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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00011
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: June 5, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00011
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

Full Text





























Beuoted to the U agricultural, fManufacturing and Industrial Interests of Florida and the South,


Vol. 1.--No. 11.

Monday, June 5, 1882.


New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.


Price 5 cents.


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.


Preserving Fence Posts.
A correspondent of the Country Gentleman
says: I have tried a number of methods of
preserving posts, and no'e have been satisfac-
tory, except perhaps one to be mentioned pres-
ently. Heart oak, if seasoned, will last a great
many years without any application whatever-
how many I am not old enough to say. Sap
wood will not last. Coal tar has somp preserva-
tive effect, but after using it on thousands of
fence posts I am almost convinced that its ap-
plication does not pay. In fact I am so nearly
without faith in its efficacy that I have not
used it at all on fence posts recently set,
although I have a barrel on hand purchased
chiefly for that purpose. About my yard and
premises I have set, since the war, a good
many posts of pine, that being the only sawed
timber I could get. These have had to be re-
placed in four or five years after setting; some
have completely rotted off in three years,
though heavily dosed with hot coal tar.
Now for the exception referred to above.
Ten years ago I built a grapery at the end of
the house, as a screen against the western sun,
using sawed pine posts. Anticipating the diffi-
culty of ever replacing these posts after they
became covered with vines, I took the extra
precaution of completely saturating the lower
ends with kerosene-common coal oil-before
applying the tar. These posts are now per-
fectly firm, and almost as sound as they were
when put in. All other pine posts set.at that
date have entirely rotted and perished. The
result of this experiment so thoroughly im-
pressed me with the value of coal oil as a pre-
servative of timber under ground, that I now
use it on all posts in building, afterward cover-
ing with hot coal tar. This is essentially the
plan proposed by Mr. Parker Earle.
"I add this, however, which I think will
doubtless prove of great value: I bore a half-
inch or three-quarter inch hole in the post near
the ground, slanting downward, and reaching
beyond the centre; this is to be filled with
kerosene from time to time-perhaps once in


three or four years will answer. I feel sure
that insects very greatly hasten the decay of
timber, to say the least; and kerosene being
repellant to them makes it a valuable applica-
tion at any point where they are likely to do
mischief."
Curing Snake Bites.
Dr. Upshar, of Carrolton, Miss., writes to the
editor of the local paper: I saw a statement in
your paper in regard to use of ammonia as a cure
for snake bites, I desire to add my testimony. I
have practiced eight years in the Yazoo swamps.
I have attended many cases of snake bite, both
of rattlesnake and moccasins. My treatment
has invariably been to cut down freely with a
bistoury, dilating the orifices made by the two
fangs. After permitting a reasonable amount
of bleeding, I stuff into the wound the dry salt
of carbonate of ammonia. At the same time I
give a tolerably strong solution of the same in-
ternally, say five or eight grains every fifteen
minutes until a drachm has been taken (less if
sufficient). Upon dissolving, the ammonia is
rapidly communicated to the blood, and through
it to tissue visited by the poison. The latter,
as is the case with all animal poisons, being of
an acid reaction, the powerful alkali on over-
taking it, instantly neutralizes it, destroying its
specific properties. I rely upon this treatment
always, and I have never had any trouble with
such cases. The whisky treatment is adjuvant
only, and I attach but little importance to it.

Prepotency.
In mating two individuals of the same
breed, that parent is said to be prepotent over the
other whose individual likeness and character-
istics predominate in the young. In crossing
distinct breeds, that breed is said to be prepo-
tent in the cross whose likeness predominates
in the mongrel offspring. In crossing two
species, that species proves prepotent in the
cross whose characteristics predominate in the
hybrids produced. So prepotency is, to those
accustomed to the technical language of science,
one of the most precise and definite of techni-
cal terms, and there is neither "mystification "


nor mystery about it. In crossing the ass and
the horse, the mules produced are invariably
more assinine than equine in character. That
is what we mean when we say the ass is prepo-
tent when crossed with the horse. Is there any
" degree of mystification about that ? Cer-
tainly and most assuredly none.-Planter and
Farmer.
The New Power.
Speaking of the Sellon and Volkmar battery,
the Scientific American says ?
If all that is said of the new invention be
true, the storage by electrical means is now re-
duced to commercial practice, and, as results,
we may soon expect to observe some curious
changes in the arts, habits, and wants of the
people.
For example, anybody who chooses to put a
windmill upon his house or barn, will be able
by means of the secondary battery, to light his
dwelling at night, supply it with heat and hot
water for washing and cooking, drive sewinig-
machines, churns, washers, pumps, keep electri-
cal carriages that will run anywhere about town
without horses, do his plowing, draw flowers,
reapers, seeders, propel boats, and perform al-
most any sort of work that may be required.
The rotation of the windmill, running day or
night steadily or intermittently, costing nothing
except repairs, will have its power stored up
and held in the secondary battery, and by the
touch of a button to be instantly delivered and
put to use when wanted in the form of light,
heat or power. The battery forms in effect a
reservoir of force, which, when connected with
an electrical lamp yields light, or with an elec-
tric machine yields heat or motive power.
Furthermore, the battery is quite portable, and
may be placed in an ordinary carriage, giving
motion thereto, like a locomotive. But there
is no boiler to explode, and no fuel or water to
be supplied. Women and children may safely
use it. Every class of society, from highest to
lowest, every art and industry in the civilized
world, will benefit by its adoption. These, we
say, are only some of the indicated uses and ad-
vantages of the new invention, if all that is
claimed for it, be true.



... T.
- ,,,._~ -_ _,I_~ ~,~__~___._____~_, ___., __ _._~~ ;__. _~ ~~~ _~~_ ~_~ __~~_~_~__ _





Le62 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Louisiana Sugars.
The planters are generally represented in
New Orleans by factors or commission mer-
chants, who attend to the purchase of planta-,
tion supplies during the planting season, 'and
the sale and disposition of the crop when manu-
factured. In farmer times the factor supplied
the means in. advance for conducting theplanta-
tions, but the war swept away this system, and
in but a few instances has it survived, the
planter having learned the necessity for econo-
mizing all charges and expenses.
Some of the larger planters market their own
crops, not always at New Orleans, but it is gen
erally conceded by all familiar with the busi-
ness, that the great levee market offers greater
facilities than any other, and fully 85 per cent.
of the annual crop is thus disposed of.
For this purpose shipments from the planta-
tion are made to the factor or commission mer-
chant in New Orleans, usually in lots of 10, 20
or 25 hhds. sugar, sometimes 50 to 100 hhds.,
and a similar number of packages of molasses.
These consignments vary in quantity according
to the State of the market as advised by the
factor, or the condition of the roads, shipping
facilities, etc.
Arriving at New Orleans, the product is
landed on the levee direct from the numerous
boats that ply along the Upper and Lower
Coast to Lafourche and Bayou Teche; or, if
arriving by rail, it is landed on platforms con-
tiguous to the levee. The factor or commis-
sion merchant, who is strictly the first hand, is
always represented by a broker, and the lots,
whether of sugar or molasses, are always offered
intact in courtesy to the dealers who for many
reasons are the most desirable purchasers, being
on the spot with ready cash, and dispensing
with the trouble of shipping and the risk at-
tending transactions with distant points. All
sales are made strictly for cash, which by cus-
tom of the levee means on demand; andso well
is this understood that terms are scarcely ever
mentioned, and the dealer who is not ready
with his check when called for, need not at-
tempt any more purchases until he has rehabil-
itated himself.
The dealers having made their purchases,
sort them out, as in every lot, either of sugar
or molasses, the quality varies and frequently
in executing orders several lots have to be sort-
ed over in order to procure the required quan-
tity of a certain grade. What remains after
the sorting are known as "culls," and sold for the
best price obtainable, to any customer.
Sometimes in executing an order for a round
lot of open kettle sugar, the dealer finds a lot
which will meet his requirements, with the ex-
ception of a few packages not fully up to the
average of the lot, and he secures an allowance
for these, or oftener procures the entire lot for a


proportionately lower price; and it has hap-
pened that the distant customer for whom the
purchase was made has promptly reported a
claim for deduction on the falling off packages,
although the dealer has fully advised the cir-
cumstances under which the purchase was
made.
These difficulties attach more particularly to
open kettle sugar and molasses, and little or no
trouble is in general experienced in handling
clarified and centrifugal sugars, the quality and
style of these goods being more uniform.
The classification in force on the levee is as
follows : Open kettle sugars, in cypress hogs-
heads, 12 per cent tare.
Inferior.
Common.
Good Common.


Fair.
Fully Fair.
Prime.
Strictly Prime.
Choice.'
Fancy Choice.
The grades of Fair and under are scarcely
fit for afny purpose but refining, and are usually
sold to refiners to be melted and worked over.
The refiners also purchase, when values per-
mit, the grades up to and including Prime.
From Fully Fair to Fancy Choice all are
known as grocery grades, Fully Fair being
generally known in some Western markets as
dry barreling sugars. Inferior and Common
sugars are dark in color, wet and sometimes
dirty-Common dry as its name implies. Fair
to Fully Fair, brighter color, dry, well cooked
and drained and good grain. Prime to Fancy
Choice, dry, well drained, handsome grain,
bright straw color, to very bright and full
grain in Fancy Choice.
Where these sugars have come in from the
plantation and been held, and sometimes when
they have come from the planter late in the sea-
son, the packages have not been refilled after
drainage, and when this is the case, the custom-
ary 12 per cent. tare will not cover the weight
of the package. This must be guarded against
in making purchases, and is a matter for stipu-
lation between buyer and seller; as a condition
precedent to the transaction, either the pack-
ages must be refilled, or taken as they are at an
allowance on the price.
Molasses is classed as follows-Open kettle
molasses:
Inferior.
Common.
Fair.
Prime.
Strictly Prime.
Choice.
Fancy Choice.
Centrifugal Molasses:
Common.
Fair.
Prime.
Choice.
Sirop de Batterie, as its name implies, is taken
from the battery kettle before the syrup has
been concentrated, and is the pure juice of the
cane boiled to the density of syrup. It rarely
finds its way to market, however, as in a very
short time it granulates.
"Cuite" [" kueet"] is very similar to what is
known in the sugar bush" and in many a
Northern farm-house as "maple wax," and is
taken from the coolers before granulation oc-
curs. This also is little known beyond the
plantation house, as it too quickly returns to
sugar.
Sugars from the various sections present pe-
culiarities which render them easily distin-
guishable by the expert. Those from the Red
River parishes for instance, where the red clay
formation of the lands is so marked as to give
the river itself the name it bears, are of a red-


dish tinge, and the same is true of the molasses
from this section.
A saline taste is often apparent in both su-
gars and molasses, particularly in the latter;
and when this is the case it is at once known
that they are from the extreme Lower Coast, or
from the Lower Teche of Lafourche, where the
lands are in such close proximity to the sea that
the cane has absorbed salt to a certain extent,
and an undue prevalence of it is an injury to
the sugar, causing a greater tendency to deli-
quescence.
It is not so much an injury to the molasses,
but impairs its flavor, and is to the distant con-
sumer unaccountable.
Almost all the plantations brand the name
of the plantation on every package of their
product, and some have acquired an extensive


and justly merited reputation for uniform ex-
cellence and standard quality ; but a large
portion of the crop comes in packages rudely
marked with a brush with the initials of the
planter, and sometimes several different initials
for the same crop where it has been made on
shares, or where several parties are interested.
When the crop has been finished and all the
sugar and molasses shipped to market, the basin
or purgery is cleaned out, and the sedimentary
deposit of the molasses, composed of sugar
and gummy matters, together with pieces of
brickbats, flakes of cement, dirt, sand, trash,
etc., ad infinitum and which delectable com-
pound is known as "cistern bottoms," is filled
into barrels and sent into the market, where it
is bought for refining purposes, or to manufac-
ture blacking or "essence of coffee," or other
articles of domestic economy, whose obscure
origin, if correctly known, would amaze the
innocent consumer. But the old New England
tradition, of ante-bellum days, that sundry
remnants of "niggers" were to be occasionally
found in the the cistern bottoms, is not sustain-
ed by investigation.
The burnt sugar or "caromel," which accu-
mulates in the kettles, is by many of the old
Creoles made into a delicious breakfast beve-
rage, which served hot with the addition of
rich cream, is similar but much superior to the
best chocolate, and proves a grateful surprise
to the chance visitor at the plantation.
"Vin du cane" is a beverage peculiar to the
sugar house during the sugar making, and the
unwary stranger is often inducted into its mys-
terious effects.
It is made from the hot juice as it leaves from
the "grande," and with the addition of a little
plantation whisky and the juice of a sour
orange, it makes a drink compared to which
the Mexican's "pulque,' fades into miserable
insignificance, and Wabash sulphuric acid corn
juice is not to be mentioned.
The stranger "smiles" with gratification as
he partakes of the delectable beverage, but
"finds too late that men betray," and ever af-
terward remembers with unmitigated disgust
the villainous deaoction.-New Orleans Sugar
Planter.

Working Mares in Foal.
It is quite common to see or hear inquiries
as to how near the time of foaling a mare may
be worked without injury to her or the colt on
the supposition that it is necessary for her to
go idle for a month or two before.
This is not the case; and in the hands of a
careful man she may be kept at such work as
plowing, harrowing, or cultivating without the
least danger, until she is ready to foal. Of
course fast driving or working to a heavy
wagon-tongue on rough or muddy roads, or
where heavy backing is to be done, should not


be allowed. The writer has always worked
mares moderately on the farm, when necessary,
until it was evident they were likely to foal
within a few hours, and has known of their
foaling in harness en route from the plow to the
barn, but never with any bad results. While
we think it more humane to let a mare have a
few days liberty before this trying event, there
seems little necessity for losing the work of a
strong mare for any great length of time before
foaling, and we would prefer to allow the extra
holidays afterwards. Ordinarily she will do
first rate with ten days' vacation, provided she
is not put immediately to work that is too
severe, and fed partly with something else than
corn.-Breeder's Gazette.
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


I





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 1


Winter Rest of Trees.
ST, NICHOLAS, FLA., May, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch.:
The question has been incidentally put in a
newspaper article whether "the sap of an ever-
green descends to the root in the fall ? I
would ask, does the sap of trees descend to the
root at all as a refuge from winter's cold ?
Let us consider, for example, a deciduous
tree growing in a cold climate, because there,
its phenomena are more pronounced, and briefly
trace its annual round. Experiments have
shown that the food of plants requires to be
dissolved in a vast proportion of water; in fact
the former is almost infinitesmal compared to
the latter. Nothing insoluble can be taken up
by the delicate feeding or rather drinking or-
gans of plants in the ground. During the
growing season the quantity of water carrying
food absorbed by the roots and evaporated by
the foliage is enormous and it is by this latter
process that the sap is cleared of the excess of
water. When there is abundant moisture in
fertile land how rapidly trees grow. The rains
gather ammonia from the atmosphere which goes
into the ground and is absorbed by the roots
with the other ingredients of plant-food which
the same water has freely dissolved. The leaves
also absorb food-gases from the air. Thus all
the elements of plant growth are brought to-
gether through the agency of air and water
and are reduced to the proper consistency.
Then by the agency of light and heat, oxygen
and electricity and the vital powers of the tree,
the sap is elaborated to the sweetness and pecu-
liar quality we find it possessing, to make wood
and fruit. These processes grow on very actively
during spring and summer, but in August, the
sap thickens, the immature shoots fill out round
and firm, the layer of 'sap-wood becomes solid,
and by September the growth of the
year is accomplished. The roots now gradually
cease absorbing food and water, but the foliage
continues to exhale moisture until the water is
almost wholly discharged from the tree. Sap
circulation then ceases and bud and branch are
comparatively dry. There is no further work
for the leaves and they dry and fall; thus dur-
ing autumn the tree is gradually prepared for
winter, or more properly speaking, for its an-
nual rest, which comes in winter, and in this
condition it cannot be injured by the cold, be-
cause there is little or no water in bud or branch
to freeze. I am aware that there are excep-
tions, but exceptions generally confirmed rules.
In the annual movement above skeched
there is a beautiful provision made for the buds
so thickly set for the next year's growth. Af-
ter the tree has perfected its new wood and


ripened its fruit, there is a surplus of soluble
sugary matter left which is evaporated down,
as before described, and is thus stored within
the tree for the use of the buds in the spring
following. Analogous to this, though in a very
different form, we find in grain, beans, and
other seeds, a store of dry, farinacious matter
accompanying the germ, which, when the seed
is planted, absorbs moisture, which, by the aid
of a substance called diastase in the seed, con-
verts the insoluble starch to sugar, which feeds
the young plant until the roots strike into the
soil and its spire rises to light and air, when it
is able to draw its sustenance from mother earth.
In the spring, the buds or germs of future
growth remain dormant until the increasing sun
warms the earth and the roots commence to
absorb water, which dissolves the reserve food,
expands the buds and they break into leaves
and grow upon it until they can perform their


functions of clearing the sap and digesting the
new food taken from earth and air.
Periods of rest seem to be as necessary for
trees as for animals, and experiments have
shown that deprived of it and forced to grow
continuously they sicken and fail to perform
their usual work. Tropical trees have their
times of rest equally marked, though not so
prolonged. Orange trees have a singular habit
of growing and resting three or four times
during the season. Generally in February
their winter rest ends; the buds break and
shoots make five to twveIvd inches growth, then
the trees rest a few weeks. In May another
growth begins, and so on.
The orange tree follows the general law in its
sap movements. As winter approaches the
wood ripens and the volume of sap ebbs until
the tree is prepared to withstand even severe
cold. Lemons, limes and guavas continue ab-
sorbtion and circulation to a later period and
do not discharge themselves as does the orange,
consequently they suffer. In the severe cold of
December 30th, 1880, the temperature fell to
180, the oranges on the trees being full of juice
froze solid, and the evergreen foliage being thin
and having some little sap also froze and fell
off, but the. trees escaped almost entirely be-
cause of the small amount of water the sap had
retained. The time of greatest danger is un-
doubtedly in February after the trees have
awakened to full activity and filled up their sap
vessels root and branch, and then if any such
cold comes the sap must freeze, which bursts
and disorganizes the delicate circulatory pass-
ages. The winter of 1835-6 was one of a
severity unexampled since. A blizzard "
swept over Florida destroying many of her or
ange trees. If there are any Florida meteoro-
logical records of that winter extant, it would
be interesting to ascertain whether there were
any similar cold snaps in December and Janu-
ary. Doubtless there were, but the sap being
at minimum the orange trees escaped.
L. H. A.
Okeechobee and the Caloosahatchee Canal.
FORT OGDEN, FLA., May 20th, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
As there seems to be a great diversity of
opinion as to the success of the drainage of
Lake Okeechobee, a brief description of the
Lake, its surroundings and tributaries, will be
interesting to your many readers.
Okeechobee is forty miles, about, both ways,
and is surrounded with saw-grass and maiden-
cane hammocks and on the south by the Ev-
erglades, which are a succession of bays, pine
islands, Mangrove swamps, and of which, but
little is known. The Miami River is the outlet
for the waters of the Everglades. On the east
side of the Okeechobee is Fort McRae, which


is on the borders of the lake and inside the
saw-grass, which is two miles wide. East of
the saw-grass the country is low prairie, with
cypress, pine and cabbage palmetto islands.
From Fort McRae, north to the mouth of the
Kissimmee, thert is a large body of hammock
bays, that are immensely rich, covered with
live oak, red bay, cypress, and cabage pal-
metto. The Kissimmee River is a deep river
and during the rainy season, will swim for two
miles and overflowing the country_ n__bot
sides, which is mostly low, with an occasional
hammock, that does not overflow. From the
Kissimmee to Fish-Eating Creek, the country is
low saw-grass and prairie, intersected with ham-
mocks, and during the rainy season, one sea of
water. From Fish-Eating creek to Caloosa-
hatchee River and the proposed canal, during
the rainy season, it is one sea of water, and


there is scarcely any spot that does not over-
flow, except the banks and the mound built by
the aborigines, and in which they were all
buried. From the mound to the river, some
three miles, there is a canal cut by these mound-
builders. The Caloosahatchee rises in Lake
Okeechobee, runs through Lake Kickpochee,
and through Lake Flirt. The Caloosahatchee
at the mouth, is two miles wide, the channel
narrow and crooked and full of oyster bars,
has a depth of seven feet of water to Myers,
which is fifteen miles from the mouth, on south
side-is a thriving town of 300 inhabitants-
church, good school, and is a quiet and orderly
place. As you travel up the river, you reach
the islands. Here the water is not so deep,
and Twelve-Mile Creek empties in on the south
side. Here there are some fine hammock lands
and several fine cane farms. From this, as high
as Fort Simmons, there is plenty of water, but
on nearing Fort Thompson, you reach the rap-
ids. The river is narrow and rocky for several
miles, until you enter Lake Flirt. This is small
shallow lake. Then still further up you enter
saw-grass for some three miles to Lake Kick-
pochee, which is deep and covers a township of
land. The dredge has not reached this lake yet.
It is three miles from Lake Kickpochee to
Okeechobee-saw grass, willows, lettuce and
floating islands. The dredge cuts 18 feet wide
and 41 feet deep, but she will have to cut sev-
eral times to make a canal large enough to carry
off the immense amount of water that runs
into the lake from the rivers and flat surround-
ink country.
The surveyors claim a fall of 21 feet. With
a canal cut deep and wide enough, there is a
probability that the waters of the lake will be
lowered to such an extent, in the dry season,
that the canal will carry off the waters so rap-
idly, that the lake will not fill to overflow its
surroundings, and thus reclaim these fertile
lands. The timber is scarce for building and
fencing. The dredge is now working, but not
as rapidly as was anticipated, owing to the dry
weather.
On the Caloosahatchee, on both sides, the
lands are good and produce corn, cane, rice
and grow fine orange trees. Should the canal
drain this immense country, it will be the gar-
den spot of Florida, and the hooting of the
owl and the bellowing of the alligator give
way to the songs of civilization.
F. C. M. BOGGESS.

THE AGE OF TREES.-A scientist interested.
in the study of cosmography, the branch of in-
vestigation bearing upon the structure of the
world, as onie element of the proof of the world's
great age, adduces the point that the great
trees of California, with from 1,350 to 2,550
annual rings of vegetable growth, reveal the
fact that these monarchs of the vegetable world
were saplings when Nebuchadnezzar was born.
Forests have likewise been estimated to have


been 4,000 years old, and grew from seed pro-
pagated by older parent trees, and these, in
turn, from grand-parents, whose crumbled dust
forms a rich vegetable mold to nourish their
younger progeny. How many such generations
occurred no one can tell.

-A writer in the Nineteenth Century says
that contagion consists of minute solid particles
and not gaseous disseminations. If this is true
we can readily understand that a person who
breathes only through his nose will be much
less likely to catch a contagious disease in a
sick-room than would a mouth-breather. Free
ventilation, perfect cleanliness and frequent
changes of clothes afford the best means of re-
moving the contagious particles given off by
sick persons.


r





e-: THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


THE COLOR OF FLOWERS.-P rof. Schueltz-
ler, assuming that the color of flowers is due to
the combination of different chemical elements
in their tissues, has shown by experiment that
when an alcoholic extract of the color is made
it is enough to add to it an acid or a kaline sub-
stance to cause it to exhibit any of the colors
which plants present. Flowers of the peony
for example, give a violet liquid tQ alcohol; if
salt of sorrel is added to this liquid it will turn
a pure red; soda produces, according to the
quantity that is added, violet, blue or green.
-The Scientific A-merican has a cut and de-
scription of a new hay-rick which is also used
as a shelter for stock. It consists of two square
inclosures with a passage-way between them,
which is covered by a peaked roof, the hay
being placed in the spaces thus inclosed, and
upon the rafters, being built up as high as nec-
essary.
-Miss Middy Morgan, the live-stock reporter
of the New York Times, is a tall, plain, raw-
boned woman of fifty years. She is the best
judge of cattle in New York, can tell the weight
of an animal at a glance, and was once a mem-
ber of Victor Emanuel's staff, her duty being
to buy all horses for his army. She has been
on the Times for ten years, has saved a good
deal of money, and is highly respected.
FACT !-In this age almost every person is a
reader, and receives more instruction from the
press than the pulpit.
-A young man writes to the Philadelphia
Times asking how to learn journalism, but the
editor answers; There is only one way-go to
work at it and keep at it until you either suc-
ceed or learn that you can't succeed, and if you
can't succeed, quit at once. Far better be a
good blacksmith than a poor journalist or law-
yer."
-Mr. Charles Dudley Warner writes from
Palermo that brigandage is about at an end in
Sicily. The organization of the brigande is
broken up and they are discouraged. "My
own explanation of the change," writes Mr.
Warner, "is that the brigands have gone to
keeping the hotels in Sicily, and take it out of
the travelers in a legal but more thorough man-
ner. I might as well say here, from considera-
ble experience in Sicilian hotels, that they are
.on their way to be first-class. The prices are
already first-rate. They have only to raise the
accommodation, the food and attendance up to
the prices and they will be all right. The land-
lords have simply begun at the wrong end.
CURIOSITIES OF THE PATENT OFFICE.-An
English Journal pays a flattering tribute to
American intelligence when it remarks that
"a good percentage of the inventions are of
American origin. In that country of geniuses
everybody invents." Yet there is a ridiculous
side to the question. Some of the applicants
for patents create a laugh at their expense if
they do not get the protection of the Govern-
ment for their inventions." One man claims


protection for the application of the Lord's
Prayer, repeated in a loud voice to cure stam-
mering. Another asks protection on behalf of
a new and useful attachment of a weight to a
cow's tail to prevent her switching it during
the milking operation. A lady patented a hair-
crimping pin, which she specified might be
also used as a paper cutter, a skirt supporter,
a child's pin, a boquet holder, a shawl fastener,
a book mark. A "horse refresher" is a hollow
bit, perforated with holes and connected with a
flexible tube with a water reservoir in the vehi-
cle, so that the driver can give the animal a
drink without stopping. The "snorer's friend"
is a luxurious contrivance to he attached to


C6, a~~


manufacture of silk, has made important im-
provements in his machine for the reeling of raw
silk from cocoons. Several of his silk-testing
machines have been adopted by the silk-grow-
ers in France and Italy, and one has been sent
to Japan to test the silk of that country. Other
machines have been purchased by a number of
American silk manufacturers.
-The loss in agricultural staples in Louis-
iana, from the overflow of the Mississippi River,
is now estimated at 100,000 bales of cotton and
80,000 hogsheads of sugar.
-It is said that the outlook for Western cat-
tle growers is exceedingly flattering. The gen-
eral condition of the cattle on the ranches is 20
per cent. better than the average years in the
Southwest.


church-pew backs, so that one may sleep
through a dull sermon in peace and quiet.
THEY LIVE IN SPITE OF ALL !-James
Watson Webb, of New York, is 81, and smokes
incessantly. Thurlow Weed is 84, and drinks
large quantities of Santa Cruz rum. Peter
Cooper is 91, and lives on a diet of oatmeal.
They are all vigorous, healthy and happy.
-Luther said : "If a man is not handsome
at twenty, strong at thirty, learned at forty,
rich at fifty, he will never be handsome, strong,
learned or rich in this ,worlhl." Luther no doubt
struck the bull's-eye as far as beauty, strength
and learning are concerned, but he died before
an office-holder had acquired the art of saving
$25,000 a year out of a salary of $3,000 ;
hence his remarks about riches don't fit now.
Norristown Herald.
-There are now upwards of twenty-five
hundred fish ponds in Georgia, most of which
are stocked with carl).
SOUTH GEORGIA.-Taken as a whole, the
crop prospect is the finest we have had for
many years. With good seasons from now on
Thomas County, and in fact all this section of
country, will have plenty and to spare for the
next twelve months.-Southern Enterprise.
To KILL MOLES.-Mr. J. A. Perry, of
Dooly County, gets rid of moles in the follow-
ing manner: He drills a hole in a ground pea
with an awl and inserts strychnine, after which
the pea is placed in the track of the mole.
Mr. Perry says his moleship will go for that
pea every time, and it never fails to kill him.
Hawkinsville (Ga.) News.
"Too-Too!" AND "UTTER.'- Favorite ar-
tistic combinations of color are pale green and
silver, turquoise-blue and violet, copper-red and
vandyke-brown, fawn-color with gold, sage-
green with heliotrope and silver, olive with
coral-pink, sapphire-blue with amber willow
green, and buttercup-yellow with black or
Venetian-red.
-A new method of preserving meat is to
cause the heart of the animal to pump boracic
acid into the tissues. For example, a sheep is
stunned by a blow, and blood being withdrawn
from the left jugular vein a strong solution of
boracic acid, kept at blood heat, is injected.
The heart of the still living animal quickly
pumps the antiseptic fluid into all parts of the
body, and the sheep is then killed by the
butcher in the usual way. The cost is slight,
and the meat thus treated will keep several
weeks in the heat of summer.
-To cure dogs of killing chickens, take the
chicken that has been killed, by the legs, and
afterbeating the dog with it, pass the leg each
side of the dog's neck and tie the feet together,
so that the chicken hangs securely fastened to
his neck. After carrying the chicken around
for a day or two, the dog will be so thoroughly
disgusted with chickens in general that he will
not be apt to trouble them again. -
-Serill, the inventor of machines for the


fully prepared, showing the present condition
and prospects of the cotton crop. The report
sums up as follows: If the season from the
present time until cotton picking begins is fair,
a considerable increase in the amount of cotton
grown in Alabama and Texas over last year,
and quite as much, notwithstanding the over-
flow in the States of Arkansas, Louisiana and
Mississippi, may be expected. Reports from
the Atlantic coast and the Noithern belt may
not be expected to be quite so favorable as
those from the Gulf States, but the whole situa-
tion at this time may be regarded as promising
a yield in excess of that of the current season
last year, and approximating po doubt the lar-
gest ever raised.


I


-It is said that the late James Vick, the
Rochester seedsman, gave more than $10,000
yearly for charitable purposes. He gave $25,-
000 worth of seeds to the Kansas sufferers by
the grasshopper plague.
PAPER BAGS TO PROTECT GRAPES.-Using
paper bags to prevent ravages of birds, and
effects of rot, has been tried and proved to be
of great value. They should be placed over
the bunch when the fruit is about half grown
or even sooner. The clusters will ripen per-
fectly inside the bags, and be of finer quality
than when grown in the open air.-N. 0. Com.
Bulletin.
-There was a silk exhibition lately in Phil-
adelphia, and cocoons were shown from worms
led upon the leaves of the Osage orange.
-A contemporary truthfully says that live
men advertise in newspapers, dead men only on
tombstones. -
About Newspapers, Etc.
There are published on the globe 34,274 news-
papers an(l periodicals, with a total circulation
of 106,000,000 copies. Europe leads with 19,-
557 journals; next follows North America with
12,400; Asia has 575; South Australia, 661;
South America, 609; and Africa, 132. Of
these periodicals, 16,500 are printed in the
English language; 7,800 in German; 3,850 in
French; and then come 1,600 in Spanish.
There are 4,020 dailies; 18,274 are published
three times or once a week, and 8,508 appear
less frequently.
A full font of Japanese type comprises 50,000
characters, of which 3,000 are in constant use.
Each Japanese word having a distinct charac-
ter, the telegraph has been useless to the nation,
and. the telephone is likely to prove a blessing
to them.
Sixty papers in the United States are pub-
lished by women.
The art of printing is taught in the public
schools of San Jose, Cal.
The New York Herald spends $500,000 a
year on news and $700,000 on white paper.
A European firm has patented a newspaper
printing press which, it is claimed, prints in
four or five different colors at the same time.
It is somewhat similar to presses used in print-
ing wall paper.
Among the novel exhibitions which have
been held of late years, the international news-
paper exhibit, now open at Dresden, is perhaps
as noteworthy as any. There are displayed
there 1,500 periodicals, printed in 55 different
languages-291 in German, 124 in English,
155 in French, Spanish, Portuguese and Italian,
34 in Sclav dialects, 7 in Finnish, and 75 in
Asiatic and other tongues. There are among
them 99 illustrated papers, 60 comic journals,
and 592 scientific and industrial publications.
Goming Cotton Crop.
The New York World has special dispatches
from New Orleans, Galveston, Memphis and
Mobile, which, it is claimed, have been care-





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. leE


- "Read and Think," Etc.-A Criticism.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
While I am in entire harmony with the
spirit of the article on page 58, under above
head. I must take exception to the figures used
to uphold the argument that there is too great
a disparity between the. price producers receive
and that which the consumer pays. If the
profit or margin of a wholesale merchant at
Jacksonville is no more than $1.02, (I laugh
when I think of one of them trying to make our
local merchant believe he handled flour for a
margin of 25 cents per barrel) I would not think
hard of it, for from that he must pay insurance,
clerk hire, rent, advertising bills, take risks of
stock depreciating in quality on his hands, etc.
The difficulty lies in the fact that he buys, gen-:
erally, from some one else, who also makes a
dollar per barrel. If he buys from large mill-
ing firms at St. Louis or Chicago, and only
makes $1 per barrel, then he pays the miller
too much. But perhaps he gets it as cheaply
as he can because the large milling firms have
combined to keep the price of flour up while in
league with all rings whose object it is to depre-
ciate the price of wheat.
The gross errors in the calculation are the fol-
lowing
It does not "take five and a half bushels of
first-class wheat to make a barrel of flour," but
less than four and a half. At any common
country mill at the North, 270 pounds of wheat
will make a barrel of flour, and in the large
commercial mills at the West, where "all the
modern improvements" are located, about 4
(four) bushels of No. 2 wheat (as it is graded as
Kansas City, etc.,) will make a barrel of flour. In
taking grist to mill in Central Kansas (a "one-
horse" mill only that it had arrangements to re-
grind the middlings and shorts) I have received
204 pounds of flour and thirty-six of bran for
each four bushels of wheat I furnished to the
hopper. As .to milling costing "75 cents," I
would again correct. FIifteen cents per bushel
was the charge it paid, and I have no doubt that
the large commercial mills will grind at 25 to
30 cents per barrel, or even lower. Only "10
cents" is allowed as the "amount realized by the
mill: for bran or middlings." If the amount
is 134 pounds, as you make it, this is a great
error, for bran sells at about one-third cent per
pound and middlings at nearly or quite one cent
per pound at the great milling centres. *
By my method ofcalculation, when wheat is
$t.30 per bushel at St. Louis and Chicago, flour
costs, laid down at Jacksonville, as follows:


Four bushels wheat $5.20, milling 30 cents,
cartage,. insurance and sundries 10 cents,
(thirty-six pounds bran will pay for barrel)
freight by car-load-lots (I know of an offer as
low as this in ten-barrel lots) .80 cents. Total
$6.40. Now if when second-grade wheat sells
at $1.30 at St. Louis, the best flour sells at 89.75
at Jacksonville, there is a go-between" profit
of $3.35 per barrel. It may be claimed that if
the product, of grinding -is only "cut "into
flour and bran that the flour will not all be of
highest grade. This I admit. Probably one-
thirMd: of it would be second-rate. In other
words, an expense of $19.20 would lay down in
Jacksonville two barrels of first-grade and one
of second-grade flour.
You ask, "is not 75 cents a low enough rate
at which to manufacture five and a half bushels
of wheat into a barrel of flour ?" I answer
most emphatically, no Even supposing it took
the grinding and bolting of five and a half


bushels of wheat, a manufacturer would get
wealthy at half that price. There is an enor-
mous profit somewhere, and when the difference
between the raw material and the wholesale
rate at place of manufacture is as at present, it
shows that the wholesale merchant at Jackson-
ville is not the only one to blame.
At Cincinnati, Ohio, on November 10th last,
the wholesale prices of highest grade wheat and
flour were $1.37 per bushel, and $8.50 per bar-
rel. Reducing these in the same proportion
would indicate that when wheat is $1.30 flour
would be $8.06, which shows that the manufac-
turer gets all I allowed him and $1.66 besides.
With 80 cents added for freight,the cost laid down
at Jacksonville is $8.86, which would allow the
wholesale merchant but 89 cents' margin, while
there is a margin of $1.66 at the other end
of the line. Speculators, to a certain extent,
make the price of wheat and flour on 'change,
and the large mill companies and wholesale
merchants are ruled by the rates on 'change.
However, wife and I have a successful way of
rebelling against these rings and their extor-
tion, we don't use their wares. Plant a patch
of cassava and be independent of the wheat and
flour rings. PIONEER.



-One Key West pine-apple grower netted
$4,000 last year on his fruit.
-The Key Westers lost 25,000 pine-apples
by the ill-fated steamer Rio Grande.
-Mrs. J. W. Funic, of Lake City, who is
engaged in silk culture, has lately added 40,000
eggs to her stock.
-Pensacola, during the month of April,
shipped about 10,000,000 superficial feet of
lumber and timber.
-A Brevard County farmer has made forty-
five barrels of syrup from a patch of sugar cane
that has not been replanted for seven years.
-A gentleman has been at Fernandina the
past week enthusing the people with the hope
of soon erecting a cotton seed oil mill.- Union.
-Orange City Times : Pine-apples in this
section are very promising. There will be a
good crop, and our fruit here is equal to that
produced anywhere.' q
-Two enterprising Hollanders, at Fernan-
dina, are reclaiming one of the marshes bor-
dering on the city for the purpose of convert-
ing it into.a pasture. They are cutting ditches,
throwing up dykes, etc.
-Colonel McWilliams started fire, Wednes-
day, in his first brick kiln, at his yard, eigh-
teen miles from Fernandina. He says he will
have about one hundred thousand good bricks,
he thinks, from the kiln.


-Key West Democrat : "About the largest
bunch of bananas we have ever seen was sold
at auction Monday. The bunch was over three
feet long, and had 250 separate bananas on it.
It was raised in this place by Mr. Tom Adams."
-The largest orange grove in Florida is that
of Major H. V. Norris, who went from Chicago
to Spring Garden in 1872. He now has a
grove of 11,000 thrifty orange trees, which bear
about 500,000 oranges.-Enterprise News.
-A subscription list is being circulated in'
Gainesville to create a fund of $10,000 for the
erection of new and commodious buildings for
the East Florida Seminary. One thousand dol-:
lars was subscribed within half an hour after
the paper had been started.
-The first crate of cucumbers went forward
on Tuesday.-Lake City Reporter, 28th ult.
Some of the truck farmers in this county
were shipping cucumbers by the 15th of Feb-


ruary.-Sumter Advance. Who wants to eat a
cucumber in February ? Out of season entirely!
This is too much in Advance.-Lake City Re-
porter.
-This squib, from the Pensacola Advance-
Gazette "looks like" a shy at Tavares: We
submit herewith a few names suitable for baby
towns, which are entirely at the disposal of
town christeners: Tropicapolis, Lemonadia,
Spring Poetville, Alligatorborough, Saurian-
town, Solarville, Pineboro', Sheepville, and
Belowthefrostliiington. The beauty of all
these names lies in the fact that they mean
something."
FLORIDA LUMBER.-The lumber business is
constantly on the increase in this State, and
especially on the line of the Florida Central
and Western. Last week, we are informed,
902,500 feet of lumber were brought to this
city from points along the line of this road.
For over a month past the wharf of the above
road in this city has been lined with vessels
loading with lumber for Northern markets.-
Union.
-We are pleased to announce the arrival of
J. P. Whitney, Esq., of the New. York Florida
Pathfinder, who has this time come to make the
ancient city his headquarters. He will take
charge in the conducting of the St. Augustine
Press, as well as making this locality the point
of issuing the Florida Pathfinder, which journal
enjoys a large and increasing circulation in the
Northern and Western States.-St. Augustine
Press, May 17.
-From what we can learn the average in
oranges, lemons, pineapples, &c., will be largely
increased throughout the county during the
year. There were nearly one thousand trans-
fers made in our county the past year, ending
March first, but yet there are many eligible
sites for groves, and we trust as many more will
seek homes among us and start their groves this
summer and fall as have settled among us the
past year.
Who dares to doubt there is no money in
the orange business. The young nine-year old
grove, 20 acres, of Dr. Gilfen, between this '
place and Beresford, was recently sold for the
handsome sum of $20,000. It has just com-
menced to bear, and is on high rolling pine
land, similar to the land around this place.
There .are within a radius of three miles
of our office nearly 2,500 acres in orange groves,
and we venture to assert that they, as a whole,
will compare favorably with any hammock
groves in the State.-South Florida Times.

Horticultural Experiment.
From a private letter to Rev. Lyman Phelps
from Hon. H. S. Sanford, we learn that the fol-
lowing trees, plants and seeds were included in
the shipment recently made by him and to be
planted at his Belair grove:
Fifty-six grafted soft-shell almonds, 50 walnut


Madeira nuts, 50 plums, for prunes; 30 Spanish
chestnuts, 20 cypress, 20 12-year-old date palms,"
20 bunches of bamboo, 12 to 20 feet high; 100
pepper trees, and some other acacias, eucalyp-
tus seed for low ground, and seed of the um-
brella pine, from the Hyeres region.
Mr.. Phelps informs us that the trees and
plants reached their destination in excellent
condition. Mr. Sanford has done more, proba-
bly, toward the introduction of foreign fruits
and plants into Florida than any one in the
State, or than the whole State. With his un-
tiring efforts, and the location of the experi-
mental Government farm, which we hope soon
to see in Orange County, new fruits, plants and
industries, will .certainly be added to the list
that is destined to bring large returns to our
county.-South Florida Journal.





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


An American's Ideal.
BY WILL. M. CLEMENS.
A common-place young girl;
A decidedly rare young girl;
Stay at home night,
Do what Is right,
Help-her-old-mother young girl.
A hard-to-find young girl; ;
A matter-of-fact young girl;
An extra-poetical,
Anti mesthetical,
Care-nothing-for-novels young girl.
A minus-her-bangs young girl;
A show-al-l-her-brains young girl;
With an unpowdered face,
One that don't lace,
A dress-for-her-health young girl.
An up-in-the-morning young girl;
A help-with-the-wash young girl;
One that can rub,
Not afraid of the tub,
A roll-up-her-sleeves young girl.
A quiet-and-modest young girl;
A sweet-and-pure young girl;
An upright, ambitious,
Lovely, delicious,
A pride-of-the-home young girl.
A remarkably-scarce young girl;
A very-much-wanted young girl;
A truly-Amtnerican,
Too-utter-paragon,
The kind-I-like young girl.
-N. Y. Independent.

Young Woman's Part in Life.
There is something in a pleasant-faced dam-
sel which takes a young man's eye-whether he
will or no. It may be magnetism. It may be
the sympathy of that which is beautiful in
men's natures for that which is lovely in wo-
men's. The women have great power over the
sex called sterner. Particularly so, if they be
young, pretty and marriagable. Young wo-
men! do you know that it is you who are to
mold some man's life ? Have you ever thought
of the responsibility that attaches to you long
before you are married ? A word you may say
to a young man whom you may never-marry,
nor even see a second time, will possibly exert
an influence over his life that you don't dream
of! A smile does wonders in lighting up the
dark corners of a man's soul-a word in. the
right place may electrify his whole being. A
wrong influence will do more damage in a sin-
gle instant than a life time may correct. The
fashionable extravagance of a large majority of
the young women, in town and country, fright-
ens young men away from all intentions of mat-
rimony, leads them to look upon the whole sex
with distrust, and drives them to scenes where
they are not bound hand and foot by the un-
reasonable demands of wives who would spend
faster than they could make. And the fact
that this tendency shows signs of increase
makes the case worse. The fever of fashionable
dress, the ignorance of housewifery accomplish-
ments, the lack of the peculiar home-virtues
that are calculated to make a home lovely-in-
fect the villages now-a-days as they do in the


city.
When an earnest, energetic, hard-working,
sensible young fellow, who is in search of a wife,
sees this, he fears and hesitates, refuses to marry
at all perhaps, and so does only half the good
he could in the world-simply because he has
no notion of fulfilling the homely but very
truthful adage which tells of placing a man's
nose upon the grindstone. We commend the
subject to the regards of our young women
readers. Let them cultivate the domestic vir-
tues-make themselves true women-know a
woman's duties-cherish their hands less and
their intellect more-and their lot will be hap-
pier and better. More than this, they will find
that there are mates in the world for them, and


those worth having. Will not mothers bring
the true mode of life before their daughters in
the light in which it ought to be shown-which
is nothing more than that of common-sense.
That is the rarest of virtues; more valuable
because there is comparatively little of it to be
found.- Germantown Telegraph.

Our Dwindling Public Domain.
The impression that the public domain of the
country is rapidly dwindling is a very general
one; but not a little surprise will be created by
the statement of the Commissioner of Public
Lands, in his last report,that the area still remain-
ing subject to occupancy under the Homestead
and Pre-emption acts is barely sufficient to
meet the probable demand of settlers during
the next year or two. There will still be left
much land of poor quality-a large proportion
of it hilly, rocky, broken and covered with
" scrub" timber; also, a good deal of swamp
land, which is valueless for agricultural pur-
poses until it is drained, and which could only
be drained at great cost. But it is scarcely an
exaggeration to say that nearly all the really
valuable-valuable, that is, for agricultural
purposes-portions of the public lands are now
taken up.
In view of these facts, and of the still swell-
ing tide of immigration, it is plain that at no
distant day there will be a radical change in
agricultural management and methods. The
railroads, it is true, have vast tracts yet undis-
posed of; but railroad lands and all other lands
available for agricultural purposes, are advanc-
ing in price and must continue to advance.
This is the inevitable result of a rapidly increas-
ing agricultural population; and, as one effect
of it the farming operations of the country must
be brought down to a strictly practical and
economical basis. As the era of cheap land
goes out, the era of small farms will come in.
The farmer of the future will be the small far-
mer, and he will devote himself assiduously to
the solution of the problem, "How much is an
acre capable of producing ?" and what method
of cultivation will best enable me to secure the
maximum of production ?"
When that time comes it will not pay to own
big farms and only half cultivate them; and
we shall see no uncultivated strips along the
sides of fields, and no weed-grown corners. Such
a time now doubtless seems far away, but it may
come sooner than we expect.-Florida Daily
Times.

'Tis Now.
Now the chowder's in the pot, and the days
are getting hot, and we'll all begin to swelter
with a swelt, swelt, swelt. While the crimson
lemonade through a straw enchants the maid,


who displays a bunch of flowers at her belt,
belt, belt.
Nor our fancies, quaint and queer, lightly
turn to thoughts of beer, and the pic-nic's ever-
lasting custard pie, pie, pie. And we sit with
pretty Nell, neathh a gingham umberell, gaily
boomeranged and shipwrecked by her sigh,
sigh, sigh.
Now the cat begins to scoot from the well-
directed boot, and the poodle wears a kettle on
his tail, tail, tail. Now the Vassar maidens
mount every soda water fount, and they drink
vermillion rapture till they're pale, pale pale.
Now the ice man with a smile slings his
haughty summer style, and the plumber bows
in solitude his head, head, head. Now the
steamer-whistle blows, and the bee deserts the


rose, long enough to sting the small boy on his
nose, nose, nose.
Now the cuffs and collars melt, now the
monte man is felt, and the circus in the country
does appear, 'pear, 'pear. No news is this, by
Jo, they are facts all people know, for they're
written by the joker every year, year, year.-
Puck.

Foreign Population of New York.
The French residents of New York, says a
correspondent of the Buffalo Courier, number
about 10,000. For so small a part of the popu-
lation, the French is certainly an important
one. It is prominent in business, in society, in
the professions, in works of benevolence, and in
many other ways. Considering its relative
numbers, it may be said to hold the lead in this
respect among the foreign classes. According
to the census, New York's total foreign popula-
tion in 1880 was 478,000.. It must now be well
beyond 500,000, for New York has retained a
part of the tremendous tide of immigration that
has flowed in since. Over 150,000 of last year's
arrivals were credited to New York, but the
bulk of these remained there only for a while.
The native population at the same time was
708,000, but probably half of these were the
children of foreign parents. If this class and
the foreign born were counted together, they
would certainly make up more than half of the
whole population. Of the foreigners counted
in 1880 nearly 200,000 were born in Ireland.
The exact census figure is 198,595. The Irish
were supposed to be more numerous than that,
but still the number is very large. The Ger-
mans comprised 153,000 the English 30,000,
the Italians 12,000, and the Dutch, (Holland-
ers,) who did so much for Manhattan in the old
time, only 1,800. The Chinese numbered 747.
COINCIDENCES.-A series of coincidences
observed in a Boston horse-car a few days ago
is thus described by The Journal: "Seven
young ladies were perceived in the car, of
whom not one had both gloves on, and none
were wholly bare-handed. Of these, four had
gloves on their right hands and three on their
left, and in every instance the ungloved hand
lay in the lap above the other. All of the
seven bare hands had diamond rings upon
them, and whenever any attentions were needed
by the hair or raiment of the ladies, in every
instance the ungloved hand was employed to
bestow them, and in the necessary movements
the stones flashed and glittered very much.
And when, as happened in process of time, the
seven young ladies left the car, one after the
other, four of them waved their left hands to
the conductor to direct him to stop, and the
other three agitated their right hands, and
again the rings sparkled quite copiously. All
of which was very curious and interesting to


the scientific mind."

Southern Women.
Mr. Geo. I. Seney, the great philanthropist
pays the following high compliment to South-
ern women. He was asked recently why he
gave so much money to Wesleyan Female Col-
lege, and replied:
"If any one asks you why I gave so much
money to Wesleyan Female College, tell them
it was to honer my mother, to whom, under
God, I owe more than all the world beside." *
* "I admire the Southern women. There
are possibilities in the Southern women not
equalled anywhere else on earth."
This reply is worthy the head and heart of
earth's greatest philanthropists.





I ... --


1.66





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 1


A Quarter-Acre of Roses I
Mr. Robertson, of the Brooksville Crescent,
(Hernando County,) is giving descriptions of a
part of his county through which he made a
trip, and thus mentions a" tower" that sur-
mounts a quarter-acre covered by the Cher-
okee Rose on the Lock-heart Hammock-a very
appropriate name:
Here, on what we christened Rose Hill, we
found the object of our search-a magnificent
Cherokee rose vine, covering nearly a quarter
of an acre of land, climbing to the tops of the
patriarchal live oaks and making a veritable
tower of roses."
We copy the following poetical account of
the* origin of the Cherokee. Rose from a late
number of the Union, and we shall not mar the
pretty story by even faintly insinuating a doubt
as to this being the true history:
THE CHEROKEE ROSE.
In the far mountains, where of old the Cherokee held
sway,
A captive youth, a Seminole, in pain and sickness lay,
There was watching in the wigwam, there was waiting
by his side-
A maiden of the Cherokees her tender nursing plied.
Though he was called a foreman, and terrible his doom,
The watcher came, with hope aflame, to light the wig-
wain's gloom.
Health kindled from the light: the maid the prison door
Sflung back,
And luminous for rescue shone the southward forest
track.I
She led the captive Seminole-she led him for the kin
There is in love of maiden kind, and hath forever been
Since heart in man hath beat and woman's pulse kept
holy time,
In every race and hue, in every sublinary clime.
She paused a moment ere the scene, the village of the
child,
Faded from view, and turned to cut a fragrant branch
and wild
From the white rose-vine climbing near her father's
wigwam door,
To plant-a relic of the hills her eyes might see no
more,
To the far lowland home she chose with the young
brave to be,
Near the palm-groves of Helaka and the prairie Kissim-
mee,
They came--and near a lodge perfumed with sweetness
of the breeze,
Enshrined by rite, their dwelling made the land between
the seas,
The white rose branch the maiden brought, one tendril
to her land
Linking her heart, she planted by the lodging with her
hand;
And there it grew, and thence it spread, and twined
as love will twine,
From hill to vale with cencer blooms of aroma divine.
The rose that tells the story of the love the brave set
free
Hath now a name, from whence it came-the lowland
"Cherokee."
Jacksonville, May 13, 1882.

Pure Water for Cows.
The time is coming, I hope, when dairymen
will be compelled to recognize the fact that
wholesome milk cannot be made from unwhole-
some water-that he who compels his stock to
slake thirst out of pools festering with typhoid
and other diseases' is more criminal when he
sends the milk of such cows to the consumer
than he who skims and dilutes his milk with
pure water, since the first tampers with health
and life whilst the latter touches only the


pocket. But many farmers are ignorant of these
facts and think they do no harm in .compelling
cows to drink of filthy waters, and when their
milk is taken to the factory, the manufacturer
is expected to turn it into a fine product, and a"
failure to do so is charged to a lack of skill or
neglect of his duties. I. can point to farms
where the lack of water for the need of herds
has made more loss in a single season than the
cost of sinking wells and erecting wind-mills for
giving an abundant supply-the question of a
good water supply for dairy farms is one that
not only pertains to new districts where dairy-
ing is about to.be introduced, but it concerns
largely the old dairy districts where from neg-


lect, or ignorance as to the true value of good
water conveniently located for stock, there is an
inadequate supply.
The widespread removal of forests and the
cutting down of timber on isolated patches of
land throughout the dairy regions of New York
and elsewhere, together with climatic changes,
have decreased the water supply on many dairy
farms; springs and streams once supposed to
be permanent now are found to fail in early
summer unless the season is more than ordina-
rily wet. Upon such farms unless some pro--
vision is made for obtaining a permanent sup-
ply of water to meet the wants of stock, dairy-
ing will soon have to be abandoned as it must
prove unremunerative.-Prof. X. A. Willard,
in Rural New Yorker.
American Silk.
The N. Y. Tribune says a silk dress is now on
exhibition in Philadelphia which has a note-
worthy history. It is the first brocade ever
made in America from American silk. The raw
silk was grown in fourteen States of the Union
by twenty-six families. It was reeled on a
Yankee reel, and manufactured by Hamil &
Boothe, of Paterson, N. J. In the quality of
the silk and the manner of manufacture it chal-
lenges comparison with the products of Lyons
looms. The gown will be presented by the
Woman's Silk Culture Association to Mrs. Lu-
cretia Garfield. As an example of what may
be done by Americans in this neglected indus-
try it is of great significance and value. The
offer of prizes, amounting to $500, made by a
Philadelphia firm for the best pound of cocoons
grown by any woman, is renewed for the pres-
ent year. The good women interested in urging
this industry on the country are succeeding
beyond their most sanguine hopes. Even with
the present difficulties in the way of bringing
the raw silk into the market, farmers' wives
and daughters all over the country find that its
growth adds a comfortable incidental sum to
their income ; and as soon as it is proved that
silk can be grown in the States of a quality
fine enough and in quantity sufficient to meet
the wants of our manufacturers, raw silk will
doubtless be protected by a tariff high enough
to give our own poor a chance to obtain the
enormous sums which now go out of the coun-
tiy every year to Italy and China.

Raising Sunflowers for Hens.
The necessity for a variety of food for chick-
ens is generally understood, but very few peo-
ple are aware of the value of sunflowers as
hen feed. They are very productive of oil, are
eaten greedily, and give a peculiar luster to the
feathers. I have one-eighth of an acre planted


in this crop, and propose to bind them into bun-
dles and stow them away for winter use. The
heads can be thrown into the hen-house, where
the chickens will soon pick out the seeds, thus
giving them exercise as well as variety. With
plenty of other grain within reach they will eat no
more sunflower seeds than are beneficial to them.
The seed can be bought at' our feed stores for
one dollar per bushel, at which price it ought
to be more generally used than it is. I Ithink a
great plot of sunflowers, with their great yel-
low faces turned to the sun, an agreeable sight.
-Kansas Farmer.
American vs. Foreign Wines.
The varieties of fermented and distilled
liquors now in use throughout the world may
be numbered by thousands. Hungary boasts


of four hundred kinds of wine alone, and France
between one and two thousand varieties. Al-
coholic liquors are made from different substan-
ces and modes of preparation, and are known
by different names in every country.
In South America the natives use "cocoanut
wine," which is made by the simple process of
burying the cocoanut in the sand by the shore,
near the edge of the tide, and leaving it until
the milk ferments. It is not very palatable to
Americans. The Swiss and Germans manu-
facture a kind of Schnapps from potatoes.
The Greeks use rakie," made from the lees of
wine and figs, while the whisky of Spain is
called aguardionte." The wine of the Rhine,
which is used largely in this country, is known
there as tietz," and the West Indians make a
wine from sugar-cane, called. tafi." Rum is
also extensively used. "Arrack is made from
rice, and is the favorite drink of the Hindoos.
The Russians indulge in a strong liquor made
from potatoes, which can cut the throat of an
American-in fact, every country uses a differ-
ent kind of liquor. In the United States the
distilization of liquors has nearly reached its
perfection, and American whisky, rum and
brandy are to be found everywhere. The cul-
tivation of the grape in California and the West
is increasing yearly, and now the production of
native wines is immense. It is claimed that our
own wines are far superior to the imported, and
they are becoming more popular for hotel and
private use. A leading hotel proprietor informs
us that the larger part of his customers prefer
the native wine to the foreign production, and
that the greater part of his wine room is stocked
with it. The use of wine as a beverage has
greatly increased in the past fifteen or twenty
years, while at the same time the use of liquors
has decreased. This is certainly an improve-
ment, and bids fair to drive the stronger liquors
out of use in time, except for mechanical pur-
poses.
To such a state of perfection has the manu-
facture of wine arrived in this country that
good judges are often deceived, and in .many
cases it is pronounced superior to the best of
foreign importations.-- -Hotel Gazette.

Rice in Louisiana.
Speaking of the Louisiana Rice crop, the
New Orleans Sugar Planter; of May 6, says:
We cannot recall a previous season when the
crop of this cereal presented such favorable con-
ditions as at preserit, and we have no doubt that
the product this year will be the heaviest in the
history of rice culture in Louisiana.
The weather has been unusually propitious
and a very large planting was effected in Feb-
ruary, larger than ever before known, and the
continued mild weatherhas caused fine growth;
in fact, there has been no check to its steady
progress. Heretofore with planting in March
it has not been unusual to have receipts of new
rice in July, and this year the crop will com-
mence to come in much earlier than usual.


One of the most extensive rice planters in
the State says that he expects to have consid-
erable rice milled and in the market during
July, and it is safe to assume that his is not the
only case.
While the planting has already been much
greater than in previous years, it is being still
further heavily increased by the planting .now
going on in the recently overflowed districts,
and this will be further extended as the waters
decline. The demand for seed for this purpose
has been so great as to absorb the bulk of the
supplies of rough rice, and the city mills have
now generally suspended milling operations as
a consequence.
It would seem that despite the flood, we are
to have a bountiful crop year, and its happy
effects upon the commercial progress of New
Orleans cannot be over-estimated.


I r I-- I -- r -- ---. ---- ----








fh orida d ispatdh.

JACKSONVILLE, JUNE 5, 1882.

EDITORS:
D. REDMOND, D. H. ELLIOTT, W. H. ASHMEAD.

Subscription $1.00 per annum, 06 advance.

ArTES OF ADVERTISINvG.
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One........................ $ 1 00 $2 50 $ 550 $10 00 $1850
Two..................... 2 00 5 00 10 00 18 00 3400
Three .................... 3 00 7 00 14 00 2500 4600
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Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
LOCAL ADVERTISING (seven words to line) ten cents
per line.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the best ad-
vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.

Work for June.-
Rice may be planted on upland to the 10th
or 15th of this month, in three foot drills, and
as recommended in a late number of THE
DISPATCH, which see.
Sweet Potatoes-cut vines-are now in order.
Plant all you possibly can during this month,
in broad, mellow drills, using as manure, all the
leaf-mould or dried muck and ashes you can
"rake and scrape." If you have no ashes made
and at hand, burn some "trash-piles," sods, turf,
&c., &c., then gather up all the ashes, scrape
the burnt and charred surface, collecting all
you can from each pile, and scatter this in the
furrows before bedding. Or, open a deep
furrow with a turning-plow-fill this furrow
with pine straw or other dry vegetable matter,
tramping it down well, burn it as it lies in the
furrow, and then bed on the ashes. To obtain
the very best results from your Sweet Potato
patch, you must supply potash in some form ;
and the modes we suggest are feasible and easy.
A moderate amount of stable manure, but
not too much, suits the sweet potato well. All
things considered: the slight cost-of preparing
land, cultivating, saving &c., we regard the
sweet potato as the Florida field crop'par excel-
lence, and do not think our readers should need
any urging to plant this invaluable esculent very
largely and in the best manner. We have laid
aside a comprehensive article on this subject,
from a correspondent of the Southern World,
and will endeavor to find room for it in our
next.


Cow Peas, either for hay or turning under,
should be. planted now. If you want the Conch
pea, or some other kind for seed, you may de-
fer planting until the end of the month.
Irish Potatoes, (if there are any still in the
ground,) should now be dug, dried carefully,
in a shady, breezy place, and put away for sum-
mer use. We have kept both the Early. Ver-
mont and Snowflake from April or early May
until November, in excellent eating condition,
by spreading them out thin on the floor of an
outhouse or loft. Let in plenty of air, but no
sun and not much light; pick out the few that
decay, as soon as discovered ; rub off the sprouts
once or twice, and you can have good, home-


raised Florida Irish potatoes "during the entire
summer.
Forage and Fodder crops, of many kinds, may
still be planted* It is rather lat'" for corn in
the drill, on account of the ravages of the eat-
erpillar; but "Cat-Tail" millet, and the Sor-
ghums do not seem to be as liable to the attacks
of this pest. We have been informed by a
practical and observing neighbor, that Gould's
Carbolated Fertilizer, sprinkled along the drill,
after covering the seed, acts as a detergent to
the caterpillar, and stimulates the growth of the
plant. Will some of our readers try this and
report ?
Sugar Cane, Cotton, Corn, Sweet Potatoes,
Rice, and all other field crops, must be promptly
and care fully worked during this month ; and no
noxious weed should be allowed to mature and
perfect its seed. By keeping the ground con-
stantly stirred around your plants, the weeds
and grass will be "nip'd i' the bud," and not
only present but future trouble and annoyance
avoided.
Watermelons will now begin to ripen up free-
ly; and those out of the reach of markets, who
have a surplus, may squeeze out the juice and
boil it down into an excellent syrup; or, a mod-
erate quantity of melons may be fed to horses,
mules and cows with benefit. Late Watermel-
ons may be planted up to the 15th.
Snap and Pole Beans, Egg-Plants, Cucum-
bers, Pumpkins, etc., may still be raised from
the seed, shading a little when the sun is too
hot. ,
Strawberry beds should always be kept clear
and free from grass and weeds; and as soon as
they are done bearing they should be shaded
for the remainder of the summer by planting a
row of cow-peas in the middle of each Straw-
berry row. At the North, many cultivators mow
off all the leaves of their plants with a scythe,
and then cover the whole patch thick and deep,
with straw or coarse litter. The great draw-
back on Strawberry culture, here, is the impos-
sibility, thus far, of keeping such fine varieties
as "Federal Point," "Manchester," "Sharpless,"
"Miner's Prolific," etc., from burning up during
the summer; and any one who can devise a
cheap and easy mode of carrying our bearing
plants safely into their second year, will be
entitled to the gratitude of all Floridians who
raise, and all Northerners who eat, this deli-
cious and incomparable berry! See Dr. P. E.
Johnson's article on "Strawberries in Du'val,"


in present number.
The young Orange Grove will now need con-
stant attention. No matter how hot and dry the
weather, or how clean and free from weeds the
surface appears, keep the harrow or cultivator
constantly running, cutting shallow, through the
rows, and giving the ground immediately around
each tree a light hoeing, repeatedly, so that no
grass or weeds may find even one day's foot-
hold. It is not good policy to plow near young
trees, nor to break or mutilate any of the roots,
but a constant shallow stirring of the surface,
up to the first or middle of August, will surely
promote the growth and vigor of the young
trees. For old-bearing groves, which have al-
ready had a good top-dressing of manure, we
recommend a surface scratching, merely-just


enough to keep down the grass and weeds. Af-
ter an early application of manure, and one
good harrowing or surface scratching, we have
seen excellent results, in old groves, from cov-
ering the whole surface from three to six inches
deep with scrapings from the woods, leaves, leaf-
mould, coarse litter, etc. We know that there
is a wide difference of opinion on this mulching
question-the "doctors disagree," mightily;
and we want the matter freely discussed by such
observing and experienced men as Dr. G. W.
Davis, of Duval; Dr. Z. H. Mason, of Orange,
and others.
Should any dead twigs or branches have es-
caped the winter pruning, you must go over
the trees and cut them out now; and, should
you desire to transplant or remove any young
orange or other tree, it may safely be done dur-
ing the rainy season."
The budding of oranges should be pushed
vigorously during this month-the Magnum
Bonum, Homosassa, Old Vini, Nonpareil, Hig-
gins and- Hart's Tardiff are all valuable sorts
for the grove, and many fancy varieties may be
cultivated in the amateur's garden, We have
now about thirty distinct sorts, in our leading
nurseries, while Gen. Sanford and other ama-
teurs may have more. South of 290 the lemon,
shaddock, lime, banana, pine apple and guava
should claim particular attention.
Do not fail to destroy all encroaching grass
and weeds during .this month, and your work
will be lighter for the remainder of the season.

Bearing Dwarf Oranges.
HICKORY BLUFF, May 30, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I was quite charmed with your description of
Dr. Kenworthy's wonderful success in dwarfing
the orange and producing such nice, promis-
ing fruit on the little tree-lets so soon. It is,
really, a new revelation of the possibilities of
orange garden culture, and I hope our nursery-
men will take the matter up, and soon be ready
to supply the demand which is sure to spring
up for the Dwarf Orange trees.
THE DISPATCH is a very welcome visitor at
our rural home, and we never fail to find in it
a variety of instructive and interesting matter.
How you manage to give so much for so little
money, is "apperiently" what "no fellah can
find out," but we suppose you know. Wish-
ing you thousands of new subscribers, and all
prosperity, I remain,
Most truly yours,
ETHEL B.
REPLY.-We thank our fair and respected
correspondent for her cheery note, and hope to
hear from her again. We ardently desire to
make THE DISPATCH a "welcome visitor" to


every urban, suburban and village home
throughout Florida and the Gulf States ; and
we are gratified to state that our circulation is
spreading rapidly, not only in our own State
and the lower South, but throughout the great
North and West, even unto California and
Utah !
The Kenworthy Dwarf Orange trees are
sure to be "the rage," North and South, as
soon as our nurserymen can supply them;
and we hope our correspondent and thousands
of other ladies who love gardening and flori-
culture may have them dotted around their
grounds, loaded with the "golden apples of Hes-
perides," ere long.
Whht Mrs. "Ethel B." says of the cheap-


T14E V-LO-RIDA DISPA '. .C I


t-





TH4E FLO R I DA DISPATCH. i


ness of THE DISPATCH, "reminds umsofa story:"
It was an ancient dealer in ready-made cloth-
ing, who, very urgently recommending a coat
to a hoped-for customer, assured him that not
only was the coat a splendidd fit," and the
"best goots," but that, also, he was offering it
to him "for lesh dan cost-far pelow cost." To
which the customer replied-"Why, do you
make a practice of selling your goods below cost?
How can you afford to do that ?" "Vell you
see," (said the dealer,) ve can't really effort it,
and selling in dat vay dere ish not mooch
profit-only, you see, ve sells so many of dem. "
That's it-we "sells so many" of THE Dis-
PATCH that even "small profits" on each one
enable us to keep our presses running ; and en-
c)urag3 us to make further imnpro)vement in the
quality of our paper as time goes on.-EDS.

The Labor Problem.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
The labor question has now become one of
the most serious problems which the Florida
farmer, fruit-grower and gardener has to con-
front ; and it will soon so press upon us that we
must give it our grave and serious attention.
The writer is one of those whose knowledge
of the Southern negro dates back to many years
before "emancipation ;" and he is forced to con-
fess that he is sorely disappointed in the effect
of that outgrowth of military necessity upon
the colored people of the South.
All who have closely observed the practical
workings of the "Amendments" (?) of the Con-
stitution must admit that the freed people have
not well-improved their opportunities and ad-
vantages, thus far; that they have retrograded
rather than advanced in morals and political
and social ethics; and that, so far as a disposi-
tion to labor. honestly and steadily at necessary
and useful occupations is concerned, they are
going wofully backwards and daily becoming
worse.
My experience during tde four years past
has convinced me that we can no longer rely
upon the great mass of negroes in Florida as
hired farm-laborers, and that we shall have to
look elsewhere, immediately, for our "hewers
of wood and drawers of water." It is not an
agreeable thing to say, but the facts are with
me when I assert that rarely do we find a col-
ored man who attaches any binding force to his
word or who will stand to that word one mo-
ment when either interest or whim impels him to
break it. A few days since, a negro man, who
had long been in my employ-one to whom I
had ever been kind, fair and liberal, who had


engaged himself to me for the whole year, at
the wages he asked; and who was fully aware
of his value to me and my dependence upon
his fidelity and labor: coolly came to me on
Saturday night and told me he was going to
quit my service. Surprised at this abrupt an-
nouncement, I asked why he was going, and
what was his grievance ? He replied that there
was nothing the matter with the place; that he
liked me very well as an employer and pay-
master :-but that he could get a job driving a
team of horses, or a horse on the new railway
now under construction in our neighborhood,
and that he "thought he should like that bet-
ter." I then reminded him of his solemn and
binding engagement to remain with me a year,
and showed him what a loss and disappoint-
ment his unexpected and sudden departure
must cause me. To all which he paid not the
slightest attention, but coolly pocketed his ar-


rears of wages and marched off to "fresh fields
and pastures new."
I should be very glad, indeed, to regard this
as an isolated or even unusual instance of bad
faith and instability on the part of our colored
neighbors ; but, unfortunately, it is not so. It
is so common as almost to be the rule for a
negro servant, male or female, to completely
ignore the wishes or interests of their employers
or patrons, and to go their own devious and
often very crooked ways, regardless of the
inconvenience or loss it may entail upon those
who are fairly and honestly entitled to their
steady and faithful services.
Is there any remedy for this state of things ?
any mode by which we can secure constant
and reliable labor on the part of the freedmen?
If you, Messrs. Editors, or any of your
readers and correspondents can aid me in the
solution of this problem, I and many others in
a similar dilemma will be truly grateful. Wish-
ing your attractive and useful paper great suc-
cess, I remain
Very truly yours,
May, 1882. AGRICOLA.
REPLY-We fully appreciate the gravity of
the situation as set forth by our correspondent,
but do not, clearly, see the way out of it. It is
certain that the agricultural laborers upon
whom we have heretofore mainly depended, are
rapidly becoming more exacting, whimsical
and unreliable; and that we shall soon be
forced, in self-defence to supplant them with
other and better "hands" or abandon many of
our present pursuits and enterprises. We trust
our readers will take vigorous hold of this
question, and discuss it freely in our columns;
and we shall, probably, have much more to say
in regard to it hereafter.-EDS.
Two communications have appeared in THE
DISPATCH froni Mr. E. T. Paine upon the sub-
ject of marketing Florida fruit and vegetables,
and co-operation.
We desire it distinctly understood that this
paper has no connection with the scheme or in
any manner endorses his views.
Co-operation has had the careful attention of
some of the more thoughtful of the students of
political economy in this as well as in Europe
and other countries, and when properly man-
aged has often proven of material value.
We published Mr. Paine's views as itenis of
interest to fruit-growers.
Our readers will please bear in mind that we
do not endorse the views of all correspondents
published in our column's.
Strawberry Culture in Duval.
To the Editor of the Daily Florida union.
With this communication we send you four
baskets of strawberries, gathered from our fruit-


farm, three miles east of Jacksonville. As per
labels, you will see the varieties are Crescent
Seedling, Capt. Jack, Cumberland Triumph,
and Finch's Prolific.
We send you the berries that you may test
their relative merits and better understand the
measure of our success. In passing judgment,
please take into consideration the unprecedented
drouth which has prevailed for three months,
and that from the plants from which these ber-
ries were gathered we have been picking ripe
fruit (and at times much finer) for over four
months; fruit germs are yet developing, so that
seasonable rains may continue the strawberry
luxury indefinitely.
Crescent Seedling-A superb variety; in all
points meeting the requirements of the pecu-
liar soil and climate of Florida; better than


rr .,.. ,3 ~U~Y-rllUL_Y- -~CL-L-L--Y 114.- __ I


chants to sell our berries ani make honut re-
turns.
P. E. Jo. is')N.
REMARKS.-DRl. JOINSON is one of' our most
experienced and careful strawberry growers.
He cultivates con more, no less than for "mate-
rial results," and has spared neither time nor
expense in procuring and testing all the latest
and best varieties. We see no reason to dis-
sent from any of the opinions he expresses in
the foregoing article, but would state that
the Duchess was the very earliest strawberry we
had, this season, among fifteen (15) varieties.
-EDS. ___
GUINEA Cows, or Heifer calves wanted.
Write the Editors of THE DISPATCH.
June 5 '82, tf.


any other strawberry yet grown by us. The
plant is very vigorous, and perfectly hardy,
growing in our heated sandy soil, with all the
thriftiness of our native crab-grass. Its early
fruiting commends it to our highest considera-
tion, being from three to four weeks earlier than
other varieties ; and last, but not least, its unim-
mense production.
Captain Jack-Plants very hardy; foliage
dark, green and glossy,; a great favorite with
us for the fine appearance of the berries and
for their superior shipping qualities, very pro-
ductive; tardy in making runners. ,
Cumberlan d Triumph-An old variety with
strawberry growers, but new in Florida; plants
enormously large and in all respects hardy;
foliage dark green ; the finest appearing plant
of any upon the farni; excels all others in
bearing uniformly large berries, which are firm
and of fiue appearance; medium prolific.
Finch's Prolific-A new variety originated in
Southern Ohio. This is our first season fruit-
ing; plants hardy ; very large, with bright
green foliage ; fruit large, very firm with supe-
rior keeping qualities, equal to the Crescent
seedling in earliness, and nearly equal in pro-
ductiveness. Besides the varieties sent you, we
have growing on our farm
Federal Point-Plant too sensitive to our sum-
mer heat to propagate itself by runners, and
rusts or "dies back" while fruiting.
Nunan-rToo late in bearing; sensitive to our
summer heat.
Charles Downing--Winter's frost destroys
the fruit germ and it is late in fruiting.
Seth Boyden.-A shy bearer of fruit and
makes few runners.
Crystal City-Good for nothing but to make
runners.
Sharpless-Our first season's growing. Plants
large and propagate well, but rust while fruit-
ing. Bears the very largest berry of any vari-
ety.
As an employment, strawberry growing is
pleasant, healthful, and, in Florida, can be
made very lucrative. To make the business
profitable there are many points to be consid-
ered. We must have a plant best adapted to
soil and climate ; one that will produce an abun-
dance of runners, as berls m:st be reset with
young plants every September and October. A I
plant giving the greatest yield of firm, attrac-
tive, marketable berries. Earliness in fruiting
is of the very first consideration ; berries in
February and March sell for $1 and $2 per
quart ; in April and May the average price is
from 20 to 45 cents per quart.
Suitable soil is a consideration, as well as the
proper method of planting and cultivating with
the best fruit-producing fertilizers
The picking and handling of berries to get
them into market in the best condition is of
great imp)ortance.I
The numerous markets now c*ompitin! for
Florida's early produ(lcts makes a selection of
market a question of importance.
And finally, the choice of coanmnissioni mir-


I _ __ _






LO THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Guilnea Cows.
Bro. Henry Grady, of the Atlanta Constitu-
tidit, in "booming up Thomasville, Ga., de-
scribes a nice little breed of cows, which some
one should crose with the best Jerseys, in order
to produce a uniforrit milking breed of bovines
for ihe South:
Not content with-her monopoly of LeConte
pears and beagle dogs, Thomas Counity is get-
ting a corner on 'Guinea' cows. These are the
most remarkable animals. They are just about
one yard high, a yard and a half long, and a
yard broad. Their body is scarcely a foot from
the ground, and the udder is enormous. They
are hardy, gentle-active browzers, and eat
about half what is needed for an ordinary
cow.
We rode out to Bob Mitchell's to see some
of the 'Guineas.' As we crawled over the
fence, Bob strode through the lot in his shirt
sleeves to meet us. *
"'That Guinea,' said he, pointing to an unusu-
ally squatty little animal, 'gives four gallons of
good milk a day right along. When other cows
can hardly find grass enough to live on, she
keeps fat. I'm satisfied we have the right thing
in the 'Guinea'; she is the cow of the pine bar-
rens.'
'Where did they come from ?'
'They were originally brought into this
country,' said Judge Hopkins, 'by the Minor-
cans, I think. That is the best .information
we can get. The Minorcans settled in Florida,
and the 'Guineas' run through the Everglades
in considerable numbers. We sent men to look
for the best 'Guineas' and found that Mr. Sta-
pleton, of Middle Florida, had the purest and
best stock. We bought heavily from him and
his neighbors at from $40 to $75 each, until we
have our county pretty well stocked: We have
some fine 'Guinea' bulls, and in a few years
will have all the stock we want.'
"I must say that the little cow commends.it-
self to the judgment. It is usually of deep red
color, always fat and gentle, with crumpled
horns and broad escutcheon. It requires less
food and gives more milk than the ordinary
cow, and is much hardier and more intelligent.
I think none can be bought, at present, as the
owners of these here wish to increase their
herd."

Orange Culture in Middle Florida.
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., May 4, 1882.
Is it worth while to plant orange seed, culti-
vate and protect the trees in this part of the
State ? From Our observation, during a resi-
dence of four years in this part of the country,
and especially our experience of the past twelve
months, as to the hardihood in extreme cold,
and its tenacity to live, comparing it with the
peach, where the latter fruit is considered at
home, during a residence of twenty-five years


in that country, there was only three abundant
peach crops because of cold winters, fresh buds
being almost always killed in the spring, and
sometimes trees killed outright. Now the
orange here is not so uncertain a crop, and
very rarely destroyed by cold. We see trees
that were thought to be seriously injured and
fruiting deferred for years, now the second yehr
after the most severe freeze of a lifetime, blos-
soming profusely and setting fruit. In view of
these facts, I would counsel to plant, cultivate
and study the requirements of the orange tree in
your section.
We should not cultivate and stimulate the
tree here the whole twelve months through, as
may be done with it in an entirely tropical


climate. In Middle Florida we should do all
our stimulating and cultivating in the growing
season, letting the tree go into a state of rest
from September to April. By teaching them
thigh we would not be subjecting them to danger'
by frost because they would not be in a tender
state at the season of cold, It is surprising how
qtlckly the tree have recovered from the freeze'
of 1880 ; many trees now, only,sixteen months
after, are bearing fruit.
We may hurry up the matter of fruiting
somewhat by budding the trees. When trees
are budded or grafted, if allowed to set and
bear fruit as soon as they often will, it to some
extent dwarfs them ; but if the fruit is plucked
off for the first two or three years, a budded
tree may make as much growth as a seedling,
though I would prefer to bud them, and get
some fruit about the third year from budding.
Our budded trees, second year from bud, blos-
somed and set fruit this year. It is not neces-
sary to bud from a fruiting tree; it makes no
difference. We may bud from any tree, the
fruit of which suits our eye and taste; but while
we are about it, we will do better to propigate
from known and named kinds, such as Magnum
Bonum, the first on the list ; Navel, an early
bearer and a first-class orange ; Hart's Tardiff,
a late orange, and we should not omit the Kid
Glove or Tangerine.
As to the Thornless or Sweet Mediterranean
and the Satsuma, which is said to stand more
cold than any other, it would be well to give
them a trial. If convenient, the lay of the land
allowed, I would run the rows east and west,
and plant close together, say from six to ten
feet apart in the row. It would much improve
the looks of our orange trees to prune out all
dead wood. W. H. Haskell, in Floridian.

James Island-St. Teresa.
The Floridian, of thd 9th, says:
Now that arrangements have been completed
to have a steamer ply regularly between St.
Marks and Teresa, we have no doubt this de-
lightful summer sesort will be filled to overflow-
ing during the summer months. The present
schedule will enable us to take breakfast in
Tallahassee and a one o'clock dinner at Teresa.
We venture the assertion that no place on our
extended sea-coast presents greater advantages
than Teresa. Its splendid location on an eleva-
ted bluff, overlooking the broad blue sea, is
locked in by sand spits so as to present the
finest boating imaginable. The bathing is un-
surpassed-the fishing as good as can be
found-the celebrated Porter oyster bar near at
hand, and a freedom from insects that is re-
markable. Taken all in all, Teresa has more
advantages than any sea-side resort we know
of, and now that it has transportation, must
prove a great resort.
, .


CREAM CHEESE.-The following recipe for
making cream cheese has been found successful:
Take a quart of cream, or if not desired very
rich, add one pint of new milk; warm it in hot
water until it is about the heat of milk from
the cow." Add a tablespoonful of rennet, let it
stand till thick, then break it slightly with a
spoon, and place it in a frame eight inches
square and four inches *deep, in which previ-
ously put a fine canvass cloth ; press it slightly
with a weight, let it stand twelve hours, then put
a finer cloth in a frame-'-a little powdered salt
should be put over the cloth. It will be fit for'
use in a day or two.-Exchange.

PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


5 1


President Gainesville; Secretary --
.....; W. K. Cessna, Corresponding ASecretary, daines-
ville.
Archer Agricultural Association.-J. WV. Williams,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine, Secretary ; I. C. Neal,
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President; John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewis, Treasurer, Tallahassee.
Indian River Agricultural and Pomological Society.-
A. P. Cleveland, President; W. H. Sharp, Secretary,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
Association.-R. J. Mays, President; Frank W. Pope,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
Orange County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred. L. Robertson, Corresponding
Secretary.
Gadsden County Fair Association.-Jesse Wood, Pres-
ident; W. H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R. Harris,
Second Vice-President; J. W. Kendricks, Secretary; E.
C. Lou, Treasurer.
South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion, Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
whidh we may have fallen in the naming of officers, &c.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH ?]


Agricultural, HIorticultural and Pomnological
Associations.
Florida Fruit-Growers' Association-Office at Jack-
sonville-D. Redmond, President; W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; W. H. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding Sec-
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee-Dr.-C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, 0. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official organ-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA STATE GRANGE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICES.-Master, Win. H. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Wm. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B. F. Wardiaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Field-
irng, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; TreatsUlrer, J. H. Lee," White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate
Keeper, Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Wm. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T. W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H,
Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Geo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Umstead, Hous-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville,-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J. C. Greeley, Treasurer.
Directors-J. H. McGinniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro, P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney. Annual meeting-
Last Friday in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; 0. E. Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. 0. Taylor, Secretary and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Florida.-President, A. B. Bartlett, Georgetown; Vice-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. Hawkins, Lake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George; George W. Thorn, Treasurer,
Georgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
mond, Fort Gates.
Picolata Agricultural and Horticultural Society.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, W. N. ParKer, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Corresponding Secretary,
N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., Recording Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer. Meets first Saturday in each month.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. Mathers, Second Vice-President; B.
W. Powell, Corresponding Secretary; B. F. Jordan, Sec-
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical Fruit Growers' Association of Monroe County,
Florida.-Home office, Myers, Florida; F. A. Hendry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson,
President; Thomas Tillis, First Vice-President; J. B.
Sutton, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary; J. M. Barco, Recording Secretary;
L. W. Hamlin, Assistant Recording Secretary.
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Association.-
John Bradford, President, Bradfordville, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida.
Pinellas, Florida, Fruit Growers' Association.-D. W.
Meeker, President; Win. P. Need, Secretary.
Central Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida.-Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
Evergreen Horticultural Society Dunedin, Florida.-
J. W. Matchett, President; W. Tate, Vice-President;
Geo. L. Jones, Secretary.
Decatur County Fair Association, Bainbridge, Geor-
gia.-Maston O'Neil President; I. Kwilecki, Secretary.
, Lake Wier Agricultural and Pomological Society (of
Marion County, Florida).-Captagn J. L. Cainy, Presi-
dent; Dr. L. M. Ayer, Corresponding Secretary.
Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J,
S. North, President; C. M. Higgins, Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Association, Albany,
Georgia.-L. E. Welch, President; T. M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
Sumter County Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation.-D. L. Hubbard, President, Leesburg- W. C.
Dodd, Recording Secretary, Leesburg; A. P. Roberts,
Corresponding Secretary, Leesburg.
Florida Central Agricultural Society.-Thos. F. King,


_ 1 111~ 1.-~- . -.:.... II 1 .I....u 1





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 17


"Huckleberries."
One of the homely and somewhat despised
products of New Jersey, and at the same time
one of the first in aggregate value, is the plain
and unpoetical huckleberry. Its European
representative is the whortleberry. In this
State the fruit of many of the various species of
Vaccinium and Gaylussacia are popularly con-
founded-all alike being called huckleberries;
but in many parts of the country a distinction
is very properly made. Those species which
produce the softest, sweetest, and lightest-col-
ored fruits (mostly representatives of the genus
Vaccinium), are appropriately called blueber-
ries; while those with firm and more highly
flavored fruits, generally black, or blue-black
in color-are the huckleberries proper, and
these mostly are of the genus Gaylussacia. The
true huckleberries have only eight or ten seeds,
or rather nutlets, buried in their flesh, while
the blueberries are many-seeded. Still, it must
be admitted that the relationship between the
two groups is very close.
Immense quantities of these fruits are gath-
ered and marketed from the pine-woods of New
Jersey, as well as from the Northern States.
The southeastern or Old Colony counties of
Massachusetts, with Maine and Eastern Canada,
also furnish large supplies of these berries;
most of them are marketed in the fresh state,
and they serve an excellent purpose, both as a
cheap dessert-fruit and as an ingredient of pies
and puddings. Considerable quantities are
dried, chiefly for domestic use in winter. In
Maine a very important industry is the canning
of blueberries for market. The blueberries of
Maine and the maritime provinces of Canada
are peculiarly sweet and delicate, but are con-
sidered to be too soft for distant transportation ;
hence they are sold chiefly in quart tins or
cans, being sent to every part of the country-
even to New Jersey itself.
All who are familiar with our pine-woods
region know that the berry pluckers form
a kind of a caste of their own, with many
strongly-mihrked peculiarities. It is the custom
with the proprietors of the berry-bearing lands
to hire large squads of these people who
traverse great areas of the pine-woods in a very
systematic way, gathering only the best of the
fruit. This system of berry-plucking is one
of the curious features of our curious pine-
woods country. The wagons for receiving and
transporting the berries are assigned the most
advantageous positions, and the hands them-
selves are under a kind of generalship which
ensures proper despatch of business and the
proper degree of thoroughness in the gathering.
There are times when the price received for
berries is so small that they do not pay for col-
lecting. It occurs to us that at such times it
might pay to can the unsalable surplus of the
fruit. We are not aware that this business has
ever been tried in our State to any extent, ex-
cept in a small domestic way; but in Maine
and Nova Scotia it has long since been found a
remunerative investment. Dried huckleberries


make a tolerably good article of food for winter
use; but this soft saccharine fruit, especially
when withered in the sun in the drying pro-
cess, attracts .many insects; and hence the
dried berries are naturally looked upon with
some disfavor. But'if well selected fruit be
dried by artificial heat in a good fruit-drying
machine, there product is so much better in ap-
pearance and in intrinsic excellence, that its
value will not be questioned. We know of an
establishment in the State of New York, which
turns out a considerable quantity of huckle-
berry wine." In fact, there is hardly any kind
of wild native fruit from which this concern
does not produce some sort of a sweetened and
fermented extract or juice, miscalled wine. The
huckleberry wine is one of the best of its class,
being smooth and well-flavored, though' lacking


in the generous qualities of real wine.-Cam-
den (N. J.) Coast Pilot.
[The huckleberry is, also, quite an institu-
tion in Florida, though not gathered to any
great extent, for commercial purposes. Our
friend, Col. L. A. Hardee, of Honeymoon
Nursery," has taken up and domesticated a
very superior native variety, which we shall
endeavor it classify and fully describe here-
after.-EDS.]

Water Telescopes.
Considering the cheap and easy construction
of these instruments, it is wonderful they are
not used more than they are, as by employing
them, extremely interesting observations can be
made on the denizens of sea or river. To make
a water telescope, procure a tube made of tin,
and funnel-shaped, about three and a half feet
long, and nine inches in diameter at the broad-
est end. It should be wide enough at the top
to take in the observer's eyes, and the inside
should be painted black. At the bottom or
wide end, a clear, thick piece of glass must be
inserted with a little lead in the form of a ring
to weight the tube. When the instrument is
immersed in clear water, it is astonishing how
many fathoms down the observer can see. One
of these simple contrivances would greatly en-
hance the pleasure of water picnics, as much
amusement would be afforded by watching the
inhabitants below, and it would also prove very
useful in surveying deep places that have been
ground baited, for if no fish were seen collected
there another spot would naturally be chosen.
The Norwegians employ this instrument largely
for ascertaining the position of herring shoals
and in their cod fisheries. Often by the use of
the telescope they discover fish which otherwise
they would not have known of.

The Courtier's Reply.
An old Norse king, one dark and stormy night,
Sat with his courtiers in his windy hall,
The oak logs blazed, and shafts of ruddy light
Wavered like moving spears along the wall.
Without., like some old Viking armed for war,
The tempest wandered in his robe of rain,
Or, rushing with a clamor from afar,
Roared through the castle, and was gone again.
The monarch and his bearded courtiers sat
All silent around the fire, with downcast eye,
No sound within was heard, save when a rat
Scampered across the floor, with dismal cry.
But suddenly a bird, wet winged and bright,
Flashed over them, and vanished as it came,
Out of the night, it vanished into night,
As brief and beautiful as a falling flame.
"Such" said the king, "such is this life of ours,-
A moment's passage through a lighted room,
One taste of this sweet breath,-then death devours
Life's transient day in its eternal gloom."
A moment no one spoke; then, with a tear,
An aged courtier hastened to respond:
"True, Sire, the tired bird did not tarry here,
Because the nest God gave it lay beyond."
-J-ames Buckham, in "Lippincott" for June.


-A sheep grower says: It is folly to keep
old sheep. They should be turned off to the
butcher in their prime. It :does not take half
the amount to fatten them. When they get
old and thin, in order to put them in the con-
dition for slaughter, the whole structure must
be rebuilt. Four sets of lambs are all any ewe
should bear; this will bring her to five years,
and this is the age when, with a little extra
care, she will round up to a full round carcass.
Exceptions may be made when the breed is
scarce, awl the blood is more desirable than
anything else.

GEESE.-If a wide pasture range is allowed
them, geese will thrive upon the grass and sedge
growing around the borders of the pond or river
where they may be kept, in great measure.


They are good foragers, persistent grazers, and
require but little other food during the first six
months after hatching if they are grown upon
an estate where there is swampy land, fair pas-
turage, a running stream or good-sized pond of
fresh water.-American Poultry Yard.

What Constitutes an Editor.
Some people estimate the ability of a periodi-
cal and the talent of its editor by the quantity
of its original matter. It is comparatively an
easy task for a frothy writer to string out a col-
umn of words upon any and all subjects. His
ideas may-flow in one weak, washy, everlasting
flood, and the command of his language may
enable him to string them together like bunches
of onions, and yet his paper may be but a
meagre and poor concern. Indeed, the mere
writing part of editing a paper is but a small
portion of the work. The care, the time em-
ployed in selecting, is far more important, and
the fact of a good editor is better shown by his
selections than anything else, and that, we
know, is half the battle. But, we have said, an
editor ought to be estimated, his labor under-
stood and appreciated, by the general conduct
of his paper-its tone, its uniform, consistent
course, aims, manliness, its dignity and its pro-
priety. To preserve these as they should be pre-
served is enough to occupy fully the time and
attention of any man. If to this be added the
general supervision of the details of publication
which most editors have to encounter, the won-
der is how they find time to write at all.-
Henry Watterson.

The Difference Between a Cyclone and a
Tornado.
The difference between a cyclone and a tor-
nado is defined by Mr. William Ferris, of the
United States Coast Survey, to be this: A cy-
clone is usually a broad, flat, gyrating disk of
atmosphere, very much greater in width than
altitude; a tornado is a column of gyrating air,
the altitude of which is several times greater
than its diameter. Cyclones are born of condi-
tions extending over large areas; tornadoes de-
pend rather upon the vertical relations of the
atmosphere, and occur when, owing to local
changes of temperature, the under strata of air
bursts up through the overlying strata. The
enormous velocities of the ascending currents of
tornadoes are supposed to be caused by the dif-
ference between the gyrating velocities above
and those on the surface. It is these ascending
currents which carry up the vast bodies of wa-
ter afterward precipitated in the form of a del-
uge of rain. The water is sometimes kept from
falling by the ascending currents, and is often


projecting outside the area of the tornado, when
it falls in a gentle shower over a large area.
When the weight of the water overbears the
force of the ascending currents, there occurs the
tremendous fall of rain known as a cloud burst.
When the area of a tornado is very small, a
land spout or water spout may be formed, ac-
cording as it is over land and water. The width
of these spouts ranges between two feet and two
hundred, and their height from thirty to one
thousand five hundred feet. A white squall is
an invisible spout formed when the dew point is
low. The accompanying cloud is invisible be-
cause of its height, but below there is a raging
and boiling sea, with a gyrating current of air
above it. Land spouts and water spouts are
hollow.


I-. i






THE FLOIID A DISPATCH.


Meteorological Report.
Weather for week ending June 2, 1882.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION )
f[IGNAL SERVICE, U. S. A., JACKSONVILLE, PJLA.__
Therm. 'I- Wind.

DATE. -4


Saturday 27...... 29.8472 77.774.3 0.00 E 16 Fair.
Sunday 28...... 29.92 8972 79.0 75.0 0.07 E 11 Fair.
Monday 29...... 29.94 87 73 78.7 78.3 0.00 SW 10 Cloudy.
Tuesday 30...... 29.998972 80.770.3 0.00 S 5 Fair.
Wednesday 31 29.95 8975 77.7 84.0 0.38 S 13 Cloudy.
Thursday 1 ... 99.85 86 77 81.0172.7 0.15 IS 18 Cloudy.
Friday 2 ........ 30.0181 74 77.38.7 0.28 W 12 Cloudy.
Highest barometer 30.,04 lowest 29.84.
Highest temperature 89.5, lowest 72.
NOTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Observer U. S. A.
Mlfeteorological Sunmnary for May, 1882.
SIGNAL OFFICE,
PENSACOLA, FLA., June 1, 1882.
Mean barometer for month, 30.016.
Highest barometer for month, 30.245.
west barometer for month, 29.742.
Mean temperature for month, 72.80:
Highest temperature for month, 85.7.
Lowest temperature for month, 52.1.
Variation temperature for month, 33.60.
Greatest daily variation of temperature, 25.9.
Least daily variation of temperature, 7.1.
Mean temperature of warmest day, 80.0.
Mean temperature of coolest day, 62.50.
Mean temperature of dew point, 62.60.
Mean humidity, per cent., saturation, 100, 73.0.
Total rainfall for month, inches, 3.51.
Total movement of wind, miles, 7,155.
Maximum hourly velocity of wind, miles, 24.
Number of cloudy days, no rain fell, 0.
Number of fair days, rain fell, 10.
Total number of days rain fell, 8.
Number of clear days, 13.
Average cloudiness, per cent., obscuration 100, 39.
M. McGAURAN,
Sergeant S. C., U. S. A.
Florida vs. Illinois.
Our friend Mahan, writes us as follows :
CHAMPAIGN, ILL., May 26.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Since my return about the first of May, from
a tour over Florida, I have felt as never before
a sense of the harshness of our Illinois climate.
We get used to being pelted by these cold
winds and rains and do not realize that there is
on this earth a climate so delightful as that of
mild, sunny Florida. The weather has been so
cold and such long cold rains have prevailed
all spring, that a large part of our corn is un-
planted and will be for some time to come.
The outlook is gloomy for Illinois farmers.
I feel justified in saying that there are ten
times as many people now inquiring about
Florida as at any former time. This is partly
because of the harshness of our climate-partly
because there are so many persons looking for
relief from climatic diseases, and partly be-
cause people begin to feel that in Florida is the
best place to settle and make a comfortable
home and livelihood. It seems certain now
that the number of people seeking homes in
Florida from the Northwest is destined to a
vast increase at no distant day. Of the diffi-
culties in the way, I may speak at another
time. J. S. MAHAN.


Utilizing the Waste of the Cotton Plant.
Some time ago, Mr. Edward Atkinson was
classed as a theorist," because he had ven-
tured upon the assertion that the lint or fibre
was the least valuable portion of the cotton
plant. Since, however, he has been industri-
ously gathering facts which justify his position;
and he has now brought to light another point
with reference to the value of that part of the
cotton plant hitherto considered not only
utterly without value, but as actually adding to
the expense of production to dispose of it. Re-
cent analyses of the cotton plant have disclosed
the fact that for each bale of the lint there are
1,500 pounds of stems, which contain larger
quantities of lime and phosphate of potash than
the seed. Mr. Atkinson suggests that the stalks
be ground and mixed with cotton seed meal or


Ocean Steamship Company.

SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.




The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, June 3d, 8:00,a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, .Wednesday, June 7th, 11:00 a. m.
CITY ( F AUGUSTA Saturdayy June 10th, 1:30 p. m.
GATE t:ITY, Wednesday, June 14th, 5:30 a m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, June 17th, 8:00 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, June 21st, 10:00 a. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, June 24th, 12:00 noon.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, June 28th 4:00 p. m.
('IIY OF MACON, Saturday, July ist, 6:00 p. m.
Throunii Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
FreiLlitl received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
H. YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agent of Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. Y.

other suitable forage, and used as feed for stock. Any of above grades roasted to or1er
If the ground cotton stems were to be mixed FLOUR-SnOW Drop, best.................. ........... 9 25
with corn ensilage, the compound would furnish Oreole, 2d best............. .... ... 25
Pearl, 3d best ....... ................... 825
all the elements desirable for the production of MEATS-Baconl................................. 8@2
milk, meat and bone, and the feeding of all Shoulderwin So....... ns ....... ...ns.....................
grains might be entirely dispensed with. Pure HoMINY-Pearl, per bbl....................... ..... 540
cotton seed meal is considered too rich for use LARD-Refined in pails..... .......................... 13!
as fodder in large quantities, and the mixture BUTTER-Very best, kegs (on ice).................... 32
cre IamCEEjSE-FuI cream............................... 15
of ground stems would not only correct this, Half cream......................... 12.
but add to the value of the meal those special TOBACCO hell dRoad. s nch5................55
elements belonging exclusively to the stems. Florida Girls, bright twist, 14 to lb.. 50
rro his Smoking in packages, 8 to 1b........... 45
To put his newly conceived theory to test, Mr. SOAP AND STARCH- Colgate's 8 oz., per box... 3 50
Atkinson wrote asking an examination of the Peerless, 8 oz., perbox................... ... 50
Starch, lump, per lb...................... 5Y@6C
subject and an opinion from Maj. J. F. Jones, Hors, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS-'
of Hogansville, Georgia, a progressive farmer, Hops, er east eseroz................... ........ 15@22
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakesy per doz"'g... S: c
who lha for many years been engaged in raising Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per 2 l
stock and grain, as well as cotton. In reply, Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. 1 lb. 2 25
Major Jones quite corroborated Mr. ALLkinson's Royal Baking Powder, per doz ..... 270
claims. Should this new use for cotton prove COUNTRY PRODUCE.
claims. Florida Sugar and syrups ruling-high
as useful as Mr. Atkinson and Major Jones for first grades.
say, it will not only open the way for the estab- POTATOEs-Irish, per bbl., new................... .350
CHICKENS, each..................... .............................. 25@ 45
lishment of an important industry at the South, EGGS-Per doz............................................... 25
and prove to cotton-growers a new source of HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lb., first class 13
Country Dry Salted, per lb........................9@011
wealth, but will greatly facilitate the raising of Butcher Dry Salted, per lb....................... 910
stock both at the South and at the North, Damaged Hides.and.. unde.. ............... 10
where grain has to be shipped from the West SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb ............"35
Deer Skins Salted, per lb. ....... 26@80
for their consumption.-Daily Times. FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win- 54
ter...................................................... 150@ 4 00
[We are willing to give the foregoing all due Raccoon, each................................. 15
t W ild Cat, each....................................... 10@20
consideration, except the "corn ensilage." That Fox, each........... 5@15
"silo business is not necessary in the South- ESW e from burs, per ......................1722
Burry, perlb ............................................ 110 15,
involves too much expense, fuss and "flum- GOAT SKINS-ach per lb.... 10
mery," and can never become popular with us. Bacon advancing rapidly-buyers wll do well to
make their purchases now. Flour market has been
Whether the total removal from the land of the very unsettled for the past week, on account of specula-
W r o mte o tions in wheat market.
entire cotton product, stalk, leaves, seed, lint, o m
etc., etc., would not necessitate the outlay for r yil ,
fertilizers of an amount fully equal to the value
of the stalks for feed, is another matter worthy SILK AND HO N EY.
of grave consideration. Let us "go slow on BEST ITALIAN BEES, QUEENS, Etc.,
some of those advanced theories.-EDS. at greatly reduced prices. An average profit of $69.63 per
S-colony, net. A salary of $2,963.00. Also eggs for rearing
.QPjwl ^ I cocoons for American silk-a new and important indus-
e y4.a1, try. Send at once.


Vegetable Quotations.
FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE,
315 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, May 31,1882.1
Receipts of vegetables at this port via Florida Dis-
patch Line and Southern Express Company, week
ending 30th inst., 3,000 packages.
The market for potatoes is firmer and prices for good
stock steady, $5 00@6 00 for Florida, Savannah and
Charleston, and $7 00 for Bermuda.
Cabbages $1 00@1 50 per barrel.
Cucumbers, Florida, $1 00@2 00 per crate; Savannah,
$2 00@3 00 per crate.
Tomatoes in demand, and when in good condition
bring top prices, selling from $1 50@3 00 per crate.
Respectfully,
C. D. OWENS,
General Agent.
Jracksonville Wholesale -Prices.
Corrected weekly, by JONES & BO WEN, Wholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.


SUGARS- Granulated.......................................
W hite Ex. C...................................... *
Golden C...........................................
Powdered..............................................
Cut Loaf.............................................
COFFEE, Rio- Fair.............................................
Good............................................
Choice ..........................................
Best............................................
Java 0. G............. .... ....................
M ocha ................................ ..................
Peaberry...............................................


10%i
10

11
11

.13
25
35
18


11, 13, 15, 17-p.


UHAS. K. MITCHELLII.
Hawkinsville, da.


LISTED^ BI -'S

Soluble Ground Bone,
THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

FBRTILIZIR FOR 'ORAN TII WES

Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.
Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTER & BEAN,
S Agents for the State of Florida.


*8gAnalysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25,1882.


to sept 26, '82







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE.




Rates on WATERMELONS in Car Loads of 20,000 Pounds.


'T'O T"A C E "EF'IxE1 CT V.E=-A" 20tl-a., y18a82.


To-


Atlanta ................................................................................................................................
A ugusta. o ........................................................................................................ ...............
Baltim ore...............................................................................................................................
Boston ....................................................................................................................................
Bristol, Tenn.......... .......................................................................... ...................
Charleston, S. C........................... .....................................................................................
Colum bus, Qa........................................................................................................................
Chattanoora, Tenn..............................................................................................................
Cfn fnriati, ...................................... ..............................................................................
Cairo, Ill.......................... ...................................................................... ..... .....
Colum bus, 0................................................................................................ .......................
Cleaveland, 0....................................................................................................................
Chicago, Ill............................................................................................................................
D lton, Ga.............................................................. ..........................................................
F ansyille, Ind......................................................................................................................
Indianapolis, Ind ............ ............................................................... .....................................
K noxville, Tennr....................................................................................................................
Louisville,K y........................................................................... .......................... ..............
M acon, Ga.. ......................................................................................................................
M ontgom ery, Ala.......... ...................................................................................................
M obile, A la............................................................. .............................................. .......
M em phis, Tenn ................................................................................................................
N ashville, Tenn................................. .................
N ew Orleans, La...................................................... .....................................................
N ew York, N Y .... ............................................................................................................
Peoria, Ill............................................................... ......................................................
Philadelphia, Pa ............................................... .......................................................
Rom e, Ga................................................................................................................................
Savannah, Ga...................................................................................................................
St. Louis, M o.............................................................. ......................................................
Terre H aute, Ind................. ..................................................................................................


From Florida Tnan-
F'r o m Jacksonville, sit Railroad, except Florida Transit Rail- Florida Central and
Callahan and Live Ocala and Points 6e- road, 0c a l a and Western Railroad.
Oak. yond. Points beyond.

$ 6000 $ 8500 $ 9000 $ 80 00
55 00 80 00 85 01' 75 00
100 00 125 00 130 00 119 00
100 00 125 00 130 00 119 00
90 00 115 00 120 00 110 00
36 00 61 00 66 00 56 00
60 00 85 00 90 00 80 00
70 00 95 00 100 00 90 00
80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
90 00 115 00 120 00 110 00
100 00 125 00 130 00 120 00
100 00 125 00 130 00 120 00
110 00 135 00 140 00 130 00
70 00 95 00 100 00 90 00
80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
90 00 115 00 120 00 110 00
84 50 109 50 114 50 104 50
80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
45 00 70 00 75 00 65 00
60 00 85 00 90 00 80 00
70 00 i 95 00 100 00 90 00
80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
75 00 100 00 105 00 95 00
80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
100 00 125 00 130 00 119 00
110 00 135 00 140 00 130 00
100 00 125 00 130 00 119 00
70 00 95 00 100 00 90 00
22 00 47 00 52 00 41 00
90 00 115 00 120 00 110 00
100 00 125 00 130 00 120 00


Excess of 20,000 pounds will be charged fprpro rata, provided the weight loaded does not exceed the capacity of the car, as marked thereon. If cars are not
marked with the capacity thereof, the weight of load must not exceed 20,000 pounds. All excess of load above capacity of the cars will be charged for at double rates.
Melons must be loaded and unloaded by the owners. Shipments of Melons will be receipted for only as "Shipper's Count." This Line will not be responsible
for deficiency in quantity loaded in the cars, nor for damage resulting from improper loading. Shipments via Florida Dispatch Line will not be required guaranteed
or prepaid.


D. H. ELLIOTT, Gen'l Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.


JAS. L. TAYLOR, Gen'l Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE in connection with _TLIN TIC COA ST 3I
Rates on Watermelons in Car Loads of 20,000 In Cents per 100 lbs. To take effect May 20th, 1882.


To-



Baltim ore..............................................................................................................................
Boston.......................... ........................... ..................................................................
New York.... .................................................................................................................
Providence .............................................................................................................................
Philadelphia............................................................................................................................
Portsm south, Va.... ........................................................................................................
Petersbtrg, Va....................................................................................................................
Richm ond, Va...................................................................................................................
W ilm ington, N C............................................ ......................................... ....................
W ashington, D. C. (via Portsm outh)..................................................................................
Shipments via "ATLANTIC COAST LINE" must be prepaid to destination.
will be charged at double rates.


om Jacksonville
and Callahan.


Florida Transit and
Peninsula Railroad,
except Ocala and
Points beyond.


Florida Transit Rail- Florida Central and
road, 0 c a 1 a and Western Railroad.
Points beyond.


Cts. Cts. Cts. Cts.
.63 .76 .78Y2 .73
.68 .81 .831 .78
.68y .81 .8312 .78
.68 .81 .8312 .78
.68y .81 .&3 .78
.48V2 .61 .63%2 .58
.48y .61 .63Y2 .58
.48F .61 .63 .58
.382 .51 .531 .48
.63!2 .76 .781 .73
20,000 lbs. will be the minimum rate charged for. All excess of capacity of cars





- .TH.E FLORIDA DISPATCH.


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
-0-
MERCHANTS & MINERS


TRANSPORTATION COMPANY!


The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail
From BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH

EVERY FIVE DAYS,


HUAU- & CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF

FINE iEY WEST CIGARS
-AND-

WHOLES.ALE LEAF DEALERS.


Proprietors of Factories Nos. 29, 61 an.81, District
of Florida,
*Taeksonville, Florida,
The Most Extensive Manufacturers in the State.
lyr to api il 23, '83.


and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE, as follows:I D. G. AMBLER. J. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.


Thursday, June 1st, at 5 p. in.
Tuesday, June 6th, at 11 a. m.
Monday, June 12th, at 3 p. m.
Saturday. June 17th, at 8:30 a. m.
Thursday, June 22d, at 11 a. m.
Tuesday, June 27th, at 3 p. m.
Monday, July 3d, at9 a. m.
The steamers are first-class in every respect, and every
attention will be given to passengers.
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $15,
Including Meals and Stateroom.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Baltimore.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
column.
JAS. B. WEST & CO., Aaents.
Savannah, January 8th, 1878. 30-tf


SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA




WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1882,
Passenger Trains will run over the Waycross Short
Line as follows:


:Fast Mail.
Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at.................. 9:00 a. m.
Arrive Jacksonville at................. 5:40 p. m.
Leave Callahan at.. ... ...9:44 a. m.
Arrive Waycross at......................11:57 a. m.
Arrive Jesup at.......................... 1:40 p. m.
Arrive at Brunswick at............ 6:00 p. m.
Arrive Savannah at........ ...... 3:40 p. m.
Arrive Charleston at................. 9:10 p. m.
Arrive at Augusta at............... 5:20 a. m.
Arrive Macoii at............................. 7:50 p. m.
Arrive Atlanta at.......................... 3:50 a. inm.
Arrive Louisville at................................
Arrive Cincinnati at......................................
Arrive Washington at................... 9:30 p. m.
Arrive Baltimore at.....................12:25 p. m.
Arrive New York limitedd express)...........
Arrive New York P.R. R............. 6:45 a. in.
Arrive St. Louis at..................................
Arrive Chicago at........ .............................
TIME.
To Savannah.........................................
To N ew York..................................................
To W ashington ..............................................
To Chicago.....................................................
To St. Louis...................................................


Jack'lle Ex.
Daily.
5:40 p. m.
8:15 a. m.
6:45 p. m.
9:15 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
5:30 a. m.
2:35 a. m.
9:05 a. m.
1:30 p. m.
7:00 a. m.
12:50 p. m.
8:00 a. m.
7:00 a. m.
9:10 a. m.
12:05 a. m.
3:50 p. in,
5:20 p. m.
7:00 p mi
7:00 p. m
6:40 hours.
45:45 hours.
36:30 hours.
49:00 hours.
49:00 hours.


THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
*%Jacksonville to Savannah.
gGa-Jacksonville to Louisville.
*D--Jacksonville to Washington.
*.Jacksonville to Cincinnati.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
Passengers taking Savannah sleeper can remain in the
car until 7 o'clock a. m.
Parlor and Drawing-Room Car on morning train
from Jacksonville through to Savannah, connecting
daily with through Pullman sleeper for New York.
The Dining Car attached to the train between Savan-
nah and Charleston affords supper to passengers going
North, and breakfast to those coming South.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to Montgomery and New Orleans
take the evening train.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. m. and arriving at. Savannah at 2:35 a. m., or train
at Jacksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vannah at 3:40 p. m.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, at Depot Ticket
Office. J. E. DRAYTON,
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*] Ticket Agent.


AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as

AMBLER'S BANK.
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
J Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf

Sportman's Emporium..






W. C. PITTMAN,
No. 3 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0
Guns, Pistols, Rifles and Cutlery,
Shooting ailnd Fishing T Uaekle.

SHELLS LOADED TO ORDER.
1 yr to April 23, '83



DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,

GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
GOLD AND METAL LEAF.
BRONZE, COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emery Papers, &e.
AGENT FOR

PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIRE TEST.
Johnson's Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, Martinez and Longman's
Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel.
to mar25,g8, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

[4-347.]


LAND OFFICE AT GAINESVILLE, FLA., May 3, 1882.
OTICE is hereby given that the following named
settler has filed notice of his intention to make final
proof in support of his claim, and that said proof
will be made before T. E. Buckman, Clerk Circuit Court
at Jacksonville, Florida, on Saturday June 24th, 1882,
viz.: Jacob Robinson, Duval County, homestead entry
No. 561, for the Nw of Nw 1, section 6, township 3s,
range 27e.
He names the following witnesses to prove his con-
tinuous residence upon, and cultivation of, said land,
viz.: Calvin Hughes, Samuel Anderson, Andrew Sess-
ions, Lee Clark, all of Jacksonville, Florida.
L. A. BARNES,
May 8 tf Register United States Land Office.


TOLIt.'r 'TTOOD."
A FEW CHOICE LOTS OF FIFTEEN OR MORE
acres, river fronts, affording attractive and lovely
building sites, and admirably suited to the growth of
oranges, figs and other Florida fruits, may still be ob-
tained on reasonable terms.
"HOLLYWOOD" is south of "Point La Vista," on
the eastern shore of the St. Johns River, four miles from
Jacksonville. For circulars, maps, terms, etc., address
D. REDMOND
apr 3-tf Box 257, Jacksonville, Fla.

W. I. PILLOW'S

STRAfWBEERRYTv ,IPPINfG A-GENCY
-AND-
F.BNIT AND VEGETABLE
REPACKING AND
COMMISSION HOUSE,
Has closed till NOVEMBER. Present address,
may 12, '83. M 0ACON, GA.

THE JONES




"AND



ARE THE

"4.. SI .ST, S.A. ES'1T,

AND

BEST IN THE WORLD.

Forsale by I)R. J. C. L']ENGLE,
Wholesale Druggist, Jacksonville, Fla.
-Send for Circular. mar 25-tf

ST. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
--
CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.



OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
1 yr to April 23, '83

VIEWS OF FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In Book IForm, Containing 1x
Views Each.
Souvenir of Florida, (small size)................ .......25c.
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size)......................... ...........................25c.
Souvenir of Jacksonville,( large size)..................0c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine,(large size)...............50c.
Stereoscopic Views, per Doz. $1.80.
Address

ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
JACIKSONVILLE, FLA.

L..JTSTE.^'E ^. S


Soluble Ground Bone,
THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

FRTIIIZHR FOR ORANQI TRE8,

Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.
Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTERt & BEAN,
Agents for the State of Florida.


*-Analysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


to sept 26, '82


--I




THE FLORIDA DISPATCH


i


:E= .3 'II,^ o5rp e,'T! Ton.,anDeetnuTE3, inr"SO er loi n QaVunnoh QtUnmQhinlhiI
(Guiaranteed Thire.) DUlUIlrUIIIU IUIUIIIIJldl ULUUIIIbUIij JJIIIM


to jan 6, '83


a Jacksonv J iVJ, Ja.


[ESTABLTSED 1871.]
J. A. BARNES & CO.,

FRUIT AND PRODUCE

COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
So'uithern Frnait and Tregetables a Specialty.
3.06 and 3 S North Delaware Avenue, Philadelphia.
to joan 6, '83_




WHOLESALE GROCERS,
AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR

AGER'S DRY HOP YEAST CAKES, 60c. PER DOZ.
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND

SNOW-DROP PATENT FLOUR.

pirst I3anIa.s on. 0:in.est uAality

Dairy Butter from 35 to 37c. per Lb.,

e2ept in the ZIarest M-efrigerator inZ the State,

No. 7 West Bay Street, - - Jacksonville, Flor-ida.
To sept 27, '82


,Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide.


H. D. BOUNETHEAU,


PROPRIETOR


N 0 R DYK E FLORIDA GHEMfIGAL (OIL AND SOAP WORKg,


.MILLS
-MANUFACTURE-

FreshGround
FEED, GRITS,
MEAL,
(Bolted or unbolted.)
Pearl Hominy.
GRAIN, HAY, COAL AND
WOOD-YARD.


MANUFACTURER OF
Lubricating and Boiler Compounds, Compressed Soaps, Car and
Axle grease.
ALSO SOLE MANUFACTURER
of the best Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide extant-
0RA GT-E TEEE E3VTJLSIS02I
made from Whale-Oil Soap, combined with other powerful ingredients known
to be most effectual for destroying the Scale" and other insect pests and
parasites of the Citrus family. It will also put the tree in a healthy and flour-
ishing condition. Prepared for immediate use. Perfectly harmless to the
youngest tree or plant. In packages of from 25 to 300 pounds. Price, 10 cents
per pound. Discount to the Trade. At Full directions for use accompany
each package. Address
HM. B. BOUINETEAU.


P. O. BOX 984, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


to july 31 '82


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
0.-----
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
--0-
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers for June are appointed to sail as follows:
JUNIATA, June 3d, at 7:00 a. inm.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, June 10th, at 1:00 p.jn.
JUNIATA, June 17th, at 7:00 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, June 24th, at 12:00 m.
Days and hours subject to change, without notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, W1M. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.


OOTT0 T SEED =VE.A6LT, $38 per Ton.,
(100 Pound Bags.)

OTTOl T SEED EC7TTjj Z ASME3:, $27 per Ton.,
(The Best Potash in Use.)
20 BuusI.els Con(c0. Peas for Sale.
STOCKBRIDGE FERTILIZERS for Orange Trees and vegetables, for sale by A A rV
1,- -l 9 1 l


PURE DRUGS, RELIABLE MEDICINES, FANCY
SGoods, Proprietary Articles, at lowest market prices.
Specialties-Norton's Salt Rheum Ointment, Melen's
Infant Food, Burnett's Cod Liver Oil. A Trial solicited
to aug 20, '82


RUBBER


STAMPS


Are manufactured right in our establishment in the
best manner and at the shortest notice.
A9~-Send in your orders.
ASHMEAD BROS.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
May 1-tf


ONLY DIRECT LINE BETWEEN
SAVANNAH AND BOSTON.
Transhipment and extra handling saved. No danger
of fruit being frozen. Cars are unloaded at the steam-
ship wharf in Savannah, avoiding drayage.
CABIN PASSAGE, $18,
SAILING FROM SAVANNAH.
Seminole, Thursday. May 4th, at 7:30 a. m.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, May llth, at 2:00 p. inm.
Seminole, Thursday, May 18th, at 7:30 a m.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, May 25th, at 1:30 p, m.
Seminole Thursday, June 1st, at 5:00 p. m.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
,.44-tf Savannah, Ga.

DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
The largest stock in the State. Country
buyers will consult their own interests
by corresponding with me. All orders
promptly tilled at prices to compete with
any house south of Baltimore. Renmem-
ber my only Florida address.
GEO. HUGHES,
to June 26, '82 Cor. Bay and Ocean, Jacksonville, Fla.

PIANOS ANDORGANS
.A.. M. C:&.:h/a 2EX ,' .
15E 13ast Ilay ..Tielksonvllle.
QOLD ON INSTALLMENTS, AT LOWEST PRICES-
A branch of Ludden & Bates, Savannah-EXACTLY
SAME PRICES AND TERMS, Sheet Music, Strings
and small instruments of all kinds. Send for cata-
logues, prices and terms. TUNING AND REPAIRING
a specialty. My tuner will make regular tours through
the State, and my customers will thus have my repre-
sentative at their doors, a great advantage to purchasers
of instruments, to sept 26, '82

O. L. KEENE,
MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,

Laces, Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF


67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, - - ..FLORIDA.
to feb 20, 82
M. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the
of the Marshall House. Screven House.
TIHE HARINETT HOUSE,
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARNETT & GEORGE, Proprietors.
RATi.S, $2 PER DAY.
SThis favorite family Hotel, under its new manage-
ment, is reconumended tfor the excellence of its cuisine.
homelike comforts, pl)rompt attention and modenite
rates, to sept 4/,'82


Wholesale and Retail Drug Store,
35 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.




.7T THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


A Good Investment!
-0-


In the County of Hernando, East of Brooksville, the
county seat, and near the
Tropical lorid~a M..,
which is now actively building, two tracts of land. The
first contains two hundred and forty (240) acres in a body;
the second contains eighty (80) acres. These tracts both
touch Upon a ILaki e of about 150 acres'area; are
well timbered with pine suitable for lumber; the second
about half a mile southeast of the first; between them
lies a cultivated farm. These lands are well adapted to
Oranges and Otfher lI'tluits, being ofgood
soil, with little underbrush, and are easily cleared. They
were selected by Hon. Walte.r (Gwynn, Ex-
Treasurer of the State of Florida, and they may be relied
upon as being what is represented. These lands are in a
part of the State that is rapildly settling up
and offer a good field either for an Investment in Flor-
ida real estate, or for orange groves and the like.
Price and terms will be so arranged as to be satisfac-
tory to the purchaser. Apply to
WALTER B. CLARKSON,
Box 877. Jacksonville, Florida.
In corresponding, please mention this paper.
to August 29, '82.

AT MANDARIN, FLORIDA.
20 FORTY-ACRE TRACTS, only 12 miles from Jack-
sonville; extra good land, well located, between river
and J., St. A. and H. R. R. R. Price, $10 per acre. Will
sell on monthly payments of $12.50. These lands will in-
crease in value, being located in an already -prosperous
town, making a paying investment at small outlay.
Maps can be seen at No. 41 East Bay Street.
to nov 21, '82. GEO. R. REYNOLDS.

3"70 S1A.i3E-
IRST-CLASS ORANGE AND VEGETABLE LAND.
Also river front, with 90 China Orange trees nearly
ready to bear.
The above property adjoins the Magnolia Hotel at
Magnolia, Florida. Address,
W, T. THOMPSON, .
(Box11,) .
to july 1, .'82 Green Cove Springs, Florida.
INTE A is a new town in Orange
WINT R PARK County Floridaeighteen
miles south of Sanford, on the South Florida Railroad,
with a frontage of two miles upon three beautiful Lakes.
WINTER HOMES in the midst of Orange Groves, for
Northerners, is the main idea. For Pamphlets and
Maps giving particulars, address
CHAPMAN & CHASE,
Winter Park, Orange Co., Fla.
to July 17, '82




DAILY TIMES.


THE TIMES Is the official paper of the city and the
leading paper of the State. It has the largest circulation
in Florida, and reaches all .parts of it. At is not mrnrely
a locaL newspaper, but aims to advocate the interests
and promote the prosperity of Florida as a whole.
Its reputation outside the State is very high. It has
taken rank among those journals whose columns are
looked to for news, and whose comments are quoted
with respect throughout the country.
Its editors have had wide and varied experience in
journalism North as well as South; its advertising pa-
tronage is liberal and of the best character; arid its re-
sources, financial and other, are ample. It will furnish
Florida with a live, progressive, outspoken, and reada-
ble newspaper, the peer of any.

ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.
THE TIMES has secured by special contract the full
despatches of the ASSOCIATED PRESS. Besides that
its Editor is Agent of the Associated Press for the State
of Florida, which gives him great advantages in obtain-
ing the freshest and most important State news.


SPECIAL DESPATCHES.
With representatives in the leading news centres of
the country, THE TIMES is well served in addition to
the regular Press reports. During the past winter it has
received a very large number of telegraphic specials."
CORRESPONDENCE.
Its regular correspondence from Washington, New
York and Boston is of noteworthy excellence; and its
State correspondence has attracted much attention.
This feature will be extended and improved; and to
this end correspondence containing news or items of
information of any kind is solicited from all quarters.

"OLI) SI. "
In addition to his editorial work, Mr.-Small will write
regularly for THE TIENs, and in its Sunday issues the
famous "Old Si"- will disseminate wisdom in chunks
to the Florida public.
TERMn o (strictly in advance): One year, $10; Six
months,o ; three months, $2.50; one month, $1. sent
one month on trial for 50 cents.
Remittance should be made by draft or post-office
order, or in a registered letter. Address
JONES & SMALL,
to sept 26,'82 Jacksonville, Fia.


ASHMEAD BROTHERS,

41 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,


PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS

PRINTERS AND BINDERS,

AND DEALERS IN

TOYS AND FANCY ARTICLES.



NEWSDEALERS.-We keep all the latest Daily and Weekly Papers from Boston, New York, Philadelplhia
Baltimore, Chicago, St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, New Orleans, (Charleston, Savannah and Jacksonville, and
take subscriptions to all publications at publication price. Orders by mail promptly attended to.

LIST OF BOOKS ON FLORIDA.
FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, INVALIDS AND SETTLERS (Barbour, Profusely Illustrated)... ...........Price 1 50
FLORIDA: ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE AND HISTORY (Lanier)..............................................................Price 1 50
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paper..................................................................................................Price 10
FAIRBANKS' H ISTORY OF FLORIDA......................................................................................................... Price 2 50
GU IDE TO JA CK SON V ILLE ..................................... ..... .............. ...................................................Price 25
TOURISTS AND INVALIDS REFERENCE BOOK OF WINTER TRAVEL..................:........................Price 75
SOUTH FLORIDA, THE ITALY OF AMERICA....................................... ................................................Price 25
DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition)enlarged and improved.............................................................Price 50
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edition, enlarged and improved).........................................: ..............Price 1 00
ORANGE INSECTS--Illustrated (Ash nead, ....................................................................................................Price 1 00
ORANGE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA, by A. T. Garey, (cloth)................................................................Price 1 25
A MANUAL OF GARDENING IN FLORIDA (Whitner)............................................................................... Price 50
COLTON 'S M AP OF FLOR IDA .............. ............................ .................... .................................................Price 75
COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-the best)...:.:.................................................................................Price 1 25
NEW 'AND ACCIURAT MAP OF $TI JOHN'S RIVER........ .................. ..................................................Price 25
McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST OF LAWS OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep, postage extra)..............................Price 6 00
INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA................................................Price 3 00
Any of the above books mailed on receipt of price.
O R A N G E WV iA 'PS ............................................................... .......................10x10, 14c.; 11x1l, 17c.; 12x12, 20c.
LAW BLANKS.
W A R R A N TY DEEDS, per dozen.........................................................................................................................Price 50
QU IT-CLA IM DEEDS, per dozen........................................................................................................ ..........Price 50
M OR TG A G ES, per dozen......................................................................................................... ...................Price 50
NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, made to order................................................................................ ...........Price $5 00
We publish a full line of Law Blanks for Lawyers and Justices of the Peace. Price-list mailed on application.
Special prices to large buyers. Adddress


ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


feb 12-tf


I. S. CONE, A. H. MAVILLE, E. A. MANVILLR,
President and Business Manager.. Se retary and Superintendent. Treasurer
ZVX A -3>T. I 3T7 LE N T.T7 SME M IE S,
Laike George, Florida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums
Peaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, and over one hundred varieties of the Citrus.
ORAINGZE A. ITND LEM11MOI TREES a specialty.
Catalogue free. to apr 17, '83


BUY THE BEST A1ND CHEAPEST

0* -o-

GOULD & C O.'S


FERTILE Z E R
-AND-



Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange Growers and Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, con-
tains potash, lime, phosphoric acid, ammonia and the other essential elements of Plant Food, making a corn
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & 1 ro.'s, and other high-priced Fertilizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity, and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $4 per barrel, $32 per
ton.
All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.

MESSls. GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-I used one-half ton of your Fertilizer, in connection with the same amount of Baker & Bro.'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gave as good results as the others, which are much higher priced fertilizers-costing
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $51.50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12, 1881.
LEESBURG, SUMMER Co., FLA., March 6,1882.
GOULD- & Co.:
Gentlenmen-Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed your
agents at this point (Messrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer,
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its fostering care, I having had the honor
to win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer better and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer skillss two birds with one stone," inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies,
at one and the same time. I bave been testing it in the field, garden and orange grove for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues, whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For my part, I ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. if I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork. '
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOURT.
GOULD & CO.,
to aug 27, '82 NO. 6 W. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


INK-