously, it is a library within itself, and a most
appropriate gift to any lady. Price, $1.75, per
mail. Address: "Free Press Co., Detroit, Mich-
igan."


OUR old confrere, Dr. I. E. Nagle, has our
thanks for a copy of his excellent monthly,
"The Planter's Journal," published at Vicks-
burg, Miss., at $2 per year. We cheerfully
place the Journal on our exchange list, and hope
to receive its regular monthly visits hereafter.
WE are much gratified by the great increase
in the circulation of THE DISPATCH, under our
management, and the many encomiums pro-
nounced upon it by our friends; and we feel
encouraged not only to keep it fully up to its
present standard, but to make valuable im
provements as fast as our success may warrant.
WRONG AUTHOR.-One of the editors of the
Florida MtHodis./t, in a letter from Welaka,
quotes Bryant as the author of the passage in,
eluding "boundless contiguity of shade!"
Overlook your Cowper, Bro. Methodist, and see
if you do not find it in the longing for "a lodge
in some vast wilderness," etc.
TRANSMITTED MARKS.-Mr. A. S. Nimns
informs us that the cow mentioned by the
Floridian as giving birth to a calf ready
"marked" with "crop" in one ear and "slit"
in the other, is his property. Mr. N. further
informs us that he has used that "mark" for
forty years, and it is no uncommon occurrence
for his calves to come ready "marked." He can
show, he says, at least twenty now in his pen
that were so marked, either in one or both ears,
at birth.-Land of Flowers.

FERNANDINA !-"beautiful for situation "-
is not growing rapidly, but surely. It is the
entrepot of the State on the Atlantic side; has
a good harbor, and will have, when the present
system of jetties is completed, ample depth of'
water on her bar, for all the ordinary purposes
of a great commercial centre. It is said to be as
healthy as any sea-coast city in the South. Its
far-famed beach is claimed to be one of the
finest in the world, and its surf-bathing, unsur-
passed. If we do not miscalculate, there is a
bright future for Fernandina.-Florida Method-
ist. _
THE "PEEN-TO" IN CHICAGO.-A pomo-
logical correspondent writes us from Chicago
under date of June 5th:
"I have seen some very pretty "Peen-To"
peaches from Florlda here, the past few days.
They sell at the stands from 8, to 10 cents
each. The Jefferson Pear also, at the same
time, from Mississippi; a beautiful fruit, and
selling well on that account. In flavor it is very
deficient."
"THE HOUSEHOLD," of the "Detroit Free


about two miles west of the town and very soon
lots will be offered for sale to buyers.--Palatka
Journal.
FLORIDA BUTTER.-Leon County produces
more rich, firm, yellow butter than any county
in Florida. She not only supplies our home
demands, which is large, (for Goshen is a drug
on the market) but ships large quantities else-
where. Messrs. Coles & Beard, one of our most
enterprising firms, are now furnishing Leon
County butter to Professor J. E. Baker, of the
Thomasville (Ga.) Female College, and to sev-
eral houses in Jacksonville.-Land of F lowers.
-The steamer Marion has found it impossi-
ble to go up to Rockledge on account of the


Continued from page 178.
-There has been 3,889 crates and barrels of
vegetables shipped this season from Talhassee.
-An egg plant in Orange County has grown
to be three years old and still bears profusely.
Lacon.
-"The wail of the whippoorwill is heard in
the South-land once again." [So says the
Union; but 'tis not the Whip-poor-Will, but
the Chuck-Will's-Widow.]
-It is a shame to read such a paragraph as
this in the finest grass-growing and hay-and-
fodder-producing country in the world. We
quote the Daily Times: "Five hundred bales of
hay were shipped from this city recently to go
over the Florida Southern Railway."
-At Mr. J. M. Sligh's home, five miles
north of this place, all the orange trees are in
full bloom. They blossomed early in the spring
and now have a crop of young fruit as well as
the late blooms. These trees will have fruit
until late the coming spring.-Sumter Advance.
-In the yard of Mrs. W. C. Brown, is grow-
ing a three-year-old mango tree, loaded with
fruit. Mrs, Brown secured the seed from W.
P. Neeld, of Point Pinellas, three years ago,
and planted it in her yard, and now she has the
satisfaction of seeing the tree bearing a large
crop of this delicious semi-tropical fruit.-
Progress.
-Our farmers should not lose sight of their
sweet potato crop this season, as one of our mer-
chants informs us that he could have disposed
of several car loads to good advantage this
spring. The culls, or small ones, could be used
for the pigs. We believe those whose farms
are within a few miles of the city can make each
year's potato crop go far towards paying a
year's cotton crop.-Lalce City Reporter.
FLORIDA WHEAT.-We received recently
from Mr. S. P. Buie, who resides three miles
west of Lake City, a sheaf of very fine
wheat. We are, unfortunately, not able to
specify the variety. The heads are heavy, the
grains plump and fully matured. This is an-
other evidence of the adaptability of our genial
climate and generous soil to the production of
almost all the great staples of the country.-
Jacksonville Union.
-At Crescent City the real estate boom has
commenced in earnest, and it is difficult for us
to keep pace with the rapid transfer of orange
groves, town lots and lands in this town and
vicinity. Already the depot for the Palatka
and Indian River Railway has been located


Volusia Bar, $5,000 ; Choctawhatchee, $12,000 ;
Escambia and Conecuh Rivers, 612,000; Key
West Harbor, $25,000; Manatee River, 12,000;
and Caloosahatchee River, $5,000. Total appro-
priations for Florida, $83416,000.
-At a recent scientific meeting in San
Francisco a paper was read on the substance
known to miners as "hell fire rock." When
striking their picks into this formation, flashes
of light are seen, which they regard with a su-
perstitious alarm. A chemical examination
shows this mineral to be an impure dolomite. It
is interesting not only from its remarkable phos-
phorescence when rubbed with any hard sub-
stance in the dark, but from its beautiful crys-
taline appearance under the microscope, and
the ease with Which it can be reduced to a crys-
taline powder, even by crushing between the
fingers.


is^


-401M


. . ~ .. ~ _, __ 1... I ~ --- im I A


I , --- I I 11 111 1 IP II - -


1


extremely low water. Parties from Titusville
have to go about twenty-five miles overland to
Lake Harney, which is as far up as the boat
can go at present. Some thirty did this last
week and rode the whole distance in a jolting
wagon. Some were not so fortunate as this,
however, and had to walk the entire distance,
and then could not get a stateroom.- Volusia
News.
IRISHD POTATOES VS. COTTON!-The Lund
of Flowers, of recent date, says that Mr. R. A.
Whitfield, one of our oldest and most extensive
cotton growers, decided this year to try Irish
potatoes on a small scale as an experiment. He
informs us that he has already made more
money from one acre of the potatoes than he
will make from four of cotton. The potatoes
are off and he has the money for them, while
there is at least six months longer to work and
wait on cotton.
-Talk about the orange business being over-
done. This will not be in your day, and the
next hundred years will find the business as
fresh and profitable as it now is. The fact is, the
demand is increasing every year, and will in-
crease as long as population multiplies. The
time is not far distant when Florida will sup-
ply Europe and other foreign countries with
this fruit. The only trouble is that we can't
grow orange trees fast enough. Oranges bring
a better price now than they did ten years ago.
-Palatka Herald.

Sailing Notice.
SAV'IH, FLA. AND WESTERN RY. Co.,
OFFICE GEN. FT. AGENT,
SAVANNAH, June 6, 1882.
The Steamship City of Macon (advertised to
sail on Saturday, June 27, at 8 a. m.) will sail
at 6 p. m. instead of hour first named. Please
take notice and be governed accordingly.
JAS. L. TAYLOR,,
General Freight Agent.
-A nourishing and pleasant drink for a sick
person is made of parched rice. Brown the
rice the same as you do coffee; then poor boil-
ing water with a little salt in it over the rice.
Let it boil until it is tender; then add sugar or
cream to it. It may be strained or not, accord-
ing to taste.
APPROPRIATIONS FOR FLORIDA.-In the
River and Harbor Appropriation Bill which
passed the House, the following are amounts
assigned to Florida: For St. John's River,
$150,000; Cumberland Sound, $50,000; Pen-
sacola, $25,000; Appalachicola Bay, $25,000;
Tampa, Bay, $20,000 ; ,uwoiwm. River, $5,000,






B.S_ THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


The Mania for Roses.
In consequence of the extraordinary prices
obtained for rosebuds during the past two or
three years, not only have the regular florists
used their large profits in extending their green-
house structures for that purpose, but the fab-
ulous reports of the profits of rose-growing
have excited the cupidity of many capitalists
in the vicinity of New York, Boston and Chi-
cago, and in all probability in the other large
cities of the Union. These men have an abun-
dance of means, and begin on a scale usually
at which the ordinary florist, who had to climb
his way up, ends; so that we have already in
the vicinity of New York at least a dozen es-
tablishments for the forcing of rosebuds in win-
ter, owned by men who count their capital by
millions. These gentlemen, of course, know
nothing practically about the business, relying
altogether upon their gardeners for success :-
for who ever heard of a millionaire florist ?
Whether they do succeed or not in making
a profit of a few thousand dollars a year is not
vital to men who count their income by the
hundred thousand ; yet it is curious with what
interest the rise or fall of a few cents in the rose
market is regarded even by them. New Jer-
sey has more than her quota of these million-
aire florists. Already we have four in Madison,
one in Summit, and two in Orange, New Jer-
sey, and it is said that there is as much interest
manifested by them in the prices at which, in
the technical slang of the flower-shops, "Cooks,"
"Jacks," "Mermets" and "Perles" are quoted
in Broadway as is evinced in Wall Street in
"Wabash," "Lake Shore," "Erie" or "Central."
It is true that one, at least, of these gentlemen
gives all the profits that accrue from his roses
to charitable purposes ; but it is feared that he
has few imitators among his compeers in this par-
ticular ; for the motive is the same as in all
other investments-to get the largest profit
possible from the smallest amount of money in-
volved. Within the past twelve months I
have been consulted by at least a score of gen-
tlemen about to embark in the business of rose-
growing, and I have no doubt others of the
trade have had the same experience. It is true
that many of these amateur florists will get
their fingers burnt; will not only never realize
a dollar on their inllvestments, but will work at a
loss; yet enough of them will succeed to give
zest to the risk, for at present prices, when suc-
cess is attained, the profits are so great as to


produce the present "craze" on the subject-a
"craze" that probably will result exactly as the
Morus Multicaulis did in 1840, or the grape-
vine fever in 1865. All experience shows that,
in the perishable commodities of fruits, flowers
or vegetables, whenever an over-supply floods
the market and brings down the prices below a
paying level, less is sold than when they bring
a fair price. Two years ago, in June, straw-
berries and cabbage in the New York markets
got so low as not to pay even the cost of mar-
keting. The result was that hundreds of loads
had to be taken back and dumped in the ma-
nure yards, as they could not be disposed of at
any price. Some thirty years ago peaches one
day fell down to 12 cents a basket in Washing-
ton Market, New York, and would not sell at
that. In those days the crop was perhaps held
by a score of dealers only. They got their
heads together and decided to destroy every
peach in the market. It was done. A scar-


city was produced, and in twenty-four hours
peaches went up to $1 per basket. The leader
in the movement had no doubt been a disciple
of Adam Smith, and had wisely studied the
laws of supply and demand.
The present excitement in rose-growing is no
doubt largely due to the unprecedented prices
realized this winter, which have been caused in
a great measure by the unusual heat and drouth
of last autumn, which weakened in many cases,
and in others entirely destroyed, the plants that
would have been used to produce the crop of
flowers. This, together with a brisk demand,
has resulted in profits which it is unreasonable
to expect can ever be long continued in any
legitimate business.-Peter Henderson in Gar-
dener's Monthly.

Agricultural Economies.
The profit of the future is to come in avoid-
ance of wastes of the farm. As the country
grows older, land dearer and immigration heav-
ier, competition waxes fiercer in all agricultu-
ral production. A ruinous share of the hay is
lost first in cutting when ripened to woodiness
or dried to hardened stems ; then in giving it
out to sustain life and animal heat rather than
for fat and flesh. Corn is also thrown away by
insufficient or injudicious feeding. There is
enormous loss in keeping a poor cow that yields
300 gallons of milk per annum instead of one
that produces 600 at about the same cost. One
may bring the owner in debt, while the other
affords a handsome profit on expense of keep.
A cow that gives milk only from April to No-
vember, and runs dry when forage is costly
and milk is dear, should have a few months'
extra feeding, and go to the butcher as soon as
possible. That a cow is dry for more than six
weeks is the fault of the owner in not procur-
ing "the survival of the fittest," and again
perhaps in not supplying ample and succulent
food at all seasons, while the milk habit of
the young cow is forming. The loss in milk
and meat by irregular feeding and a change
from fresh pastures to a straw stack and coarse
hay during an inclement season, is an irrepar-
able waste which is projected into the succeed-
ing summer without regard to the abundance of
its pasturage.
The losses from negligence, or want of skill,
in the preparation for market, the manipula-
tion or manufacture from raw material, is enor-
mous, Milk of the same quality, of the same
eot, iiakee butter at 1,5 cents anid at half a dol-
lars per pound. Mixed fruits sell in market at
half the value of assorted samples neatly put
up. The pig products of a famous Massachu-
setts farm are disposed of in New York City at


23 cents per pound, while similar goods from
the average farm command but 13 cents. Skill,
taste, neatness and a well earned reputation for
reliable excellence get the highest rewards-
give better dividends than the capital and labor
represented in the product on which they are
expended. There is solid money in these in-
tangible valuables. But the wastes that may
be avoided are numerous in every department
of agricultural practice, and cannot be hinted
at in a paragraph. They are illustrated in the
differing costs and selling prices of the products
of adjoining farms in every neighborhood of
the land.-N. Y. Tribune.

PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


Agricultural, lHorticultural and Pomological
Associations.
Florida Fruit-Growers' Association-Office at Jack-
sonville-D. Redmond, President; W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; W. H. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding Sec-
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee-Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, 0. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official organ-TiHE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA STATE GRANGE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICES.-Master, Wm. H. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Winm. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B. F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Field-
ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. H. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate
Keeper, Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Wm. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T. W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H.
Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Geo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Umstead, Hous-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville,-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J. C. Greeley, Treasurer.
Directors-J. H. McGinniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro, P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney. Annual meeting-
Last Friday in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President ; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; 0. E. Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. 0. Taylor, Secretary and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Florida.-President, A. B. Bartlett, Georgetown; Vice-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. Hawkins, Lake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George; George W. Thorn, Treasurer,
Georgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
mond, Fort Gates.
Picolata Agricultural and Horticultural Society.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, W. N. ParKer, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Corresponding Secretary,
N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., Recording Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer. Meets first Saturday in each month.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. Mathers, Second Vice-President; B.
W. Powell, Corresponding Secretary; B. F. Jordan, Sec-
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical Fruit Growers' Association of Monroe County,
Florida.-Home office, Myers, Florida; F. A. Hendry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson
President; Thomas Tillis, First Vice-President; J. B.
Sutton, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary; J. M. Barco, Recording Secretary;
L. W. Hamlin, Assistant Recording Secretary.
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Association.-
John Bradford, President, Bradfordville, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida.
Pinellas, Florida, Fruit Growers' Association.-D. W.
Meeker, President; Wm. P. Neeld, Secretary.
CeTitral Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida,-Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
Evergreen Horticultural Society, Dunedin, Florida.-
J. W. Matchett, President; W. Tate, Vice-President;
Geo. L. Jones, Secretary.
.Decatur County Fair Association, Bainbridge, Geor-
gl, -Mtston O'Neil President I. Kwilecki, Secretary.
Lake Wie' Agricultural and Pomological Society (of
Marion County, Florida),.-Captain J. L. Cainy, Presi-
dent; Dr. L. M. Ayer, Corresponding Secretary.
Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Higgins, Secretary.
Sotithwest Georgia Industrial Association, Albany,
(eorgia,-L, E, Welch, President; T. M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
Sumter Cohlilty Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation.-D. L. Hubbard, President, Leesburg; W. C.
Dodd, Recording Secretary, Leesburg; A. P. Roberts,
Corresponding Secretary Leesburg.
Florida Central Agricultural Society.-Thos. F. King,


President Gainesville; -*, Secretary,
; W. K. Cessna, Corresponding Secretary, Gaines-
ville.
Archer Agricultural Association.-W. B. Lipsey,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine, Secretary; Dr. J. C. Neal,
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President; John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewis, Treasurer, Tallahassee.
Indian River Agricultural and Pomological Society.-
A. P. Cleveland, President; W. H. Sharp, Secretary,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
Association.-R. J. Mays, President; Frank W. Pope,
Secretary, Madisorr, Florida.
Orange County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred. L. Robertson, Corresponding
Secretary.
Gadsden County Fair Association.-Jesse Wood Pres-
ident; W.H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R. Harris,
Second Vice-President; J. W. Kendricks, Secretary; E.
C. Lou Treasurer.
South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
which we may have fallen in the naming of officers, &c.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH?]


_ __ I ___ __99%


- P I






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


A Second Thanatopsis.
BY RICHARD'HENRY STODDARD.
Not what we would, but what we must,
Makes up the sum of living,
Heaven is both more and less than just
In taking and in giving.
Swords cleave to hands that sought the plow
And laurels miss the soldier's brow.
Me, whom the city holds, whose feet
Have worn its stony highways,
Familiar with its loneliest street-
Its ways are never my ways.
My cradle was beside the sea,
And there, I hope, my grave will be.
Old homestead In that old, gray town,
The vane as seaward blowing,
Thy slip of garden stretches down
To where the tide is flowing:
Below they lie, their sails are furled,
The ships that go about the world.
Dearer that little country house,
Inland, With pines beside it :
Some peach trees, with unfruitful boughs
A well, with weeds to hide it:
No flowers, or only such as rise
Self-sown, poor things, which all despise.
Dear country home Can I forget
The least of thy sweet trifles ?
The window vines that clamber yet,
Whose blooms the bee still rifles ?
The roadside blackberries growing ripe,
And in the woods the Indian Pipe?
Happy the man who tills his field,
Content with rustic labor;
Earth does to him her fulness yield,
Hap what may to his neighbor.
Well days, sound nights, Oh, can there be
A life more rational and free ?
Dear country life of child or man!
For both the best, the strongest,
That with the earliest race began,
And has outlived the longest.
Their cities perished long ago-
Who the first farmers were we know.
Perhaps our Babels, too, will fall,
If so, no lamentations,
For mother earth will shelter all,
And feed the unborn nations :
Yes, and the swords that menace now
Will then be beaten to the plow.

Tallahassee and its Prospects.
It is with extreme pleasure that we note the
numerous and increasing evidences of the pros-
perity of our fair Capital City. There is no
more beautiful spot in the entire State. No
section presents a finer soil or greater induce-
ments to the industrious and enterprising im-
migrant. Nowhere can there be found a more
cultivated and refined population. The charm-
ing scenery, diversified with pleasant hills and
pretty vallies, attracts the eye and gratifies the
senses.
And yet, in spite of these many and varied ad-
vantages, Tallahassee, for years past, has shown
but few signs of progress. Within a compara-
tively recent period, a change, and a marked
one, is visible. The citizens are waking up to
a new and more vigorous existence. The grati-
fying success that has attended the increased
cultivation of early vegetables this spring, the
completion of a handsome and spacious hotel,
with the certainty of an outlet to the West by
the Pensacola and Atlantic Railroad, the plant-
ing of groves of the LeConte pear, that are to
be as valuable as the orange groves of East
Florida, the favorable prospect of the estab-
lishment of an extensive cotton seed oil mill,


and of the building of a railroad to Columbus,
Ga., have combined to create hope and inspire
confidence.
The Union most cordially congratulates Tal-
lahassee upon the flattering future visible upon
her horizon, and expresses the sincere hope
that the highest anticipations of her good peo-
ple may be realized.- Union.'
Man's Development.
The paper contributed to the May number
of the Atlantic Monthly by Mr. John Fiske, the
ablest of American philosophical writers, upon
the "Arrival of Man in Europe," is one of ex
traordinary interest. As the results of his stud-
ies he finds that four races of men have succes-
sively lived in Europe. First, the men of the
River Drift; who lived by hunting and used only
rude chipped stone implements. Second, the


Cave Men, now represented by the Esquimaux,
who possessed finer tools and weapons, and had
some artistic sense. Third, the Iberians, who
sharpened their implements, were farmers and
weavers, built houses and boats, and it is be-
lieved had some knowledge of an existence af-
ter death. Fourth, the Aryans, who came from
Central Asia and intermarried with the Iberi-
ans, and with them became the progenitors of
the modern people of Europe. The men of the
River Drift, Mr. Fiske believes, belonged to the
Pleistocene period, which began 240,000 years
ago, and he is inclined to believe that men had
inhabited Europe 160,000 years earlier than
that period. That Mr. Fiske is a devoted ad-
vocate of the evolution theory is shown by the
following statement from his paper:
"We seeifnf living on'the earth for perhaps
half a million year, -to all intents and purposes
dumb, leaving none but a geological record of his
existence, progressing with infinite slowness and
difficulty, making no history. Yet his geologic
record is not quite like that of the dog or the ape,
who could not chip a flint, and in the incised
antlers of the Cave Men we see the first faint
gleams of the divine intelligence that was by
and by to shine forth with the glories of a
Michael Angelo. We cannot but suppose that
during those long dumb ages, through infinite
hardship, and through the stern regiment of
deadly competition and natural selection, man
was slowly but surely acquiring that intellec-
tual life which was at last to bloom forth in his-
tory, and which has made him the crown and
glory of the universe."

How Maine Girls Work.
A young lady writing from Temple Mills,
Maine, to the Cincinnati Farming World, is
evidently preparing herself to support some
young man who is constitutionally opposed to
physical exertion. She says : "My father owns
a large farm and a nice lot of cattle and sheep
and I and my sister were born on this large
farm and have always lived here, and of course
we think there is no place like home, but we
can play on the piano or organ as well as the
next one. I play in two churches in this town
every Sunday, unless it is too rainy to have a
meeting. I can spin yarn (not street yarn), for
I don' take any stock in that, but real woolen
yarn. Two years ago this summer I spun sixty-
four and one-half pounds of wool and made
one hundred and nine yards of cloth all for our-
selves. I can harness our horse and take a
drive when I like, and I and my sister can yoke
the oxen or unyoke them when there is need of
it ; have done so several times this winter, and
I and my sister have done all the chores a great
many times this winter when father was away,
and we can do all kinds of fancy work as well
as the next one. Now mother and I and sister


takes all the care of a large garden after it is
plowed and we get premiums on our vegeta-
bles. I am twenty-one and my sister is nine-
teen years old."

On the Topmast.
One of the finest pieces of description, or
"word painting," we have ever read, is the fol-
lowing from a work entitled "Ocean Free
Lance ;" by the author of "The Wreck of the
Grosvenor :"
I have often wondered, in reading that mag-
nificent description of a giddy height of cliff in
"King Lear," how the great master would have
described a view from the mast-head of a lofty
vessel. Say what you will of a survey from a
mountain-top or from the edge of towering
cliffs; in my humble judgment the most thrill-
ing impression that great elevation can produce


is (leaving of course the ballon car out of the
question) to be obtained from the slender yard
of a tall ship in the middle of the sea.
For here you get an element of isolation that,
in spite of the lonesomeness of craggy hind, is
qualified, if not extinguished, when surveying
a scene from any sort of height ashore, not only
by the sight of land all around you, but by land
being under your feet. But at the mast-head
of a ship you stand upon a slender rope or
bestride a spar that looks no stouter than a
knitting-needle from the deck, and you gaze
around upon a mighty surface of water, for the
narrow and familiar horizon beheld from the
deck is magnified into an immense ocean, and
a whole hemisphere of heaven leans away into
the prodigious distance, while below is the nar-
row shape of the hull on whose surface the sea-
men crawl in size no bigger than flies, and you
are amazed that so slender and tapering
a fabric should support the sky-searching
height of mast and canvass from the summit of
which you look down. Here, I say, a man gets
that sense of isolation which no land eminence
yields, and it is complete enough even when the
seas bask brightly and calmly around, when the
sails are gently drawing, when the sweet winds
blow softly, and the blue sky looks blandly
upon the deep in whose bosom it pictures its
azure beauty. But it is supreme whei the tem-
pest is around you, when the heavens are full of
sooty clouds, whirling in convolutions like the
smoke of a newly-fed furnace crowding in black,
fat volumes from a factory chimney; when the
torn sea spreads like a vast surface of wool for
leagues and leagues, and the huge surges plash
in sheets of blinding spray over the streak of
hull that races, far beneath you, like a shadow
through the white haze of storm-driven spume,
and reels under the shocks with a quivering
that sets the mast on which you are poised
trembling like and old man's hand; when the
gale is roaring in thunder out of the strip of sail
stretched upon the yards a long distance below
you, and the din of clashing seas, and the yell-
ing of the tempest in the sky perfect through
the ear the scene of grandeur and terror beheld
by the eye.
Profit in Oranges.
Many, who don't take a practical view of or-
ange culture, can't see the profit in it. For in-
stance, take a man who has but small means,
say enough to buy a place, break up several
acres of land and set it out in trees. If he has
the will and energy he can take his living out
of the soil while his groves are corning on, besides
make enough from his produce to buy clothing
and other necessities. Every year comes easier,
your property improves rapidly, you learn the
nature of the soil, so as to make it produce
more abundantly, and with good engineering
and management, you soon have no trouble in
making all ends meet. The next thing, your
trees reach their maturity. Spring brings forth
the bloom; summer the maturity, and in the


winter, the time for shipping, you find yourself
the possessor of a handsome income, and an in-
dependent man. Your place would readily
sell for several thousand dollars. After scaning
over your past labors, you find that you have
made the place self-sustaining, consequently its
final value must be the profit. We would like
to see any one working on a salary do as well.
Putnam County is filled with instances like
this, and there are plenty of openings for others
to come and do the same. But remember one
thing, if you don't possess energy and will, you
had better not start in the business.-Palatka
Herald.
AT MANDARIN, FLORIDA.
20 FORTY-ACRE TRACTS only 12 miles from Jack-
sonville; extra good land, well located, between river
and J., St. A. and H. R. R. R. Price, $10 per acre. Will
sell on monthly payments of $12.50. These lands will in-
crease in value, being located in an already prosperous
town, making a paying investment at small outlay.
Maps can be seen at No. 41 East Bay Street.
to nov 21, '82. GEO. R. REYNOLDS.


`~'" '"~ ''





COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl., new ...................
CHICKENS, each..................... .............................
EGGS- Per doz............... .................................
HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lb., first class
Country Dry Salted, per lb.....................
Butcher Dry Salted, per lb.................
Dam aged H ides....................................
Kip and Calf, 81bs. and under................
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb)....... .............
Deer Skins Salted, per lbf..................
FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter.......................................................
Raccoon, each..... ......................
Wild Cat, each..... .....................
Fox, each............ ...............................
BEESW Ax- per lbt................................................
WOOL-Free from burs, per lb.......................
Burry, per lb).... ..........................
GOAT SKINS-Each per lb..................................


350
25@45
25
13
9@10
6
10
35
26@30
1 50@4 00
5@15
10@20
5@15
20
17@22.
11@15
10


Bacon advancing rapidly-buyers will do well to
make their purchases now. Flour market has been
very unsettled for the past week, on account of specula-
tions in wheat market.







IRST-CLASS ORANGE AND VEGETABLE LAND.
4 Also river front, with 90 Choice Orange trees nearly
ready to bear.
The above property adjoins the Magnolia Hotel at
Magnolia, Florida. Address,
W. T. THOMPSON,
(Box 111,)
to july 1, '82 Green Cove Springs, Florida.

PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


Sailing Notice.
SAVANNAH, June 10.
Geo. W. Haines, Agent:
The "Gate City" (advertised to sail Wednes-
day, June 14, at.5:30 a. m.) has been changed
to sail the same day at 5:30 p. m.
J. L. TAYLOR, Gen. Ft. Agent.





Vegetable Quotations.
FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE,
315 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, June 7,1882. f
Receipts of vegetables at this port via Florida Dis-
patch Line and Southern Express Company, week
ending 6th inst., 2,500 packages.
Watermelons from South Georgia, two car loads.
Watermelons in good condition and selling at $35 and
$40 per hundred. The cold weather interferes with de-
mand and they are selling slowly; with warm bright
days higher prices can be expected.
Potatoes, fine, $5 50@6 00, mostly coming in poor con-
tion.
Tomatoes in demand, $2 00@3 50 per crate.
Cucumbers slow sale, $1 00@l 75 for good quality.
Respectfully,
C. D. OWENS,
General Agent..
.Jaeksonville Wholesale Prices.
Corrected weekly, by .TONES & BOWEN, Wholesale and
lRetail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.
SUGAus-Granulated......................................... 10%
W hite Ex. C..................... ................... 10
Golden C............................................ 8y%
Pow dered ............................................ 113
Cut Loaf.......................... ................... 11V4
COFFEE, IRio-Fair .............................................. 11
G ood ............................................ 11
Choice .......................................... 12
B est ............................................ 13
Java 0. G ............................................ .. 25
M ocha ................................ ............. 35
Peaberry............................................. .. 18
M aracaibo............................................. 18
Any of above grades roasted to order
FLOUR-1Snow Drop, best.................................... 9 25
Oreole, 2d best....................................... 8 50
Pearl, 3d best......... ................. ...... 8 25
M EATS- Bacon..................................................... 8@ 121
Hams (Merwin & Sons)........................ 162
Shoulderso.................. ........................... 12
HoMINY-Pearl, per bbl.................................. 5 40
M EAL- per bbl............................................. ........ 5 40
LARD-Refined in pails........................................ 13
BUTTER-Very best, kegs (on ice)................. 32
CHEESE-Full cream.... ......................... 15
H alf c eam .......................................... 12%
TOBAccO-Shell Road........................................ 55@56
Florida Boys, 11 inch 5's.................. 40
Florida Girls, bright twist, 14 to lb.. 50
Smoking in packages, 8 to lb ........... 45
SOAP AND STARCH-Colgate's 8 oz., per box.. 3 50
Peerless, 8 oz., per box............................ 3 50
Starch, lump, per lb...... ........ ................ 5 2@6c
HOPS, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS-
H ops, per lb............................................... 15@ 22c
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz .......... 60c
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
doz. 1 lb................................................. 2 25
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. 1 lb. 2 25
Royal Baking Powder, per doz.1b ..... 2 70
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. T ...... 1 50


LAW B LANKS ELLA
B ills of Sale......................................................
FOR SALE BY Master's Sale........................ ...........................
Warranty Deeds (cap size, heavy paper)......
parchment paper....
ASHMEAD BROTHERS Quit-Claim Deeds (capsize, heavy paper)...
Mortgages, heavy "......
parchment "
S~C nSl Q 'vllle, :Fla. Chattel Mortgages heavy "
Release of Mortgage..................................
Bond for Title........... ............................
L eases .............................................................
Powers of Attorney............................ ............
JUSTICES' BLANKS. Promissory Notes,Draft and Receipt Books,
100 to book............. ...............................
PER P protests ........................................................
Sr EM N0 s"- EACH 002oz Bills of Lading, Shipping Receipts...... 3 to
Civil Action, original and .copy ........ 2 15 sheet.........cles...............................
Replevy ..................................................
coast ise ............................
SY POE3AS.S......................................... 2 15 Shippers' Manifests............ .......
:03 D6S- -" part of cargo.................
Peace. .2 1 Coastw ise .........................................
Appeal, e .criminal, ................ 5 30 Outward foreign Manifests, small size.........
civil ......................................... 5 30 large size..........
Appearance .. ........................................ 5 30 Seaman's Discharge (books of 100,) ...............
Claim ...................................................... 5 30 Im port Entry Blanks........................................
Replevy .................................. 5 30 Charter Parties ...................
Defendant's Bond n Replevin..... Marriage License.................. ......
Attachment.......................................... 5 30 Certiicates-all sizes and p ices....
I3 ZT S ........................................ 2 15
Garnishment .........................................2 15PRCES O WRITNG PAPB.
Attachment........................................2 15 PICES O WITING PAPE
Personal Property.... ................. 5 30 Legal Cap and Foolscap Paper, 10 lb.............pe
Of Execution .............................. 2 15 " 12 lb
Replevy, Personal Property...............5 30 14 "
Peace........................................... ........ 5 30 " 16 "
2 15 (extra size an(
~ThT............................... 2 15 t ....... ...........(ex ......
.2T, W rit .................... 2 15 Parchm ent.............. ...................................
ITTI'-S (Commitment) .................. 2 15 (Discount to the trade.)
"7- E": '' .................................................... 2 15
.S ..A. T ........................................... 2 15 N ote Paper (first class) 4 lb........................ pe:
P eace ..................................................... 2 15 6 ......... ..... .....
Search.................................................... 5 30 Letter 10" ...............................
Affidavit for Search Warrant............. 5 30 " 12 "............................
E C T I .... .............. .......... 5 30 " 14 "......... ................
AF ID.-'VIT of I3SOX'. iL"Z 2 15 Lyon's Parchment Note Paper (thin) ............
"TI IC-A.TE O 2 15 (thik...........


CIRCUIT COURT BLANKS.

O .V.Zj- EACH
Juror's Summons................................ 2
Writ of Attachment (original and
copy ............................................ 2
Subpoenas ............................................. 2
in Chancery.......................... 2
Sum m ons .................... ..................... 2
and Garnishment............. 2
Writ of Replevy................................... 5
M asters' Deeds....................... .............. 5
Commissioners' Deeds....................... 5
Grand Juror's Subpoenas................ 2
W witness' ...................... 2
C apias ................................................... 2
A ttachm ent......................................... 2

PBOBATE COURT BLANKS.


PER
DOZ
15
15
15
15
15
15
30


15
15
15
15


DI A S, c --.- EACH ooz
Administrators' Bonds....................... 5 50
Letters of Administration.................. 5 50
Letters Testamentary......................... 5 50
Guardians' Bonds ................................ 5 50
Letters of Guardianship................... 5 50
Warrant of Appraisment................ 5 50
Citation for Administration............... 3 30
Oath of Administrator........................ 3 30

UNITED STATES COMM'RS BLANKS.
PER
O T .L ~a CZ "A",.,- EACH 00Z
Warrants ............................................. 5 30
Commitment........................................ 5 30
Com plaint......................................... 5 30
Witness' Recognizance...................... 5 30
Prisoners' ........................ 5 30
Subpoenas ....... .............................. 2 15
Order to Pay Witness........................... 2 15


ACH
5
5
5
10
5
10
5

5
5
5
5o
5
5
5
5


10
5
5

10
5
25
5
10


PER
DOZ
30
50
50
75
50
75
50
75
50
50
50
50

50
50
1 00

75
50
.50
75
2 00
50
50
75


IS.
r ream $3 00
" 8 60
4 20
480
d
... 800
900

r ream $1 00
"1 50
1.. 80
.. 3 00
.. 3 60
" 4 20
200
300
" 3 50


Discount to the trade.)

PRICES FOR PRINTING.
Note Heads (1 sheet, printed to order) 6 lb.....per 1000 ,. 25
Letter 10" 4 25
12 4 85
Envelopes (white or buff, good quality, print-
ed to order,) 5 size " "............... " 3 50
6 size .... " 3 75
Bill Heads (sm all).................................................. 3 00
" (m edium )........................................... 3 25

Notarial Seal Presses (made to order)................ 5 00
Notarial Seals (red, green and blue,) No.21. 1%
inches..............................................................per 100 20
Notarial Seals (red green and blue) No. 23, 2
inches............................................................... per 100 25
Notarial Seals (red, green and blue[ No. 26, 2%
inches.............................................................. 30
Notarial Seals, gold and silver, No. 21, 1%
inches................................................................... 25
Notarial seals, gold and silver No. 23, 2 in. 53
,, No. 26, 2%.. " 50
Lawyers' Seals, A. & B.......... ................." 15

Rubber Stamps manufactured right in our establish-
ment -all sizes and prices
Index to the Decisions of the Supreme Court of
Florida ................................................................ 3 00
McClellan's Digest................................ ..................... 7 00
Ordinary Law Books bound to order in best sheep,
single volum es.............................................,......... 1 75
Sent to any address upon receipt of price. A lib-
eral discount will be given to dealers to sell again, or to
those wishing to purchase in quantity.
If you want any Printing or Binding done, you
should send to us. We send out nothing but first-class
work, and at reasonable prices. Prices furnished, upon
application, for anything in our line.
Respectfully,
ASHMIEAD BROS.,
Jacksonville, ,Fla.


I- I _


- ~-.~ ----


Ocean Steamship Company.


SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.





The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, June 3d, 8:00 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, June 7th, 11:00 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, June 10th, 1:30 p. m.
GATE (ITY, Wednesday, June 14th, 5:30 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, June 17th, 8:00 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, June 21st, 10:00 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, June 24th, 12:00 noon.
GATE CITY. Wednesday, June 28th, 4:00 p. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, July 1st, 6:00 p. m.
Througit Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight, received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
H. YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agent of Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS,
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. Y.
- - -


THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


I V-


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE.



Rates on WATERMELONS in Car Loads of 20,000 Pounds.


TO T.A. z 2 "E :r' E0T LrV.A..A 2 20t31., 1S, 2.


S'Mom Florida Tran-
Fro m Jacksonville, sit Railroad, except Florida Transit Rail- Florida Central and
T" 0-- Catllahan and Live Ocala and Points be- road, O e a 1a and Western Railroad.
Oak. yond. Points beyond.

A tlanta ................................................................................................ ............................. $ 60 00 $ 85 00 $ 90 00 $ 80 00
A ugusta.................................................................................................................................. 55 00 80 00 85 0 75 00
B altim ore............................................................................................. ................................ 100 00 125 00 130 00 119 00
B oston .................................................................................................................................... 100 00 125 00 130 00 119 00
B ristol, Termn........................................................................................................................... 90 00 115 00 120 00 110 00
O harleston, S. C ..................................................................................................................... 36 00 61 00 66 00 56 00
Columbus, Ga........................................................................ 60 00 85 00 90 00 80 00
Chattanooga, Tenn............................................................................................................. 70 00 95 00 100 00 90 00
Cincinnati, 0 .................................................... ..................................................................... 80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
Cairo, Ill.............................. ....................... ....................................................................... 90 00 115 00 120 00 110 00
Colum bus, 0........................... .................................................................................... 100 00 125 00 130 00 120 00
Cleaveland, 0............................................ .................................................... ... .......... 100 00 125 00 130 00 120 00
Chicago, Ill........................................................................................................................... 110 00 135 00 140 00 130 00
Dalton, Ga.................................... ........................ .. ..................... 70 00 95 00 100 00 90 00
E vansville, Ind..................................................................................................................... 80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
Indianapolis, Ind............ ................................................ ...............................................90 00 115 00 120 00 110 09
K noxville, Tenn................................................................................................................... 84 50 109 50 114 50 104 50
Louisville, K y............................................................................................ ..............80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
M acon, Ga......................................................................................................................... 45 00 70 00 75 00 65 00
M ontgom ery, A la.................................................................................................................. 60 00 85 00 90 00 80 00
M obile, A la................................................................................................................... ......... 70 00 95 00 100 00 90 00
Memphis, Tenn ............................................. ................................................. 80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
Nashville, Tenn................................................................................ ........................ 75 00 100 00 105 00 95 00
N ew O rleans, La..................................... .............................................................................. 80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
N ew Y ork, N Y .................................................................................................................. 100 00 125 00 130 00 119 00
P eoria, Ill............................................................................................................................. 110 09 135 00 140 00 130 00
Philadelphia, Pa................................................................................................................. 100 00 125 00 130 00 119 00
R om e, G a............................................................................................................................. 70 00 95 00 100 00 90 00
Savannah, G a................................................................. .................................................... 22 00 47 00 52 00 41 00
St. L ouis, M o............................................. ....................................................................... 90 00 115 00 120 00 110 00
Terre H aute, Ind................. .................................................................................................. 100 00 125 00 130 00 120 00
Excess of 20,000 pounds will be charged for pro rata, provided the weight loaded does not exceed the capacity of the car, as marked thereon. If cars are not
marked with the capacity thereof, the weight of load must not exceed 20,000 pounds. All excess of load above capacity of the cars will be charged for at double rates.
Melons must be loaded and unloaded by the owners. Shipments of Melons will be receipted for only as "Shipper's Count." This Line will not be responsible
for deficiency in quantity loaded in the cars, nor for damage resulting from improper loading. Shipments via Florida Dispatch Line will not be required guaranteed
or prepaid.


D. H. ELLIOTT, Gen'l Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.


JAS. L. TAYLOR, Gen'l Freight Agent, Savannaih, Ga.


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE in connection with ATI0ANTIO COAS 0


Rates on Watermelons in Car Loads of 20,000 in Cents per 100 lbs.


To take effect May 20th, 1882.


To-
O- -


Baltim ore...... .............................................................................................. ......................
Boston................................................................... ............................................. ..............
New York...............................................................................................................................
Providence ...........................................................................................................................
Philadelphia..........................................................................................................................
Portsm south, Va.....................................................................................................................
Petersburg, Va........................................................................................................................
Richm ond, Va.......................................................... ........................................................
W ilm ington, N. C................... ................. .............................. ......
W ashington, D. C. (via Portsm outh)................ .............................................................


From Jacksonville
and Callahan.


Cts.
.631
.681.
.681

.48 -
.48F
.48s
.38 Y
.63Y


Florida Transit and,
Peninsula Railroad, Florida Transit Rail- Florida Central and
except Ocala and road, c a l a and Western Railroad.
Points beyond. Points beyond.

Cts. Cts. Cts.
.76 .78Y .73
.81 .83Y .78
.81 83. .78
.81 .83- .78
.81 .832 .78
.61 .63h .58
.61 .631'. .58
.61 .63Y .58
.51 .532 .48
.76 .78/1 .73


Shipments via "ATLANTIC COAST LINE" must be prepaid to destination. 20,000 lbs. will be the minimum rate charged for. All excess of capacity of cars
will be charged at double rates.


e10


7- M


Apo"


(_I__ ^LI__~__L_ I_ I ___ ~


II _




90 JTHE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
---------------- -------:------------ ---.-..--.-- ----.:,- .' ~ -._ --.-_- ---.-


II


[




[


*-Jacksonville to Washington.
*_Jacksonville to Cincinnati.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
Passengers taking Savannah sleeper can remain in the
car until o'clock a. m.
Parlor and Drawing-Room Car on morning train
from JacKsonville through to Savannah, connecting
daily with through Pullman sleeper for New York.
The Dining Car attached to the train between Savan-
nah and Charleston affords supper to passengers going
North, and breakfast to those coming South.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to Montgomery and New. Orleans
take the evening train.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. m. and arriving at Savannah at 2:35 a. m., or train
at Jacksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vannah at 3:40 p. m.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, at Depot Ticket
Office. J. E. DRAYTON,
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*] Ticket Agent.


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
-o
MERCHANTS & MINERS

TRANSPORTATION COMPANY!






The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail
From BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH

EVERY FIVE DAYS,
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE, as follows:
Thursday, June 1st, at 5 p. m.
Tuesday, June 6th, at 11 a. m.
Monday, June 12th, at 3 p. m.
Saturday. June 17th, at 8:30 a. nm.
Thursday, June 22d, at 11 a. m.
Tuesday, Jufie 27th, at 3 p. m.
Monday, July 3d, at 9 a. nm.
The steamers are first-class in every respect, and every
attention will be given to passengers.
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $15~,
Including Meals and Stateroom.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company lias arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points In the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Ba I tlim ore.
]Iy this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
col ulun.
JAS. B. WEST & CO., Aaents.
Savannah, January 8th, 1878. 30-tf

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA




WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1882,
Passenger Trains will run over the Waycross Short
Line as follows;
:Fast Mail. Jack'lle Ex.
Daily. Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at.................. 9:00 a. m. 5:40 p. m.
Arrive Jacksonville at................. 5:40 p.m. 8:15 a. m.
Leave Callahan at.................... 9:44 a. m. 6:45 p. m.
Arrive Waycross at..................11:57 a. m. 9:15 p. m.
Arrive Jesup at................ 1:40 p. m. 11:25 p. m.
Arrive at Brunswick at........... 6:00 p. m. 5:30 a. m.
Arrive Savannah at ................ 3:40 p. m. 2:35 a. m.
Arrive Charleston at..................... 9:10 p. m. 9:05 a. m.
Arrive at Augusta at........ ....... 5:20 a. m. 1:30 p. m.
Arrive Macon at ....................... 7:50 p. m. 7:00 a. m.
Arrive Atlanta at........................... 3:50 a. m. i 12:50 p. m.
Arrive Louisville at................................ 8:00 a. m.
Arrive Cincinnati at.......... ...... ..... ............. 7:00 a. m.
Arrive Washington at................ 9:30 p. m. 9:10 a. m.
Arrive Baltimore at............. 12:25 p. m. 12:05 a. m.
Arrive New York (limited express).......... 3:50) p. m,
Arrive New York P. R. R............. 6:45 a. m. 5:20 p. m.
Arrive St. Louis at................................. 7:00 p m
Arrive Chicago at.................................... 7:00 p. m
TIME.
To Savannah................................................ 6:40 hours.
To New York............................................... 45:45 hours.
To Washington....... ........................................ 36:30 hours.
To Chicago................................................... 49:00 hours.
To St. Louis..................................................... 49:00 hours.
THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
BkJacksonville to Savannah.
AhrJacksonville to Louisville.


Johnson's Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, Martinez and Longman's
V Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
to mar25,g., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

[4--34t7.]
NTotice fozr 1FuLblioationi.

LAND OFFICE AT GAINESVILLE, FLA., May 3, 1882.
OTICE is hereby given that the following named
settler has filed notice of his intention to make final
proof in support of his claim, and that said proof
will be made before T. E. Buckman, Clerk Circuit Court
at Jacksonville, Florida, on Saturday June 24th, 1882,
viz.: Jacob Robinson, Duval County, homestead entry
No. 561, for the Nw 4 of Nw V, section 6, township 3s,
range 27e.
He names the following witnesses to prove his con-
tinuous residence upon, and cultivation of, said land,
viz.: Calvin Hughes, Samuel Anderson, Andrew Sess-
ions, Lee Clark, all of Jacksonville, Florida.
L. A. BARNES,
May 8 tf Register United States Land Office.


HUAU & CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF
FINE KEY WEST CIGARS
-AND-

WHOLES.ALE LEAF DOE.LERS.

Proprietors of Factories Nos. 29, 61 and 81, District
of Florida,
.Tackesonville, Florida,
The Most Extensive Manufacturers in the State.
lyr to april 23, '83.

D. G. AMBLER.' J. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as
AMBLER'S BANK.
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas.*G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Lettersof
Credit .. apr 10-tft.


Sportman's Emporium.





o 0
W. C. PITTiI AN,
No. 3 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0--
Guns, P1stols, Rifles and Cutlery,
Shooting and Fishing T ackle.

SHELLS LOADED TO ORDER.
1 yr to April 23, '83


DEALER IN
PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,
GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
GOLD AND METAL LEAF,.
BRONZE, COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emery Papers, &c.
AGENT FOR
PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIRE TEST.


Soluble Ground Bone,
THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

ERTILIZIR FOR ORANGII TRIIS.

Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.
Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTER & BE N,
Agents for the State of Florida.


*m-Analysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


to sept 26, '82


I"E OLLTJTY OOD."
A FEW CHOICE LOTS OF FIFTEEN OR MORE
acres, river fronts, affording attractive and lovely
building sites, and admirably suited to the growth of
oranges, figs and other Florida fruits, may still be ob-
tained on reasonable terms.
"HOLLYWOOD" is south of "Point La Vista," on
the eastern shore of the St. Johns River, four miles from
Jacksonville. For circulars, maps, terms, etc., address
D. REDMOND
apr 3-tf Box 257, Jacksonville, Fla.
W. 1. PILLOW'S

8TRAWBERRY lIlPINGT A IGNCY
-AND-
FRUITj ANID VEGETABLE
REPACKING: AND.
COMMISSION 'HOUSE,
Has closed till NOVEMBER. Preseiit address,
may 12, '83. MA. CO iN, GA.










ARE THE

EASIEST, S..A-SEST.

SAND

BEST IN THE WORLD.

For sale by . E . E r ".
Wholesale Druggist, Jacksibtirtle, Fra..
A=-Send for Circular. mar 25-tf

ST. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-o-
CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.


OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
1 yr to April 23, '83

VIEWS -OF FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In Book Formn, Containing 1S
Views Each.
Souvenir of Florida, (small size)....... ..... .25c.
Scenes anid Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size)................................................25c:
Souvenir of Jacksonville,( large size).............. 50c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine,(large size)...............50c.
Stereoscopic Views, per Doz. $1.50.
Address
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.





THIE FLORIDA DISPATCH 1.1


F. S. CONE, A. H. MANVILLE, E. A. MANVILLE,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer

Lake George, iFlorida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums
Peaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, and over one hundred varieties of the Citrus.
ORANGE lE AN'D LEMON TREES a specialty.
Catalogue free. to apr 17, '83

ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]

J. A. BARN E2S C .,

FRUIT AND PRODUCE

COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Souath.ern FrT.Uit asnd. "Vegeta'bles a Specialty.,
3"6 and 3 8 North Dela-wajre Avenue, Philadelphia.
to jan 6, '83

JORmE=t d/ BOWN p


WHOLESALE GROCERS,
AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR

AGER'S DRY HOP YEAST CAKES, 60c. PER DOZ.

SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND

SNO=W-DROP PAA.TIENT FLOUR.

First IE-an3ds oz. investt 0ualit3r

Dairy Butter from. 3Za to 37c. per Lb.,

=ept izn tlbe ILiargest efrigerator in. table State,

No. 7' West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
To sept 27, '82



Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide.

H. D. BOUNETHEAU, PROPRIETOR

N R D Y K E FLORIDA CHEMICAL OIL AND SOAP WORKS,

MILLS MANUFACTURER OF
-MANFACTE- Lubricating and Boiler Compounds, Compressed Soaps, Car and
F Axle grease.
Fresh Ground ALSO SOLE MANUFACTURER
of the best Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide extant-
FEED, GRITS, 0:RANr.T:E T':":EE E E'r.3,SI0O I
made from Whale-Oil Soap, combined with other powerful ingredients known
M]EAL to be most effectual for destroying the Scale and other insect pests and
M !parasites of the Citrus family. It will also put the tree in a healthy and flour-
(Bolted or unbolted.) fishing condition. Prepared for immediate use. Perfectly harmless to the
youngest tree or plant. In packages of from 25 to 300 pounds. Price, 10 cents
Pearl Hominy. per pound. Discount to the Trade. Full directions for use accompany
each package. Address
WOOD-YARD. 0 I E i. IT.


P. O. BOX 984, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


to july 31 '82


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
0
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
--O--
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers for June are appointed to sail as follows:
JUNIATA, June 3d, at 7:00 a. inm.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, June 10th, at 1:00 p. m.
JUNIATA, June 17th, at 7:00 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, June 24th, at 12:00 m.
Days and hours subject to change, without notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, WM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.


ONLY DIRECT LINE BETWEEN
SAVANNAH AND BOSTON.
Transhipment and extra handling saved. No danger
of fruit being Irozen. Cars are unloaded at the steam-
ship wharf in Savannah, avoiding drayage.
CABIN PASSAGE, $18.
SAILING FROM SAVANNAH.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, June 8th, at 12:30 p. in.
Seminole, Thursday, June 15th, at 6:00 p. m.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, June 22d, at 12:00 nm.
Seminole, Tlursday, June 29th, at 6:00 p. m.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, July 6th, at 11:00 a. m.
Seminole, Thnrsday, July 13th, at 5 p. nm.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, July 20th, at 10:30 a. m.
Seminole, Thursday, July 27th, at 4 p. m.
RIC(HARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
44-tf Savannah, Ga.

DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
The largest stock in the State. Country
buyers will consult their own interests
by corresponding with me. All orders
promptly filled at prices to compete with
any house south of Baltimore. Remem-
bler my only Florida address.
GEO. HUIiGHES,
to june 26, '82 Cor. Bay and Ocean, Jacksonville, Fla.

PIANOS AND ORGANS
4AS. 7:. CA. =PBETL ,
1.5 Eaiast fliay ,T cksonv111e.
QOLD ON INSTALLMENTS, AT LOWEST PRICES-
branch of Ludden & Bates, Savannah-EXACTLY
SAME PRICES AND TERMS, Sheet Music, Strings
and small instruments of all kinds. Send for cata-
logues, prices and terms. TUNING AND REPAIRING
a specialty. My tuner will make regular tours through
the State, and my customers will thus have my repre-
sentative at their doors, a great advantage to purchasers
of instruments, to sept 26, '82

0. L. KEENE,
MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,

Laces, WVorsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF


67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, - FLORIDA.
to feb 20, '82
M. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the
of the Marshall House. Screven House.
T HE HARi-RNETT HO 1 USE,
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARNETT & GEORGE, Proprietors.
RATES, $2 PER DAY.
This favorite family HIotel, under its new manag~e-
ment, is recomnmended for the excellence of its cuisine.
homelike comforts, prompt attention amd moderatete
rates. to sept 4,'83


TOL"T'S
Wholesale and Retail Drug Store,
35 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
PURE DRUGS, RELIABLE MEDICINES, FANCY
Goods, Proprietary Articles, at lowest market prices.
Specialties-Norton's Salt Rheum Ointment, Melen's
Infant Food, Burnett's Cod Liver Oil. A Trial solicited
to aug 20, '82

RUBBER STAMPS
Are manufactured right in our es -tli-mmientt in the
best manner and at the shortest notice.
4j-Send in your orders.
ASHMEAD BROS.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
May 1-tf





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


A Good Investment!
-0


In the County of Hernando, East of Brooksville, the
county seat, and near the
Tropical :Ploriclsi E. :E.,
which is now actively building, two tracts of land. The
first contains two hundred and forty (240) acres in a body;
the second contains eighty (80) acres. These tracts both
touch U pon a I-aikace of about 150 acres area; are
well timbered with pine suitable for lumber; the second
about half a mile southeast of the first; between them
lies a cultivated farm. These lands are well adapted to
Oranges and Other F'ruits, being of good
soil, with little underbrush, and are easily cleared. They
were selected by -ILon. Waltter G"vynn, Ex-
Treasurer of the State of Florida, and they may be relied
upon as being what is represented. These lands are in a
part of the State that is ra pidly settling, up
and offer a good field either or an investment in Flor-
ida real estate, or for orange groves and the like.
Price and terms will be so arranged as to be satisfac-
tory to the purchaser. Apply to
WALTER B. CLARKSON,
Box 877. Jacksonville, Florida.
In corresponding, please mention this paper.
to August 29, '82.

RICH'D H. MARKS'

OANGE COUNTY LAND AGENCY,
SANFORD, FLORIDA,
Agent in Orange County for
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMPLY.
BUYS AND SELLS

Orange Groves and Orange Lands on Commission,
ALSO ORANGE TREES.
EXAMINES DEEDS, NEGOTIATES LOANS, ETC.
june 12-tf
IN TER PAR new town in Orange
W INTER B R (County, Florida, eighteen
miles south of Sanford, on the South Florida Railroad,
with a frontage of two miles upon three beautiful Lakes.
WINTER HOMES in the midst of Orange Groves, for
Northernerns, is the main idea. For Pamphlets and
Maps giving particulars, address
CHAPMAN & CHASE,
Winter Park, Orange Co., Fla.
to july 17,'82 . ...
TIHE
FL ORID A
DATIYTIMES.


THE TIMES is the official paper of the city and the
leading paper of the State. It has the largest circulation
in Florida, and reaches all parts of it. It is not merely
a local newspaper, but alms to advocate the interests
and promote the prosperity of Florida as a whole.
Its reputation outside the State is very high. It has
taken rank among those journals whose columns are
looked to for news, and whose comments are quoted
with respect throughout the country.
Its editors have had wide and varied experience in
journalism North as well as South; its advertising pa-
tronage is liberal and of the best character; and its re-
sources, financial and other, are ample. It will furnish
Florida with a live, progressive, outspoken, and reada-
ble newspaper, the peer of any.
ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.
THE TIMES has secured by special contract the full
despatches of the ASSOCIATED PRESS. Besides that
its Editor is Agent of the Associated Press for the State
of Florida, which gives him great advantages in obtain-
ing the freshest and most important State news.


SPECIAL DESPATCHES.
With representatives in the leading news centres of
the country, THE TIMES is well served in addition to
the regular Press reports. During the past winter it has
received a very large number of telegraphic specials."
CORRESPONDENCE.
Its regular correspondence from Washington, New
York and Boston is of noteworthy excellence; and its
State correspondence has attracted much attention.
This feature will be extended and improved; and to
this end correspondence containing news or items of
information of any kind is solicited from all quarters.
"OLD SI. "
In addition to his editorial work, Mr. Small will write
regularly for THE TIMES, and in its Sunday issues the
famous "Old Si" will disseminate wisdom in chunks
to the Florida public.
TERM (strictly in advance): One year, $10; Six
months, $5; three months, $2.50; one month, $1. sent
one month on trial for 50 cents.
Remittance should be made by draft or post-office
order, or in a registered letter. Address
JONES & SMALL,
to sept 26,'82 Jacksonville, Fla.


=T-TI=E I-NE'T KEQOT.TTD "B0ITE, $38.50 per Tonr,
(Gu-aranteed Pure.)

COT (100 Pounnd Bags.)

COTTO aT SEE3D ETTLL A.SE3:, $27 per TIonx,
(The Best 1Potashl in lUse.)
20 Bsl-hels Co00ob. :=eeas for Sale.
STOCKBRIDGE FERTILIZERS for Orange Trees and vegetables, for sale by
,J. E. I A I -T.
to jan 6, '83 Jaclksonville, 'ln.



S. B HUBBARD & CO.
-


JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN

HARDWARE, STOVES, DOORS, SASH, BLI N DS,
IPAAINTS, OILS, IPU1JIPS, LEIAJD 1AN) IRON PIPE,
SUGAR-MI.LLS, RUBBER AND LEATHER BELTING,
STEAM AND GAS-FITTING, PLUMBING AND TINSMITHING,
AGRICULTURAL I IM PLELIMENTLTS of all kinds,
IIAZARID'S POWCDEIW ,
iBA IRB3EI1) FI1 ENC_ VIT E,
-g-ents for S. Mi. A4llen &Z Co.'s c-.DElT TOOLS.
to june 11 '83 )A- Send f1or Price ]List and Catalogue. .


BUY THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

-0

GOULD & CO.'S


FERTILIZER
-AND-


Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange. Growers and Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, con-
tains potash, lime, phosphoric acid, ammonia and the other essential elements of Plant Food, making a com
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & Bro.'s, and other high-priced Fertilizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity, and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $1 per barrel, f32 per
ton,
All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.

MESSRS. GOULD & CO.:
Gentlemen-I used one-half ton of your Fertilizer, in connection with the same amount of Baker & Bro.'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gave as good results as the others, which are much higher priced fertilizers-costing
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $51.50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12, 1881.
LEESBURG, SUMTER Co., FLA., March 6, 1882.
GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed your
agents at this point (Messrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer,
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its fostering care, I having had the honor
to Win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer better and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer "kills two birds with one stone," inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies
at one and the same time. I bave been testing it in the field, garden and orange grove for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues, whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For my part, I ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. if I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork.
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOURT.


to aug 27, '82


GOULD & CO.,
NO. 6 W. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


A. N. DOBBINS & BRO., 100 H IAIINP 0RAN E TREE1 ,
Surrounding a handsome residence in Jacksonville,
halt-mile from the centre of business on Bay Street.
House has seven rooms neatly finished in natural
wood, with kitchen and servants' rooms, store room,
Sand plenty of closets. Good stable and carriage house,
PURE WATER,
Good neighborhood-(ALL WHITE.) Lot is 210x157 feet,
has
100 Orange Trees,
12 to 16 years old, large and thrifty. Also,
Grapes,
]Pecans,,

ll L Splendid chance for any one desiring a lovely home in
24 LAURA STREET, Florida, and a bearing grove.
JACCKISON VIL.T.E - FLOI ,II)Z For price and terms, apply to
funsmithing done in all its branches. J. H -. NO- T ON,
G IRON SAFE WORK. Jacksonville, Florida.
Special rates on Stencil Cutting, by mail. Address, State that you saw this advertisement in THE FLORIDA
to june 12'83, (1P. O. Box 8 33.) DISPATCH. june 12, '82-tf


192


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