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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00010
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 29, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00010
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

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Beuotedt tkt~ ~j~ri~htthu i1, Uf~-{anufactttvin~ and 1ndulstrial Tntcnests nrf Eb~ridLa


Vol. 1.--No. 10.


New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.


and the South.

Price 5 cents.


Monday, May 29, 1882.

Orange Park. "I doan'spropose to jine hands wid a stran-
Our engraving, this week, represents the river ger bekase his gran'fader cum ober wid de Pil-
front of Orange Park" one of the best known grims. Neither shall I lend five dollars to one
settlements on the St. John's River, twelve miles o' my color on de ground dat his uncle weighed
settlements on the St. Johns river, twelve miles a ton an' shook hands wid three different Presi-
south of Jacksonville. Within the past few dents. What a man he am, an' wheder his
years, the lands of Orange Park have greatly fader was a poet or a blacksmith, won't make
appreciated in value, and the place is being him better or wuss. Size up your man on his
rapidly built up and settled by an excellent own personal shape. It doan' matter to you
ras ui n what sort of a head his fader had, or how big
class of residents.___ ____ his uncle's feet war', he am de man you am
"Blue .Blood." doing' bizness wid. De pusson who trables roun'
"Bro. Gardner," of the Lime Kiln Club, dis kentry on nothing but de record made by
thus disposes of what Tennyson styles the some relative half a century since, will land in
claims of long descent:" jail as soon as in good society. When I have
When I shake hands wid a stranger," said any plug tobacker to spare, de man who's fader
Brother Gardner, as silence fell upon the mem- didn't do anything but mind his own bizness
bers, "I doan' keer two cents wheder his great- an' purvide fur his family, will get it quite as
gran'-fader was a Cabinet officer or a cobbler ; soon as de man whos' fader diskivered a comet
wheder his own gran'fader sold silks or kaliker; or predicted an airthquake.
wheder his fader was a cooper or a statesman. I want each an' ebery member of dis club
De man I have to deal wid am de man befo' to stan' on his own shape. If he am fast-colors
me, an' not de dust an' bones, an' coffins of his dat's all we want to know. If he crocks or
predecessors. He may size up well, or he may fades in de washin' he must step down an' out.
run to remnants; he may be squar' or he may De fack dat Samuel Shin's fader was electedd to
be a bilk ; he may be honest, or he may have de South Carolina Legislatur' doan' prove that
de right-bower up his sleeve-dat am fur me to Samuel hisself knows beans from hoss-barns.
find out. Likewise, de fack dat Giveadam Jones had an


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.

uncle'hung fur stealin' co'n, doan' go to prove
dat it wouldn't be safe to leave our brudder in a
grocery sto' fur half an hour while de clerk
went out arter change. When a man boasts
dat one of de family signed de Declarashun of
Independence, doan' you take his note without
a good indorser. People who lay back on noth-
ing but de glory of de dead or de statesman-
ship of some one who sat in Congress a hun'erd
y'ars ago, am jist as apt to work off a bogus dol-
lar on a sore-eyed railroad conductor as de man
whose geological tree has a baker hangin' to
ebery limb."-Detroit Free Press.
Kansas Farmers in Florida.
A party of thirteen sturdy farmers from Con-
cordia, Cloud County, Kansas, passed through
here this week on their way to Marion County,
Florida, about to locate there. Some of them
having been in poor health when they started,
have evidently recovered under our balmy
breezes, and look forward to a future home in
this State with high hopes. As an evidence
of their foresight, and an almost certain guar-
antee of their success, they left with us subscrip-
tions for several copies of THE DISPATCH, for
themselves and their old friends in Kansas.


ORANGE PARK, CLAY COUNTY, FLORIDA.




THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


--A very successful farmer once remarked
that he fed his land before it was hungry,
rested it before it was weary, and weeded it be-
fore it was foul."
-There are two things that every farmer
must have-things that subserve like purposes
and of about equal importance-a grindstone
and THE DISPATCH.
-Mr. Joe Jefferson when in Washington re-
cently presented to Attorney-General Brewster,
who has been a friend of his for many years, a
view of a Southern swamp, painted by himself.
It hangs in the Attorney-General's office.
-The New York Produce Exchange Weekly
says: "It is estimated that the Southern
States have drawn on the Northern States this
season to the amount of $50,000,000 for provi-
sions, making a round sum of $177,000,000 for
these three items of wheat, corn and provisions."
-The Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle says: "The
oat crop in Georgia and South Carolina is the
finest, perhaps, ever known in this section, and
will do much to place the planters in a good
position for the next season. A large grain
crop is a good thing for any section. Farmers
who trade in Augusta speak very hopeful of
the situation."
-" Be aye planting' a tree, Jock. 'Twill
grow while ye'r a-sleepin'." The Poet, Whit-
tier, in a letter declining an invitation to the
Forestry Congress in Cincinnati, said: My
thanks will be due to the public school which
is to plant a group of trees in your Eden Park
in my honor. I could ask no better memorial.
I have always admired the good taste of the
Sokokis Indians, around Sebago Lake, who,
when their chief died, dug around a beech tree,
swaying it down, and placed his body in the
rent, and then let the noble tree fall back in to
its original place-a green and beautiful monu-
ment for a son of the forest."
-Prof. Swift, of Rochester, the astronomer,
announces that the new comet will be at its
greatest brilliancy June 12th, and that then it
can be seen with the naked eye during the day
time.
-The N. Y. Times says that "one of the
best disinfectants for a vault is chloride of lime,
and it is the cheapest. Sulphate of iron finely


-In answer to the question, "Is Florida
healthy ?" the Palatka Herald responds thus:
"From observations we are induced to believe-
that northerners stand the climate here for sev-
eral years better than the natives. It is im
portant that care should be taken to preserve
health. During the season in the summer,
avoid drenching rains, and especially a change
of warm clothing is necessary after getting wet.
To sit about with damp clothing, exposed to
the cool air after a squall, is enough to chill
any man and make him sick. The death-rate
of Florida, according to population, is less than
any other State in the Union."
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


Tornadoes-Signal Bureau.
In Washington, General Hazen,


the


-Some kinds of wood season better out of
doors, than under cover, but it is not so with
the beam and handles of a plow.
--Vegetable decay prepares for subsequent
life. An exception to the rule is rotten pota-
toes and turnips in a cellar in May.
-It is better for a farmer to eat salt on his
potatoes instead of butter, if the latter is needed
to pay an old debt at the village store.
-Every farmer should compete for all the
premiums at the annual fairs in his line except
the "fastest trotter owned and raised in the
county."
-Men may deceive each other, but they can
never deceive mother earth. Dealers may sell
sawdust guano, at $50 a ton, but they cannot
count on the soil as a helper in their imposi-
tion.


It is well to infuse into every child's mind the
wholesome principles of self-respect, to teach
him that certain things are to be avoided and
others cultivated, not because you say so, but
because of his dignity and social position. So
should they be taught in their earliest years
that certain things are for their good; that gen-
tleness, unselfishness and neatness are not only
admirable in themselves and pleasant in the
home circle, but they make their possessor wel-
come in the outer world, and are excellent cap-
ital to begin life upon. Children who are
waited upon, their wants anticipated, and all
the machinery of their little world carefully
oiled, are often fretful, exacting and trouble-
some.-Dirigo Journal.


i-so


powdered is an excellent disinfectant for a wet
vault or sess-pool; for a dry one there is noth-
ing better than common dry soil."
-Milledgeville Recorder: Would it not be
well to send from Georgia as Congressman-at-
large, a farmer? The vast majority of the
people of Georgia are farmers, and they should
have a share in the representation. It would
be better for the country if there were more
farmers in Congress. The manufacturing in-
terests are well represented and well protected,
while the interests of the farmers are neg-
lected."
-The price of hay in the -recent inundated
regions of Louisiana is $40 per ton. It might
as well be $100, since nobody can buy it.
WEEVILS.-Fort Valley Mirror: A mer-
chant in Perry has discovered that the stalk
and leaves of the Jimpson" weed is a weevil
exterminator. He had two tubs of shelled peas
in his store which had a great many weevils in
them. He cut the limbs off of a single weed
and placed them upon the peas. In a very
short time the weevils began to leave the peas,
and many of them died. The remedy is be-
lieved to be a sure and permanent one, but the
experiment has been tried only a short while.
-Near Penfield, Ga., lives two ladies who,
since the war, started to farming with one old
blind horse. Now they own a good plantation
well stocked, all paid for, and eighteen or
twenty bales of cotton on hand. They managed
for themselves, one attending to the farm while
the other managed the household affairs.
SUCCESs.-Do not believe those who too
lightly say that nothing succeeds like success.
Effort, gentlemen, honest, manful, humble
effort succeeds by its reflected action, especially
in youth, better than success, which, indeed, too
easily and too early gained, not seldom serves,
like winning the first throw on the dice, to
blind and stupefy. Get knowledge-all you
can; and the more you get, the more you
breathe upon its nearer heights their invigora-
ting air and enjoy their widening views, the
more you will know and feel how small is the
elevation you have reached in comparison with
those immeasurable altitudes that yet remain
unsealed. Be thorough in all you do; and re-
member that though ignorance often may be
innocent, pretension is always despicable. Be
you, like men, strong; and the exercise of your
strength to-morrow. Work onward and work
upward, and may the blessing of the Most High
soothe your cares, clear your visions, and crown
your labors with reward.- Gladstone.


mmoo


---


I


Chief Signal Officer, is studying the sub-
ject of tornadoes, and Sergeant Finley will soon
leave the city for the purpose of" making an
investigation concerning the wind-storms which
swept over Michigan, Iowa and Illinois on the
6th of April. The Signal Service Bureau issued
last year a valuable monograph on the charac-
ter of the storms of May 29th and June 30th,
1870, and it has in press another paper by the
same writer, containing a tabulated statement
concerning 600 tornadoes, with generalizations
founded upon their history and suggestions as
to the proper method of investigation. These
600 storms occurred in a period of 87 years in
this country. It is shown that these storms oc-
cur most frequently in summer, and in the
month of June. They have occurred more
frequently in April than in July, and more
frequently in May and September than in Au-
gust. Kansas is the State which has been most
severely affected by them, having been visited
by 62 in the period from 1859 to 1881. Illi-
nois has had 54 from 1854 to 1881; Missouri,
44 from 1814 to 1881; New York, 35 from
1831 to 1881; Georgia, 33 from 1804 to 1881;
Iowa, 3.1 since 1854; Ohio, 28 since 1823, and
Indiana 27 since 1852. So far as can be ascer-
tained, there has been only one since 1794 in
each of the following States and territories:
Colorado, California, Indian Territory, Nevada,
New Mexico, Montana, Rhode Island, West
Virginia and Wyoming.
The storms occur most frequently between
5 and 6 o'clock in the afternoon. The average
width of the path of the storm has been 1,085
feet, and the storm cloud has traveled at a rate
of from 12 to 60 miles per hour. Within the
vortex the wind sometimes has attained, a ve-
locity of 800 miles per hour, the average being
392 miles. A tornado cloud always has a cen-
tre,, and it always moves forward from west to
east. It may, however, sway from side to side
as it goes. Changes in motion are sometimes
very sudden, and when one of these changes
takes place the observer, who may be east or
southeast of the storm, should move quickly
southward. If he is northeast of the storm he
should move northward, and if he is very near
to the cloud, he should run eastward, bearing
a little to the south. These are some of the
directions given. Sergeant Finley will make a
very thorough examination of the recent
storms.
How to Manage the Little Folks.
It is useless to endeavor to make a child
control his temper if you give way to your own;
to tell him to be truthful while you are not
strictly so; to inculcate neatness while careless
of your own dress; the little folks are keen ob-
servers, and will not respect you unless you are
worthy. Be careful not to impose unnecessary
instructions-to forbid nothing without reason.


NIB






-. -Hl"1'ORD DIPTGI A


-A Melbourne, Australia, newspaper records
births, .marriages and deaths under the same
heading: "Buds," "Orange blossoms," and
"Cypress."
".Thre is no death; what seems so 4 transition .
.. This: lfe of mortal breath,
Is but a uburb of the life elysian,
Whose portal we call death."
'-"Some people," -says 'Alphonse Karr "are
always& finding fault with nature for putting
'thorns"on rodes; I always thank- her for hav-
"uing put roses on thorris" .
-We all have launched our life-boat, and we
all are oiir oWn comemmanders. Let ts each' see
to it that"obir boat is not wrecked on the sand,
br that th6e 'roigh rbcks of sin do not sink it.
-"There are people who live behind the
ill,'" is an old German proverb, which means
th'at there .ari other folk in the wdrld besides
yourself, although you may not see them.
--"God alone
Beholds the end of what is's owtV;
, .Beyond 9ryisln, weak. and dim, .
The harvest time is hid with Him."
-A prominent physician says that if moth-
ers did not take up the senseless prattle of ba-
bies a'id' hurlit back at them 'under the plea
thiit it is "baby talk," children "would learn
sooner how 'to talk plain. They repeat 'the
jumble of syllables that they first hear. That's
the idea. Instead of' saying of' soapy water:
"I doesn't link it tastes dood," you' can just as
well have .Mr. to-year-old observe: "The taste
'of soap combined with aqueous fluid is not
agreeable to me."-Boston Post.
The eyes to see, the ears to hear,
TlIe very sight and sound;
But speak not, for the place whereon
: You Stand Is holy ground! '
Yes, look and think, if think you can,
But leave the thought untold ;
S';" For speech Is only silver, dear,
S .ut silence, purest gold. .
-One of tile prominent uses of tr-ees lately
developing very rapidly.appears, to; have. been
overlooked by the Forestry Coplvention;. we
refer.ito l use made.of them by lynching par.
ties. The Forestry Convention should adopt a
resolution on this point applying to localities
where lamp-posts ar. not indigenous to the
soil,. American traditions must be preserved.
2Louisviite Courier-Journal.
-.. -Evry day of my life makes me feel more
and more how seldom a fact is accurately stat-
ed; how almost invariably when a story has


passed through the. mind of a. third person it
becomes. so far as regards the impression that it
snakes in further repetitions, little better than
a falsehood ; arid this, too, though the narrator
be the most truti-seeking person in existence.-
Hawthorne.
If you sit down at set of sun,
'And count the acts' that you have'dorne,
'. Ad'countiag flnd,
On. e self-denying act, one word
'That eased the heart of m ho heard ;
S-'. One glance most -ki, ,
That fell like sunshine where, it went,
Then you' ma" count thAt day well spent.
Bt if, through all the livelofig day
You've cheered no -heart by yea or nay ; .
If through it all,.
SYou've nothing done, that you can tree,
S That brouagtt.the sumshlnea to one face; .
S i o act most small,
That helped some .soul and nothing cost,
S Ten count that day s worse than lost.!


---An English critic says that a Shaksperian
play,, translated by an elegant French versi-
fier;, is like a feudal castle with the moss and
ivy carefully scraped from.it and well painted
over.
-Better be cold than to affect to feel. In
truth nothing is so cold as assumed, noisy en-
thusiasm. Its best emblem is the northern blast
of winter, which freezes as it roars.--Exchange.
SWEET SALAD SAUCE.-Mix together two
good tablespoonfuls of olive 'oil, the raw yelk of
an :egg, a little pepper, one tablespoonful of the
best vinegar, a pinch of salt, and a desertspoon-
ful of moist sugar.

Charcoal and Its Uses.
Charcoallaid flat, while cold, on a burn, caus-
es the pain to abate ininmediatelv ; by leaving
it on for an hour the burn seems almost healed,
when it is superficial. And charcoal is valua-
ble for many other purposes. Tainted meat
surrounded with it, is sweetened ; strewn over
heaps of decomposed' pelts, it prevents an un-
pleasant odor. Foul water is purified by it.
It is a great disinfectant and sweetens the air
if placed in trays around the' apartments. It
is so very porous in its "minute interior" it ab-
sorbs and, condenses. gases most rapidly. One
cubic inch of fresh"charcoal Will absorb nearly
100 inches of gaseous ammonia. Charcoal
forms arn unrivaled poultice for malignant
wounds and sores, often corroding away: dead
flesh, reducing it one quarter in six hours. In
cases ;of what we call proud flesh it is inval-
uable.' It gives no disagreeable odor, corrodes
'iob metal,'hurts no texture, 'injures no color;
is a simple and safe sweetener and disinfectant.
A teaspoonful of charcoal in a half glass of
Water often relieves a sick headache; it absorbs
the gases and relieves the distenited stomach
pressing against the nerves which extend from
the stomach to the head.--Kansas Farmer.
Railroad Matters.
BRUNSWwIK, MOBILE & NEW ORLEANS.
This company h>s been organized to build a
railroad from the Chattahoochee 'River at Co-
lumbu.s, Ga., westward by Elba and Nedwon to
Pollard on the Mobile & Montgomery road.
It will be about 130 miles long, and is intended
to be an extension of the Brunswick & Albany
road.
EAST TENNESSEE, VIRGINIA & GEORGIA.
The bridges on the extension of the North
Carolina Division to Paint Rock are completed
and the connection with the Westein North
Carolina road made. Trans will soon begin to
run through.
FLORIDA TROPICAL.


Work is progressing well on this road, and
track is now laid from Ocala, Fla., the junction
with the Peninsular road, southward 30 miles.
Work is well advanced on the grading to
Taimpa, `70 miles' further.
GEORGIA & FLORIDA MIDLAND.
This company has filed articles of incorpora-
tion for a railroad from a point on the St.
John's River in Duval County, Fla., through
the counties of Bradford, Alachua, Lafayette,
Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Leon and Gadsden
to the Georgia line. The distance is 'about 225
miles.
PENSACOLA & ATLANTIC.
Work is progressing steadily on this road.


I


prosperity and happiness of this truly "great
and glorious" country, than all the blatant
brood who make "politics" their trade, and
fatten and fester on the unearned perquisites
and pilferings of" office and party spoils."
The 'Nashville Journal of Medicine and Sur-
gery. Edited by C. S. Briggs, M. D. Pub-
lished by H. A. Hasslock, at three dollars,
per year, in advance. Nashville, Tennessee.
The May number of this journal contains
several articles of value and interest to the
"profession and the general public. It is the
oldest medical journal in the South, and gives
each month a fresh and readable record of
medical and surgical progress. Address, as
above.


The Blackwater draw-bridge is ino erected,
and nearly half the pile bridge at a ha hoo-
ehee is done. Track laying will soon be begun
from Chattahoochee eastward. Track is now
laid from Milton west 10 miles, and is progress-
ing steadily toward Pensacola.-Railroad Ga-
zette.,

New Publications.
From our kind and venerable friend, Hon.
Marshall P. Wilder, President of the Amer-
ican Pomological Society," we gratefully ac-
knowledge the following:
History and Progress of the Massachusetts
State Board of Agriculture, for the First Quar-
ter of a Century, with a Report on Fruits," by
Marshall P. Wilder.
Address delivered at the Semi-Centennial
Anniversary of the Massachusetts Horticulfural
Society," by Marshall P. Wilder, Ex-President
of the Society. .
Address at the Eighteenth Session of the
American Pomological Society, held in Boston,
Mass., September, 1881, by Marshall P. Wilder,
President of the Society.
These highly valued publications reached us
too late for more than brief mention in our
present issue, but they contain so much in-
struction and encouragement for fruit-growers
that we shall make copious extracts from them
hereafter. If the full statistics of pomology in
the United States could be gathered and prop-
erly set forth, they would fill with wonder and
astonishment the minds of that too numerous
class of our people who. are disposed to regard
frait culture and kindred pursuits as "small
business." The report of the Commissioners of
the Centennial in 1876-certainly an under-
estimate---shows the market value of the fruits
of this country as $138,216,700! or nearly
equal to one-half the value of our average
wheat crop! and since 1876, the spread of fruit
culture, especially in Florida and California
has added several more millions to the above
estimate.
Irn this connection, we cannot withhold the
expression of the conviction that the entire
nation owes a deep debt of gratitude to such
noble, zealous and truly patriotic men as Presi-
dent Wilder and his co-laborers, who have, in
their quiet, steady, persistent and enthusiastic
devotion to the improvement, dissemination and
proper culture of fine and wholesome fruits,
done a thousand times more to advance the


I I - -- ,


-- - --- --- -- -PB~:F:I~R R ID d :UI 6 P-AT681


, 7





1-e_8 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


h


very sweet and beautiful poem, "The Courtier's
Reply," which we shall give our readers next
week; "Traps," illustrated; "An Absent-
Minded Hero ;" "On the Wheel;" "Art and
Art-Life in New York ;" "English Lawyers
and Law Counts ;" "The Teacher of Rachel ;"
Monthly Gossip; Literature of the Day, etc.
The Electic Magazine for the coming month,
fully sustains its well-earned reputation as the
best re-print of Engliph current literature in.ex-
istence; and its regular visits to any faintly
may well be regarded as going very far toward
a "liberal education." The June number con-
tains, among a great number of other papers,
the following: The Relation of Insects to
Flowers ;" "Emigration from Ireland ;" "The


A General D~ optionon of. Orange County,
Florida. :Os Climate, Health, Productions,
sources, and Facilities of Transportation-
very fairly, honestly and well written by Z. H.
Mason, M. D., and published in handsome form
by the Orange Co. Immigration Society, may
be had by addressing R. G. Robinson, Secre-
tary, Apopka, Fla., or Hon. C. Drew, State
Agent of Immigration, Jacksonville, Fla.
Descriptive Circular of the new Town of
Sat suma, Putnam County, Florida--Whitney,
Gold & Hodges, Proprietors, P. 0. Box 95,
Jacksonville, Florida.
The June magazines-kindly furnished us
by Ash mead Bros., of this city-arc of unusual
interest.
The Atlantic Monthly is a Longfellow memo-
rial number, and contains a fine steel portrait
of the Poet, from a photograph which he pre-
ferred above all others. It also contains a po-
etical tribute to "Our Dead Singer,,' by Oliver
Wendell Holmes; a hitherto unpublished poem
by Longfellow, on "Decoration Day," written
only a short time before his death; an estimate
of the character and genius of Longfellow, by
0. B. Frothingham ; Studies in the South, No.
4 ; The Rapid Progress of Communism, etc.,
etc.
The Century has a fine portrait of Cardinal
Newman, and a large number of other illustra-
tions, some of which are of more than average
merit; and the leading articles are "Around
Cape Horn;" "The Street of the Hyacinth,"
concluded ; "Opera in New York," with fine
portraits of Mario, Grisi, Parepa Rosa, Nilsson,
Patti, Clara Louise Kellogg, Lucca, Gerster,
&c., &c. ; "In the Haunts of Bream and Bass,"
a pleasant Southern poem; "The Bee Pastures
of California ;" "Through one Administra-
tion ;" "Carlyle in Ireland ;" "The Danger of
an Office-Holding Aristocracy ;" &c. &c.
Harper's Monthly, for June, has a good por-
trait of Longfellow; a very interesting paper
styled "Quaint old Yarmouth," copiously illus-
trated ; "The Social Athens of America," (Bal-
timore); "Torpedoes and Torpedo Boats,"
illustrated ; "In the Pines ;" "The Father of
the Pueblos;" "The Gates of Paradise;""
Money-Making forLadies;" "Shandon Bells,"
continued; "The Overthrow of the French
Power in America,"etc., etc.
Lippincott's, for June, the cheapest, as well as
one of the best first-class monthlies,) is quite at-
tractive, and well-filled. We particularly noted
"Toledo," in Old Spain, finely illustrated; a


feet from the surface, and is quite stiff and re-
tentive.]
2. "Are there any cold springs, or durable,
running rivulets on the tract-if so, how
many ?"
[There are few cold springs in Florida-
but we have, in many places, very good water
within a few feet of the surface, and generally
showers enough to keep our cisterns filled with
the finest and healthiest water in the world-
filtered rain water !]
3. "Is the land well adapted to clover and
other grasses ?"
[Our light, sandy lands are not, generally,
well adapted to clover, except the Alfalfa, (a
variety of clover,) which 'grows luxuriantly in


Borders and their Ballads ;" "The Lady
Maud ;" "A Statesman's LIve-Letters; "Emile
Zola ;" The World's End; Outof the Beaten
Track in Madagascar;" "The Future of Eng-
lish Humor ;'" Literary Notices; Science and
Art; Miscellany, etc.
Thomas Carlyle. A History of the first forty
years of his life. 1795 -1835. By James An-
thony Froude. In two volumes. Price, 15
cents each. Franklin Square Library. Price,
15 cents each.
The Queen of Bohemia. A story of English
Life and Manners. By Joseph IIatton, author
of," To-Day in America," etc. Price, 15 cents.
The North American Review, for June, con-
tains : "The Currency of the Future ;" "Mon-
golian Immigration;" Old-School medicine
and Homneopathy;" Swedenborg;" Has
Land a Value ?" "At Unconstitutional Mili-
tia," etc.; and is a number of rather more than
average interest. Price, 50 cents..
All the above may be obtained from Ash-
mead Brothers, who have, also, the leading
daily and weekly papers; the illustrated jour-
nals ; "Popular Science Monthly;" "Scientific
American;" "The Critic;" the latest novels
and new publications, etc.

The Letters They Write Usl
Editors, land agents, postmasters and other
"public characters," in Florida, have some
queer epistolary experience; the multiplicity,
variety and wide range of questions evincing
an eager desire for information and keen in-
terest in our great American "Sanitarium" and
" El Dorado." We copy portions of letters re-
cently addressed to the senior editor of this
journal, giving our replies in brackets.
The first is from an esteemed old friend, in
Linn County, Kansas.
Speaking of Florida, and its mild-and equable
climate, he says:
"I often wish I were there, or in some other
country where the wiind would stop blowing
once in a while; for I never did like to have
my hair blown out by the roots! * * *
I may take a notion to run down to Florida
and 'look around,' some time this season, if I
can arrange to get away. It requires a great
deal of work here to raise grain, wool, stock,
etc.; and we get very little money for all the
hard labor."
Alluding to one of the tracts of land offered
for sale in THE DISPATCH, he then proceeds:
1. "How far is it from the surface down to
the clay; and is this clay a stiff, hard clay, or
a loose clayey-loam ?"
[The clay lies from eighteen inches to two


8. Are there good building stone ?"
[No building stone in this part of Florida.]
9. "Are there plenty of panthers and other
ferocious beasts in those big pine woods to
come out at night and devour any small stock
you may have out-doors ?"
[Ne'er a panther-sometimes, on the margins
of swamps and dense hammocks," a wild-cat;
but the prowling and prehensile 'possum, and
an occasional fox, are the most "ferocious
beasts" that we have about here.]
10. "Are you subject to. ague and fever on
or along the St. John's River ?"
[Sometimes--but iot often, when people
take proper care of themselves; and our Flor-
ida "chills and fevers are slight and trivial


properly prepared and manured soil. As to
" other grasses that we can profitably raise
here, their name is legion." We have the
Bermuda, an excellent perennial grass for
either pasturage or hay ; the Guinea or "John-
son grass, also a perennial, which affords sev-
eral cuttings of green forage during the whole
season, almost three-fourths of the year; the
Para grass, from South America, easily propa-
gated, perennial, highly nutritious, and adapted
to low, wet lands, which will not produce any-
thing else of value. Then we can produce two
or three crops of the Millets and Sorghums iin
the year, to say nothing of corn fodder, cow
peas, Doura, Teosintc, etc., etc. In short, no
part of the United States can at all compare
with Florida in the variety of forage crops
which may be produced, with no .intermission,
during twelve months in the year. This in-
cludes, of course, rye, oats and other fall and
winter crops used for green forage and hay-
the production of which is practically limitless.]
4. Will your land bear good crops of corn
without manure?"
[It will not-except in very rare and excep-
tional cases.]
5. "Will it produce wheat, oats, rice, etc?"
[No wheat, of consequence, except in some
portions of middle or northern Florida. Oats,
for pasturage and forage, or to be fed in the
sheaf," can be raised in abundance; but good,
plump, heavy, "'shelled oats," we generally
buy from the North and West. Rice ?-well,
rather. Lots of it, either upland or lowland-
dry or flooded. Why-this is a Rice country,
old friend!]
6. "Will it raise Apples ?" .
[Yes-a few Red Astracharis, Carolina
Junes, Early Harvests, etc., but none to do
any good." This ain't an apple country; but
when the Apple crop is abundant at the North,
we can buy the Baldwins, Spitzenbergs, Yellow
Belleflowers and Northern Spies" cheaper than
we can raise them;" as communication is direct
and sailing freights quite low.]
7. "Is it windy In Florida, or subject to
tornadoes ?" -
[It is not at all windy, looking at it from a
Kansas standpoint. We have a great deal of
pleasant, breezy Weather--sometimes a pretty
sharp blow for a few hours, and occasionally a
brisk gale; but very seldom anything like a
tornado or huricarie, and never a fierce
" norther" or blizzard."]


_ -


I


I





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 14


when compared to the regularr fever'n agur"
of the West.]
11. "I hear the Indian River country praised
very much by some" What part of Florida do
you think the best for comfort and health ?"
[We have strongly indicated our individual
preference by pitching our tent on the eastern
shore of the St. John's River, near Jackson-
ville; but there are lovely and attractive
places over on the Gulf, from Perdido Bay to
Cape Sable-also, in the "Lake Region," of
Orange County, and on the Indian River and
sei-coast-to say nothing of the charming re-
gion of Tallahassee and northern Florida. We
really cannot decide for our friend; he must
come 'and look for himself.]
12. "How are the markets? How are tea,
sugar, coffee, rice, &c.?"
[Our butchers' meat 'is not, generally, so
good as you' have at the West-price from five
to twenty cents per pound. Other market pro-:
ducts about the same as at the N1orth. Vege-
bles higher, here, and so bring the grower
more money. Tea, sugar, and coffee, at
New York prices, with freights added. Butter
about five cents per pound over New York
prices. Rice, a little cheaper.]
13. "How far from' Jacksonville to New
York city ?"
About' 1,150 miles.
"I begin to think I am asking almost too
many questions, and that I may weary your
patience." [Oh, no!. not in the least--" on the
contrary .quite the reverse "-" we" are just
crammed full of information on Florida, and
anxious to disgorge!) "But I am eager to
learn the particulars of Florida. One of our
distant neighbors and a friend of his went to
Florida last winter. They went down.to New
Orleans, and took ship and went to sea, around
on the Gulf, and landed in the south-west corner
of Florida, and came along near the west part
of the State, and up into Georgia. He said
Florida was all sand-there was no soil, but'a
little, nmuck on top of sand-bank! No cAi-
.e. (!)--no hogs (!)-nor did they see anything
.oiptehem on! 'They were all poor little
runts.' No crops of any kind! !! But there
were plenty of negroes, and one would eat one
whole broad side of a hog, or make clean work
with a smoked ham.! And it was a miserable
country !-and they were glad to get out of it!
* What could be the matter with
these neighbors? Were they homesick, or was
the country as they describe it ?
"Now, if my long letter does not worry your
patience too much, I hope you will answer my
questions; and believe me, with best respects,
YSours truly."
[Your neighbors were laboring under a com-
plication of disorders, among which it is easy to


diagnose general cussedness, crabbed pessimism,
nostalgia and short-sightedness. They, evi-
dently, belonged to that' somewhat numerous
class, who having eyes see not, and having ears
hear too much! They remind us of Coleridge's
striking lines in regard to the owlet Atheism,"
Who, sailing with flned lids,
Close shut, athwart the glorious
Sun at noon, shrieks out; ...
Where is it?'"
[Florida is too good and pleasant a country
for all such people as these, and they should
hug the North Pole and "cuddle up close to
their icebergs!]
Our next letter is from a gentleman in
Massachusetts, who really "means business,"


and would risk all the drawbacks and incon-
veniencies of Florida-if he could only get just
the sort of place he wants, at his own figures!
He seems to be blissfully oblivious of the great
Florida boom," and (we sadly fear) his ideas
of" improvements" and prices" will scarcely
harmonize with those of our cracker friends
who "p'raps wud sell ef they cud git what
their place is wuth." We will let our corres-
pondent tell just what he wants; and we may
then venture upon a few words of reply.
"DEAR SIR-I want to purchase a place in
Florida for my future home.
I want a small place, with a grove of one
or two hundred [orange] trees, that are bear-
ing, or nearly ready to- bear; with a chance to
raise small fruits and poultry. It must be on
good land, in a healthy locality, and amoPg
good people. In fact, it must be a place that I
can fix up and make me a pleasant home of.
Should rather have a pluce without a
house; then I could build to suit myself; but
would like to, have the land improved, with
some [orange] trees well started, so that I could
get a living on it right away.
"I think in the region of ---- would suit:
me.' Please send me what information you can
in regard to the place, and whether you have
an improved place on your list, that you think
would suit me; and, if you have such a place,
give me a full description of it.
"I am willing to pay $1,000 or $1,500 (!) for
an improved place. If I cannot get an im-
proved place, I shall take a new lot. If I
could get a place right away, I should be
pleased; so that I could go on to it in the fall.
"I should like to get an illustrated map of
Jacksonville and suburbs.
"Please give me what information you can,
and oblige. Yours, &c., M,"
[This correspondent evidently knows exactly
what he wants, but he has not fully "kept step"
with the great Florida boom" of the past few
years. An improved place," with "two hun-
dred bearing orange trees," from which a man
can make a living right away," will easily
bring thousands instead of hundreds of dol-
lars-in short, not to put too fine a point upon
it"-the amount which our eastern friend pro-
poses to invest in improved places" in Flor-
ida, is so ridiculous inadequate as to provoke a
good-natured smile! We have taken the pains
to cut out and send our friend, M.," a priced
catalogue of Florida places held by some of our
real estate agents, from which he will be certain
to get some new ideas on the cost of" improved
homes" in this favored clime. After subsidiz-
ing innumerable railways, and squandering and


frittering away thousands of broad acres, our
"Uncle Samuel" has yet left a good deal of the
"public domain" in various parts of the nation;
but there is only one Florida-one summer
land," where the feeble and aged and those
who love not the boreal pole can take pleas-
ant refuge. It is true that State and other wild
lands may still be had here on cheap and easy
terms. When, however, these lands are cleared
up, built upon, planted in orange trees and
otherwise judiciously "improved," the way
they "appreciate" in value, and run up in
price is somewhat startling The moral of
all this is, that Now is the time to buy good
and favorably located, lands, and that nowhere,
perhaps, in this western hemisphere will the
proper exercise of taste, labor, energy and skill


in improving land "pay" as well as in Flor-
ida.-EDs.]
Reasons for Living in Florida.
BAY SAINT JOSEPH, FLA.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I will confine myself to the vicinity known
as Clearwater Peninsular, commencing at An-
clote River and extending to the Point Terri-
tory, about five miles wide and forty long.
The Gulf breeze makes us cool and pleasant.
All kinds of vegetables can be raised the year
round by a little work and fertilizing the land
properly. It is summer all the year round, ex-
cept December and January, which are our
spring months. We do not have house-flies
enough to need a brush, at meals. We have a
continuous growth of semi-tropical plants and
trees the year round. The thermometer rarely
goes higher than ninety in the shade. Our
country is so healthy that an M. D. is not need-
ed, nor is he to be found in this section. Our
population is all white, with the exception, I
believe, of one family of negroes. No intoxi-
cating liquors are sold and consequently none
drunk. You can get your fish out of the -bay
by a little effort, and sweet potatoes you can get
all the year out of the patch. You can always
sell out for more than you paid-and many
other reasons too numerous to mention.
W. V. FUTRELL,
A .Poultry Department in Dispatch.
CHARLESTON, S. C. May 19th 1882.
If our friend "B," will lead off on the
Poultry subject, it may stimulate others to give
their opinions and experience. We have the
finest climate in the world for poultry, and fewer_
obstacles to contend with than any other people
in the Union. We suggest to our correspondent
that his opening chapter be devoted to the best
mode of keeping our poultry and poultry-
houses free from vermin. If we can accomplish
this, easily and cheaply, the profits of poultry-
raising are assured; but there is still a wide
field for the discussion of different breeds, modes
of. Ifeding, general' management, &c.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Suppose you start a "Poultry Department"
in your FLORIDA DISPATCH. I will give you
all the assistance in my power, and if you can
get a few more who are as observant and en-
thusiastic on the subject as I am, I believe you
will get it to be authority on the subject. I
suggest that in your next issue, you allude to
the subject, and say that to start it will depend
on the number of replies you get from parties
who will promise to write, to exchange views
and generally advance the cause of both fancy
and profitable poultry raising.
Yours,


B.
Dynamite for Stumps.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Editors of Florida Dispatch:
In No. 8 of your excellent paper I see a
recommendation of Dynamite for blowing up
stumps. That is all right enough, but where
can the small farmer get it and what will it cost,
with the electric battery ?
Respectfully,
K& K.
[A friend, just starting for New York, has
promised to look up the Dynamite and explod-
ing apparatus for us ; and as soon as we get
any facts, we will give them to our readers.
-EDS.]


- - - I 11.~1__ 1
I Ir 1






5 TH LRIADSPTH


are not fitted to be a poor man's wife to remain
with their parents than become such. It will
be better for their lovers too, and better for
society.
A Laugh is a Good Thing.
What a capital, kindly, honest, jolly, glori-
ous good thing is a laugh! What a tonic!
What an exorcise of evil spirits! A healthy
laugh, which is ever in order, stirs up the phy-
sical man from the centre to the circumference,
and tends to improve the whole physical and
spiritual being. It promotes animal health and
spirits, and is to the man what the tides are to
the ocean-it stirs up the sluggish depths, pre-
vents stagnation, and keeps the whole system


I,


Single Women.
A clever old maid once said that it was fai
better to be laughed at because you were not
married, than not to be able to laugh because
you were. There is sound logic in that. It is
well for woman to marry if she meets a good.
true man, who loves her and whom she loves;
but if she is not suited, better that she remain
single. The majority of the old maids are help-
ful, lovable and sweet tempered, and fill their
allotted niche as acceptably as do their married
sisters. Are they not more to be honored, than
they would have been had they married merely
for a home or position? Our young ladies
have erroneous ideas upon this subject, -They
feel almost disgraced, if they have arrived at a
mature age and are not yet able to write Mrs.
before their names. Their whole ambition. is
to get a husband, by hook or crook; but get
him somehow they must. Consequently, they
take the first man that offers himself,: whether
he really suits them or not.
N'ow, girls, do not marry in haste. Get the
best education possible, help about domestic
affairs, and enter upon some trade or profession,
for which you have a taste, and master it;
Skilled labor is always well paid. Don't spend
your time repining because you cannot:see the
coming man. If you never see him, you can
live useful, happy lives. You think if you had
a husband, you would have a strong arm on
which to lean, a sharer of sorrow and trouble.
Alas! many a slender woman has not only had
to stand alone, but, serve also as prop for chil-
dren and husband; and very few wives find in
their husbands all the sympathy and compan-
ionship they desire. If you are good for any-
thing, you will not be hurt by remaining sin-'
gle, neither will you be elevated by becoming
" John's wife." Do your duty in life, and you
will count for one in the world whether-you are
married or single.-Presbyterian.
Sensible Advice.
There is nothing like their own' home for
married people, and especially for young mar-
ried people, even if the wife shall have to cook
and sweep the floor and clean the windows- If
she be a healthy girl, the exercise will do her
good-and no young man who has to .labor for
his living should marry a girl that is not
healthy, strong and willing to do her own work
while they are too poor to hire a servant.
This thing of marrying a girl that you have
to hire another to take care of is. not a wise
thing for a poor young man to do. He should
look out for a girl that is broad shouldered,
strong in muscle, having of course other vir-
tues. The ideal girl, the consumptive, tight-
laced, party-going, piano-playing, French-
talking, fashionable girl, can be no proper wife
for him. This language the girls may think
unkind, but it is not. It is better for girls that


fresh and wholesome. It is what the Gulf
r stream is to the ocean-a vivifying and warm-'
ting element. The convulsion produced by
hearty laughter penetrates to the mainutest
blood vessel, and causes the blood to flow with;
a freshened impulse. Laughter shuts the
, mouth of malice and opens the brow of kind-
; ness. W, whether it discovers the gumsI of in-
1 fancy, or age, the grinders of folly, or the dimples
of beauty; whether it racks the sides or de-
forms the countenance of vulgarity; or -deep:
lines the visage or moistens the eye of, refine-
ment-in. all, its phases, comforting, relaxing,
overwhelming, convulsing, throwing the human
form in happy shaking and quaking, a laugh is
a glorious thing! There is no remorse il.,it.j
It leaves no sting except at, the sides, and that
soon goes off.

The Olive and Its Culture
Our old and valued friend, the' late Robert.
Chisolm, of Beaufoirt, S. C.,, wrote one of the
Charleston papers thus, on the Olive, .ujube,
etc.:: I perceive by. a .late number of your,
paper, that you are' under the impression that
the Olive will not ripen its fruit in our climate.
I .presume that you are informed of tle state of
things in:. Charleston;, but I can assure you,
from an experience of ten or more years, that
in this neighborhood it ripens its fruit fully,
and I have never known. ainy t6 be 'at all
affected by frost. I have some three hundred
or more trees, most of which are in bearing,
and some have been for several years. The
fruit begins to ripen in Septemiber, and by the
middle of November, little, if any, unripe fruit
can be found. My trees are of two kinds and
were procured from the neighborhood of Flor-
ence,'and thus far, bear' fruit every year, and.
abundantly. Labor is too dear, and cotton too
profitable, for oil making, to pay; and until some
great change takes place in the value of labor,
or our market. crops, I do not think that sweet
oil will be made to any extent in the Southern
States.
"I have had the Jujube in cultivation for
twenty years, and it grows as readily as'the
Spanish paper mulberry, and in the same way.
It suckers freely, and the suckers grow very
readily, and I believe that this is the best way of
propagating it. Its foliage is quite ornamental*;
its flowers small, but very numerous and fra-
grant; and its fruit very pleasant, having the
merits of a fruit without being one. Beyond a
tree or two, I do not think that any one would
care to cultivate it. The Capers plant has
proved able to stand our climate for twenty
years past, and has borne fruit even in a low


if all the forts within our borders were put into
one it would not 'equal the fortified structure
that is yet to be seen on the Peruvian coast.
Louis Hoffman, an engineer who was. with,
Maximillian, has described the ruins of a large
seaport town on the Pacific coast of Mexico.
The Central American country abounds in evi-
dences of the Aztec race, and this winter many
archaeologists have gone thither, and from their
labors we shall soon learn more of this won-
drous people. Their origin is lost in antiquity.
They may. have come from the seed borne
across the sea, by Phoenician traders-perhaps
;hey sprung from the .fabled race of ,Atlantis.
They were either indigenous or imported in an
.mbryotic state from the oriental.archsepelago-
the latter the most likely.


-~ --- - -~. .~....,..... .......


m


clay soil on the seaboard, though its favorite
situation is rocky hill sides. It is propagated 1
principally by layers, but thus far I have not
succeeded in getting any layers to take, though "
I have never used any of the means used by
nurserymen for layering, which may be the
cause of my failure."

Fish Guano,
A subscriber on the Gulf Coast wishes T.IE
DISPATCH to furnish a good recipe for making (
fish guano.
Respectfully, L. W. H.
CEDAR KEY, FLA., May 20,1882. t
[Will some gentleman who is familiar with
the process of making Fish Guano, be good
enough to give full and plain directions for the t


whole process? Are there not parties on the
Gulf already engaged in this business ?-EDs.]
Ancient People of America.
At the New York Academy of Sciences, Pro-
fessor John S. Newberry lectured recently on
"The Ancient Civilization of America," ,and
said in substance:
When, the savages were pressed back by ad-
vancing civilization until they had passed what
was once the great natural ,water-gap between
the lakes and the Mexican Gulf, it was discov-
ered that they were not autochthonous, for
moIunds, caves, palaces and .remains of cities
showed the existence of a race that lived in the
highest state of civilization. Investigation and
research by historians, geologists and arche-
ologists havebrought to light much concerning
these wonderful people.' They can. e divided.
into trqo classes, which, with local,.differences,
are.generically. the. sope, One is the. mound-
builders,. who dwelt in the.fertile alley .of. the;
Mississippi, following a sedentary: and. peaceful
life. Mounds built by them, and instrpaneAts
and pottery and copper ornaments, made by.
them,. have been discovered all through the
Mississippi valley. They were miners and farm-
ers, raised tobacco,, and remains of:; their oil
wells still exist at Titusville, Pennsylvania., In
numbers they probably equaled the inhabitants
of the region at present, and enough is known
of their osteology to say they were of medium
size, fair- proportions, with a cranial develop-:
ment not unlike our" red' Indian. Their teeth'
were large and strong. They buried theii'deiad
with great ceremony. 'When, and why, and
how the mnound-builders disappeared we dQo:ot.
know. Their ultimate fatewas'probably entire
extinction. '
The second class of these early A-mericans
was the palace-builders of: the table-lands, a
class that was.spread from Chili, on the south,
to Utah, on the north, reaching their greatest
degree of power and civilization in Central
Aiperica, Mexico and lPeru. The I and
Montezurnas were types of this race, .apd through,
when swept from the earth by the brutality of
Pizarro and Cortez, their glory was already in
its decadence, we cari scarcely conceive 6f ith
extent. of their magnni cenee this 'Mexican
and Peruvian era far: surpassed anything in our
day in the construction of public works, roads,
aqueducts,' palaces and cities. The macada-
mized road that led from Callao to Lima ex-
ceeded in cost the Union Pacific Railroad, and


150


THEFLRD DIPTH


--I





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 1


Sheep Raising.
In answer to inquiries on the general man-
agement of sheep, best breeds for Florida, &c.,
we give a portion of a report made by an agri-
cultural committee in South Carolina:
"Sheep husbandry is coeval with civilization,
and has ever held a respectable position. Wool
growing is now next in importance to our great
staple, cotton. Stop the production of either,
and you starve thousands of human beings;
increase the production of either, and you pro-
portionately make glad and comfortable many
by affording them the means of subsistence.
Had. the subject no other claim upon our at-
tention, the above fact should induce us to pro-
duce more wool than we could consume. But
it has, as it can be made profitable to us, and
is so, wherever proper attention and study is
given to it. It is admitted, that sheep, although
close feeders, improve the land upon which they
graze ; while all other stock, except, probably,
hogs, injure it. They mature earlier, are sub-
ject to as few diseases as any stock, will live
and thrive upon pastures, upon which a cow
would starve, increase rapidly, provided the
dogs let them alone. The high price which
pork and bacon command now-a-days, is well
calculated to make us think of some substitute.
It is a pretty expensive operation to raise a hog
-it is bad economy to slaughter pigs for the
table. The committee will not weary you with
a long report as to the various reasons why you
should give more attention to an interest in
sheep husbandry. But simply give you their
experience in breeding and raising sheep, for the
benefit of those who may take an interest in
sheep husbandry.
In the first place, it is important that we
should select the breed best adapted to our pe-
culiar locality and purposes. When the locali-
ty is thin and hilly land, select large and heavy
bone breeders ; for level and richer localities,
a medium size, always, in any locality, select-
ing for breeders, healthy sheep, also, those of
the most perfect symmetry, with greatest apti-
tude to fatten, separating the puny and small
animals for sale and mutton. By this plan, al-
though we may breed several years from
the same buck, we may improve our stock.
Our breeders, especially the buck, should be
full grown, say, eighteen months to two years
old.
Varieties.-The sheep best adapted to our
climate and treatment, is a cross of Merino


upon the native. We have seen a great im-
provement by a dash of Merino blood-the
Merino is proverbially hardy and free from
lung diseases. The full blood Merino will not
suit our purposes, as they are too long in ma-
turing, anid the wool is too fine for domestic
purposes. We have heard it said, that the
broad tail or Turnisian sheep was remarkably
hardy and well adapted to our climate and
short pastures-they are a coarse wooled sheep
and not as prolific as the Southdowns.
Treatment.-The sheep is partial to particu-
ler food, and if'the pasture become deficient
in what suits his taste, he is very apt to de-
cline, (or jumps into his neighbor's field.)
They soon eat out that which is most palatable,
and should be removed at once. No animal


relishes his salt more, and he should be regu-
larly supplied with it, at least once a week and
oftener if rainy weather. Sheep will always
come up before a shower for salt. During win-
ter they should be protected by shelters, brush
piles or pine woods, from the cold winds and
rains, and if possible pasture provided for them.
Wheat, rye or barley, cotton seed in moderate
quantities with a little bran, makes a very good
winter food. During the yeaning season, it is
very important to have the young lambs cared
for. If they can only be watched for a few
days, they will take care of themselves. No
hogs should be allowed, access to the sheep-
fold, and it will be found best always to pen
them at this season by themselves. The lamb-
ing if possible should take place before the first
of January. Late lambs are worth very little,
and are a deal of trouble.
Shearing.-It is bad policy to shear sheep
more than once a year-a flock will soon run
out by this treatment, unless a degree of care is
exercised, not common among us. After being
sheared-smear the nose well with tar, and turn
them into a woods pasture, the sun is very se-
vere upon their bare backs, and the dews, at
night at this season equally so-they escape
both in the woods.
Diseases.-The sheep is more troubled by
lung affections than any thing else. Tar we be-
lieve to be the best remedy-and the best pre-
vention which is more important-plenty of
food and protection from severe changes of
weather.
For scours, a common disease among sheep
-salt and soot will be found very efficient-
while the addition of a little sulphur now and
then will be very beneficial in keeping off lice,
sometimes very injurious to sheep.
But there is very little use in any farmer ex-
perimenting in sheep raising, either for pleasure
or profit, so long as the country is infested by
"mongrel pupy, whelp and hound and cur of
low degree." Until this evil is remedied we
may expect to do without our wool or our mut-
ton. A worthless dog may destroy more sheep
in one night than would feed a dozen families
a week. Your committee are of the opinion
that so long as the present state of things ex-
ist, there is no encouragement for improve-
ment of the breed of sheep-they would there-
fore recommend that the Legislature pass some
law to protect the sheep owner.

Coco-" Nut Grass," Etc.
An old South Carolina correspondent says:
Mr. Stephen Elliott, once President of the Bank


of the State, informed us that it could be de-
stroyed, by not permitting it to go to seed, dur-
ing the growing season, which could be effected
by keeping it hoed down.
Having a patch in my yard, about twenty
feet square, I tried the experiment on it last
summer. It was fully set, had been there sev-
eral years, spreading, and got complete posses-
sion of the soil, and had driven out all other
grasses, the earth was rather compact and rich.
I hoed the patch once a week regularly, during
the whole summer, beginning soon after it got
up, and never permitted the seed vessels to
form. The hoe cut about half an inch below
the surface of the earth.


The result is, that this season not one spear
of the grass has come up-the ground, is bare.
It is now the middle of June, the nuts would
long since have thrown up their spires, if any
were alive. I have not dug down to hunt for
the nuts, but have no doubt that they are dead.
The reason of this result from the treatment,
would seem to be, that by such continual cut-
ting off the top of the plant, leaving nothing
above the surface, the nut is exhausted, loses
vigor and dies; possibly also that the lungs of
the plant being so destroyed it cannot breath
and dies. The planter treats a stump in his
field on the same principal. He cuts off the
young shoots during the growing season several
times, and kills the stump possibly the first sea-
son, certainly the second. .
This plan may not be adapted to an exten-
sive field, but by using the Scraper or "Skim-
plow," I think that a planter might destroy
many acres in one season, without seriously in-
conveniencing his work on the crop. I am well
satisfied that the plan is certain and effectual,
and well worth the trial of any one troubled
with this pest, "Nut Grass."

THE POPE AS A FARMER.-How many peo-
ple are there, asks Land, who know that the
Pope is a farmer? Such is the fact, however,
and there is reason to believe that his Holiness
makes a very good thing of it. Leo XIII. is,
however, neither a grower of cereals nor a
raiser of stock, but a breeder of fish. The
lagoons of Comacchio are thus turned to profit-
able use. Eels are the staple food and several
tons of cooked eels are sent from the lagoons
every Lent. The fish come up in immense
shoals from the Adriatic and are fed in the
lagoons on other fish provided for them, until
they are nicely fattened, when they are killed
and cooked in a vast kitchen.

A Cow WORTH HAVING.-Very few dairy
achievements can excel the following record of
a cow belonging to Dr. John E. Comfort, of
Morrisania. During the past year she has
yielded cream from which 358 pounds of butter
have been made, and in addition to this, she
has supplied abundance of milk and cream for
a family table. The butter was carefully
weighed after each churning. This model ani-
mal is about nine years old, of mixed Alderny
and Durham, and was bought from a well-
known dairy farm in Tremont several years
since. During the previous year, 1880-81, this
cow made 313 pounds of butter.-N. Y. Mail.
*-*


HEAT IN THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE.-
The summer in the Southern Hemisphere has
gone ahead of the last in the Northern one in
the matter of heat and dryness. An Austra-
lian correspondent of Nature says that on Jan-
uary 17 in the Sturt River region "the ther-
mometer registered 180 degrees in the sun and
114 in the shade." That this is abnormal heat
is shown by a record completed by an English
climatologist, which states that up to 1877 the
highest shade temperature ever known at Mel-
bourne was 111.2 degrees and at Adelaide,
South Australia, 113.5 degrees, both warm
enough in all conscience to set the coldest-
blooded animal in a fever.




52 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


4h Jhrida f 5sicuh.

JACKSONVILLE, MAY 29, 1882.
EDITORS:
D. REDMOND, D. H. ELLIOTT, W. H. ASHMEAD.
Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.
RATES OF ADVERTISING.
SQUARES. 1. TIME.1 1 MO. 3 MO. 6 MO. 1 YEAR
One ............. ... $ 1 00 $ 250 $550 $10 00 $ 1850
Two ................. ... 2 00 5 001 10 00 18 00 34 00
Three.............. 300 7 00 14 00 25 00 46 00
Four ...................... 4 00 9 00 17 50 30 00 58 00
Eight..................... 8 00 16 50 30 00 5000 100 00
Sixteen.................. 1600 30 00i 50 00 80 00 150 00
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the best ad-
vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.
5,000 TO 8,000 COPIES ISSUED EVERY WEEK.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.
MR. FRANK JORDAN, No. 9 East Fifth St., Cincin-
nati, Ohio is our Western Agent, and is authorized to
receive subscriptions and advertisements to THE FLOR-
IDA DISPATCH.

Bearing, Dwarf Orange Trees.
A few days since, we accepted the kind invi-
tation of our friend, Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, of this
city-a gentleman very widely and well known
for his enthusiastic and persevering devotion to
all matters of scientific and practical value and
interest-and visited his garden, especially to
see the very beautiful and rare collection of
Dwarf Orange trees, which he has in full bear-
ing.
These miniature trees, ranging from two and
a half to four and five feet high, are mostly of
perfect form; branching near the ground,
limbed out symmetrically, and presenting, gen-
erally, the shape of an obtuse cone-the true
form for all fruit trees, in this climate.
It is about twenty-two (22) months since
these little bearing trees were budded; and
they are now carrying each, from ten, fifteen
and twenty up to forty beautiful oranges, larger
and farther advanced toward maturity than
those of the same varieties on older standard
trees overhead! The foliage of these Lilliputi-
ans of the citrus family is also larger, thicker
and darker in color than that of the ordinary
sweet orange trees growing around them; and
they present an air of thriftiness and vigor
which we were at first disposed to refer to the
liberal use of fertilizers and extra care and cul-
tivation. Dr. K. assured us, however, that
such was not the fact; and stated that all his
trees-dwarfs and standards-have been treated
precisely alike, and that there are no favored,
forced, or pampered ones among them. And


now the reader will naturally ask-" Cui Bono ?"
and How are these little, precocious trees pro-
duced?" We shall answer the last question
first, and tell how the Doctor propagates his
early-bearing Dwarfs.:
Most green-house men, and a few outsid-
ers," know a little, pendulous, tortuous and
drooping pot-plant of the orange family, called
the Otaheite. We have had it for a number of
years, sometimes in the open ground and some-
times in-doors, but nowhere "to do much
good," and had almost forgotten its existence
until we visited Dr. K.'s garden. We are now
disposed to alter our figures in regard to this
variety, and to give it a high place among the


"stocks" of Florida nurserymen and amateur
pomologists. In short, what the "Paradise"
and Doucin are to the apple; the quince,
sloe and hawthorn to the pear; and the maha-
leb to the cherry, the Otaheite will, we believe,
prove to the orange, the lemon and their conge-
ners; and the only question in the near future
is, how to procure these "stocks in sufficient
quantities to supply the demand for Dwarf
Orange trees, which is sure to spring up as soon
as the novelty-loving public see them. Leaving
this to the enterprise of our friends, Bidwell,
Manville, Beach, and others, we will try to de-
scribe the simple and easy mode by which Dr.
Kenworthy produces these little pets of the gar-
den and the grove.
He plants out a number of the Otaheite shrubs
or trees in a fair soil; and, at the proper season,
i. e., when they are making a vigorous growth
-he carefully layers (in the usual way) every
available limb or branch. When these layers
show signs of growth, he buds into them, (very
near the ground,) such varieties as he desires to
propagate; and, when the buds start, he does
not cut off the stock above, but ties a ligature
of cord or fine wire around and near the top of
the stock, retaining the leaves to assist in nour-
ishing and pushing forward the young bud. If
this budding is done very early, the bud will
make several "growths" during the first
season, and the little tree will be large
enough to transplant the following fall or
winter. When thus removed, the dwarfs may
be planted six or eight feet apart-(the Doc-
tor's are only five feet)-and they will after-
wards require no more care than any good
orange-grower bestows upon the trees in his
garden or grove-though we confess we should
be tempted to give the little fellows, "early and
often," an extra handful of bone-dust, etc., just
to see them spread out near the ground, bour-
geon, blossom and don their "golden apples !"
This spreading near the ground," by-the-way,
is something greatly under, the control of the
grower; who, if he understands the theory of
"pinching back," or "pruning with thumb and
finger," (as set forth in Barry's "Fruit Gar-
den," and similar works,) may easily give the
young tree any shape he desires, without ever
using his knife or pruning-shears. The short
and almost hidden trunk or stem of these lit-
tle orange trees, with their dense, rounded,
solid masses of large, shining, dark green
leaves, studded plentifully with ripe Mandarins,
Homosassa's, Magnum Bonum's, Nonpareil's,
Old Vini's, or other choice varieties (which a


child could gather without standing on tip-toe,)
would surely be one of the most charming
" pomological exhibitions which it is possible
to imagine!
And now for the more practical, dollar-and-
cent side of this "new departure" in orange
culture:
1. It expedites the bearing of thle orange, so
that the great Bug-Bear of all new-comers-
" having to wait so long for the trees to come
into bearing "-is completely vanquished. With
a few hundred of these dwarfs in his garden or
grove, certain (with good care,) to produce
large crops of superior fruit in two or three
years, the settler, could wait, hopefully and


patiently, for the larger seedlings to mature,
and feel that he had achieved some pleasant
and profitable results, without spending a life-
time in expectancy.
2. The amateur or city resident, of limited
space, who desires to test many sorts and varie-
ties, may plant these dwarf trees four or five
feet apart, (or even closer,) in a corner of his
garden, and derive from them all the satisfac-
tion enjoyed by the cultivator of many broad
acres.
3. There could be no more perfect blending
of the utile cum dulce than borders and groups
of these lovely little trees, full of fruit, scattered
around the gardens and grounds of the number-
less lovely homes on St. John's River; in the
Lake region; along the Gulf coast, and in
many other portions of fair Florida!"
4. Should there be any danger to tree or
fruit from a nipping and eager frost, these
little trees could be perfectly protected by turn-
ing over them a sugar hogshead, or wrapping a
blanket around them.
5. As selling stock for our Florida nurs-
erymen, they would prove, at once, a perfect
Bonanza." Trees large enough to bear twenty
to fifty oranges, could be grown in fourteen or
sixteen inch pots, packed in small space, and
shipped, per Express, with the fruit all on!
Such souvenirs of Florida as these, no "tourist"
could resist, and the demand for them in the
winter, would be something truly awful!"
They could, also, be propagated very largely
here, in the open ground, then potted and sent
to the North, in the fall, for stocking conserva-
tories and green-houses.
Other uses for these pretty trees may suggest
themselves to the reader, but we will close for
the present; merely remarking that Dr. Ken-
worthy has no trees, roots or stocks to dispose
of, and that he does not specially desire to be
troubled with any correspondence on the sub-
ject.

Death of James Vick.
We are pained to announce the death of
our old friend and co-laborer, JAMES VICK, of
Rochester, New York. Mn, VICK was justly
entitled to the name of the Great American
Seedsman and Florist. He was, we believe, of
Irish descent, but born in Portsmouth, England,
where he was the playmate of Charles Dickens.
He was, originally, a printer, and after coming
to America, he set type by the side of Horace
Greeley, with whom he maintained a life-long
friendship. It is no disparagement to those who
have preceded, or who survive MR. VICK, to


say that no man in this country, during the last
twenty-five years, has done as much for orna-
mental gardening and floriculture as JAMES
VICK, and that he deserves the kindliest re-
membrance in the hearts of all good and gen-
tle men and women.

Silk Culture for Florida.
Mr. J. W. Barclay, of this city, has procured
forty thousand eggs of the Japanese silk-worm
and begun the raising of silk-worms. He has
already growing the morus alba and Osage
orange for food. This is a commendable enter-
prise, which we hope to see followed by many
others. There's money in it.


--





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 15O


TEA-AND HOW TO MAKE IT.
Letter from South Carolina.
Mr. Owen A. Gill, of Baltimore, writes from
Georgetown, S. C., April 23, whither he went
recently to make up the tea crop of Mrs. Fors-
ter, as follows:
That more Northern merchants may under-
stand something concerning this new product of
the South, we will preface the account of how
this South Carolina tea was made by a brief
statement of what has been done for American
tea culture.
As far back as 1850 the attempt to grow tea was
made in this State. At that time it was thought
that if the tea would only grow the question
would be solved, and when it was found that it
not only grew, but gave promise of rivaling
even that of China, great hopes Were entertained,
and the United States Government was induced
to assist in the experiment. But after the plants
matured, to convert the fresh leaves into tea
was found to be quite another matter, and there
seemed to be but two ideas, which were either
to import Chinamen, who were skilled in the
art of tea-making, or to find out their receipts.
The former was impracticable and expensive,
and when the receipts were secured they were
so complicated and mysterious that to follow
them would so add to the cost that the making
of tea, except as a curiosity, was out of the
question. Even when the receipts were fol-
lowed, good results did not, and it has been sus-
pected that the heathen Chinese applied a simi-
iar treatment to his receipts as that by which
he was accustomed to "fixee" seeds when the
outside barbarian was his customer-that is, he
boiled them. Then, again, the impression pre-
vailed that tea to be tea must be made to look
like the time-honored Gunpowder, Young Hy-
son, etc., and the idea that American tea should
be made on American principles did not sug-
gest itself. So the experiment failed, and the
tea plants were relegated to the flower gardens
as ornaments and curiosities. In this way many
fine specimens are now found scattered through-
out the South.
In 1876, when Gen. LeDuc found himself at
the head of the Department of Agriculture at
Washington, he saddled upon tea for a hobby,
his claims for which as a rival to other agricul-
tural products were somewhat extravagant, and
brought on him the ridicule of the Northern
press. He procured seed from the South, most
of it from this place, and when they germinated
into young plants they were distributed through-
out the South, by far the greater portion of
which, falling into the hands of those ignorant
of their culture and in unsuitable locations, died.
Still LeDuc, notwithstanding the ridicule, suc-
ceeded in interesting many Southern planters
in the matter, and among them the lady upon
whose plantation this tea garden is located. In
the spring of 1877, at the invitation of Gen.
LeDuc, some Baltimore tea merchants went to


Washington and made the first American tea
out of leaves picked from seedlings of the Gov-
ernment nurseries. This was found to be of
a most excellent quality, and encouraged the
Commissioner to extend his field. He sent to
India, and, procuring the choicest seed, started
the experimental tea farm at Summerville, S.
C., twenty miles from Charleston. Unfortu-
nately for tea culture he spent the large pro-
portion of the appropriations on his "improve-
ments and very little on tea, so when Dr. Lor-
ing succeeded him last year he very naturally
looked at the cost, and finding it, so far as the
tea was concerned, extravagant, put a stop to
the General's improvements.
Because a man is a 'Chinaman is no more
reason why he should know anything more
about tea than a Maine farmer does of the cot-
ton plant, and because one has spent his life in
a tea broker's office in Wall street is no reason


that he knows anything more about tea than
its commercial value; indeed the commercial
value of tea is sometimes very absurd; for in-
stance styles" or appearance is a very large
factor in the commercial value of tea, which
has little to do with its quality and is often the
cloak to cover grave defects of leaf. That the
public should be fooled into buying tea to look
at and not to drink is a singular comment on
its intelligence, and a lack of sincerity on the
part of those who cater to this false estimate of
value. It was by throwing aside all these pre-
judices of trade and applying a little chemistry
and common sense to the matter that the con-
clusion was reached that tea-making after all
must be a simple matter-, or how would such a
people as the Chinamen were 1,000 years ago
have known such peculiar properties as tea lay
hidden in the tea-leaf, which leaf in its green
state possesses none of the properties which we
call tea. Experiments verified this supposition.
The location of this tea garden, and which,
we believe, is rightly demonstrated the first,"
is on the rice plantation of the late Dr. A. M.
Forster, now in the possession of his much-
esteemed widow, whose special care is the "first"
tea garden. It is three miles from the city of
Georgetown, S. C., and is directly on the Pee-
Dee River. Before the war such a rice planta-
tion was regarded as the most precious and cer-
tain inheritance a father could provide for his
children; the profits were large, and the plan-
ters of the "low lands" were looked upon as
the elite of the State. Unhappily slavery was
a necessity of these profits, and now although
the prosperity no longer exists, the surround-
ings of the plantation are marked with signs of
refinement and cultivation. The mansion was
erected in 1818, and the grounds, laid out by
English gardeners, give an aristocratic air to
the scene, while the half-hundred houses for the
negroes, imposing chapel and numerous out-
buildings give one an idea of what a planter's
life must have been when he had, as Dr. Fors-
ter did, three hundred slaves at his beck and
call. But all this is now of the past, and it was
in the hope of adding to her income that Mrs.
Forster has been doing all she could to get her
little tea garden in order. Saturday, on which
it had been arranged to pick and cure the
leaves, was unfortunately a very rainy day, and
the chilly weather of the previous fortnight had
somewhat toughened the young leaves. Still,
it could not be postponed or wait for more pro-
pitious weather. The spring growth of the
plants was about four inches, with an average
of six leaves. All of these would have made
tea, but because of the cold weather spoken of,
only the two tops or the youngest leaves were
thought sufficiently succulent and tender to
make good tea; these are nipped off with the
finger and thumb nail and gathered into bas-
kets; when a sufficient quantity had been col-
lected they were taken to the kitchen, and tea-
making commenced in earnest, during the whole
of which nothing more elaborate was used than


an ordinary sieve and tin basin, such as are
found in any kitchen, the object being to sim.
plify the whole matter to the understanding of
an ordinary cook.
The first thing to be done was to wilt the
leaves; the best way would have been to' ex-
pose them to the hot sun for an half hour or so,
but it was raining and artificial heat had to be
resorted to; this was obtained by putting the
leaves in an oven with the doors open, while
some were put in sieves and held over the top of
the stove. The object of this is to wilt, or make
the leaves soft and flabby ; when they are so that
you could roll them without breaking them,
when they had all the spring taken out of them
so they stayed as you twisted them. The first
part of the process was declared completed.
The soft leaves were then thrown on a clean
pine table and rolled between the hands, the
effect of which was two-fold ; it bruised the leaf,


permitting the juices to come out, and it
twisted the leaves into the shapes they natu-
rally take, and such as you see in black teas.
It was surprising to see how quickly this was
accomplished ; the leaves seemed to hanker af-
ter a curl. All of this wilting and rolling
could be much better done by machinery ; in
fact, in India all the tea is so made, which gives
a product at once perfect and uniform. One of
the simplest devices for rolling the leaf is to
put it in a leather bag three feet long and one
foot in diameter, tied at the top to keep the
leaves in. When this is filled with wilted leaves,
it is rolled by a series of cog-wheels, which in a
short time impart to the leaves an individual
twist; the leaves seem to aid in twisting and
bruising each other. While this rolling was
being done, the leaves became very sticky, and
it would have been easy, with labor, to fashion
them into any desired form or shape, to imitate
the round bolls of Gunpowder or the delicately
and even-twisted grains of Hyson; but cui
bono f except to cater to the absurd idea of
making tea to look at. As each handful was
finished with the rolling it was made into a
round boll about four inches in diameter, and
when the leaves had been so treated a portion
was set aside to ferment for English Breakfast
tea. What was left were broken up to be con-
verted into green or fresh tea. These were put
directly into tin basins, for want of coffee roas-
ters, and set over the fire. They now passed
through the same process that green coffee does
in the roasting, only the roasting was not car-
ried so far, otherwise the tea would have a
burnt taste.
It was in this state stirred constantly, to
keep from burning, and in about an hour the
well-curled grains became crisp and fresh,
while the delicious fragrance of green tea was
diffused throughout the apartment. The tea
was pronounced finished and it was set aside to
cool. It was not green in color, but it was
green in the sense of fresh," like green corn,
which was the original signification of the term
till the very sly Chinaman, finding the outside
barbarian was making the inistake, colored the
leaf artificially with Prussian blue and gypsum
to suit the demand and avoid explanations.
The question will naturally be asked, What
is to be the result of this tea-growing in the
South ? Will it pay ? It is quite too early to
answer this with any degree of certainty, but it
is the opinion of the writer that it is very
doubtful if Southern tea will be able to com-
pete in Baltimore or New York with tea from
China and India without the assistance of a pro-
tective tariff". Twenty-five years ago China
had a monopoly of supplying thie world with
tea, now she has as competitors Japan, India
and Java, the effect of which has been to re-
duce the prices of tea to a very low point. Yet
there is an opening for this Southern tea, and
one of which the people of the South will avail
themselves without doubt; it is that planters,


when they learn how simple is the preparation
of the leaves, requiring not as much skill as the
making of good bread, will grow tea for their
own use, which they can do at a much less cost
than they can buy of equal quality from
stores, and in this way the culture may prove
a benefit to the country. Of course, if this were
done it would withdraw much trade from tea
merchants whose business lies within the tea
belt; but for one house at least the writer can
vouch the loss would not be complained of,
while they would find a recompense in the
knowledge that they had contributed to an in-
dustry which was benefiting so many.
Concerning the quality of tea made from
Southern leaves, there is no question it is cer-
tainly superior to the average of our import,
and decidedly better than a great many teas
sold in the South, especially in country stores,
where "style" or appearance seems to be the
principal characteristic.-6Char. News & Courier.


~-------


I






L.54-_: THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


COCOANUT CAKE.-Cocoanut cake made
from this recipe is as nice cake as one need wish
to make: Take the whites of five eggs, one
small cup of sweet milk, one cup and-two-thirds
of another of granulated sugar, two-thirds of a
cup of butter, one teaspoonful and a half of
baking powder, about three cups of sifted flour,
flavor with almond extract, bake in layers.
Beat the whites of two or three eggs to a frost;
add pulverized sugar enough to make rather
thin frosting and put between the layers; on
this scatter cocoanut; put on enough to make
a nice layer; for the top and sides of the cake
the frosting should be a little thicker. The
best way to get the cocoanut on the sides is to
put it on with your hand; you can press it
gently upon the frosting and make it stick to it.
ORANGE PUDDING.-Peel and cut fine six
oranges; sprinkle a very little sugar over them;
make a steamed custard of one pint of milk,
one tablespoonful of corn starch, the yolks of
three eggs, one-half cup sugar and pinch of
salt; when cool, pour over the oranges. Beat
the whites to a froth adding a tablespoonful
pulverized sugar, pour over the custard and
then set in. the oven five minutes to brown. To
be eaten cold.
TOMATO SouP.-Three pounds beef, one
quart tomatoes, one gallon water. Boil beef
about two hours, until reduced to about two
quarts of water; then add tomatoes; boil about
half an hour; season with pepper and salt,
strain and serve.
CURE FOR DANDRUFF.-A preparation of
one ounce of sulphur and one quart of water,
repeatedly agitated during intervals of a few
hours, and the head saturated every morning
with the clear liquid, will in a few weeks, re-
move every trace of0 dandruff from the scalp,
and the hair will soon become soft and glossy.
ANTIDOTE TO POIsoN.-Stir a heaping tea-
spoonful of salt and of mustard, one of each, in
a glass of water, and drink at once. Repeat
the dose if necessary. To counteract the effects,
swallow the whites of two or three eggs, and
drink one or two cups of strong coffee. Drink-
ing sweet oil freely is also highly beneficial in
poisoning cases.
PUFF PASTE.-Mix one pound of flour, one
ounce of butter and the juice of one lemon into
a firm paste with ice-cold water. Let it stand
an hour. Roll it out thin and lay over it one
pound of butter in thin slices, fold over the
paste from each side, roll it up into a ball, and
roll out quarter of an inch in thickness. Fold
over in three layers and lengthwise in three
folds. Let it lie half an hour. Repeat the


operation, let it lie ten minutes and repeat the
rolling. When used for pies and tarts, rub
over the top with a feather dipped into sweet
milk.
PIQUANTE SAUCE FOR SALADS.-Two hard
boiled yelks of eggs, and two raw ditto, mashed
smooth, together with a tablespoonful each of
cream and salad oil; add sufficient vinegar to
make it pretty sharp.
ENGLISH SALAD SAUCE.L-Pound in a mortar
the hard-boiled yelk of an egg; mix with it a
saltspoonful of salt, a teaspoonful of mustard
flour, a mashed mealy potato, two desertspoon-
ful each of cream and olive oil, and tablespoon-
ful of good vinegar.
DROP GINGER CAKE.-One cup full of but-


ter or lard, one cupful of white sugar, one pint
of molasses, three eggs, one cupful of hot water.
with two teaspoonfuls of soda disolved in it,
one tablespoonful of ginger, and flour enough
to make a tolerably stiff batter. Drop with a
spoon into a long pan.
GLAZED SWEET POTATOES.-Boil softly, peel
carefully and lay in a greased dripping-pan in
a good oven. As they begin to crust over, baste
with a little butter, repeatijig several times as
they brown. When glossy, and of a golden rus-
set, dish.
NICE SUMMER DRINK.-Slice 1 large lemon,
bruise 1 oz. of ginger root and mix them with
1 1-2 lb. of sugar and 1 oz. tartaric acid. Pour
2 1-2 gals. boiling water on them. Let stand
until cool ; then add 1 gill of yeast. Let stand
12 hours and bottle, corking tightly. Ready
for use in 48 hours.
CLEANING SILVER.-Nothing is better to
clean silver with, than alcohol and ammonia ;
after rubbing with this, take a little whitening
on a soft cloth and polish ; in this way even
frosted silver, which is so difficult to clean, may
be easily made clear and bright.
SODA MILK PANCAKES.-One quart of sour
milk, one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot
water, a little salt, one egg, add flour and mix
to the consistency of thick cream. They are
very nice.
CHOCOLATE CAROMELS.-One cup of sugar,
one cup of molasses, one cup of cream, one
cake of chocolate, one tablespoonful of flour,
half bottle of vanilla. Boil half an hour.
MOUNTAIN CAKE.-The whites of eight eggs;
one cup of butter ; one of sweet cream ; two
and a-half teacups of sugar ; three and a-half
of flour, with two teaspoonfuls of yeast pow-
ders stirred in the flour.

WHAT IS MULCHING ? -Having used the
term "mulch," for these many years, we were
desirous of learning its origin, and after much
search through cyclopedias and dictionaries,
find it derived from a Hebrew word for partly
rotten straw. Loudon says: "Mulching con-
sists in laying a circle of litter around newly
planted trees to retain the natural humidity
of the soil, and in American practice is even
extended to mellow earth, keeping the surface
of the soil, light by constant stirring so that it
will be a poor conductor of heat".-American
Agriculturist.

Bees in Louisiana.
We copy from a late number of the Ameri-
can Bee Journal:
I put into winter quarters last fall thirty-five
colonies in good condition, all in Langstroth
two-story hives: used one thickness of cotton


cloth, and one thickness of jute bagging as ab-
sorbents. They came through in good condi-
tion, with the exception of three queenless,
which I doubled up March 1. I reared and
had fertilized ten fine Italian queens during
April. Bees are now bringing in plenty of
honey. Surplus arrangements are all on and
rapidly being filled. I am working them for
surplus, not wanting any increase. So far I
have kept them from swarming. The flood did
not reach me, as I had four feet more to spare.
Some of my neighbors lost quite a number of
colonies, but not quite all. Weather is dry
and cool. The overflow is gradually falling,
-with no places flooded on the west bank of
Bayou Teche in this parish. The cane crop is
promising.
W. R. THOMPSON.
New Iberia, La., May 1, 1882.


A1y JicflftIet ra, Horticutltural and Pomtological
Associations.
Florida Fruit-Growers' Association-Office at Jack-
sonville-D. Redmond, President; W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; W. H. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding Sec-
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee-Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, 0. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official organ-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA STATE GRANGE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICES.-Master, Wm. H. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Wm. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B. F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Field-
ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. H. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate
Keeper, -- Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Wm. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T. W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H.
Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Geo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Unistead, Hous-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville.-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J. C. Greeley, Treasurer.
Directors-J. H. McGinniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro, P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney. Animal meeting-
Last Friday in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; 0. E. Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. 0. Taylor, Secretary and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Florida.-President, A. B. Bartlett, Georgetown; Vice-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. Hawkins, Lake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George; George W. Thorn, Treasurer,
Georgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
mond, Fort Gates.
Picolata Agricultural and Horticultural Society.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, W. N. ParKer, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Corresponding Secretary,
N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., Recording Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer. Meets first Saturday in each month.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. Mathers, Second Vice-President; B.
W. Powell, Corresponding Secretary; B. F. Jordan, Sec-
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical Fruit Growers' Association of Monroe County,
Florida.-Home office, Myers, Florida; F. A. Hendry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson,
President; Thomas Tillis First Vice-President; J. B.
Sutton, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary; J. M. Barco, Recording Secretary;
L. W. Hamlin Assistant Recording Secretary.
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Association.-
John Bradford, President, Bradfordville, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida.
Pinellas, Florida, Fruit Growers' Association.-D. W.
Meeker, President; Wm. P. Neeld, Secretary.
Bronson Agricultural Union Bronson, Florida.-Jo-
seph Hirst, President; L. W. Iamlin, Secretary; semi-
monthly meetings, first and third Saturdays.
Central Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida.-Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
Evergreen Horticultural Society Dunedin, Florida.-
J. W. Matchett, President; W. Tate, Vice-President;
Geo. L. Jones, Secretary.
Decatur County Fair Association, Bainbridge, Geor-
gia.-Maston O'Neil, President; I. Kwilecki, Secretary.
Lake Wier Agricultural and Pomological Society (of
Marion County, Florida).-Captain J. L. Cainy, 'Presi-
dent; Dr. L. M. Ayer, Corresponding Secretary.
Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Higgins, Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Association, Albany,
Georgia.-L. E. Welch, President; T. M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
Sumter County Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
clation.-D. L. Hubbard, President, Leesburg; W. C.
Dodd, Recording Secretary, Leesburg; A. P. Roberts,
Corresponding Secretary Leesburg.
Florida Central Agricultural Society.-Thos. F. King,
President, Gainesville; Secretary, -
-- ; W. K. Cessna, Corresponding Secretary, Gaines-
ville.


Archer Agricultural Association.-J. W. Williams,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine, Secretary ; I. C. Neal,
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President; John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewis, Treasurer, Tallahassee.
Indian River Agricultural and Pomological Society.-
A. P. Cleveland, President; W. H. Sharp, Secretary,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
Association.-R. J. Mays, President; Frank W. Pope,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
Orange County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred. L. Robertson, Corresponding
Secretary.
Albion Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Associa-
tion.-Joseph Hirst, President; S. Frei, Secretary. Semi-
monthly meetings first and third Mondays.
Gadsden County Fair Association.-Jsse Wood Pres-
ident; W. H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R. Harris,
Second Vice-President; J. W. Kendricks, Secretary; E.
C Lou Treasurer.
South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion, Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. RMcLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
which we may have fallen in the naming of officers, &c.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH?]


I _ _


I





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 5I


T1[ 'JON
ATEXT VIENT1LUITIO
vTR.UsSa.


Yaentilatol TrrNsss
AND


ARE THE


AND


B DI Proprietors of Factories Nos. 29, 61 and 81, District
BEST IN THE W ORLDI. of Florida,


Jacksonville, Florida,
The Most Extensive Manufacturers in the State.
lyr to april 23, '83.
WINTER PAR is a new town in Orange
IN T R IV R County, Florida eighteen
miles south of Sanford, on the South Florida Railroad,
with a frontage of two miles upon three beautiful Lakes.
WINTER HOMES in the midst of Orange Groves, for
Northerners, is the main idea. For Pamphlets and
Maps giving particulars, address
CHAPMAN & CHASE,
Maitland, Orange Co., Fla.
to july 17, 82-
THE


DAITY TIlES.

ESCOST ETUS.
THE TIMES is the official paper of the city and the
leading paper of the State. It has the largest circulation
in Florida, and reaches all parts of it. It is not merely
a local newspaper, but aims to advocate the interests
and promote the prosperity of Florida as a whole.
Its reputation outside the State is very high. It has
taken rank among those journals whose columns are
looked to for news, and whose comments are quoted
with respect throughout the country.
Its editors have had wide and varied experience in
journalism North as well as South; its advertising pa-
tronage is liberal and of the best character; and its re-
sources, financial and other, are ample. It will furnish
Florida with a live, progressive, outspoken, and reada-
ble newspaper, the peer of any.
ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.
THE TIMES has secured by special contract the full
despatches of the ASSOCIATED PRESS. Besides that
its Editor is Agent of the Associated Press for the State
of Florida, which gives him great advantages in obtain-
ing the freshest and most importantState news.
SPECIAL DESPATCHES.
With representatives in the leading news centres of
the country, THE TIMES is well served in addition to
the regular Press reports. During the past winter it has
received a very large number of telegraphic specials."
CORRESPONDENCE.
Its regular correspondence from Washington, New
York and Bostbon is of noteworthy excellence; and its
State correspondence has attracted much attention.
This feature will be extended and improved; and to
this end correspondence containing news or items of
information of any kind is solicited from all quarters.

"OLD SI. "
In addition to his editorial work, Mr. Small will write
regularly for THE TIMES, and in its Sunday issues the
famous "Old Si" will disseminate wisdom in chunks
to the Florida public.
TERM (strictly in advance): One year, $10; Six
months, $5; three months, $2.50; one month, $1. sent
one month on trial for 50 cents.
Remittance should be made by draft or post-office
order, or in a registered letter. Address
JONES & SMALL,
to sept 26,'82 Jacksonville, Fla.


Sportman's Emporium.


A FEW CHOICE LOTS OF FIFTEEN OR MORE
acres, river fronts, affording attractive and lovely
building sites, and admirably suited to the growth of
oranges, figs and other Florida fruits, may still be ob-
tained on reasonable terms.
"HOLLYWOOD" is south of "Point La Vista," on
the eastern shore of the St. Johns River, four miles from
Jacksonville. For circulars, maps, terms, etc., address
D. REDMOND,
apr 3-tf Box 257, Jacksonville, Fla.
W. II. IIL.OE W9'S

STRAWBIRY QllIHPNN AWINCY
-AND-
FRUThIT AND VEGETABLE
REPACKING AND
COMMISSION HOUSE,
Has closed till NOVEMBER. Present address,
may 12, '82. MA2CCON, GrA.

THE JONES,


For sale by D1R. J. C. C L'ENGLE,
Wholesale Druggist, Jacksonville, Fla.
-Send for Circular. mar 25-tf

ST.. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
0-
CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.


OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
Slyr to April 23, '83


jEW BEAUTIFUL UOLEiUS,
SPLENDID COLLECTION-THE MOST MAGNIFI-
cent Show Plants during our slimmer and autumn,
for only a little outlay, 50c. per dozen. VERBENAS,
all colors, same price.
Three Excellent Moses.
S"Marechal Niel," bright golden yellow.
"General Jacqueminot," brilliant crimson.
Perle des Gardin," beautiful straw color.
Strong plants, from five inch pots, 50c. each.
A good assortment of ever-blooming Roses. The very
best Tea-scented, from five inch pots, 30c. each.
M.alalisa azdcL :Eas pas,
The most effective and stately of all the Ornamental
Grasses, 25c. each.
3ot-C-r=0'Trr r1a.it Tirees
IS NO RISK IN TRANSPLANTING.
Japan Plums, 30, 50 and 75c. each.
Japan Persimmon, 75c. each.
Satsuma Orange, 81 each.
Black Hamburg and White Sweetwater Grapes, 40c.
.each; Figs, 25c. each.
Packing and boxing free. Address
ARNOLTD PUTJETZ,
Inar 25-tf Jacksonville, Fla.

RUBBER STAMPS
Are manufactured right in our establishment in the
best manner and at the shortest notice.
*FSend in your orders.
ASHMEAD BROS.,
May1-tf JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


to sept 26, '82


GULF NURSERY
Has thirty thousand three and four year old orange
trees prepared for summer setting. Send in your
orders.
M. T U:EDN B E L0RID3T,
DUNEDIN, FLORIDA.
o vy61'61


Half interest in my homestead of 120 acres, in heart
of the thriving settlement of Altamonte, Orange County,
Florida. Oranges, Lemons, Limes, Figs, Plums, Grapes,
in bearing. Seven hundred and fifty orange trees in
grove-fifty in bearing. Address
DR. W. KILMER,
Altamonte, Orange Co., Fla.

VIEWS OF FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In Book Form, Containing 1U2
Views Each.'
Souvenir of Florida, (small size)................ 25c.
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size) ................................. ..................... 25c.
Souvenir of Jacksonville,( large size)...............50c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine ,(large size)............... 50c.
Stereoscopic Views, per Doz. $1.50.
Address
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
JOACIKSONVILLE, FLA.


HUAU & CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF
FINE KEY WEST CIGARS
-AND-
WHOLESALE LEAF DIEALE6RS.


W. C. PITTMAN,
No. 3 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0-
Guns, JPlstols, Rifles and Cutlery,
Shooting and FishingL Taeckle.

SHELLS LOADED TO ORDER.
1 yr to April 23, '83


DEALER IN
PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,
GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emery Papers, &c.
AGENT FOR
PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIRE TEST.
Johnson's Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, Mfartinez and Longnman's
Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
to mar 25,t8, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

D. G. AMBLER. J. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON

Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as
AMBLER'S BANK.
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf



Soluble Ground Bone,
THE BEST AND CHEAPEST



Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.
Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTER & BEAN,
Agents for the State of Florida.


I


t-Analysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


I


o t May 31 82.






5d THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


probably similar to the one recently discovered
as the cause of the "yellows in the peach" an
account ot which will be found in No. 2 of
THE DISPATCH.
We unhesitatingly recommend cutting off all
affected limbs and burning them, Do not let
them lay around-it would only allow a tempo-
rary cessation of the trouble-the germs or
spores developing would lodge again in fresh
trees-propagate and cause the same evil ;
whereas by burning they are radically de-
stroyed.

BEAUCLERC, FLA., May, 14, '82.
WM. H. ASHMEAD-Dear Sir: I enclose
you a leaf from an orange tree, with insects at-


Meteorological Report.
Weather for week ending May 27, 1882.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION. .
SIGNAL SERVICE, U. S. A., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
S Therm. Wind. 1


DATE. : z A- 0 0



Sunday 21...... 30.141 82 62.0 l 0.00 SE 4'Fair.
Monday 22...... 30.08381i68 74.0 79.0 0.00 S 5;Cloudy.
Tuesday 23...... 30.076 88172 78.0 69.7 0.03 E 1 6:Fair.
Wednesday 24 30.093 82 701 74.74. 0.00 NE 8 Fair.
Thursday 25... 30.005066 85 76.7 71.7 0.00 E i 5 Fair.
Friday 26........ 29.981 81 671 75.71 76.7 0.18 E 10 Fair.
Saturday 27 ...... 29.973 84 721 77.7 74.3 0.00 E 7 Fair.
Highest barometer 30.179 lowest 29J.955.
Highest temperature 88, lowest 62.
NOTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Observer U. S. A.
Correspondence.
ROCKLEDGE, INDIAN RIVER, FLA.,
May, 8th, 1882.
Editor of Scientific Department.
DEAR SIR : Inclosed please find an orange-
limb that I found on a tree apparently healthy
except this limb. I have other trees similarly
affected with many limbs on a tree. Please tell
me what the disease is and what remedy to ap-
ply for it.
I also send samples of bark taken from just
above the ground on a guava tree. The trees
become affected in this way and what is it and
the cause and remedy ?
Our Indian River crop of oranges will be
light this season, judging from the small amount
of blooms. We are having a dry but delight-
fully pleasant spring. An M. D. who has so-
journed here for the last few months, is about
to leave us. He says it is too distressingly
healthy on Indian River for doctors.
Very truly,
C. B. MAGRUDER.
REPLY.-The affected limb was duly received
and if our diagnosis be correct, is apparently
suffering from die-back.'
Upon a careful microscopical examination of
the different layers beneath the bark, in what
in botanical language is called the albumen or
sap-wood and in the cambium or the mucilagi-
nous layer in which the new wood and bark
are developed, we find what we take for mycelia
of a fungoid.
Should we be correct in our determination, it
will throw light upon a vexed question i. e.
the origin or cause of the disease-DIE-BACK.
This fungus growth must certainly stop the
circulation of the sap, fermentation sets in, the
tissues swell, causing the bark to burst and the
sap to exude ; ultimately killing the limb in
which the disease has taken a foothold.
In its nature and functions, the fungoid is


square and as large as a small room, but the
most common form being shaped like a bowl
with the apex down. These give evidence of
having been made twenty or thirty years ago,
and some are in use at the present time. The
writer has long used one, and it is now perfectly
water-tight and in good order, having needed
no repairs in five years and the water has al-
ways'been of good quality. For the convenience
of those who desire a first-rate cistern, at little
expense, we give the manner of making one :
Mark out the shape desired on the surface of
the ground ; carefully dig out the earth as
nearly perpindicular as the soil will allow with-
out caving in, being particular to leave the


tached. If described in your book, please in-
form me upon what page, and oblige
Yours respectfully,
L. R. TUTTLE.
REPLY.-The insects attached are what we
call the broad-scale (Lecanium hesperidum).
For description, see Orange Insects, p. 32.
It seems unusually abundant and trouble-
sonme, in and surrounding Jacksonville, this
summer, and is apparently on the increase.
Many complaints of its destructiveness have
been recci vetl.
An orange twig, brought to us this week
by Mr. Phil lips, from his grove on the opposite
side of the St. John's, was literally covered
with them and must, if allowed to breed un-
checked, result in destroying his trees or at
least, seriously injuring them. Although so
badly infested, it was gratifying to us, to see,
that many were parasitized by a small black
chalcid fly (Coccophagus flavoscutellum-Ash-
mead); also to find several webs of a coccid-
eating caterpillar (Dakruma coccidivora-Com
stock,) with a small caterpillar under each
web, feeding on the young scales.
REMEDY.-Syringe your trees with the emul-
sive wash of kerosene and milk, recently dis-
covered by our friend, Mr. H. G. Hubbard, of
Crescent City, and published in the Agricultu-
rist. The formula is as follows:
Kerosene oil, one gallon; condensed milk,
two cans (or cow's milk, fresh or sour, six pints);
and water, six cans. Thin the condensed milk
(two cans) with three times its own volume (six
cans) of water, mix together the oil one gallon
and six of the eight cans of diluted condensed
milk, keeping back two cans of the milk and
water to be added when the butter begins to
come. Churn exactly as in making ordinary
butter, until the mixture begins to curdle, then
add the remaining two cans of diluted milk and
churn until the butter is smoothly united.
This can afterwards be diluted to any extent
with water and sprayed upon the insects.

Cementing Cisterns on Sand.
ARREDONDO, FLA., May, 1882.
Editors of Florida Dispatch :
Looking over the DISPATCH, (which, in its
new dress, is a truly typical example of what
a Florida paper should be,) the writer noticed
a query in regard to the cementing of cisterns
on sand or soil of any kind, and was surprised
that the plan seemed to be so little known. In
the region where the limestone prevails, and
rain water is universally used for drinking,
there are remains of old cisterns in many forms,


Jfacksonrille Wholesale Prices.
Corrected weekly, by JONES & BO WEN Wholesale
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, iFla.
SUGARS-Granulated ....................................
White Ex. C ........................... ........
Golden C......................................
Powdered............................................
Cut Loaf.............................................
COFFEE, Rio-Fair.......... ...................
Good... ........................
Choice..... ....................
B est .............................................
Java 0. G......... .................. .
Mocha ........................... ......
Peaberry................... ... ...............
Maracaibo...... .................
Any of above grades roasted to order.
FLOUR---Snow Drop, best....................................
Oreole, 2d best.. .......................
Pearl, 3d best.......................... .......
MEATS-Bacon................................................. 12@
Hams (Merwin & Sons)....... ........- "
Shoulders......... ......... ...................
HOMINY-Pearl, per bbl.............. ........
MEAL-per bbl...... ..........................
LARD-Refined in pails.....................................
BUTTER-Very best, kegs..................................
CHEESE-Full cream..........................................
Half cream ................ ........ ..........
TOBACCO-Shell Road...................................... 556
Florida Boys, 11 inch 5's...............
Florida Girls, bright twist, 14 to lb..
Smoking in packages, 8 to lb..........
SOAP AND STARCH-Colgate's 8 oz., p1er box...
Peerless, 8 oz., per box..........................
Starch, lump, per b.............. .......
HOPS, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS-
Hops, per fbt............................................ 1
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz..........
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
doz. 1 tlb....................... ...............
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz, 1 lb.
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. 1 .....
Royal Baking.Powder, per doz. lb.....
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl..................................
CHICKENS, each.................................................. 2
EGGS-Per dozu................................. .............
HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lbt., first class
Country Dry Salted,per Tlb....................
Butcher Dry Salted, per tlb....................
Damaged Hides.....................................
Kip and Calf, 8b1s. and under................
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb...... ............
Deer Skins Salted, per lb...... ............
FUITRS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter...................................................... 1 506
Raccoon, each.........................
W ild Cat, each....................................... 1
Fox, each................................................
BEESWAX-per lbt...... V.....................
WooL-Free from burs, per lb.'.. ......................... 1
Burry, perlb...................................... 1
GOAT SKINS-Each per lb.................................
Bacon advancing rapidly-buyers will do we]
make their purchasesnow.


and
11


11
121
102
13
25
35
18
18 .
9 50
850
8 25


540
540
34
15
13Y
956
40
50
45
350
3,50

t@22c
60e
225
225
270
1 50

325
25@45
25
13
9011
9@10
6
10
35
26@30
@400
5@15
0@20
5@15
20
7@22
1@15
10
l1 to


qu


I I


I


I


I


sides smooth and even, gradually sloping to
the depth required, and leaving it rounded at
the bottom, without corners, to better facilitate
the laying on of the cement. Procure any good
water cement, the "Rosendale" or the "Port-
land" are first-rate and cost about $2.00 per
bbl. and one bbl. will make a large cistern.
Prepare the cement by mixing it with one-half
clean sand, adding water sufficient to make it
easy to work, but only mix in such esall quan-
tities that it can be laid on quickly before it sets,
as it then becomes useless. A bucket' full at a
time is enough ; lay on one coat quickly and
roughly with a trowel, about an inch thick,
beginning at the top of the- -cistern. Some
hours after lay on a second ,e'at smnootly, nice-
ly and when quite dry make a thin paste of the
cement and lay on with a iriAie.wash brush.
The cistern will not leak and wilfbe perma-
nent, and cost from five dollars 'up.
RAMBLER




vegetable Quotations.
FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE,
315 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, May 24, 1882.1
Receipts of vegetables this at port via Florida Dis-
patch Line- and Southern Express Company, two
weeks ending 23d inst., 9,200 packages.
Potatoes have been coming in good condition and are
selling well at $4 00@5 00 per barrel for first quality, and
$2 00@2 50 for seconds.
Cabbages coming in large quantities from points
nearer, and bringing-Florida 75c@$2 00 per barrel;
Charleston and Savannah, $2 00@3 50; Norfolk, $1 50@
2 50.
Tomatoes $2 00@4 00 per crate.
Cucumbers, Florida, $1 00@1 50 per crate; Charleston
and Savannah, $2 00@3 00.
Beans, Florida, 50c and 75c per crate; Charleston and
Savannah $1:50@2 00.
Egg-plant, $1 50@2 00 per crate.
Respectfully,
C. D. OWENS,
General Agent.






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


-`ft-R-M


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE.



Rates on WATERMELONS in Car Loads of 20,000 Pounds.


TO TA=a :E E3 ZECT 1 V.Ah. 20th., 1SS2.

\From Florida Tran-
W o From Jacksonville, sitRailroad, exept Florida Transit Rail- Florida Central and
O- Callahan and Live Ocala and Points e- road 0 a la and Western Railroad.
Oak. yond. Points beyond.

A tlanta .................................................................................................................................. $ 60 00 8 0 $ 90 00 8 00
A ugustao ................................................................................................................................. 55 00 80 00 85 00 75 00
Baltimore................................... ........ 100 00 125 00 130 00 119 00
Boston ................................... .........................................................100 00 125 00 130 00 119 00
B ristol, Tenn.......................................................................................................................... 90 00 115 00 120 00 110 00
C harleston, S. C .................................................................................................................... 36 00 61 00 66 00 56 00
Colum bus, G a.................................. ................................................................................... 60 00 85 00 90 00 80 00
Chattanooga, Tenn .........................................................................................70 00 95 00 100 00 90 00
Cincinnati, 0.............................................. .......................................... 80 00 105 00 110 00 100 0
Cairo, Ill.............................................................................. ................................................90 00 115 00 120 00 110 00
Colum bus, O ........................................................................................................................... 100 00 125 00 130 00 120 00
Cleaveland, 0 ......................................................................................................................... 100 00 125 00 130 00 120 00
Chicago, III............................................................................................................................. 110 00 135 00 140 00 130 00
D alton d.......V........ .......I,....................................... ............... ........ 70 00 95 00 1 00 00 90 00
E vansville, Ind............................................................. .......................................... 80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
Indianapolis, Ind ............... ............................................................... .............................. 90 00 115 00 120 00 110 00
K noxville, Tenn.....................................................................................8............................... 450 109 50 114 50 104 50
Louisville, K y ........... ........................................................................................... ............... 80 00 105 00 0 00 11000 00
M acon, G al............................................................................... ............................................ 45 00 70 00 75 00 7565 00
Montgomery, Ala...... .................... o ..................... .......... 60 00 85 00 9000 8000
M obile, A la........................................................:.:................... ..................................... 70 00 95 00 100 00 90 00
Memphis, Tenn ...... ........................................ .......................................................... 80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
N ashville, Tenn ......................................... ............................................. ........................ 75 00 100 00 105 00 95 00
New Orleans, La......................... ............................... .................................... 80 00 105 00 110 00 100 00
N ew Y o t Y .........06.................................................................................................... 100 00 125 00 130 00 119 00
Peoria, ............................. .................. ........................................... l10 00 135 00 140 00 130 00
Philadelphia, Pa....... ........................................................................ ............ ....... .......... 100 00 125 00 130 00 119 00
Rom e, Ga...................... ............. ....................................................................................... 70 00 95 00 100 00 90 00
Savannah, Ga.............................................. .......... ................... ............................... 22 00 47 00 52 00 41 00
St. Louis, M o.................. ........ ............................... .............. ........ .......................... 90 00 115 00 120 00 110 00
Terre H aute, Ind................................................................................................................ 100 00 125 00 130 00 120 00
Excess of 20,000 pounds will be charged for pro rata, provided the weight loaded does not exceed the capacity of the car, as marked thereon. If cars are not
marked with the capacity thereof, the weight of load must not exceed 20,000 pounds. All excess of load above capacity of the cars will be charged for at double rates.
Melons must be loaded and unloaded by the owners. Shipments of Melons will be receipted for only as "Shipper's Count." This Line will not be responsible
for deficiency in quantity loaded in the cars, nor for damage resulting from improper loading. Shipments via Florida Dispatch Line will not be required guaranteed
or prepaid.


D. H. ELLIOTT, Gen'l Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.


JAS. L. TAYLOR, Gent' Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE in connection with A AL NT Oi WOAST LIA 3
HRates on Watermelons in COar Loads of 20,000 in Cents per 100 lbs. To take effect May 20th, 1882.


-Florida Transit and
T o From Jacksonville Peninsula Railroad, Florida Transit Rail- Florida Central and
and Callahan. except Ocala and road, 0 ca 1 a and Western Railroad.
*Points beyond. Points beyond.

Cts. Cts. Cts. Cts.
Baltim ore......................................................... ....... ........... ........... ........ .631( .76 .78y .73
Boston .68....' .81 .83 .78
New ......................... ............................ .................................. ..68( 2.81 .83 .78
Providene ....................68 .81 .&32 .78
Philadelphia..................................... ...... ......................... ............. .. 8 .81 .83/ .78
P ortsm south, V a........................ ............. .. .. ... ..... ........................................................... 8 3 58
P etersburg, V a......................................................................................... .......... .48 .61 .63 .58
Richmond, Va..................................................... .... 48 .61 .63' .58
W ilm ington, N. C............................................................ .. .............................38 51 .53 .48
Washington, D. C. (via Portsmouth)........................................ .63 .76 51.78 .73
Shipent vi "ALANIC OAS LIE" ust e. pepa..t.detintio..2,00.lbs.wil.b.th.miimu.rae.cargd.fo..Al.eces.ofcapcit.ofcar


SShipments via "ATLANTIC COAST LINE" must be prepaid to destination.
will be charge at double rates.


3157


_ __ ___ __


20,00 ls. illbe he inimm rte hared or.All excess of capacity of cars






s THE FLORID A DISPATCH ......


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
-o
MERCHANTS & MINERS


TRANSPORTATION COMPANY!


The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail
From BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH
EVERY FIVE DAYS,
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE, as follows:
Tuesday, May 2d, at 5 p. m.
Saturday, May 6th. at 10 a. in.
Thursday, May 11th, at I p. in.
Tuesday, May 16th, at, 5 p. m.
Monday, May 22d, at 11 a. m.
-aturday, May 27th, at 2 p. m.i
Thursday, Junie 1st, at 5 p. n-.
Tuesday, June 6th, at. 11 a. m.,
Monday, June 12th, at 3 p. m.
Sat urday. June 17th, at 8:30 a. m.
Thursday,June 22d, at 11 a. n.
Tuesday, June 27th, at 3p. m.
Monday, July 3d, af9 a. m.
The steamers are first-class in every respect, and every
attention will be given to passengers.
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $15_,
Including Meals and Stateroom.
For the accomnio(dation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Balt Imore.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates-of freight by this route will be-found int another
columnin.
JAS. B. WEST &-CO., Aaents.
Savannah, Jannary 8t1h, 1878. 30-tf

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA




WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
.ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1882,
Passenger Trains will run over the Waycross Short
Line as follows;


Fast Mail.
Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at............. 9:00 a. m.
Arrive Jacksonville at ............. 5:40 p. m.
Leave Callahan at........................ 9:44 a. inm.
Arrive Waycross at.................11:57 a. m.
Arrive Jesup at....................... 1:40 p. m.
Arrive at Brunswick at............ 6:00 p. m.
Arrive Savani ah at..................3:40 p. m.
ArriveCharleston at....... ............. 9:10 p. inm.
Arrive at Augusta at................... 5:20 a. m.
Arrive Macoit at...... .... ........ 7:50 p. m.
Arrive Atlanta at................. 3:50 a. m.
A rrive Louisville at..... ............................
A rrive Cincinnati at....................................
Arrive Washington at.............. 9:30 p. inm.
Arrive Baltimore at...... ...........12:25 p. m.
Arrive New York (limited express)...........
Arrive New York P. R. R............. 6:45 a. m.
Arrive St. Louis at....................................
Arrive Chicago at..............................
TIME.
To Savannah............. .................................
To N ew York.............................................
To Washington ......................................
To Chicago ....................................................
To St. Louis.....................................................


Jack'lle Ex.
Daily.
5:40 p. m.
8:15 a. m.
6:45 p. m.
9:15 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
5:30 a. m.
2:35 a. rn.
9:05 a. m.
1:30 p. m.
7:00 a. m.
12:50 p. m.
8:00 a. m.
7:00 a. m.
9:10 a. m.
12:05 a. m.
3:50 p. m,
5:20 p. m.
7:00 p nm
7:00 p. m
6:40 hours.
45:45 hours.
36:30 hours.
49:00 hours.
49:00 hours.


THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
ileJacksonville to Savannah.
S 4-Jacksonville to Louisville.
k-J acksonville to Washington.
W.Jacksonville to Cincinnati.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
Passenger s taking Savannah sleeper can remain in the
car trntil 7 o'clock a. m.
Parlor and Drawing-Room Car on morning train
from JacRsonville through to Savannah, connecting
daily with through Pullman sleeper for New York.
The Il)ining Car attached to the train between Savan-
nah and Charleston affords supper to passengers going
North, and breakfast to those coming South.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to Montgomery and New Orleans
take the evening train.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. nm. and arriving at Savannah at 2:35 a. m., or train
at Jacksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vannah at 3:40 p. nm.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, at Depot Ticket
Office. J. E. DRAYTON,
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*] Ticket Agent.


W. L. mDAV:IDS,


Broker and Commission Merchant,


Oysters, FrRits ald VBoitbles i8 fllerRI frors 1is,

P. O. Box 862.] Jacksonville, orida.
... ,,. .. !.- 't '. r ". a ,


.I., No: 3.. :' o. 4. No. 5. -
CAPACITY. u. ounce to Ioun ce to 1 ounce to
S11 bs. 2 lbs. 55 lbs.

Tin Scoop,. Brass Beam.......... $ 12 1 $ 13 00 $ 14 00
Brass 1 27 .......... 12 5 14 00 15 00
rass (seamless) .......... 13 50 5 00 1 00
Nickel Plated Scoop.and Beam............. -14 75 ..- 16 50 _; 17 50
.. .. .-= .. .


Ocean Steamship Conpany.


SAVANNAH AND NE-W- YORK.




The 'Magnificent New IronfSteimshipr sail from Shvainah on following (dates:
GATE CITY. Wednesday, May 3d, 6:30 a. m.
CITY OF' MAO(N, Saturnlay, May 15th,8 :30 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, May 10th, 12:00 noon. .
CITY .CF AUGUSTA, Satuiday lav. 13ith 3:00 p. i. .
. GATER IT Y, \Wedniesday, Ma.y 171ti, f:30 in. : .
CITY OF MA-'C)N,.Sat tudaly;'May 2tut.h, 8::i~9. i. .
CITY OF CtI-.LUMi., W Vdnesday, May 24th, 12:00 noon.
CI" Y OF AUGUSTA, Sal urday, May 27th, 2:CO p. m.
GATE CITY, Saturday. May ,3lst, 5;3)0 a. n.
Througll Bills of Lading ,ad Tickets over. Ceiitral.Raill;rd of G(eorigia' -Savannah, Florida & Westert
Railway, and close connections with lie new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight, received every day front 7 a. m. to 6 p.m., at Pier 35, N. R.
IH. YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agentof Line, and C. R.R. ofGa., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT. General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS,
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Sav'h. Florida & Western Ry. Co. 315 Broadway. N. Y.


n


F. S. CONE, A. II. MANVILLE, E. A. MANVILLE,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer
Zvi: -Ah T"T7 .IT 1 .E 3^mTS .11-S.7me ;= M
Lake George, Florida.
FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums
Peaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, and over one hundred varieties of the Citrus.
ORANG-_E ANiD IElMlON I;M N TREES a specialty.
Catalogue free. to apt 17, '83

BU Y THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

-"---0o-- ----

GOULD & CO.'S


PE R T I L I Z E
-AND-

I3>TSEOT EXS=TE&Il, 1.TA-ToM,

Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange Growers and. Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, con-
tains potash, lime, phosphoric acid, ammonia and the other essential elements of Plant Food, making a cornm
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & Bro.'s, and other high-priced Fertilizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity, and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $4 per barrel, $32 per
ton. .
All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.

MEssns. GOULD & Co.: -
Gentlemen- I used one-half ton of your Fertilizer, in connection with the sanie amount of Bake'-& -Bro:'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gaveas good results as the otliers, which are much higher'prieed fertilizers-costing
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $51.50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12,1881.
GOULD & CO.: LEESUURG, SUMTER Co., FLA., March 6, 1882.
Gentlemen-Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed your
agents at this point (Messrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer,
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its fostering care, I having had the honor
to win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer better and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer kills two birds with one stone,'6inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies,
at one and the same time. I bave been testing it in the field, garden and orange grove for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For my part, I ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. if I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork. -
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOURT.


to aug 27, '82


GOULD & CO., -
NO. 6 W. BAY ST.,JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


I




THE FLORIDA DISPATCH .5


I .


WHOLESALE GROC ER
AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


ACER'S


DRY HOP YEAST CAKES,


60c. PERI


S,


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND

SNOW-DROP PATENT FLOUR.

:First a3n.d.s on. rinxest@'it. aiLity

Dairy Butter from.n 35 to 37c. per Lb.,

2:ept in. tlbe Ljargest EMefrigerator in. tle, State,
No. 7 West Bay Street, - - Ja ksonv ille, Florida.
To sept 27, '82 _


Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide.


H. D. BOUNETHEAU


PROPRIETOR


N R DY K E FLORIDA CHEMICAL OIL AND SOAP WOKS,


MILLS
-MANUFACTURE-

FreshGround
FEED, GRITS,
MEAL,.
(Bolted or unbolted.)
Pearl Hominy.
GRAIN, HAY, COAL AND
WOOD-YAI-D.


MANUFACTURER OF
Lubricating and Boiler Compounds, Compressed Soaps,.. Car and
Axle grease.
ALSO SOLE MANUFACTURER
of the best Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide extant-
OM6A,2TO-E Tcm EE E1MTEU SIONl 11
made from Whale-Oil Soap, combined with other powerfulingredients known
to be most effectual for destroying the Scale and other insect pests and
parasites of the Citrus family. It will also put the tree in a healthy and flour-
ishing condition. Prepared for immediate use. Perfectly harmless to the
youngest tree or plant. In packages of from i) to 300 pounds. Price, 10 cents
per pound. Discount to the Trade. sy" Full directions for use accompany
each package. Address
M[. 3. BCIUNETIE ITU.


P. O. BOX 984, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


to july 31 '82


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
-0-
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
--0--
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers are appointed to sail:
JUNIATA, May 6th, 9:30 a. nm.
C(ITY OF SAVANNAH, May 13th, 3:00 p. m.
JUNIATA, May 20th, 9:30 a. inm.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, May 27th, 1:00 p. m.
JUNIATA, June 3d, 7:00 p. m.
Days and hours subject to change, without notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, WM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf AgeSt, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Saitannah..


Boston Rat1 SaR 8nn Steaimsi Lie


PIE :FIN E G-O'U D BOBT, C38.50 per Ton,
(Guaranteed Pure.)

COTTON SEEmD VJ".EA $38 per Ton,
(100 Pound Bags.)

COTTOlT SEE'D C-~T7.T'LI .S-3:, $27 per TWon,
(The Best Potash in Use.)

STOCKBRIDGE FERTILIZERS for Orange Trees and vegetables, for sale by
J. E. IA[AI'T.
to jan 6, '83 Jao sonville, IFla.

ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]
J. A. BARNES & CO.,





Sou.thernr 'Fruit and- -T7egetables a Specialty-
306 and 38 North Delaware Avenue, Philadelphia.
to jan 6, '83 _____________________________.
J O N E S ...... I.g d ...O. -


DO Z. to une 26, '82.Cor. Bay and Ocean, Jacksonville, Fla.


PIANOS AND ORGANS
A. B. M A .VJ"3EL,
15 taist iHay sT ksonvlllc.
SOLD ON INSTALLMENTS, AT LOWEST PRICES-
branch of Ludden & Bates, Savannah-EXACTLY
SAME PRICES AND TERMS, Sheet Music, Strings
and small instruments of all kinds. Send for cata-
logues, prices and terms. TUNING AND REPAIRING
asespacial. My .tuner W1il11 taake r gt ,r tours through
4theSt4tet aii iA.. custhm.Wn will thl.S, have my repre-
sentattveAt teirQrs gredt advantage to purchasers
of ihstfuments. to sept 2, "82

BELL &HALLIDAY,
MANUFACTURERS


FR UIT AN VEIET RELi BOX ,8I

CAIRO, ILLINOIS,
-" Send for Illtustrated Price-Dist'
to june 12, '82
i 'i O.lL.KEENE,.."

MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS.
NOTIONS,

Sauces, otIEtesiF
AND A FINE LINE OF -


~L.QVE5


67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,


JACKSONVILLE,
to feb 20, '82


- FLORIDA.


M. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the
of the Marslhall House. Sereven House.
TI-E LIA-ILNEI TT I-lO JUSE,
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARNETT & GEORGE, Proprietors.
RATS, $2 PER DAY.
This favorite family Hotel, under its new manage-
ment, is recommended for the excellence of its cuisine.
homelike comforts, prompt attention and moderate
rates, to sept 4,'82


Wholesale and Retail


Drug Store,


35 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
PURE DRUGS, RELIABLE MEDICINES, FANCY
Goods, Proprietary Articles,, at lowest market prices.
Specialties-Norton's Salt Rheum Ointment, Melen's
Infant:Food, Burnett's Cod Liver Oil. A Trial-solicited.
to aug 20, '82


ONLY DIRECT LINE BETWEEN
SAVANNAH AND BOSTON.
Transhipment and extra handling saved. No danger
of fruit being frozen. Cars are unloaded at the steam-
ship wharf in Savannah, avoiding drayage.
CABIN PASSAGE, $18.
SAILING .FRONTf SAVANNAH..
Seminole, Thursday. May 4th, at 7:30 a. m.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, May 11th, at 2:00 p. m.
Seminole, Thursday, May 18th, at 7:30 a m.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, May 25th, at 1:30 p. m.
Seminole Thursday, June 1st, at 5:00 p. m.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
44-tf Savannah, Ga.

DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
The largest stock in the State. Country\
bnvers will consult their own interests
hIy corresponding With me, All .-Qders
promptly filled it. pipices..tQ competeee with
any house south of Baltimore. Remeni-
h)ei nmy B t GlIorid;i .-ad(ress.
GEO. HUGHES,


I I ____ __ __-:_ -- ---








BLANKS.
BLANKS.
BLANKS.



BLANKS.
BLANKS.
BLANKS.


O THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


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L BA L A N K NEWSDEALERS.-We keep all the latest Daily and Weekly Papers from Boston, New York, Philadelphia,
Baltimore, Chicago, St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, New Orleans, Charleston, Savannah and Jacksonville, and
L A W B L A- K Itake subscriptions to all publications at publication price. Orders by mail promptly attended to.


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LAWYERS,

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE,

CLERKS OF CIRCUIT COURTS,

AND DEALERS,


Please Take Notice!


%e Ha-ve J1.st Pri.tecd,

smcld. ill eep in.

Stock, -.

A COMPLETE LINE OF


LAW BLANKS

Consisting of All Kinds for


Justices' Court,


Circuit Court,


Probate Court,


II. s8, gofissiolor's COrt,

ETC., ETC.



SEND FOR CATALOGUE.



ADDRESS,

ASHMEAD BROTHERS

PUBLISHERS,



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LIST OF BOOKS ON FLORIDA.
FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, INVALIDS AND SETTLERS (Barbour, Profusely Illustrated)...............Price $1 50
FLORIDA: ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE AND HISTORY (Lanier).................................................................Price 1 50
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paper..................................................................................................Price 10
FAIRBANKS' HISTORY OF FLORIDA........................................................................................ .....Price 2 50
G U IDE TO JA CK SON V ILLE ..........:................................................................................................... ............ Price 25
TOURISTS AND INVALIDS REFERENCE BOOK OF WINTER TRAVEL.............................................Price 75
SOUTH FLORIDA, THE ITALY OF AMERICA.............................................................................................Price 25
DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition)enlarged and improved..............................................................Price 50
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edition, enlarged and improved)..............................Price 1 00
ORANGE INSECTS-Illustrated (Ashmead, .....................................................................................................Price 1 00
ORANGE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA, by A. T. Garey, (cloth).................................................................Price 1 25
A MANUAL OF GARDENING IN FLORIDA (Whitner)..............................................................................Price 50
COLTON 'S M A P OF FLOR IDA ...........................................................................................................................Price 75
COL4TON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-the best)........................................................................................Price 1 25
NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF ST. JOHN'S RIVER.................................................................................Price 25
McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST OF LAWS OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep, postage extra)....................Price 6 00
INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA...................... ...........................Price 3 00
Any of the above books mailed on receipt of price.
ORANGE W RJlAPI ...................................................................................... 10xl0, 14c.; 11x11, 17c.; 12x12, 20c.
LAW BLANKS.
WARRANTY DEEDS, per dozen.............................P...... rice 50
QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS, per dozen.................. ..................Price 50
M OR TGA G ES, per dozen................................................................................................................................. Price 50
NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, m ade to order..................................................................................................Price $5 00
We publish a full line of Law Blanks for Lawyers and Justices of the Peace. Price-list mailed on application.
Special prices to large buyers. Adddress


feb 12-tf 21 W


A Good Investment!
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In the County of Hernando, East of Brooksville, the
county seat, and near the
Tropical :Floridca e:. .,
which is now actively building, two tracts of land. The
first contains two hundred and forty (240) acres in a body;
the second contains eighty (80) acres. These tracts both
touch Upon a Lake of about 150 acres area; are
well timbered with pine suitable for lumber; the second
about half a mile southeast of the first; between them
lies a cultivated farm. These lands are well adapted to
Oranges and Other Fruits, being of good
soil, with little underbrush, and are easily cleared. They
were selected by lHon. iValter Gwynn, Ex-
Treasurer of the State of Florida, and they may be relied
upon as being what is represented. These lands are in a
part of the State that is rapidly settling up
and offer a good field either for an investment in Flor-
ida real estate, or for orange groves and the like.
Price and terms will be so arranged as to be satisfac-
tory to the purchaser. Apply to
WALTER B. CLARKSON,
Box 877. Jacksonville, Florida.
In corresponding, please mention this paper.
to August 29, '82.

AT MANDARIN, FLORIDA.
20 FORTY-ACRE TRACTS only 12 miles from Jack-
sonville; extra good land, well located, between river
and J., St. A. and H. R. R. R. Price, $10 per acre. Will
sell on monthly payments of $12.50. These lands will In-
crease in value, being located in an already prosperous
town, making a paying investment at small outlay.
Maps can be seen at No. 41 East Bay Street.
to nov 21, '82, GEO. R. REYNOLDS.
[4-347.]
Totice for b11a11ioation.

LAND OFFICE AT GAINESVILLE, FLA., May 3, 1882.
OTICE is hereby given that the following named
settler has filed notice of his intention to make final
proof in support of his claim, and that said proof
will be made before T. E. Buckman, Clerk Circuit Court
at Jacksonville, Florida, on Saturday, June 24th, 1882,
viz.: Jacob Robinson, Duval County, homestead entry
No. 561 for the Nw Y of Nw %, section 6, township 3s,
range i7e.
He names the following witnesses to prove his con-
tinuous residence upon, and cultivation of, said land,
viz.: Calvin Hughes, Samuel Anderson, Andrew Sess-
ions, Lee Clark, all of Jacksonville, Florida.
L. A. BARNES,
May 8 tf Register United States Land Office.
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS, APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
VEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

W INTER PARK isa new town n Orange
W INTER A I( County, Florida, eighteen
miles south of Sanford, on the South Florida Railroad,
with a frontage of two miles upon three beautiful Lakes.
WINTER HOMES in the midst of Orange Groves, for
Northerners, is the main idea. For Pamphlets and
Maps giving particulars, address
CHAPMAN & CHASE,
Winter Park, Orange Co., Fla.
to July 17, '82
THE
FLORIDL4

DAILYTIMES.


THE TIMEs is the official paper of the city and the
leading paper of the State. It has the largest circulation
in Florida, and reaches all parts of it. It is not merely
a local newspaper, but aims to advocate the interests
and promote the prosperity of Florida as a whole.
Its reputation outside the State is very high. It has
taken rank among those journals whose columns are
looked to for news, and whose comments are quoted
with respect throughout the country.
Its editors have had wide and varied experience in
journalism North as well as South; its advertising pa-
tronage is liberal and of the best character; and its re-
sources, financial and other, are ample. It will furnish
Florida with a live, progressive, outspoken, and reada-
ble newspaper, the peer of any.
ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.
THE TIMES has secured by special contract the full
despatches of the ASSOCIATED PRESS. Besides that
its Editor is Agent of the Associated Press for the State
of Florida, which gives him great advantages in obtain-
ing the freshest and most important State news.
SPECIAL DESPATCHES.
With representatives in the leading news centres of
the country THE TIMES is well served in addition to
the regular Press reports. During the past winter it has
received a very large number of telegraphic specials."
CORRESPONDENCE.
Its regular correspondence from Washington, New
York and Boston is of noteworthy excellence; and its
State correspondence has attracted much attention.
This feature will be extended and improved; and to
this end correspondence containing news or items of
information of any kind is solicited from all quarters.

"OLD SI."
In addition to his editorial work, Mr. Small will write
regularly for THE TIMES, and in its Sunday issues the
famous "Old Si" will disseminate wisdom in chunks
to the Florida public.
TERM (strictly in advance): One year, $10; Six
months, $5; three months, $2.50; one month, $1. sent
one month on trial for 50 cents.
Remittance should be made by draft or post-office
order, or in a registered letter. Address
JONES & SMALL,
to sept 26/,82 Jacksonville, Fla.


ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,

PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS
-PRINTERS AND BINDERS,

AND DEALERS IN

TOYS AND FANCY ARTICLES.


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