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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00009
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 22, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00009
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

Full Text































iviotded to thle Ai~ricultural, f~luanufacturinq and in b strial 1nte.rests of Florida and thi ewut]


Vol. 1.--No. 9.


New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.


Price 5 cents.


Monday, May 22, 1882.

Suggestive. buckled on the agis of liberty and took command
A "Farmer," writing in the Lake City Re- of his country's armies in the hours of her great-
por o est danger; the proudest work of Cato, the dis-
porter, throws out some good, practical ideas. tinguished orator, was a book he wrote on farm-
Give him a hearing: ing, for the use of the Romans; twenty-eight-
I am glad to read your notice of Dr. H.'s books of Mago of Carthage on farming were or-
farm. Dr. M. M. T. Huchingson is a man of dered to be translated, by the Roman Senate;
thought; he bestows thought upon his farm, as Cato, Vasso, Virgil, itlumella, Pliny and Pal-
well as his profession ; he succeeds admirably at lada wrote brilliantly on farming. Among
both ; go to his farm and you find everything in the ancient Romans their most famous houses,
its place; provisions are made findr his animals, such as the Pisonese, the Fabii, the Sentuli, etc.,
his croppers and hands are all cared for; he derived their names from their favorite crops.

takes an interest in them; nor does his home, A thousand years before Christ, the great Greek
over which his good lady presides, fall short in poet, Hesiod, speaks of a plow as "a beam, a
systematic order, taste, etc. share and handles." Job used 500 yoke of oxen
If the reader is not successful in his farming in plowing. Isaac was a successful farmer; he
operations, a visit to the doctor's farm would be sowed in the land of Gerar, and "reaped an
a benefit; or to the farm of another successful hundred fold."
farmer; then go home and go to thinking. Farm- If the farmer is a small bug'" he makes him-
ers ought to know that to succeed is the busi- self so.
ness of life. Now is the time to commence-never too late.
Too many farmers think that their profession Crops of corn are now planted; then let us
is low, and that they feel like they are plodding plant all the pinders, potatoes, cow-peas, millet,
along as farmers because they cannot be any- etc., possible up to July 15th.
thing else. Agricultureis the ol-.,st of all arts. Soon as your corn gets in tassel, pull out and
Over 25,000,000 of the
population of this Union
are farmers! they culti-
vate about 1,388,000,-
000 acres of land; 318,-
000,000 acres of our vast
domain has never had
a hoe stuck in it; the
farmers have invested
in this country $12,000,-
000,000 and they furnish
80 per cent. of our com-
merce. This is the chief
occupation of mankind
in all ages; it is the
very soul of the na-
tion's existence.
Among the old Ro-
mans it was considered
the highest praise to be
called a good farmer.
The great statesman
and leader, Cincinnatus,
turned loose his plow-
handles three times and


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.


feed on that partly; you can safely feed every
other row, and not hurt your corn; never neg-
lect saving fodder, peas, potatoes, etc., for the
sake of cotton-it will wait better; sow your
cabbage bed in July, best in boxes above ground
to keep insects away; early in the fall plant
turnips, a good patch marrowfat peas; put cab-
bage out three feet each way; this gives 4,900
to the acre. Four gills of carbolic acid, diluted
with forty gallons of water, sprinkled on cab-
bage, is said to be proof against worms and
does not affect the cabbage in any way.
Two bushels of corn soaked six or twelve
hours will do your horses more good than three
bushels unsoaked; 165 pounds oats straw is
equal for feed to one bushel corn; shucks
sprinkled with salt water are worth more than
fodder for horses.

-A neighbor of Ocala planted two acres in
strawberries, at an expense of less than fifty dol-
lars. He has already sold over three hundred
dollars worth, and is "still a sellin'.-' 'Florida
Bulletin.

THE FLORIDA Dis-
PATCH, published at
Jacksonville, Fla., is up-
on our table,replete with
information about that
State. It has been en-
larged to sixteen pages
and otherwise improved,
and presents a neat ty-
pographical appearance.
We regard it as a valu-
able auxiliary in ad-
vancing the interests
and claims [of Florida.
Its truthful and forcible
articles cannot fail to
arrest the attention of
those seeking homes in
the Sunny South."
This excellent journal
should receive the hear-
ty support of its entire
State.-News and Sig-
nal, Blackshear, Geor-
gia.


THE ORANGE BUTTERFLY."--SEE PAGE 136.


r~b~P~P rret~ 1E~ti






LSO THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
I I^ ^.. ^.... .. -...... .. ., .... . . ..... -. ... . .. I l II I ll 1 ..-... ". "* .. .. . .. ..... I i "'l ...... . . .- ^ .-* ..... ....


THE BANANA-[Musa Sapientum.]
Plant, Flower and Fruit.
Our highly valued correspondent, who is a true
lover of plants and trees, and a close and deli-
cate observer of nature, kindly sends us the fol-
lowing very perfect description of the BANANA,
its inflorescence, fructification, reproduction, etc.:
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I was gratified in reading your article in THE
DISPATCH of the 1st of May, to see prominence
given to the above subject.
Nothing can be more interesting to an ob-
server of the habits of plants than the fruiting
of the banana. From among the grand leaves,
which rise from the large trunk ten or fifteen feet
above the root, a germ shoots, which emerges
into a stem an inch and a half in diameter,
green and strong. Upon the end of this the bud
or pod forms, of a brown color, and in maturity
takes the shape of a full ear of corn, more en-
larged at the base, the brown shield lying close,
something like the shuck upon the solid ear.
After the stem attains some length, bending
downward with its weight in the time of ripen-
ing, an outer layer from one side of the long pod
lifts itself, and exposes close to the base the
germs of fingers, as on a hand, which prove' to
be the bananas, four, five or six, as the case
may be, pointing downward. After these at-
tain proper strength the russet shield which
covered them, and which was gradually lifted
to a right angle with the stem, loosens itself and
falls to the ground ; then another quarter of the
covering is lifted in the same way, while a new
series of bananas is perfected, and so on, until
four, five or six digital combinations are ma-
tured, each falling compactly upon ,the other
beneath it as the bananas become full
and ripe. They retain the greenness of the
leaf until they attain full size, and
before they begin to turn yellow. According
to soil and climate, and adaptation of the plant,
the number of hands of fruit is greater or less.
Hence, in a favorable grove, the immense
bunches seen, which are as much as a person
can with some labor carry, are produced. As
the hands mature and the lid is lifted from the
casket, from time to time, the bulk of the re-
maining pendant is diminished, and it is driven,
as it were, to the bottom of the stem, the ex-
posed bananas maturing above it. But it is
Soon seen that the power of fruition is ex-
hausted, and the inner and barren core, pressed
to the extremity, still in shapely form, and con-
cealing the secret of its sterility in the close-
fitting russet case, decays and falls off. Then
commences the thorough compactitig and ripe-
ning of the mass of bananas, until the strong
stem is cut from the trunk.
The shields of the fruit, so to call them, as


they fall to the ground, having a rich, glossy,
russet color, which an artist could hardly pro-
duce, are mottled or covered with a misty coat-
ing, as if the breath of sweetness chilled them.
This may be wiped off, and the rich brown ap-
pears in its perfection. As the shields retain
their shape-long, concave, with a flange at the
base where they break from the stem, and taper-
ing often to a lip at the point-they suggest the
ancient Roman lamp, and are most beautiful
flower-vessels for temporary use and ornament
on the table, or hanging, if one invents a mode
of suspending them. By watching from day to
day, as the shields fall, flower-holders can be
supplied for quite a season.
Not the least noticeable behavior of the
casket, is the dripping of sweet drops from its
extreme point, the lacteal exudation which
ceases as the layers refuse to unfold their mys-
teries, and sometimes the fallen shields lie just
in a position to receive the fluid as in a vessel.


Besides the luxury of a fruit so easily ob-
tained as the banana, the habit of the plant, as
well as its grandeur when its great leaves stand
as the green shutters against the rifts of heaven,
are an instructive study to those who love to
contemplate the wonders of nature.
The great stems which bear the fruit grow
from two to three feet long, and start from the
clefts at the base of the branches or leaves.
They are extended in the process of nature by
long joints, three or four to a stem, each outer
one lessening in size, as though the piston of
nature paused in its labor and renewed its work
in driving through its upper chamber the sap
for another tube, to be congealed by the atmos-
phere in the process to the end. Its propelling
task is finished, or its power exhausted. In the
month of September, in the region of Talla-
hassee, the bananas are ripening, and the dead
bud is dropping.
Generally, but one branch or bearing stem is
produced by a plant. Stems produce from a
single hand to six or seven, bearing from six to
forty bananas. And this locality is not claimed
to be the natural location of the plant. It is
largely being cultivated for commerce in south-
ern Florida, and travelers will easily be enabled
to witness fine groves, by inquiry, on their way.
In many instances the product of a tree is much
larger than indicated by this description as to
the plant in Middle Florida. Like the citrus,
the banana has become a leading object of cul-
tivation in Florida in later years. It is not
native to the State. Twenty-five years ago
there were few plants grown here.
In a square of a quarter of an acre in Talla-
hassee the plants closely cover the outer line,
in number about one hundred, and sufficient of
them bear to afford a supply of fruit to a hotel
table during a season.
From a planted root several trees will spring
in a cluster within a circle of a few feet. They
will rise to the height mentioned, and if not
killed by cold, will survive in the second year.
With their suckers from the ground, the cluster
will be constantly renewed ; or, if killed by the
cold, they will spring up again the next more
favorable season.
One tree may bear the first year; it then
withers and is cut or dies down, and from the
centre of the stump springs a new tree ; another
bears the next year, and so annually; so that in
a grove there will be only a proportion bearing at
one season. The roots are durable, and spread
almost without culture; so that, for tropical
ornament alone, the trees are worth planting,
and there is no excuse for a housekeeper not
taking the chance of having a table dessert
which requires little more than watching to
possess.
Esthetically, there is nothing more grand
than the close-set banana line. The great, green
shining trunk, with its surface like marble, fif-
teen to twenty inches in diameter, is clowned
with its leaf formation, measuring again the
height of the trunk in the air. Each leaf in it-


self is, on its stong midrib, a spreading branch
or bough. They reach out in many stalks from
the body, proportioning the cluster well to the
shaft of the tree. The lower leaves, drooping
down, stripped laterally into ribbons between
the strong nerves which divide the cloth like
the folds of an open fan, from the frailty of tex-
ture, look like disordered fronds, while the new
and gorgeous foliage surmounts them. As the
banana is sometimes called in Eastern lands the
bread tree, its top leaves flame up to the sun, a
signal for the famished exile to return to the
garden of the tree of life; or they sway to and
fro in the ether deep like great paddles in the
mirage of an Eden river.
Each leaf springs isolated from a cleft. At
first appears a green staff, which is almost a sur-
prise to the eye, so suddenly has it emerged
from the base of the cluster. It may be six or


thousand acres in the extreme point that is suf-
ficiently elevated above the surrounding coun-
try to render it pleasant as a place of residence,
and most admirably adapted to the citrus fruits,
while the large bodies of warm tide waters which
almost surround it, give it a climate almost strict-
lyt ropical, thus favoring the growth of perhaps
very many others, but particularly several other
excellent and highly profitable fruits, plants,
and things. The soil or surface of the land is
perhaps exceptionally poor and is lacking of a
physical or mechanical structure, thus render-
ing us liable to the worst effects of drouth, and
making the frequent application of fertilizers a
necessity. Saying this, I feel that I have said


seven feet long, and is as perfect and round as
a walking-cane, green, and curving and taper-
ing to the top. This proves to be the leaf, the
lap being unseen around its midrib till it ex-
pands. In the lapse of a night an emerald flag is
unfurled from the staff, which develops its full
glory about the third day. No son of Erin, re-
membering his native land, should refuse nature
the privilege of hanging over his home in Flor-
ida the banner he loves so well.
The leaf is somewhat lanceolate, though ob-
tuse at the point, and often enlarges to a size
over six feet in length and more than two in
width. When first opened, with its perfect
structure and transparent green, lifted erect, it
is the most beautiful sight in nature. This
great fabric, almost a thing of magic, and sen-
sitive to the touch of frost, green, succulent and
tender from root to crown, seems destitute of
woody fibre, although it may be called the mon-
arch of its kind. Standing upon a verandah,
and reading its mystic story with close eye,
the human form can be concealed behind it.
At the battle of San Jacinto, the Mexicans, re-
treating, fighting, and fording the river,
screened their forms under the immense bonnet-
leaves lying on its surface. In the open field,
a thousand men, standing erect, could hide in
the ambuscade of the serial semaphore.
Well may the banana be named of the genus
paradisiaca, when it towers aloft as something
more grand than the heavenly wonders which
it screens.
The prisoner from the Ganges, released after
long exile in Paris, when he entered the Gardin
des Plants, bowed under a banana tree as under
a shrine, and wept tears of joy to behold again
the plant which consecrated to him the name
of home.
The thousands buffeting life upon a spar,
looking to Florida as the haven of rest, and
whose hopes may discern the mast and sails of
this floral ship emerging on the tropical horizon,
may feel the thrill of restoration upon our soil.
The words of Whittier, written upon the
enchantments of his home, when the seasons
came in which it was snow-bound," no longer
seem more applicable to the Banana Land:-
"The traveler owns the grateful sense
Of sweetness nigh, he knows not whence;
And, pausing, takes with forehead bare
The benediction of the air."
C. DREW.
Tam pa Bay-Pinellas Notes.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
Pinellas is the post-office name of a peninsula
stretching out between Tampa Bay and the Gulf
of Mexico, and is about twenty-five miles long
and from three to eight wide; this land is
marked on the map as Piny Point-as this is
the English of the Spanish name given it many
years ago.
The land is high above the sea, but how high
I cannot tell near enough to pretend to say, but
suffice it to say that there is some four or five


- --






THE PLOLRI)IA 1DISPATACH.. 11.3


produce and ship it to their own agents in the
large cities North and West. From those large
cities your own agents can arrange to supply
the smaller towns to be supplied from those
cities. It will require co-operation among the
farmers to do this, and it is their only salvation.
Get up a co-operative union somewhat similar
to those which have proved so successful in
England, called the Rochdale plan so-called
as it originated first at a small town called
"Rochdale" about twenty-five years ago. This so-
ciety commenced with twenty members and a
capital of only $100, and in 1876 it had 8,000
members and a capital of over $1,000,000.
From the great success of that small beginning,
there was in 1876 over one thousand co-opera-


nothing to discourage the settlement of the coun-
try, and our own best interests. It is not the
land beneath so much as the heaven above and
the waters around, that make the possibilities
of this country comparatively great. As for
the effects of drouth the fruit interest does not
greatly suffer, as evidenced by heavy yields of
fruit, and our garden, of course, justify precau-
tion against it. As for agriculture the low lands
must be sought, and as for fertilizing, it is done
all over the State; so much so far. Now let us
look at another view of this case ; here is this
magnificent bay and harbor with twenty-one
feet of water over the bar at Egmont Key, the
inlet; here to the southwest is Manatee River,
with Manatee, Fogartaville and Palma Sola
villages, within twenty-five miles or less, and
Tampa to the northeast only twenty-one miles,
while Clear Water and Bay View are not far-
ther away and are located northwest and north-
east from us thus making us the "middle man ;"
but even these are not the good things I wish to
impress on the prospectors' minds. It is the
cleanliness of the land and the constant sea
breeze that makes the point noted for its health-
fulness and freeness from malaria. It is the
splendid sporting field, and its vast cruising
range, and the fine fish, and excellent bivalves,
the beautiful Gulf back, the foaming surf, the
millions of shells, and the countless curiosities
that wash up from the great waters that will
make the point a vast sanitarium, and a resort for
invalids, tourists, and sportsmen; thus filling the
land with money, and the hearts of our people
with pleasure. Thus, kind reader, saith your
humble servant. Many good people seeing my
letters in print have written to me for more-
more information. In most instances I have
simply filed the letters as my time is too lim-
ited, and my labors too pressing to justify me in
writing to them. I hope no unkind feeling will
result. I think that as I have no "litlle axe to
grind," and simply for the benefit of others, I
have said enough. If people could feel justified
in enclosing one of Uncle Sam's checks for 50
or 100 cents, according to the information re-
quired, I could write in detail of many of the
developed resources and undeveloped possibili-
ties, but otherwise, as Mr. Disston owns all the
so-called, vacant land, they must look to him, or
wait until he sees fit to authorize me to lay the
facts and figures before the people. Private
lands, let me say here, can be had at from $7.50
to $10 per acre. WM. P. NEELD.
"Farmers Co-Operative Union."
[LETTER NO. 2.]
TocoI, FLA., May 3, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
The farmers have it in. their power to correct
the evil of shipping their produce to unreliable
agents, and to overstocked markets. Let them
at once form a co-operative union among them-
selves, and appoint their own agents at the
most central points in Florida to handle their


and each agent will be required to give a satis-
factory bond before he is allowed to handle any
of the produce. The association will be incor-
porated under the laws of the State, and having
a cash capital the shipper will be safe in get-
ting returns for his produce.
OTHER ADVANTAGES TO BE DERIVED.
Stockholders can order through their agents
articles from any part of the country, from a
paper of pins to a steam engine. There are
hundreds of articles that can be raised and
manufactured in Florida, many of them by its
fair daughters, for which there could be created
a demand, if there were agents to whom they
could be shipped, and who would take the
trouble to introduce them. It would bring
hundreds of thousands of dollars into the State,
help the railroads and build up the country.
Your agents will not only sell your fruits and
vegetables, but your sugar, syrup, moss and


tive societies in Great Britain, with over 400,-
000 members doing an annual -business of
$60,000,000. One society in Manchester com-
menced operations in 1864 with a capital of
$500. In twelve years it had increased its capi-
tal to $1,800,000, and did a yearly business of
over $8,000,000. Since 1876 the co-operative
societies of Great Britain, France and Germany
have enormously increased, and they have
proved so successful that they have been ex-
tended to large co-operative manufacturing
companies. Some few farmers have been lucky
in selecting prompt and reliable commission
houses to ship their produce to, but a very
large majority of the farmers have not been
successful in finding reliable houses to ship to.
The result has been that three-fourths of the
farmers have aiven up entirely the cultivation
of early vegetables. Whereas, if they could
ship to reliable parties, who would make
prompt returns, there would be an enormous
increase in the production of early vegetables
and small fruits. Take, for example, the staple
article of sweet potatoes. They are to day
worth $1.25 to 1.75 per bushel in the up coun-
try of Georgia and South Carolina, and they
are usually as high or higher when the new
crop comes in, in August and September.
What better crop could be raised for market,
and the freights are now so low by the railroads to
the western cities, especially if they are shipped
by car load lots, which can easily be done
through your agents, which reduces the rate of
freight one-half, so that your sweet potatoes
would net you about $1 per bushel. I have,
within the past month, conversed with fifty
farmers of this county, every one of whom
would plant early vegetables for market if they
could be certain of finding reliable parties to
ship them to.
CAPITAL STOCK.
The stock should be $10,000, divided into
shares of $10 each, to enable every small
farmer to take one or more shares. One dollar
per share to be paid upon subscribing, and the
balance as soon as the company is organized,
and the charter obtained. The object of the
capital stock is that there must be necessarily
considerable expenses in advertising and to pay
your agents, &c., before any income can be
derived from the commissions on the produce
sold. There are many parties who prefer sell-
ing their fruit upon the tree, they should by all
means take stock in the company, fbr it will
enable those who are in the habit of purchasing
tlhe crops upon the tree, to ship their fruit to
reliable agents and get quick returns, thereby
enabling them to pay you a better price for
your fruit. It does not compel a party taking
stock to ship their fruit to its agents, but it
gives him reliable agents to ship to if he de-
sires to do so. The association will be respon-
sible to the shipper for every article shipped,
and the association holds the agent responsible,


quired for use. I think the result will be a
yield of double what otherwise would have been
produced, and by combining a small quantity of
common salt and potash with the above ingre-
dients the availability of the compost would be
further improved. The cost of this compost
would not exceed $15 or $20 per toni, as in two
days with ten hands I can put up fifty tons."-
Planter, Mobile, Ala.

UNSHOD HORSES.-A Virginia physician,
Dr. Perkins, of Hanover County, has, it is said,
used for eight years in his daily practice an un-
shod horse, and during the whole period the
hoofs remained sound and good, a slight occa-
sional rasping keeping them in shape, and there
was "less liability of slipping on ice." He holds
that "it is the shoe and not the road that in-
jures the foot."


every other article that can be produced in
Florida.
WILL IT PAY THE STOCKHOLDERS?
If the company gets but one-twentieth of the
produce shipped to it, the commissions will not
only pay all of the expenses, but a handsome
profit to the stockholders. Let there be meet-
ings held in every county, and by every com-
munity, and get up subscriptions to the stock,
and then meet in Jacksonville and permanently
organize and elect your officers. Already a
large number have consented to join, and the
"Farmers Co-Operative Union is a fixed fact.
E. T. PAINE.




JUTE A PROTECTION TO COTTON PLANTS.
-Professor S. Waterhouse, St. Louis, Mo., who
has made a special study of jute, says: "There
are important incidental advantages in the cul-
ture of jute. The vigorous, luxurious growth
of the jute almost exterminates weeds from the
soil in which it is sown, while the bitterness of
its juice repels the attack of insects. It has been
found that cotton fields surrounded by a belt of
jute were exempt from the depredations of the
caterpillars, while unprotected fields in the same
neighborhood suffer from its ravages." Hugh
Elias, of San Diego County, Cal., contributes
this statement: Jute exercises an antagonistic
influence on insects, especially of the lipidopter-
ous tribes which generates caterpillars. Cotton
fields belted by jute are thoroughly protected
from insects and devouring worms. James M.
Putnam, St. Bernard, La., in the Sugar Bowl,
adds his testimony to the protective properties
ofjute against the ravages of the cotton-worm."

TURPENTINE FROM SAWDUST.-The Black-
shear (Ga.) News and Signal says: Capt. J.
M. Lee showed us some spirits of turpentine
made from sawdust and the refuse of the saw-
mill. It is extracted by a sweating process,
and yields fourteen gallons of the spirits, three
to four gallons of rosin and a quantity of tar
per cord. The spirits produced has a different
odor from that produced by distillation. The
experiment was made by Captain Lee, at Rep-
pard's mills, 101 S., F. & W. Railway, in
Clinch County, with the above result. We
shall have something more to say about this
new discovery again soon.

COTTON-SEED COMPOST.-" My method this
last season has been to combine cotton seed with
stable litter, diffusing the two thoroughly and
made into heaps of four or five tons each, en-
veloping them with six or eight inches of earth.
This was done two months before the time re-






L32 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Of t tor, to build additional dockage facilities at the
,Broome Street wharf. Slips are to be built to
-A lot of ripe peaches was shipped from accommodate the docking of at least six to eight
Clay County to Chicago, on the 20th of April.
e e rr m io cra o -If an orange tree can be made to produce
-The Reportermentions that 500 crates of four thousand oranges a year, and one hundred
vegetables were shipped from Lake City last such trees will grow upon an acre, why is not
Tuesday. an orange grove as profitable an investment in
-The South Florida Railroad Company have Columbia county as elsewhere, when it is known
decided to extend the road twenty miles further that the fruit is always worth one cent a piece
toward Bartow. on the tree ?-Reporter.


-The true remedy for barren farms and bar-
ren churches : Plow deep.-Dr. 0. P. Fitzger-
ald. Also fertilize.-Florida Methodist.
-It is expected, says the Spring, that five
miles of the Green Cove Spring and Melrose
Railroad will be ready for the engine early in
June.
-The crops are looking well and promise to
place Marion County at the head of the list in
farm products, as well as in fruits.- Ocala Ban-
ner.
-The Cedar Key Journal says that the
Eagle Pencil Company is building a new
steamer, and that it is rafting great quantities
of cedar timber.
-Mrs. E. R. Ives, of Lake City, besides a
fine orange grove, has a large cork oak, several
tea-plants in full yield, and a bearing black-
pepper vine.
-The Green Cove Spring declares that the
deer in Clay County are being wastefully slain,
and calls upon the County Commissioners to
enforce the game laws.
-The Recorder states that Madison has
shipped this spring seventy-four crates and
three hundred and six barrels of vegetables.
She ought to do ten times better next season.
-Over one hundred thousand pounds of
vegetables have been shipped from Lake City
during the month of April, by the Southern
Express Company alone. So says the Reporter.
-A fine watermelon found its way into our
office this week. It was the first of the season
and was raised by Mr. J. C. Lanier, the King
of truck farmers in Sumter, at his place in
Orange Bend.-Advance.
-Lake City is surprised at the vigorous
growth of the orange trees in that vicinity this
year. The Reporter is of the opinion that the
reason is because of the fact that the owners did
not trim off the lower limbs, as usual.
-The Live Oak and Rowland's Bluff Railroad
has called an assessment of 25 per cent., and
has concluded to employ a gang of free labor-
ers, as such operatives cost less than convicts.
Several miles are now ready for the locomotive.
--The Gulf Coast Progress has this gratifying
item: "There is a tremendous amount of money
coming into South Florida just now. The item
of beef cattle alone has brought into the hands
of one firm in this city over thirty tlhmusa nd d(ol-
lars in the last twenty days."
CLEAR AND CLOUDLESS!-Some sections of
Florida may be foggy, but if there is a clear
spot to be found it is here. Why, only six
street lamps light one mile of Marion Street on
a dark night, and ordinarily it has not been
deemed necessary to light any,-Reporter.
-There has been very great improvement in
the carrying of mails in this State, not to men-
tion the new and splendid facilities of the St.
John's River fast mail. The interior semi-


weekly and weekly mails are carried more punc-
tually, and are better taken care of than form-
erly.
-The Fernandina Mirror understands that
the Transit Railroad Company has made a con-
tract with Dr. Cloud, the Jacksonville contrac-


-Mrs. J. W. Hall sent to this office a few
days ago, some sweet potatoes of this year's
planting. They were of medium size, and shows
how early such things can be produced in this
county. Our soil is so well adapted to the
raising of sweet potatoes that we are surprised
that our farmers do not plant larger crops of
them.-Florida Bulletin.
-The Advocate says the schools of Alachua
County are in splendid condition. Mr. Sheats,
the County Superintendent, estimates the assets
over liabilities to be $259.49, which brings the
scrip to par, and puts the School Board on a
good basis for running public schools for terms
of five months during the next scholastic year.
ROBUST CHILDREN.-The children living in
this town are about as healthy a set of young-
sters as one will meet with in the State; real
robust little fellow, full of romp aud noise. Doc-
tors are completed to own farms and pay atten-
tion to their crops to make both ends meet.-
Lake City Reporter.
-A correspondent of the Tampa Guardian,
who has been marooningg" down among the
Keys, found some Spanish fishing families, from
whom an attempt to purchase some chickens
brought out the preliminary information that
they were raised for the Key West market,
where they brought $1.50 each! Key West is
evidently the place to start a big yard of
Plymouth Rocks or Brahmas.
-Immediately on the line of the Transit
Railroad, between Gainesville and Fernandina,
there are thirteen saw-mills in active operation
and all apparently doing a large business. It is,
no doubt, safe to assume that each of these
mills will average 12,000 feet of lumber per
day, which will give an annual production of
lumber of 48,172,000 feet along only ninety-
eight miles of the Transit Railroad.-Express.
BIG YIELD !-Mr. J. W. Hensley planted in
his garden this spring two quarts of bean seed
for home consumption. These were planted in
nine rows an eighth of an acre in length. He
has gathered from this small planting already
ten bushels of beans. One acre, yielding at the
same rate, would produce four hundred bushels
of snaps. Can this be beat ?-Reporter.
"ORANGE BELT" RAILROAD A FIXTURE.
-This important line, running from Tavares,
southeast, via east end of Lake Dora, Lake
Apopka, Orlando, Little Lake Tohopskalia, to
Eau Gallie, on Indian River, is now an assured
fact. Active work will commence at an early
dlay. The officers of this company are as fol
lows: N. R. Gruelle, President; F. A. Garrison,
Vice-President.-Palatka Journal.
-Sanford Journal: "Mr. E. R. Trafford.
Civil Engineer of the Sanford and Indian River
Railroad, received instructions by telegraph last
Saturday, to make the final location of the line
at once, and set the hands to work grading as
soon as possible. Mr. Trafford is at work, and
has his survey made as far as Gen. Finegan's,
through Fort Reed. The road will branch off
from the South Florida Railroad just north of


the Fair grounds. A large force of hands will
be set to work Monday, 8th inst., and the grad-
ing will be rushed through as rapidly as possi-
ble. The location of the entire line is not fully
decided upon yet, but will be, probably by our
next issue."


What Voices Indicate.
There are light, quick, surface voices that in-
voluntarily seem to utter the slang, I won't
do to tie to." The man's words may assure
you of his strength of purpose and reliability,
yet his tone contradicts his speech.
Then there are low, deep, strong voices,
where the words seem ground out, as if the man
owed humanity a grudge, and meant to pay it
some day. That man's opponents may well
tremble, and his friends may trust his strength
of purpose and ability to act.
There is the coarse, boisterous, dictatorial
tone, invariably adopted by vulgar persons, who
have not sufficient cultivation to understand
their own insignificance.
There is the incredulous tone, that is full of
a covert sneer, or a secret You-can't-dupe-me-
sir intonation.
Then there is the whining, beseeching voice,
that says sychophant" as plainly as if it
uttered the word. It cajoles and flatters you;
its words say, I love you, I admire you; you
are everything that you should be."
Then there is the tender, musical, com-
passionate voice, that sometimes goes with sharp
features (as they indicate merely intensity of
feeling) and sometimes blunt features, but
always with a genuine benevolence.
If you are full of affection and pretense, your
voice proclaims it.
If you are full of honesty, strength and pur-
pose, your voice proclaims it.
If you are cold and calm and firm and con-
sistent, or fickle and foolish and deceptious,
your voice will be equally truth-telling.
You can not change your voice from a natu-
ral to an unnatural tone, without its being
known that you are doing so.

Sugar from Sorghum.
The Macon (Ga.) Journal and Messenger
says: "Many of our readers will remember
what a factor sorghum was during the late war.
It contributed a large portion of the short and
long sweetening" used by our people, for in
many instances a coai-se sugar was made from
it more by accident than skill, and it also fur-
nished a cheap, villainous, but very powerful
whiskey or brandy, which was capable of the
highest stimulation. Sorghum went from the
front to the rear upon the advent of peace and
cotton at fifty cents per pound, and has since
that time received but limited attention at the
hands of our farmers. But the men of science
have been at work on sorghum, and the results
so far obtained are simply wonderful.
The experiments made within the last year
have not yet been published by the Govern-
ment, but Professor Silliman, chairman of the


commission having the subject in charge, has
written a letter to Dr. T. G. Richardson, of
New Orleans, setting forth the main results.
We find the document in a late number of the
New Orleans Democrat, and feel that we cannot
do our readers and the farmers of Georgia a
greater benefit than to furnish them with an in-
telligent synopsis of its most important and in-
teresting points. It has been demonstrated that
our planters can secure a crop from the seed of
say half a dozen sorts of sorghum, which will
fully mature in periods of from three months
to six months from date of sowing, and which
produce from one to two hogsheads of good
" C sugar, polarizing 96 per cent., and which





THE PLO 14bEb1JT


cannot be told from the best ribbon or other
cane sugar of the same grade. This they- can
do with no other treatment than they now em-
ploy in working the old stands of cane, and with
a longer working period; the, juices will reach at
least 10 deg. B., equal to 1,065 specific gravity,
and will polarize good 12 per cent. to 16 per
cent., which is, if we are correctly informed,
fully as well as the Louisiana planters now do.
This juice they can defecate with lime and
treat with sulphur fumes or sulphurous acid,
and reduce in vacuum pans as usual, or in open
trains.
This result follows with the Early Amber
cane, which matures in about ninety days. It
makes fully 9 per cent. of available sugar "
(after deducting about 11 per cent. of glucose
and 3 per cent. of solids not sugar), and has
produced over wide areas of the West ten to
twenty tons of cane* per acre, yielding 140 gal-
lons of juice per ton, and of well-grained sugars,
from 80 to 100 pounds per ton of stalks, and
from 20 to 25 gallons of syrup of excellent
quality, weighing from 11 to 111 pounds per
gallon. This may be considered the leading
variety of the early maturing sorts of sorghum.
The yield of seed is from 20 to 30 bushels per
acre, an excellent grain for stock or hogs,
worth in the North from 50 cents to 75 cents
per bushel.
It will make about two thousand pounds per
acre of good C sugar, and this particular va-
riety promises to become perennial in the cli-
mate of the South.
Col. Henry B. Richards,ofLaGrange, Fayette
County, Texas, says of it:
I have tested it now for two years, and am
convinced that the stubbles will stand colder
weather and more of it than those of the ribbon
cane. My cane from- last year's stubbles has
larger stalks, is taller, and in every respect
ahead of the earliest seed cane at this time.
There are other varieties maturing in from
150 to 170 days from seeding, and requiring
about 60 days' working. They are the "Hon-
duras," "Honey Top," "Texas Cane," "Mam-
moth," etc. These will produce from two to
three thousand pounds of sugar per acre. As
high up as Kansas during the last year, thirty-
seven and a half tons of the Honduras cane
were matured on one acre. The South has the
soil and climate for the production of the sor-
ghum to its fullest sugar-making capacity. Our
late frosts will enable planters to put it in the
ground late, and at a time when not pressed
with other work, or they can by reason of long
seasons make it an early crop.
Now that the necessity of a diversity of crops
is forcing itself upon the attention of our plant-
ers, it will be wise in them to not only make
their own supplies of syrup and sugar, but to
make each a crop out of which more money may
be realized at less labor than out of cotton. The
season is not too far advanced to experiment
during the present crop year, and for the benefit
of those who may have the enterprise to at-
tempt it, we add the formula for cultivation as


laid down by Professor Selliman :
1. The plant should be thoroughly ripe be-
fore rolling commences. Its ripe condition is
known by the seed being fully hard and the
upper leaves beginning to wilt. If rolled be-
fore this time the juice, as appears by thou-
sands of analyses, contains less sugar and more
glucose than at maturity, and of course the
amount of sugar available is considerably di-
minished.
2. The canes should be rolled as soon after
cutting as possible-r-all in the same day if possi-
ble. It is not important to remove the leaves;
by some evidence the removal of the leaves ap-
pears to be an injury.' But the top must be re-
moved, of course, as well to save the seed as to
avoid injury to the juice.
3. The juice shows by its density just what it
is worth. It should run from 8 degrees to 12


degrees B, say from 1,060 to 1,090 specific grav-
ity, averaging about 1,065, or 10 degrees B. And
it should be handled without delay, as it is
more prone than Cuba cane juice to chemical
changes. But the same rules for acidity, the
same treatment by lime and by sulphur will be
found available as at present with your plant-
ers.
4. For the matter of culture it is sufficient to
say that any soil that will raise a good crop of
corn will do well for sorghum, which is best
drilled in with a common drilling machine in
rows 32 to 4 feet apart, the plants to be thinned
out to about 4 inches apart in the row. During
the early weeks of growth sorghum is delicate
and requires a little more care than corn. But
once under way it requires no extra care.



Meteorological Report.
Weather for week ending May 20, 1882.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION,
SIGNAL SERVICE, U. S. A., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Therm.- Wind..

DATE. U 0 1


Sunday 14...... 29.83 74 60:66.7148.7 0.00 W 10|Clear.
Monday 15 ...... 291 72,57 66.0 51.' 0.00 W 4 Fair.
Tuesday 16...... 30.01 75 581 67.7 44.0 0.00 NW 51Clear.
Wednesday 17 30.13 75i52 64.7 60.0 0.00 NE | 8Clear.
Thursday 18... 30.19 75 54 66.7 58.0 0.00 NE 6 Clear.
Friday 19........ 30.19 76'57 68.3 59.7 0.00 NE 5 Clear.
Saturday 20..... 30.19 76' 62 70.0 70.0 0.00 SE 1 7 Fair.
H ighlest barometer 30.250, lowest 29.782.
Highest temperature 76, lowest 52.
NOTE.-Barometer readings reduced to sea level.
J. W. SMITH, Signal Observer U. S. A.
Wood Pavements.
The following remarks in the Builder, by
Robert Rawlinson, B. C. E., Chief Engineering
Inspector of the Local Government Board,
England, about wood pavements are interest-
ing, as those interested in having Bay Street
paved with wood will have the opinions of an
engineer of eminence in Great Britain:
"1. As to foundations, sand layers of boards,
or any other similar form of loose foundation,
should be rejected.
2. Open-jointed wood paving, however the
joints be filled, as whether with asphalt, with
gravel, or with Portland cement, or any com-
bination of these materials, will constitute a
swiftly wearing surface, and the wider the
joints the more rapid will be the wear and dis-
integration of the blocks of wood.
3. Hard woods will not make the best
pavement, as the surfaces will wear slippery,
and jar the wheels passing over in proportion
to the swiftness of the traffic and the hardness
and roughness of the surface.
"The requisites for a good form of wood
pavement are-
1. An absolutely sound and true cement
concrete foundation, capable of resisting the
ramming strokes and vibrations of the wheel
traffic moving over the surface.


2. A thick layer of tar felt to be laid over
the concrete when fully hardened, upon which
the wooden blocks are to be bedded, and also a
layer of similar felt betwixt the paving blocks,
which must be set close jointed.
3. The blocks to be sound soft pine, free
from sap, dead knots and shakes. If creosoted
all the better.
The wear and tear upon street surface along
the main lines in London is something tremen-
dous, and it is this almost unceasing quick
traffic which wears street pavements most; such
traffic for instance, as by spring vans, omni-
buses, carriages and cabs. Any wheels moving
at a rate of six miles per hour and upwards,
jump and ram in proportion to the speed and
roughness of the surfaces; the heaviest and
swiftest moving loads doing most injury. A


wheel in rapid motion strikes as a sledge ham-
mer strikes, and the blow is in proportion to
the velocity.
"A firm and true foundation of cement con-
crete is stipulated for, to preserve the surface
of the finished road smooth, even and in order,
and to prevent the uprising of the subsoil. The
layer of felt is stipulated for to form an elastic
cushion for the wooden blocks, and so soften
the places given by the swiftly moving wheels.
The felt in the joints is to enable the blocks to
be laid close, and yet have elasticity, and be
in a great degree water tight. The wood is to
be sound, true in dimension of depth, and soft
in texture (like white pine,) so as to have more
elasticity than a harder substance has. The
character of wooden pavements may be known
by the occupants of carriages in driving over
them. Where the planks are laid upon sand
and boards, the vibrating and drumming effects
upon nerves and ears are most distressing.
When laid with open joints the surface becomes
rapidly worn and uneven; and when laid upon
an improperly formed or weak foundations, the
surface also becomes uneven, alternately hills
and holes, retaining dirt and wet, and so tend-
ing more and more to the destruction of the
material and the road. Blocks of wood, unex-
ceptionable in character, form, and dimensions
of material laid hard on an exceptionally good
cement concrete foundation, close jointed, but
without felt bedding and jointing have a disa-
greeable jarring effect, though in a less degree
than the examples previously described.
Cement foundations for wood block paving
ought to have ten or twelve days to set, but in
London this time can seldom, if ever be given,
and this may, in some cases, account for partial
failures. Wooden pavements in themselves
make no mud, but this is carried on from ad-
joining dirty macadam.
When, therefore, wooden pavements are mud-
dy, it shows neglect in street scavenging. White
pine, we have not, but we have in abundance
two kinds of soft wood, to-wit, cedar and cypress
as substitutes, and which no doubt would an-
swer as well. But from a sanitary point of
view all wooden pavements are objectionable,
because liable to decay and from their decom-
position may become a source of disease."
Practico-Literary Lady.
There is a lady living in a little four-roomed
cottage in the environs of Boston, says a writer
in Lippincott's, whose name is well-known to
literary people. She depends wholly upon her
own exertions for the support of herself and
children, and does all her own housework, yet
her cottage is the focus of the best society of
the locality. A gentleman calling there re-
cently was received at the door by a daughter
of the lady, who told him her mother was too
busy to be called, but that he could see her in
the kitchen if he pleased; and he followed her
to that room. The lady greeted him without
the least embarrassment, though she had on a
big apron and her sleeves were pinned back to
her shoulders. She was cutting a pumpkin into


strips for pies; and there sat a venerable gen-
tleman gravely paring the strips to the accom-
paniment of brilliant conversation. I* was
asked to guess who the gentleman was, and,
after several fruitless attempts, was told that it
was the poet Longfellow. While the pumpkin-
paring was in process, another distinguished
poet called, and he also insisted upon being im-
pressed into the service. It was a dreary day
outside, and no one cared to leave the pleasant
cottage, so they all stayed to lunch, one of the
pies forming the piece de resistance of the occa-
sion. Speaking of this incident afterward, the
lady said, My friends are kind enough to come
to see me, though they know I cannot leave
my work to entertain them. Visiting and work
must proceed together, and when I set my call-
ers at work with me we are sure to have an
agreeable time."





1, THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Courtesy at Home.
Good breeding, like charity, should begin at
home. The days are past when children used
to rise the moment their parents entered the
room where they were and stand until they had
received permission to sit. But the mistake is
now made usually in the other direction of al-
lowing to small boys and girls too much license
to disturb the peace of the household. I think
the best way to train children in courtesy would
be to observe toward them a scrupulous polite-
ness. I would go so far as to say that we should
make it as much a point to listen to children
without interrupting them and to answer them
sincerely and respectfully as if they were grown
up. And indeed many of their wise, quaint
saying sare far better worth listening to than the
stereotyped commonplaces of most morning call-
ers. Of course, to allow uninterrupted chatter,
would be to surrender the repose of the house-
hold, but it is very easy, if children are them-
selves scrupulously respected, to teach them in
turn scrupulously to respect the convenience of
others, and to know when to talk and when to
be silent.
The best brought up family of children I ever
knew were educated on the principle of always
commending them when it was possible to do so,
and letting silence be the reproof of any wrong-
doing which was not really serious. I have
heard the children of this household, when their
mother had failed to say any word of commen-
dation after some social occasion, ask as
anxiously as possible, "What was it, mamma. I
know something was wrong. Didn't we treat the
other children well, or were we too noisy ?" In
that household reproof was never bestowed un-
sought-only commendation, of whatever it was
possible to commend, was gratuitous.-Mrs.
Louise Chandler Moulton in Our Continent.

Luxury in New York.
The luxury and perfection of detail in New
York dwellings is passing into a proverb. No-
where in the world, probably, is so much time
and money expended upon the furnishing and
ornamenting of the homes of the rich as in this
city. The draping of curtains has become a dis-
tinct branch of art, and every decorator and
upholsterer has one or more employes whose
sole business it is to arrange in graceful folds
the draperies, which are now indispensable, at
doors, windows, and fireplace. Even the ban-
isters must now be stuffed and tufted and draped
on either side with heavy fringe. Ceilings are
frescoed and painted in the studios of distin-
guished artists, and then transferred to the
houses that they are to embellish. Hundreds
of women are employed, at an expense of thou-
sands of dollars, upon embroidery and art nee-
dle-work which are to adorn the sumptuous pal-


aces in which our rich men live. Paintings,
statuary, carvings in stone and wood, the rich-
est fabrics of French and Indian looms, indeed,
all that is rare and beautiful in nature and art,
are brought to bear upon the decoration of these
republican palaces. Even the stables in which
the horses, coachmen' and grooms are to be
housed are far more luxurious than the simple
homes in which the fathers of our race passed
their lives. The newly-finished stables of Cor-
nelius Vanderbilt in Fifty-eighth street far out-
shine those of the Roman Emperor, whose sump-
tuous appointments have become a matter of
history.
-In New York far more women are daily
seen riding on horseback in the park and along
the boulevards than ever before at this season.
A dozen women ride now where one rode a few
years ago.


A Talk About Toast.
Mrs. E. P. Ewing, in a lecture on cookery at
Dearborn Seminary, said that toasting effectu-
ally destroyed yeast germs in bread, and con-
verted the insoluble starch into a soluble sub-
stance resembling gum, and which chemists
called dextrine, so that toasted bread was inca-
pable of fermenting and producing flatulence,
or becoming sour on the stomach. Bread toasted
very dry agreed better with a weak stomach
than any other bread. Indeed, a sensitive
stomach would frequently degest toast when it
would digest no other article of food. Hence
toast, which was in general use as a diet for in-
valids, could be safely and judiciously recom-
mended for them at all times; and the loose
talk indulged in by some self-styled teach-
ers of physiology about the extreme un-
healthfulness of toast, especially when
buttered, only gave emphasis to the fact
that toasting bad bread and melting bad
butter did not improve the quality of either,
or render them less indigestible or unwhole-
some than when in their original unregenerate
condition. Meeting or boiling inferior butter
would not make it proper food for a human
stomach, and the most skilled manipulation
would not convert sour, half-baked bread into
nutritious, palatable toast. The latter held so
important a place among foods that every one
should know how to make it properly. Yet one
of the best American authorities on culinary
matters has said that only about one in ten
thousand know how to make toast, and the lec-
turer indorsed the statement so far as to assert
that bad toast was the rule and good toast the
exception.
In making toast three directions should be
observed: Cut the bread, which should be
somewhat stale, in even slices, about half an
inch in thickness. If the bread is fresh, dry
them slightly. Hold each slice a sufficient dis-
tance from the fire, which should be of clear,
bright coals, to keep it from burning, and let it
brown evenly. For this purpose a wire broiler
or a toasting fork can be used, When the sur-
face of one side becomes a rich, golden color,
turn and heat the other side in a similar man-
ner, until the slice is perfectly toasted. Serve
the moment it is done in a warm plate, dry or
buttered, and it will tempt the appetite of either
invalid or epicure. And the average individual,
said Mrs. Ewing, might indulge occasionally
with impunity in a broiled quail or a Boston
stew, served on toast after this method, without
the least fear of future regret or discomfort.

"Do Commercial Fertilizers Pay?"
Is a very common question in the agricultural
papers every year. This question can be an-
swered very briefly. It pays a good farmer who
knows how to use it, and who buys for cash, to
apply ammonia, potash and phosphoric acid to
his land if it needs it, and he can get them at
their commercial value. A poor farmer who


buys it on a credit and does not know what he
is buying, it will not pay. If, instead of buy-
ing anybody's manipulated fertilizers that -are
offered to him on a credit, he confines his pur-
chase to pure ground bone (fine), and then sup-
plements this with all the stable manure, cotton
seed and ashes that he may be able to save or
purchase, a farmer will find that it is profitable
to use certain forms of commercial fertilizers,
while it may not pay to use certain other forms.
I repeat, it will pay to buy ammonia and solu-
ble phosphoric acid where bought for cash, and
a full equivalent of the same obtained for the
money, if it is used in accordance with the law
of nature, otherwise not. Our farmers have
literally thrown away thousands in their com-
mon practice of putting highly soluble and con-
centrated fertilizers in one single furrow, and
as deep as they could get it, when, if they had
put it broadcast and near the surface, they


might have saved as many thousands as they
have lost by the unnatural practice that they
have followed so long, and which they are loath
to belive is wrong. Any farmer can prove this
question very easily if he will proceed intelli-
gently to give it a fair test, and it is a very im-
portant question for our farmers to solve.-S.
A. C. in Southern Farmer's Monthly.
Importing Potatoes.
Potatoes from Scotland, cabbage from Hol-
land and butter from Denmark and Germany.
How rapidly a scarcity in any part of the world
starts shipments. Commerce is always vigilant,
and the drouth in America gives a market to
distant producers. The Scotch potato is well
liked by many of our consumers, and the im-
ports average 75,000 bushels a month. They
pay 15 cents a bushel duty, but this, as well as
freight and commission, is met by the present
high market. A Scotch vegetable house has
been started here, with the expectation that this
traffic will be permanent. It is probable, how-
ever, that an immense breadth of potatoes will
be planted this season, and this will bring
prices down to their former mark. A year ago
potatoes were so dull that it hardly paid to send
them here, and now they are so dear that we
are glad to receive them from Scotland. Thus
one extreme is followed by another. New York
consumes 10,000 bushels of potatoes every day,
and hence the early crop from Florida and
South Carolina is always eagerly expected. Po-
tato speculators have made money, but only .at
the expense of suffering among the poor. There
are thousands here who are almost famished,
and even the well-paid working classes are
pinched. How welcome to the city will be a
resumption of old-fashioned prices at the potato
market.-New York Letter.

The Farmer.
Is it not a living fact that the farmer now
feels something of the old inherited, dependent
and servile spirit which was so universal among
the laboring classes in the centuries past and
gone? If he did not feel and show this spirit,
why should his rights be so often ignored, his
feelings hurt, and he himself treated as though
he belonged to an inferior class ? The man who
boldly asserts his rights and feels his equality
with others may be hated, but he will never be
looked down upon. It is the manifest duty of
the farmer if he is conscious of feeling one par-
ticle of servility or inferiority to other classes
to rise above it just as quick as he can. He
must educate himself and better his .circum-
stances, and elevate his condition till he can
feel the assurance that he stands on the full
level with the most prosperous and best edu-
cated classes. He must think and study and
learn and work till he is fully emancipated
from the thraldom of poverty, ignorance and
mental inactivity which has heretofore charac-
terized his condition. He must work out his
own salvation by patience and industry, by ob-
servation, by experiment, and by the exercise
of his indomitable will. He must feel his no-


ability and respect himself as the son of the Most
High, capable of doing great things and of
achieving a noble and high destiny. He must
build himself up in the stature of a perfect man.
Just to the extent that he builds himself up in
dignity, self-respect, strength of character,
knowledge and power of will, to that extent
will he gain a conquest over nature, make the
earth yield her increase, and attain the ends of
his earthly existence. There is beyond perad-
venture a bright future outlook for the farmer,
if he will shake himself from sloth and be up
and doing with a cheerful heart and determined
will the work of the day.-Southern Cultivator.
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


--


I


"MW





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, O3


Forage and Hay.
There is not one planter or farmer in twenty
within the borders of Louisiana or Mississippi,
taking them as an average who produce a suffi-
cient amount of hay to feed his horses and
mules, much less his cattle.
We believe it to be an established fact that
it is not only possible for us to raise all the
stock feed we need, but in addition a large
quantity for export. We are fully aware while
writing this article that we are merely repeat-
ing opinions that have been almost worn thread-
bare, and in many instances these opinions
have been thrust upon the notice of farmers by
the so-called agricultural (?) writers, most of
whom knew as little about growing forage crops
as they know about grafting trees, and very
little of anything.
Hence we read articles upon growing red clover,'
Kentucky blue grass and Timothy in the far
South, where any laborer in the, fields knows
that to plant these species of grass in our hot
climate would be wasting both time and money.
There are grasses and forage crops, however,
which have been tested both for pasture and as
stock food, and which every farmer knows will
succeed, and it is to these we would call espe-
cial attention, hoping thereby to do something
towards checking the tremendous flow of
money which goes to the West every year for
the purchase of feed which could easily be
raised at home. Among the first in point of
nutrition both as a pasture grass and where the
ground is rich enough to give it a luxuriant
growth for hay, we give the Bermuda a place
in the front rank.
On lands suited to its growth we have known
it to produce four tons to the acre. On poor
lands, in order to bring about the best results,
they should be top-dressed occasionally with
superphosphate, finely ground bone, or, what is
excellent, a compost of Byram marl and cotton
seed meal, sown broadcast in the winter or early
spring and well harrowed in. This will cause
the grass to grow large enough to be mowed
several times during the summer season.-N.
0. Com. Bulletin.

Fruit Trade of New Orleans.
The N. 0. Commercial Bulletin says that
some Northern reporters have in special tele-
grams asserted that "extensive frauds had
been perpetrated upon the government by im-
porters at Boston, New York and New Orleans,
in the undervaluation of cargoes of oranges and
lemons from Messina and Palermo, and that the
New Orleans Collector of Customs had ad-
vanced the valuation 30 or 40 per cent., which
the consignees were compelled to pay, together
with the addition of 20 per cent. penalty. Both
our collector and appraiser pronounce this
statement .to be totally and absolutely un-
true," so far as New Orleans is concerned.
The fact is the valuation here has been higher
than at the Northern cities, giving them a cer-
tain advantage over us in supplying the West-
ern demand.


It is essential to the equitable administration
of the customs that valuations should be uni-
form at all the seaports. This was always
just, but is more important than ever now that
profits have been so much reduced by the com-
petition among importers.
Under uniform valuation the entire Western
consumption of foreign fruits should be from
New Orleans importations, the principal excep-
tions being where vessels returning from the
fruit ports to the North in ballast would take
fruit on ships account with the expectation of a
very light profit, in lieu of freight. What thus
happens in New York may also occur in New
Orleans, but such transactions should be re-
garded as exceptional.
With our rapid means of railway transporta-
tion to all parts of the country, and especially


to the West, New Orleans has substantial ad-
vantages for the fruit trade, greater perhaps
than can be offered by any other American sea-
port. What we most need in this matter is
capital and enterprise-the former to establish
a line of freight and passenger steamers to the
Mediterranean, and the latter to induce our
dealers and importers to go still more exten-
sively into the trade. If we had to rely ex-
clusively on the river for transportation of per-
ishable fruit to the interior our facilities for the
trade would be less important, but when we
consider our means of rapid transit by rail to
Chicago and other cities of the West, we can-
not but conclude that our foreign fruit trade
should present more imposing proportions.
The actual importers engaged in the trade have
shown commercial enterprise, but still more
can be accomplished in promoting the. trade;
liberal advertising not being ignored as one of
the effective means to the end proposed.

Schools for Farmers.
Dr. J. R. Nichols, in his address before the
Essex Agricultural Society, speaks of the im-
portance of establishing schools of instruction
for farmers, by way of a course of practical
lectures, and suggests for a course six lectures
on fertilizers, six lectures upon soils, six on how
plants grow, and six on milk, cream, butter and
cheese.
This is an important suggestion; and with
the present reasonable prospect of securing an
Agricultural Experiment Station at Amherst,
there is no reason at all why a suggestion of so
much importance should not be successfully
carried out, and we believe it to be one that
will challenge an instantaneous welcome
throughout the agricultural community. The
illustrations which could accompany the lec-
tures, and the practical work of compounding
fertilizers, would be much more fully impressed
upon the minds of the farmers than the read-
ing of the most elaborate treatise. How plants
grow, and how to feed them, is an interesting
and important subject, and one on which we
want more light, if we would expend both labor
and material on our farms to the best ad-
vantage. For at that centre the science of ag-
riculture will be continually reduced to prac-
tice. There will be collected and concentrated
there all the tested and proven resources for the
thorough instruction of farmers which diligent
study can supply. And from that common
centre of the highest agricultural intelligence
will diverge streams of positive knowledge
through the Farmers' Institutes, Farmers'
Clubs, and other agricultural conventions and
meetings throughout the State, which will en-
rich discussion, multiply information, inspire
lectures and carry practical instruction to every
farmer in Massachusetts. Lectures can then
be multiplied indefinitely on a constantly in-
creasing stock of actual knowledge, and every
lecture will be a verification as well as a trans-
lation of theories previously reduced to prac-
tice.-American Farmer.


Horseradish
May be very successfully grown in Florida,
along the margins of streams-on the edge of
hammocks, or in any moist, rich land. How-
ever, (as the American Agriculturist says,) it is
more frequently tolerated than cultivated on
the farm, even at the North. It is often found
occupying some odd corner, making a slovenly
weedy patch, from which a few pieces are taken
as wanted in the spring. When left to itself it
takes such thorough possession of the soil that
it is difficult to get rid of it. The only way to
keep it under control is to plant the roots, let
them grow one season and then dig the whole
up. If left longer it will make trouble, and


the roots will not be so good. Sets are the small
side roots, about six inches long, and half an
inch or less in diameter. They are made when
trimming the roots for use orfor market; as they
must be planted right end up, the top part is
cut off square and the lower end with a slant.
In this shape they are sold at the seed stores,
but enough for the home garden may be'dug
from any accessible patch. Market gardeners
plant them between the rows of early cabbages;
if they start before the cabbages are matured
the tops are cut off in hoeing; when the cabba-
ges are removed the horseradish is allowed to
grow. In the family garden a small planting
may be made without reference to the cabbage
or other crops, planting the sets eighteen inches
apart each way, with a sharp-pointed dibble,
having the tops of the set three inches below the
surface. Be sure and take up the roots, large
and small, in autumn or early next spring.

Wild Cane Seeding.
The Eatonton (Ga.) Chronicle, of recent date,
says: "Mr. Sid. Griffin exhibited at the store
of Mr. Howell Hearn, the other day, a stalk of
cane with a head well filled with grain, just in
the dough. The grains were like that of wheat,
though much larger. We never saw anything
like it. Mr. Griffin says he has a patch of it
all headed out. We do not know how to class-
ify it, though it must be the ordinary cane-brake
grass, technically called arum dinaria macros-
perma, which is usual in this country, growing
in low places and rich soil. The books tell us
of only three kinds-the bamboo, the sugar and
the rattan cane, all of which have a distinct his-
tory, and are serviceable in many ways. But
this cane-brake is well known in this country,
and is splendid for cattle and serviceable for
poles, quills, etc. A gentleman who is an old
settler in Putnam says he has known this grass
to head only twice during his long observation. In
1839, everywhere seen, it was literally weighted
with heavily filled heads of grain, both in Geor-
gia and Alabama, through which he traveled
that year. This is a peculiarity of the ordinary
stock cane which has escaped the notice of agri-
culturists. We would like to hear from some
of them upon the subject. The seed is evidently
good food.
A LAWYER ON GARDENING.-At a farmers'
meeting in Kansas, a young lawyer discoursed
of gardening: "For fifteen minutes, in a clear,
sweet treble, with many wild gesticulations, the
torrent of eloquence rolled forth, like peas from
the smooth surface of a shovel." And he
finally took his seat amid a silence" which
The Industrialist declares was "so dense you
could cut it with a knife." There uprose a
shock-headed granger," and, in slow and
hesitating fashion, said: "These men who
talk so much about gardening had better hoe a
little." The record concludes with the re-


mark : You should have heard that audience
roar out its applause of these thirteen words."
If the youthful counsellor's appearance on such
an occasion was prompted by political or other
selfish motive one would be inclined to say,
" Served him right." If, on the other hand, his
interest was genuine and not feigned, then it
would doubtless have been well to encourage
him somewhat, for nobody can deny that the
more horticulture and the less law the better
for all concerned.

RICE DROPs.-Boil rice to a mush; when
cold beat three eggs well and stir in ; add tea-
spoonful of yeast powders, sprinkle of salt;
drop a tablespoonful at a time in boiling lard,
when brown take out and sprinkle sugar over
them; serve hot. Very nice for breakfast.






3.< __THE TtfOl itDA I18PAT0II.


JACKSONVILLE, MAY 22, 1882.
EDITORS:
D. REDMOND, D. H. ELLIOTT, W. H. ASHMEAD.
Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.
RATES OF ADVERTISING.
SQUARES. 1 TIME. 1 MO. 3 Mo. 6 MO. 1 YEAR
One...................... $1 00 $2 50 $ 5 50 $10 00 $ 1850
Two .............. ...... 2 00 5 00 10 001 18 00 34 00
Three ............... 3 00 7 00 14 001 25 00 46 00
Four.............. 4 00 9 00 1750 3000 5800
Eight..................... 8 00 16 50 30 00 50 00 100 00
Sixteen............... 16 00: 30 00, 50 00 o 80 00 150 00
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the best ad-
vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.
5,000 TO 8,000 COPIES ISSUED EVERY WEEK.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.
MR. FRANK JORDAN, No. 9 East Fifth St., Cincin-
nati, Ohio is our Western Agent, and is authorized to
receive subscriptions and advertisements to THE FLOR-
IDA DISPATCH.
VENNOR, the weather prophet," predicts a
wet and rather coolish summer, and we begin
to have some faith in him.
Two DOLLARS per year (not $1.50, as we
erroneously printed it, recently,) is the price of
the Florida Weekly Union, of this city; and
only $2.25 for both that excellent newspaper
and our DISPATCH, clubbed together. The
reading public will please note this very liberal
offer.
The Florida Methodist," a weekly paper of
this city, is edited with unusual ability and in-
dustry. It is becoming highly popular, not
only in its wide-spread and influential "parish,"
but among non-denominational readers, and
it merits its prosperity. The editors and pub-
lishers have our thanks for appreciated favors.
FORAGE, &c.-The Conch Pea may still be
planted for mulching and to make seed; and if
you desire a supply of good winter fodder, sow
more "Cat-Tail" Millet and Sorghum. See
article on Curing Hay Without Sunshine,"
and provide one of the cheap and convenient
drying sheds we describe and recommend.
THE ILLUSTRATION on our first page
represents one of the most beautiful diurnal
butterflies found in Florida and the South.
It is the imago or progeny of the so-called
" orange-dog" or puppy" so destructive to
orange trees. It is black with yellow spots and
bands; and, fluttering in front of the grove or
hovering over flowers, presents a beautiful ap-


pearance, which adds greatly to the enchant-
ment of tropical scenery.
An Editor-Farmer.
We are glad to find the following in the Union
of last Thursday, and heartily wish our talented
and persevering neighbor restored health and
full prosperity :
REAL ESTATE TRANSFER.-Rev. H. B. Mc-
Callum, editor of the Union, has purchased four
acres of land in the western portion of LaVilla,
known as the Salbide property, and contem-
plates erecting a handsome residence there soon.
This is a very desirable and valuable piece of
property, and upon it is growing fruit of almost
every variety, as well as one of the finest straw-
berry beds in the county, which covers about
one acre.


Dr. Z. H. Mason,
Of Apopka, Orange County, an old and highly
valued Georgia correspondent of our Southern
Cultivator in ante-bellum days; and, since his
settlement in Florida, an industrious and pro-
gressive worker and writer for the agricultural
press, passed through Jacksonville last Wednes-
day, on his way to attend the General Assem-
bly of the Presbyterian Church, at Atlanta. It
was very pleasant for our senior editor to meet
this esteemed friend and co-laborer of the olden
time, and to receive from him even a qualified
promise of an occasional article for our new
DISPATCH, which will owe its highest value to
the teachings of men of such close, acute ob-
servation, great experience and sound, mature
judgment, sa our good and worthy friend, Dr.
Mason.
Angora Goats.
A correspondent, J. L. R., writing from
Cleveland, Ohio, says:
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
In your paper of April 24th I noticed an ar-
ticle on the Angora Goat." If not too much
trouble, will you be so kind as to inform me
where a good goat can be purchased and in-
struction as to their care thrown in ?
REPLY.-Address Col. Richard Peters, At-
lanta, Ga. The Col. has spent a great deal of
time and money on the Angoras, and brought
them to a high state of perfection.
As to their care, they scarcely need any.
They will live and grow fat in almost any old
broomsedge field, browsing on twigs and
" sprouts" which no other animal will eat; but
of all this and more, Col. Peters will inform
you in his circulars on this valuable animal.-
EDS.

Does Early Vegetable-Growing in Florida
Pay?
As an answer to the above, and an indication
of what may be accomplished on the "poor sandy
soil" of Florida, we publish the following :
LIVE OAK, FLA., May 18, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch .
This is the result from planting five (5) gal-
lons Valentine beans, on the 14th of February,
on one acre:
Gross sales up to date................................. $231.50
Paid freight to New York................... .$i.
Paid drayage in New York........................... 7.i5
Paid G. L. Lawrence commissions............... 23.15-$120.80
$131.30
paid for crates and packing................... 29.10
Net proceeds......................................... $102.20
with eight crates shipped to Atlanta yet to
hear from, besides furnishing two families all


they could eat, foraging six geese, three turkeys,
thirty head of chickens, with plenty of beans
for home use and bushes still blooming.
Yours. respectfully,
NAT. T. ELLIOTT.
"Facts and figures," are just what we and our
numerous readers in and outside the State want.
The bean crop, as is well-known here, makes
the poorest returns of any of our numerous pro-
ductions, and we would earnestly request data
on the shipment of cucumbers, strawberries, to-
matoes, pine-apples, etc.
Arrow Root-How to Cultivate, Etc.
We have already, in a previous number,
answered some of the questions of our esteemed
correspondent, J. R. W.," so we leave further
and fuller replies to some reader of THE Dis-


PATCH, who has raised and manufactured Ar-
row Root.
KINGSLEY, CLAY CO., FLA., April 21, '82.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
I have read the article from the Agricultu-
rist-copied into your paper of April 3d, and
entitled Our Starch Plants "-with much in-
terest, and would like to know more about
them, especially the Arrow Root-the real
Maranta Arundinacce. Will you please tell us
in your paper:
1. How to prepare the ground and seed, and
how and when to plant?
2. How to care for the growing crop, and
when to harvest ?
3. What to do with the roots, and how to do
it?
These questions may show unpardonable
ignorance, but if all your readers knew as
much as they suppose you do, what would be
the use of your publishing THE FLORIDA DIs-
PATCH-or, rather, of our buying it ?
To the foregoing questions, let me, also, add:
What kind of soil is best for Arrow Root?
Very truly, J. R. W.
The "Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Hali-
fax Railway"
Has recently passed into the hands of a new
Company, who, we are assured, possess ample
means to push the work to speedy completion.
We learn that recent surveys along the line
have developed the gratifying fact that the open-
ing of the Road will, probably, bring into mar-
ket and cultivation large bodies of excellent
land, and that the timber resources of the
broad strip of territory between St. John's
River and the ocean are very rich, varied and
almost exhaustless for many years to come.
This one item, in addition to heavy winter
travel, will furnish the road with a paying
business at the outset, and greatly benefit not
only the mills and merchants of Jacksonville,
but the large population which is sure to settle
along the line of the road and in the adjacent
country. It will give us great pleasure to
chronicle the further progress of this important
Road, and our final direct connection by rail
with the attractive Halifax and Indian River
country.
Since writing the foregoing, we find the fol-
lowing very encouraging railroad paragraphs
in the Daily Union:
Within the next few days, we are reliably in-
formed, about three hundred men will be put
to work on the Jacksonville, St. Augustine and
Halifax Railroad, and work will be vigorously
prosecuted from both ends. About fifteen miles
from this city has already been graded, and


yesterday afternoon.a number of men left for
Mandarin, from which place they will cross
over to the line of road and commence work.
Our informant also says that a new double-
ended ferry boat ninety feet long, to be used in
transferring cars over the river, is being built
North, and if the weather permits the road will
be ready for the rolling stock in November or
December.
THE JACKSONVILLE, TAMPA AND KEY
WEST ROAD.-We were informed yesterday by
a gentleman in a position to know, that work
on the Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West
Railroad would be commenced at this end in a
very short while and the road pushed forward
to completion as rapidly as possible. A large
force of men are at work on the Tampa end,
and about ten miles have been graded.
-What is a strand" of wood ? We see it
advertised in the Orange County Reporter.


I. .~ -







A Cheering Letter.
The following letter, from an old subscriber
and reader of TmHE DISPATCH, was accompa-
nied by a dingy and faded little number of the
paper in its early form; and while we feel a par-
donable pride in the enlarged, improved, and
very cheap journal we now furnish, and in the
many favorable opinions which it has elicited
from the people and the press, such testimony
encourages us to make greater exertions and to
go on hopefully and confidently in the future:
WAKULLA, FLA., May 15, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
You will find inclosed a number of your once
small, but valuable sheet, published in Live
Oak, May 8, 1876, at which time it was not no-
ticed much as an advertising medium ; and in it
a letter suggesting "that all commission mer-
chants should have their cards in it that we
might know where and to whom to ship our
vegetables." Soon, they found it to be the best
medium in the State as its circulation was very
great, and was welcomed by all who read it.
To-day, we find it enlarged to a sixteen-page
paper with the largest circulation of any paper
in the State of its age, and it is welcomed by all
farmers, and is sought for by every one to gain
reliable information, In fact, no paper in the
State is so complete as TIE FLOnIDA DISPATCH;
none more reliable and so full of information
that enlightens the farmer and assists him on
the road to prosperity.
Go to any town, village, or farmer's home,
and you will find THE DISPATCH on file for ref
ererence. Reference for what ? Anything that
a farmer wishes to know. It is to him as his
almanac. He looks to the latter for changes of
the moon, the days of the month, the sun, etc.,
and to the former (THIE DISPATCH) how to
farm; how to compost his manure; the best seed
to plant; to whom to ship his vegetables, and
which way, and how to pack them and to tell
the whole of how to do anything that will en-
able him to push through this life in ease, pros-
perity and comfort. Is not this all man cares
for ? And thousands now thank you for such a
prize as THE DISPATCH is.
The crops of this county are far better at this
season than for several years, and without dis-
aster, the greatest yield for years; a larger
acreage of corn oats, cane and potatoes than
ever before; less cotton, and I am sorry that
there is as much cotton even now, half as much
would have been better. But I predict that all
provisions will be very cheap this winter, and
so may it remain.
With my best wishes for you and your valu-
able and unequalled paper,
I am, yours, gratefully,
REVEILLE.

Proper Culture of the Peach.
Some portions of Florida seem admiraby
adapted to the Peach, and wherever the fine,


early varieties can be raised in perfection for
Northern markets, we have no fruit so profita-
able. We agree with the Fruit Recorder that
the peach tree is more sensitive to neglect and
retarded in growth when allowed to grow in
grass and weeds, as well as powerfully stimnu-
lated by good cultivation, than any other of our
common fruit trees. We have never seen a
successful orchard in grass unless subjected to
constant and heavy manuring. We observe a
recent statement by. Mr. C. Engle, of Paw Paw,
Michigan, that lie has an orchard eighteen years
old, bearing abundant crops of excellent peaches
through the influence of cultivation, He ploughs
it early every spring to a depth of five and six


.HE 111 E I L O 1 A I 7 I I


inches. In two weeks he passes a heavy har- thing new and wonderful. Yesterday we were
row both ways. Afterward a two-horse culti- shown by Mr. James H. Carradine a sample of
vator, set to run two inches deep, is passed over fibre and of rope constructed from it, which was
the ground from three to five times. This ends left with Mr. Carradine by Dr. Meux, of Car-
the season's cultivation. Mr. Engle thinks there roll Parish, La., which in our opinion is supe-
are more peaches of th'e best quality borne on rior to either jute or hemp. The history of the
these trees than on any equal number elsewhere production of this sample is this: An old ne-
in the State. In allusion to the recommended gro man in Carroll Parish being in need of
practice of sowing buckwheat in peach orchards, some rope which he was unable to procure, be-
instead of keeping it clean and mellow, Mr. En- gan to cast about for something which would
gle says he would as soon think of sowing buck- supply his want. His attention was directed
wheat among his corn to insure a heavier crop. to that well known and troublesome weed, the
The truth is, while the fariner knows that clean wild coffee plant. He cut the stalks and treated
culture is absolutely essential to success in his them in the same manner he had been accus-
r i a tomned to see hemp treated in Kentucky, and
common farm crops, many fail to apply the same the result was fibre of good length and of sur-
knowledge to their more expensive orchard. uprising strength, which the old man soon con-
Our long experience satisfies us that peaches verted into rope.
must not only be grown on ground that is kept The sample of fibre shown us was fully eight
feet in length and much softer and stronger
worked (but not too late in the season), but than Jute and can with ase be twisted into the
tat the ts be h d i is, t than Jute and can with ease be twisted into the
that the tops must be headed in-that is, the very best of rope. Thus we have a plant which
new growth cut half off in August. was a few years ago, and probably still is, con-
* sidered a plantation pest-a ifmaterial which, if
Young Animals-Their Care, Etc. cultivated and cared for, would supply all the
This is a fit topic for consideration. The rope and bagging used in the South.
young animals being weaned and deprived of -
their mother's milk-the most appropriate food How to Make the Best Butter.
for their growth and health-the art of man The question, which yields the best butter,
now comes into practice in place of natural in- sweet or sour cream, is thus spoken of by S.
stincts. The young animal must be fed and its Bliss, the Secretary of the Vermont Dairymen's
food chosen and apportioned for it. This should Association. "It seems to me that in this, as in
be done with propriety. If the food is not pre- most other cases, the old proverb, 'safety lies in
cisely right, no excess of quantity will make up a mihle course, is appropriate. at the
for the defect in that respect. In fact, excess aroma of butter, which goes very far to estab-
of quantity will be a serious error, although the lish it 6 selling value among the best class of
food should not be of the very best. We can- customers, is due to a certain amount of decom-
not here suggest what foods should be used, and position of some of the elements of the milk, I
can only give a hint or two as to the manner of think is established, beyond controversy. So far
feeding. This should be very cautiously done. as I can learn by most diligent inquiry, all of
A young animal is spoiled as soon as it becomes the sweet cream butters having keeping quali-
fat, for its food is turned from the production ties are madeby a process admirably calculated
to develop the acidity to a very considerable
of bone and muscle-which are needed-to the extent. They arechidirnety slowly, the butter
growth of fat, which is unnecessary and posi- granules are then separated from the milk by
tively unhealthful. The food should be given the use of seives-no water or brine being al-
in small quantities and often, and the ration in- lowed to come in contact with the butter at all.
creased gradually as it may be found to be dis- The conclusion which I have reached as the re-
posed of in a satisfactory manner. Water is of salt of a thorough investigation of the subject
the greatest necessity, and this should not only is that the cream process is only adapted to
be liberally supplied but it should be perfectly small establishments, where the more scrupu-
pure. Regularity in feeding is of the greatest lous care and the most unremitting effort may
iml)portance. Animals do not reason, but they be secured; but that on the other hand, the
remember their times of feeding; they fret and souring should not be permitted to go beyond
worry if the times pass without bringing the the first stages before the cream is churned. I
expected food, and this worry seriously affects do not believe sweet-cream butter-makingo will
them. Sheep and pigs are especially fretful if ever be popular or profitable in this country,
their usual time passes by, and a flock of sheep but I do believe that the nearer we can get to
thus worried through a whole winter will fail it without actually adopting .it the better will
to gain weight, although as well fed as another be the results.
that having been fed regularly may add twenty -
pounds a head to their carcasses.. The habits -Says the Orange County Reporter: '"A fine
and requirements of each animal should be display of fruits was placed on exhibition in our


watched, and a weak, timid thing that is driven sanctum a day or two ago by L. P. Westcott,
fi-om its food by belligerent and tyrannical who gives as careful and intelligent attention to
companions should be kept separate. The fruit culture as any man in this region. The
owner's eve should be everywhere and on the exhibit left with us consisted of ripe and green
continual watch to observe how his young stock oranges and blooms from a single tree; ripe
are progressing, and just now this is important, Florida limes and fi-esh blooms taken from one
because it is indispensable for their welfare that tree, and blooms and mature Tahiti limes from
they should begin the season strong, vigorous one tree. The sorts were all large and fine; but
and robust.-Irish Farmer's Gazette. the Tahiti limes were specially notable for their
S* -size and beauty. They were taken from a bud
Wild Coffee for Hemp I less than two years old."
The Natchez (Miss.) Democrat remarks that *.-0.
many latent resources of the South are yet to be -Mr. Willoughby Adams, residing two miles
developed, and if the discoveries of the next from Bay Street, has accomplished an agricul-
tural feat. He obtained some time ago fro,,,
quarter of a century could be suddenly flashed Syracuse, New York, a seed some time ago whiom
upon our sight, there are few of us who would he planted, and from which he has raised a
not be astonished. Every day produces some- full bushel of potatoes.-Jacksonville Times.


4D


THE FLSOIR IDiA ]DISPATCA i CH.


137






L~e rHE Pt~tatnA DISPATCHl


Crop Reports.
We desire crop reports from all parts of
Florida and the lover Soutlh'. A postal card,
closely written, will generally contain all' we
need from each locality, though we shall, of
course, be glad if our correspondents will, occa-
sionally, "let themselves out" at greater
length. As a sample of the sort of reports we
want, we append a few notices compiled by the
N. 0. Bulletin. Will our readers, everywhere,
let us hear from them ?
Some of the farmers are complaining for
the want of movie rain. The crop prospects in
this vicinity are pronounced better than usual
at this season.-iMontgomery Journal.
We need rain, and are beginning to fieed
it badly. Corn and cotton not yet up can not
come without rain, hence if it comes not soon
the crops will be very spotted in West Texas.
The genuine potato bug, the first of fhe North-
west, has put in its claim on the field of Mr.
Neill M. McKinnion.-Schulenberg Enterprise,
April 29.
The prospect. for a large crop of fruit was-
never better, it is early and the trees are very
full.- Wills Point Chronicle.
The various reports from the wheat crops
of the county are conflicting. Some say" it is a
failure, while others think there will be a plen-
tiful yield.-Alvarado Bulletin.
The crops generally, and especially the
wheat crop, were never more promising than at
present.-Bonham News.
We never saw better prospects for crops
than at present. Corn is knee-high, cotton up
and looking beautiful, and the whole is just as
clean as a marble floor, so to speak.-Kosse
News, April 29.
We learn that many farmers are replant-
ing their corn, owing to its coming up too
sparsely to insure a good crop. This trouble
is due to the fact, in some instances, that the
ground was not prepared in a farmlike manner
and in other cases the cold rains rotted it in the
ground.- Kaufman Sun, April 28.

Making Hay Without Sunshine.
Mr. R. Neilson, who occupies a farm on the
estate of the Earl of Derby, near Liverpool, it
appears, has solved the problem of making hay
when the sun does not shine. In a pamphlet
recently issued by the Field, Mr. Neilson tells
British farmers in particular and other farmers
in general how for years he has succeeded, in
spite of abnormally wet seasons, in harvesting
and storing his crops without material damage.
The method employed by Mr. Neilson, ac-
cording to this farmer's own account, consists
in utilizing the heat which is generated in damp
stacks in "curing" the produce. This is ac-


complished by forming in the middle of the
stack a hollow space, which communicates by
means of a damper arrangement with an air-
passage formed of earthenware pipes laid in the
ground beneath the stack and carried to a
point some little distance away. The outlet
here is closed by means of a revolving fan. A
series of stacks may be made to communicate
with the same air-passage, and the fan may be
worked by a horse or steam power,. according
to the amount of mechanical energy required.
The spontaneous heat of the. stack is tested
by means of a thermometer inserted in a tube
which penetrates a considerable distance into
the stack and when the combustion point is ap-


preached the fan is set to work. The air and
steam collected in the interior cavity and pass-
age and thus exhausted and cool air forces its
way through the stack on all sides to fill the
vacuum recesses, carrying with it from the
stack the superabundant moisture. The fan is
kept at work until the stack is sufficiently
cooled, aRid the operation is repeated until the
hay is thoroughly cured. The most difficult
part of the undertaking is to preserve an ap-
proximately equal degree of pressure through-
out the stack, otherwise the cool air will force
its way through the poirits of least resistance
and the denser portions of the stack will be
likely to become mouldy or charred;
As regards the quality of ihe foddef eutedi
according to the pamphlet in question, the hay
made in the shade is better thahi the sun-dried
hay. The appliances, it is said, involve little
outlay and the process is not protected by any
patent rights:
Anid yet, soinehow, we doubt if this new pro-
cess will ever become popular with- our Ameri-
can horny-handed sons of toil." There seems
to be a little ftoa much scietice ~' bout it for
the masses; but we have thought for many
years, that a long open shed, simply supported
on posts, with racks to sustain poles, running
in long aisles or passages through the building,
could be made to form a most convenient and
profitable addition to many of our Southern
farms and plantations. Such a shed would
solve the problem of curing, slowly with dry
air and in the shade, such difficult fodder crops
as cow-peas, millet, drilled corn-fodder, sweet
potato vines, &c., and as it need only consist of
a roof supported by strong, rough posts, and
covered with "split" or rivedd" pine
board," the cost and labor of constructing it
would be very trifling. A portion of such an
open, airy shed, when not used for drying for-
age, could be turned into an excellent place for
banking and storing sweet potatoes, sheltering
farm implements, and other uses which will
readily suggest themselves to our practical
readers.

Notes on Common Things.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
The season of showers has arrived at last,
and nature'puts on her best apparel. The trees
are robed in "living green." From the wild
spontaneous growth of the forest, to the care-
fully kept garden spot, all are grateful for the
refreshing rains, and show their gratitude by


putting on their brightest looks, and hastening
on to perfection. From my window I can see
the bright colors of the Indian bean; they send
up a leafless stalk like the lily, and from this
the flowers unfold with color of brightest car-
mine, which contrasts beautifully with the deep
green of its surroundings. I notice that most
the wild plants and vines, with which the
woods abound, have long tap roots which ac-
counts for their not being affected by the hot
sun or dry weather. The vine which runs on
our piazza came from the hammocks of Lake
George; it has a thick foliage and bears a lit-
tle black berry that grow in bunches. This
vine will not die out, for it has a tap root from
three to four feet long ; for this reason it will


stand the drouth. The leaves are not affected
by the frost, and only a severe freeze will cause
them to drop off. A yellow jessamine climbs
one end of the piazza that is never affected by
any Florida weather; the leaves are a never-
fading green, The bright yellow flowers are
fragrant and pretty; they are harmless to the
touch, but poisonous to the taste. Bees make
honey from them, and those eat it will feel the
effects of the poison, although I don't know as
it ever proves fatal in that way. Lemon grass
is very pretty and very useful when lemons are
scarce. It grows in large round bunches and
makes an excellent tea for fever; when cold,
will answer for lemonade. We steep the leaves
in the water where dried apples are to be
stewed, and it gives them a nice flavor. Oil
can be made from it by distilling, worth from
two to three dollars a pound. Florida is not
lacking in resources, and the past year has seen
many of them developed. The inhabitants are
greatly on the increase. They come to escape
the cold, the disease, and the famine. They
come to inhale the soft breezes, to taste the or-
ange and the banana, fresh from the trees on
which they grow. Here let me say those who
have eaten only such fruit as are found for sale
hundreds of miles from where it grew kfiow
nothing of the luxury of that which has been
allowed to ripen on the parent stem. Espe-
cially is this true of the banana. They who have
once tasted it in its perfection would have no
longing for the precarious ones which hang in
the fruit stores and have come to maturity
there. The banana is one of the most health-
ful and at the same time one of our most
luscious fruits; it ought to be raised more
abundantly. In this latitude (290,) it needs no
protection, and with a little care will yield a
great quantity of fruit.
It is nice to have a little Bermuda grass in
the front yard if nowhere else. It looks more
home-like than the clear sand; it can be con-
fined to a certain limit and is very easy keep-
ing it there as it spreads only on top of the
ground. The horse, cow and hens are all fond
of it, and will keep it down if allowed to feed
there for a short 'time now and then, so it will
not need mowing. It should be kept about two
feet from the plants and trees. This can be
done by hoeing around them once a month in
summer when the grass grows very rapidly. A
few acres in this grass would keep a cow the
year around, for while we can only pasture half
of the time at the North, we can pasture all the
time here. The pasture will grow better every
year, and on this grass the milk will be excel-
lent, both as regards quality and quantity, pro-
viding the cow is a good one.
There is nothing in Florida that can be
called dairy farming, and a great improvement
is needed in this direction. Bermuda grass
would bring this about, for it is an excellent
grass and it will grow in Florida. Plenty of
good milk and butter are very desirable things
to have, and with them at hand the question of


"how to live" would not be so hard to answer.
The question is often asked me by those who
would like to remove here for a permanent
home, but must have some way to live while
making a grove. I wish THE FLORIDA Dis-
PATCH was in the hands of every such inquirer.
They would soon feel satisfied that there was a
chance and an excellent one for all who are in-
dustrious and persevering, and that here is an
open door that is not likely to be soon shut.
NORTHERNER.
Maywood Farm, Altoona, Fla., May, '82.

NEW YORK, May 13, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
"City of Columbus" left Savannah, Wed-
nesday, May 10th, amd arrived at New York,
Friday, May 12th, at 7 o'clock a. m.


-- __


I I


m


m


now





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 13S


Knickerbocker Society.
The New York Sun, in a review of the Last
Days of Knickerbocker Life "-a recently pub-
lished work compiled by George W. Harlan,
from MSS. left by Abram C. Dayton, contain-
ing reminiscences of so-called life in New York
forty years ago, presents this pleasant and at-
tractive picture of the "good old times" before
the flash days of "shoddy" and "petroleum '':
Mr. Dayton tells us that when the population
of New York city did not exceed 200,000, soci-
ety proper was by no means so nicely differen-
tiated as at present. Active employment was a
necessity for all men, and sloth was a bar to re-
spectability, because it was really in most cases
incompatible with honesty. There were some
retired men, but only advanced age or chronic
infirmity could have forced them to abandon
active life. The trade or calling of every man
was known to his neighbors, for the mysterious
ways in which fortunes are now gained without
visible continuous labor had not been discov-
ered. The city could boast of a few capitalists
whose wealth was computed by hundreds of
thousands, but the whole possessions of a man
reputed rich would scarcely equal the
amount which thousands now annually expend
in a sumptuous mode of living. The more emi-
nent representatives of the Church, the bar, and
medicine were regarded with a certain special
deference, but even these did not assume to con-
stitute an exclusive coterie. The merchant came
next, but the dividing line between store and
shop was not so clearly drawn as it is now, nor
was the status of the employer so sharply dis-
tinguished from that of the employee, the latter
being not unfrequently an inmate and always
a welcome guest at the former's home. A fixed
abode and a consistent unvarying mode of liv-
ing entered largely into the Knickerbocker no-
tion of social dignity, and people looked with
distrust on those who did not own the houses
they lived in, or whose dwellings were mort-
gaged, deeming them to possess no adequate
foundation for respectability.
Parties, even among the most affluent, were
not of frequent occurrence, and stated reception
days or evenings were not needed, since visiting
had not become ceremonial. The invitation to
spend the evening was, however, a near ap-
proach to what would now be called a party.
The routine of diversion comprised a dance-
which was always the solemn cotillion, for the
waltz or any round dance was considered un-
chaste, even on the stage-a song or two, "Gaily
the Troubadour," being an especial favorite-
conversation, turning on such topics as the last
dramatic sensation in the novels of G. P. R.
James-and finally the "handing around of re-
freshments," which was a trying ordeal for a diffi-
dent young man. There was, it seems, a marked
difference between an invitation "to take tea,"
and one to "spend the evening." Both, indeed,
signified that you should come early and not
stay late; that is come about 7 and leave about
10. Neither involved the necessity of full dress,


though the swallowtail was so commonly worn
that frock coats were the exception, even for
business. But tea was an en famille entertain-
ment, which, by contrast, was informal and agree-
able. On the highly polished mahogany table
were set out the highly burnished family silver
urn and tea service, surrounded by shining
white and gilt cups and saucers. A basket of
silver filigree work was heaped with dainty cakes;
cut-glass dishes filled with sweetmeats were
flanked by short-cake, biscuit, toast, dried beef,
tongue and cheese, all "fixed" in geometrical
order.
Mr. Dayton assures us that there has been a
vast deal of exaggeration by the landatores tem-
poris acti touching the luxurious mode of living
among the old New Yorkers of Hollander lin-
eage. He cannot, of course, pretend to say that
some of the legends relating to the Dutch mag-


nates of colonial times, may not be well founded,
but he does not hesitate to aver that there was
no trace of such lordly doings in the primitive
and thrifty ways of their Knickerbocker de-
scendants in the fourth decade of this century.
There were, indeed, a few gentlemen of Dutch
ancestry who prided themselves upon their din-
ners-good livers, who had cooks that under-
stood how many turns of the spit were required
to present a canvas-back duck or partridge in
perfection, and who had educated their tastes to
a nice point in sherries, ports and madeiras.
But, on the whole, Knickerbocker life was too
sober and too uniform to admit of elaborate din-
ner parties, and, indeed, there was little room
for enjoyment in a noon repast which had to be
hurried through to enable the participants to
return to the drudgery of daily toil. To be sure,
an invitation to dinner was not a rare occur-
rence, but it merely signified that the guest was
welcome to partake of an abundant but simple
meal, served, in nine cases out of ten, without
the slightest attempt at ostentation. The meal
usually consisted of one course-meats, poultry,
vegetables, pies, sweetmeats, and fruits, viz:
Newtown pippins, almonds and raisins, being
crowded together upon the board.

FEEDING Cows.-The Live Stock Journal, in
regard to feeding cows, well says: There is
less excuse for feeding a good milch cow stingily
than any other farm animal. She does not ask
any credit; she makes prompt daily payment;
and her product is a cash article. If he has
not the food at hand, prudence and good judg-
ment, as well as humanity, require him to
furnish her full rations at all times, without re-
gard to a favorable or unfavorable season. We
always counsel dairymen to make an earnest
effort to produce all the food for their herds
upon their own farms; but the first principle
of profitable dairying requires that they give
abundant food to keep up an even flow of milk,
whether they produce or purchase the food.

A WORD FOR JOHN CHINAMAN."-First,
the points in favor of the Chinese are these :
They are quick, strong, sprightly, enduring,
accurate and faithful. In both heavy work
and light, in field work and as operatives and
artisans they betray their good qualities, which
are without number, and which cannot be too
highly praised. They are sharp and quick in
intellectual faculties, apt and sure in learning,
fully the equals of other races mentally and ex-
hibiting great breadth of culture in the higher
classes. They are polite, adroit, shrewd, cir-
cumspect, adaptable and resourceful. They
give honest and good work for small pay, and
are satisfied and happy.-N. 0. Picayune.

IMPORTING ORANGES!-The Jacksonville
Times, of the 12th inst., says: "It certainly
does not look as if the orange business was be-
ing greatly over done. Eben Bean, the West
End commission merchant, has just received
from New York three large crates of Messina


oranges for our retail trade. This may seem
like carrying coals to Newcastle, but it is safe to
predict that the oranges will be sold. Until
Florida ceases to import oranges from the Med-
iterranean for her home consumption it will be
safe to continue the planting of new groves."

--The estimated total length of all the sub-
marine telegraph cables in the world is 62,100
miles, and their money value is computed at
$200,000,000. According to the estimates of a
French statistician, the total length of all the tel-
egraph wires at present laid is sufficient to reach
forty-six times around the world.

-Fruit trees, grape vines and bushes should
have no place in a vegetable garden, as they
draw nourishment from the soil, while their
branches cast a damaging shade. Garden vege-
tables require plenty of soil for their own use.


Agricultural, Horticultttural and Pontoloqical
Associations.
Florida Fruit-Growers' Association-Office at Jack-
sonville-D. Redmond, President; W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; W. H. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding Sec-
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee-Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, 0. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official organ-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA STATE GRANGE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICES.-Master, Win. H. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Win. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B. F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Field-
ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. H. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate
Keeper,--Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Winm. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T. W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H.
Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Geo. TW. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Umstead, Hous-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville.-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J. C. Greeley, Treasurer.
Directors-J. H. McGinniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro, P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney. Annual meeting-
Last Friday in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; 0. E. Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. 0. Taylor, Secretary and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Florida.-President, A. B. Bartlett, Georgetown; Vice-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. Hawkins, Lake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George; George W. Thorn, Treasurer,
Treorgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
mond, Fort Gates.
Picolata Agricultural and Horticultural Society.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, W. N. ParKer, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Corresponding Secretary,
N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., Recording Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer. Meets first Saturday in each month.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. Mathers, Second Vice-President; B.
W. Powell, Corresponding Secretary; B. F. Jordan, Sec-
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical Fruit Growers' Association of Monroe County,
Florida.-Home office, Myers, Florida; F. A. Hendry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson,
President; Thomas Tillis, First Vice-President; J. B.
Sutton, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary; J. M. Barco, Recording Secretary;
L. W. Hamlin, Assistant Recording Secretary.
Florida Agricultural and hMechanical Association.-
John Bradford, President, Bradfordville, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida.
Pinellas, Florida, Fruit Growers' Association.-D. W.
Meeker, President; Wm. P. Neeld, Secretary.
Bronson Agricultural Union, Bronson, Florida.-Jo-
seph Hirst, President; L. W. Hamlin, Secretary; semi-
monthly meetings, first and third Saturdays.
Central Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida.-Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
Evergreen Horticultural Society, Dunedin, Florida.-
J. W. Matchctt, President; W. Tate, Vice-President;
Geo. L. Jones, Secretary.
Decatur County Fair Association, Bainbridge, Geor-
gia.-Maston ONeil, President: I. Kwilecki, Secretary.
Lake XVier Agricultural and Pomological Society (of
Marion County, Florida).-Captain J. L. Cainy, Presi-
dent; Dr. L. M. Ayer, Corresponding Secretary.
Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Higgins, Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Association, Albany,
Georgia.-L. E. Welch, President; T. M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
Sumter County Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation.-D. L. Hubbard, President, Leesburg; W. C.
Dodd, Recording Secretary, Leesburg; A. P. Roberts,
Corresponding Secretary, Leesburg.
Florida Central Agricultural Society.-Thos. F. King,
President Gainesville; -, Secretary, ---
; K. Cessna, Corresponding Secretary, Gaines-
ville.


Archer Agricultural Association.-J. W. Williams,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine, Secretary ; I. C. Neal,
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President; John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewis, Treasurer, Tallahaissee.
Indian River Agricultural and Pomological Society.-
A. P. Cleveland, President; W. H. Sharp, Secretary,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
Association.-R. J. Mays, President; Frank W. Pope,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
Orange County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred. L. Robertson, Corresponding
Secretary.
Albion Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Associa-
tion.-Joseph Hirst, President; S. Frei, Secretary. Semi-
monthly meetings first and third Mondays.
Gadsden County Fair Association.-Jesse Wood, Pres-
ident; W. H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R. Harris,
Second Vice-President; J. W. Kendricks, Secretary; E.
C. Lou, Treasurer.
South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion, Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
which we may have fallen in the naming of officers, &c.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH ?]


I ` -





~PT14RPLO kIP)A I )1t1A12I


Hints to Beginners with Bees.
A correspondent of the Prairie Farmer gives
this advice to beginners:
Spring is undoubtedly the best time to start
an apiary. The danger of loss in wintering is
past, and bees have little brood and honey, so
that they can be moved easily and safely. A
person unacquainted with bees should beware
of purchasing a pig in a poke," as every hive
containing comb and bees may not be a perfect
colony. We may infer that a colony is all
right if during the early spring months the
hive is full of bees, as such a colony must con-
tain a young, vigorous queen. It is a poor,
policy for a beginner to purchase black bees in
boxes and gums, intending to transfer and Ital-
ianize. Such work as this barely pays in the
skillful hands of veterans, and had better not
be undertaken by novices. A better plan
would be to select the hive of a desired pattern
for the whole apiary, as the profit and pleasure
derived from it consists, in a large degree, in
having every part of each hive exactly alike.
The life of many a colony of bees is saved by
giving it a frame of brood or honey from a
more prosperous one, and this could not be
done if the frames and hives were not alike.
If a person is not able to secure a strong colony
in the hive preferred, then a new hive of the
desired pattern might be taken to a bee-keeper,
and a first swarm put into it.
Bee-keeping is a science, and not acquired in
one day, by talking with a person who knows
all about bees." Therefore, to insure success
commence slowly with not Wore than two col-
onies, and let your knowledge increase in like
ratio to your bees. If you can make money
with these, it will be safe for you to invest in
more. It is absurd to suppose that a person
who knows nothing about bees, except that
they sting and gather honey, could manage a
large apiary successfully.

Three Important Things.
Three important things on the farm return-
ing most profit on capital invested; three
things affording most gratification to a cultivated
taste, while uniting pleasure with profit; three
things requiring a high degree of intelligence,
care and gentleness in their management, are
sheep, bees and fowls.
The family raised to care for and attend
those three things will acquire a degree of re-
finement foreign to a large majority of those
deprived of their educating influences. They
will grow up wiser, more intelligent, more re-
fined and in every way better men and women.
For these reasons the three industries named
in the beginning of this article should be a part


of the system of every farm. There is an im-
portant blank remaining unfilled where these
are wanting.
The farmer's family that plod in plowed
ground all their lives, with no more elevating
employment, are apt to grow up boorish, coarse
and clownish in' manners, tastes and character.
But those brought up to devote a part of their
time to the care of sheep, bees and fowls, will
acquire gentleness in manners, careful habits
and keenness of observation.
It is the every day business of life that truly
educates, and farmers that place the welfare of
their children above all else, will see to it that
no branch of industry be neglected which in
any way belongs to farm life, that can be in-
troduced without incurring loss, which tends to
expand the moral and intellectual growth of
his children.


The man who lets his sheep run at large, at
the mercy of every prowling cur, his fobwls
scratch for their living and roost on the fence,
and his bees live in hollowed logs and rude
boxes in a state of native wildness, is in no
sense caring for them. That man needs some
one to take charge of and teach him how to
live. He is in a state of nature himself. But
if his flock is hurdled or yarded at night, and
constantly improved in the breeding; his fowls
housed and fed with the care required to keep
them in the best condition; and his bees kept
in moveable frames and managed with the light
and knowledge which modern apiarians have
brought to their aid in the business, the work
will prove a moral, social and business educa-
tor to all who pursue it.
Old, slovenly nm dles, benighted in ignorance,
must be abandoned, and the lights of modern
discoveries brought to the farmer's aid.-
Farmers' A dviser.



Jacksonville Wholewsale Prices.
Corrected weekly, by J.ONES & BO WEN, Wholesale and
Retail grocerss, Jacksonville, Fla.
SUGARS-Granulated ...................................... 11
W hite Ex. C.................................... .. 10Y1
Golden C ......................................... 89
Pow dered............................................ 11
Cut Loaf........ ................................
COFFEE, Rio-Fair ............. ....................... 11
G ood ............................................. 11
Choice .......................................... 121
B est .............................................. 132
Java 0. G ........... .............................. 25
M ocha ................... ......... .................. 35
Peaberry ................................................ 18
M aracaibo............................................ 18
Any of above grades roasted to order.
FLOUR-Snow Drop, best.................................. 9 50
Oreole, 2d best........ ......................... 8 50
Pearl, 3d best....................................... 8 25
M EATS-Bacon..... ........................................ 11 2@12
Hams (Merwin & Sons).................... 15
Shoulders....................:........................ 11%
HoMINY-Pearl, per bbl.................................. 5 40
M EAL- per bbl................................................ 5 40
LARD-Refined in pails........................................ 131 4
BUTTER-Very best, kegs................................ 31
CHEESE-Full cream................................ 15
H alf cream ........................................ 13%
ToBAcco-Shell Road......................................... 55@56
Florida Boys, 11 inch 5's.................. 40
Florida Girls, bright.'twist, 14 to lb.. 50
Smoking in packages, 8 to lb........... 45
SOAP AND STARCH-Colgate's 8 oz., per box... 3 50
Peerless, 8 oz., per box....................... 3 50
Starch, lump, per lb...... ........ ................ 5 @6c
HOPS, YEAST (CAKES, BAKING POWDERS-
H ops, per lb)............................................... 15@ 22c
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz .......... 60c
Grant's 3-Dine Baking Powder, per
doz. 1 lb...... '2........... ............. 2 25
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. ilb. 2 25
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. 1 lb..... 2 70
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. lb...... 1 50
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl.................................... 3 25
CHICKENS, each................................................... 25@ 45
EGGs-Per doz.... ........................... 20
HIDES-D)ry Flint Cow Hides, per lb., first class 13
Country Dry Salted, per lb..................9.. ll
Butcher Dry Salted, per lb.................... (a 10
Dam aged Hides................. .................... 6
Kip and Calf, 81ts. and under................ 10
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb....... .................. 35
Deer Skins Salted, per lb.................... 26@30
FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter..................................................... 1 50@ 4 00
R accoon, each ........................................ 5 15
W ild Cat, each....................................... 1(0 2'
Fox, each ............................................. 5('15
BEESWAX-per tb.............................................. 20
WOOL-Free from burs, per lb.......................... 17@22
Burry, per lb......................................... lI,, 15
GOAT SKINS-Each per lb............................. 10
Bacon a(1vancing rapidly-buyers will do well to
make their purchasesnow.


AT MANDARIN, FLORIDA.
20 FORTY-ACRE TRACTS, only 12 miles from Jack-
sonville; extra good land, well located, between river
and J., St. A. and H. R. R. R. Price, s10 per acre. Will
sell on monthly payments of $12.50. These lands will in-
crease in value, being located in an already prosperous
town, making a paying investment at small outlay.
Maps can be seen at No. 41 East Bay Street.
to nov 21, '82. CGEO. R. REYNOLDS.
[4-347'.]
I>Totice for P1ia"blicatioln..

LAND OFFICE AT GAINESVILLE, FLA., May 3, 1882.
OTICE is hereby given that the following named
settler has filed notice of his intention to make final
proof in support of his claim, and that said proof
will be made before T. E. Buckman, Clerk Circuit Court
at Jacksonville, Florida, on Saturday, June 24th, 1882,
viz.: Jacob Robinson, Duval County, homestead entry
No. 561, for the Nw 4 of Nw 4, section 6, township 3s,
range 27e.
He names the following witnesses to prove his con-
tinuous residence upon, and cultivation of, said land,
viz.: Calvin Hughes, Samuel Anderson, Andrew Sess-
ions, Lee Clark, all of Jacksonville, Florida.
L. A. BARNES,
May 8 tf Register United States Land Office.


-_ :7" S..A.,E.
Half interest in my homestead of 120 acres, in heart
of the thriving settlement of Altamonte, Orange County,
Florida. Oranges, Lemons, Limes, Figs, Plums, Grapes,
in bearing. Seven hundred and fifty orange trees in
grove-fifty in bearing. Address
DR. VW. KIILMIER,

Altamonte, Orange Co., Fla.

VIEWS OF FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In Book Form, Containing 1P2
Views Each.
Souvenir of Florida, (small size)....................25c.
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size)......... ............................ ............ .25c.
Souvenir of Jacksonville,( large size)..................50c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine,(large size)...............50c.
Stereoscopic Views, per Doz. $1.50.
Address

ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
J AC KSO 0 N VILL E, 1LA.


HUAU &CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF
FINE KIEY WEST CIGAIS
-AND-

WHOLESALE LEAF (EALEIS.


Proprietors of Factories Nos. 29, 61 and 81, District
of Florida,
Jacksonville, -lorida,
The Most Extensive Manufacturers in the State.
lyr to april 23, '83.

WINT-ER PAR County, Florida, eighteen
miles south of Sanford, on the South Florida Railroad,
with a frontage of two miles upon three beautiful Lakes.
WINTER HOMES in the midst of Orange Groves, for
Northerners, is the main .idea. For Pamphlets and
Maps giving particulars, address
CHAPMAN & CHASE,,
touly 17,82 aitland, Orange Co., Fla.
to july 17, '82

THE

DAILY TI1 ES.




THE TIMES is the official paper of the city and the
leading paper of the State. It has the largest circulation
in Florida, and reaches all parts of it. It is not merely
local newspaper, but aims to advocate the interests
and promote the prosperity of Florida as a whole.
Its reputation outside the State is very high. It has
taken rank among those journals whose columns are
looked to for news, and whose comments are quoted
with respect throughout the country.
Its editors have had wide and varied experience in
journalism North as well as South ; its advertising pa-
tronage is liberal and of the best character; and its re-
sources, financial and other, are ample. It will furnish
Florida with a live, progressive, outspoken, and reada-
ble tu,.,v-;,qr, the peer of any.
ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.
THE TIMES has secured by special contract the full
despatches of the ASSOCIATE]) PRESS. Besides that
its Editor is Agent of the Associated Press for the State '
of Florida, which gives him great advantages in obtain-
ing the freshest and most important State news.


SPECIAL DESPATCHES.
With representatives in the leading news centres of
the country, THiE TIMES is well served in addition to
the regular Press reports. During the past winter it has
received a very large number of telegraphic specials."
CORRESPONDENCE.
Its regular correspondence from Washington, New
York and Boston, is of noteworthy excellence; and its
State correspondence has attracted much attention.
This feature will be extended and improved; and to
this end correspondence containing news or items of
information of any kind is solicited from all quarters.

"OLD SI."
In addition to his editorial work, Mr. Small will write
regularly for THIE TIMES, and in its Sunday issues the
famous "Old Si" will disseminate wisdom in chunks
to the Florida public.
TERM (strictly in advance): One year, $10; Six
months, S5; three months, $2.50; one month, $1. sent
one month on trial for 50 cents.
Remittance should be made by draft or post-office
order, or in a registered letter. Address
JONES & SMALL,
to sept 26,'82 Jacksonville, Fla.





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 3


Sportman's Emporium.





W. C. PITTMAN,
INo. 3 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0-
Guns, Pistols, fRifles and Cutlery,
Shooting alnd t Fishing L' Tackle.

SHELLS LOADED TO ORDER.
1 yr to April 2:1, '83


DEALER IN
PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,
GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, OOPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emery Papers, &e.
AGENT FOR
PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIRE TEST.
Johnson's Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, lffartinez and Longmans'8
Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
to mar25,N8, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

D. G. AMBLER. J. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as
AMBLER'S BANK.
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS..
Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents- Importr.s & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New'
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf



Soluble Ground Bone,
THE BEST AND CHEAPEST


FnRTLbImER FOR ORANGE TBRH,
Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.


Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTER & BEAN,
Agents for the State of Florida.


AW-Analysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


to sept 26, '82


GULF NURSERY
Has thirty thousand three and four year old orange
trees prepared for summer setting. Send in your
orders.


to May 31 '82. DUNEDIN, FLORIDA.


W. L. DAVIDS,


Broker and Commission Merchant,


Oysters, Frills ail Yogotailes an general Grocors Snmilis,

P. 0. Box 862.] Jacksonville, Florida.

:0 M 27 0 ,r 10*I 7.

No. 3. No. 4. No. 5.'
(. OCAP'ITY. ounceSto 1 ounce to 1 ounce to
11 lbs. 22 lbs. 5V lbs.

Tin Scoop, Brass O'ean ........... $ 12 00 $ 13 00 11 t00
Orass a........... 1275 14M00 15 )
G BITs, (sonWde 1 :17,0 16 16 00
Nickel Plated Scoop and Beam........... 14 75 16 50 17 50

Ocean Steamship -Company.


SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.




The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
GATE CITY, Wednesday, May 3d, 6:30 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, May 6th, 8:30 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, May 10th, 12:00 noon.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, May 13th, 3:00 p. in.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, May 17th, 6:30 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, May 20th, 8:30 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, May 24th, 12:00 noon.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, May 27th, 2:00 p. m.
GATE CITY, Saturday. May 31st, 5:30 a. m.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
HI. YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agent of Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS,
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. Y.
F. S. CONE, A. H. MANVILLE, E. A. MANVILLE,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer

Lake George, .jFlorida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums
Peaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, and over one hundred varieties of the Citrus.
OIA.NGIEB ANID LEEM 3ON TIBREBES a specialty.
Catalogue free. to apr 17, '83

B THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

-o-0

GOULD & CO.'S


FERTILIZER
-AND-


Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange Growers and Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, con-
tains potash, lime, pliospiri< acil, ammonia and the other essential elements of Plant Food, making a cons
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & Bro.'s, and other high-priced Fertilizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity, and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $1 per barrel, $32 per
ton.
All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.


MESSRS. GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-I used one-half ton of your. Fertilizer, in connection with the same amount of Baker & Bro.'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gave as good results as the others, which are much higher priced fertilizers-costing
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $51.50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12, 1881.
LEESBURG, SUMTER CO., FLA., March 6, 1882.
GOULD & Co.:
Genlrem,n--Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed your
agents at this point (Messrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer,
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its fostering care, I having had the honor
to win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer better and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer kills two birds with one stone," inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies,
at one and the same time. I bave been testing it in the field, garden and orange grove for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues, whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For my part, I ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. if I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork.
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOURT.
GOULD & CO.,
to aug 27, '82 NO. 6 W. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


--










BALTIMORE EXPRESS


MERCHANTS & MINERS


TRANSPORTATION COMPANY!







The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail
From BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH
EVERY FIVE DAYS,
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE, as follows:
Tuesday, May 2d, at 5 p. m.
Saturday, May 6th, at 10 a. min.
Thursday, May llth, at I p. inm.
Tuesday, May 16th, at 5 p. inm.
Monday, May 22d, at 11 a. inm.
SatuIrday, May 27tih, at 2 p. m.
Thursday, June 1st, at 5 p. inm.
Tuesday, Juiie 6th, at, 11 a. m.
Monday, June 12th, at 3 p. m.
Saturday. June 17th, at 8:30 a. inm.
Thursday, June 22d, at 11 a. im.
Tuesday, June 27th, at 3 p. m.
Monday, July 3d, at9 a. in.
The steanmers are first-class in every respect, and every
attention will be given to passengers.
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $15,
Including Meals and Stateroom.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and( Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Baltimore.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
wi lli receive careful handling and quickd(lispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
.col um n.
JAS. B. WEST & CO., Aaents.
Savannah, January 8th, 1878. 30-tf

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA




WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26 1882,
Passenger Trains will run over the Waycross Short
Line as follows;


Fast Mail.
Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at....... ...... 9:00 a. m.
Arrive Jacksonville at............... 5:40 p. m.
Leave Callahan at........................ 9:44 a. m;
Arrive Waycross at......................11:57 a. m.
Arrive Jesup at......................... 1:40 p. m.
Arrive at Brunswick at............. 6:00 p. m.
Arrive Savannah at.............. 3:40 p. m.
ArriveCharleston.at....... ........... 9:10 p, m.
Arrive at Augusta at......... ....... 5:20 a. rn.
Arrive Macon at.............................. 7:50 p. nm.
Arrive Atlanta at.......................... 3:50 a. m.
A rrive Louisville at........... ......................
Arrive CincinnatD at......................................
Arrive Washington at...... .... 9:30 p. inm.
Arrive Baltimore at....................12:25 p. m.
Arrive New York (limited express)....
Arrive New York P. R. I............ 6:45 a. m.
A arrive St. Louis at.......... ....... .... ..........
Arrive Chicago at.............................
TIME.
To Savannah.................................................
To New York.............. ............
To W ashington.............................................
T o C hicago.....................................................
To St. Louis....................................... ..


Jack'lle Ex.
Daily.
5:40 p. m.
8:15 a. m.
6:45 p. m.
9:15 p. nm.
11:25 p. m.
5:30 a. m.
2:35 a. m.
9:05 a. in.
1:30 p. m.
7:00 a. m.
12:50 p. m.
8:00 a. m.
7:00 a. in.
9:10 a. m.
12:05 a. m.
3:50 p. rn,
5:20 p. in
7:00 p m
7:00 p. mn
6:40 hours.
45:45 hours.
36:30 hours.
49:00 hours.
49:00 hours.


THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
-.Jacksonville to Savannah.
4GJ-Jacksonville to Louisville.
u_-Jacksonville to Washington.
r.T Jacksonville to Cincinnati.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
Passengei staking Savannah sleeper can remain in the
car until 7 o'clock a. m.
Parlor and Drawing-Room Car on morning train
from Jacksonville through to Savannah, connecting
daily with through Pullman sleeper for New York.
TheI Dining Car attached to the train between Savan-
nah and Charleston altords supper to passengers going
North, and breakfast to those coming South.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to Montgoniery and New Orleans
take the evening train.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Uak, leaving
2 p. m. and arriving at Savannah at 2:35 a. rn., or train
at Jacksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vannah at 3:40 p. m.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, at Depot Ticket
Office. J. E. DRAYTON,
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*] Ticket Agent.


Through Tariff on Vegetables Only.

VIA THE


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE.

ALL-RAIL VIA ATLANTA OR MONTGOMERY.
IN EFFECT MARCH 15, 1882.



FROM C t
JACKSONVILLE, CALLAHAN JUNCTION, LIVE OAK AND STATIONS S., F. & W. R'Y.
TO j 0


M aco n .............................. ... ......................... ................................................ ......................... .................. 25 50 $50 00
A ugusta ................................................... .........................................................................................................30 60 60 00
A tlan ta ..................................................................................................................... .. ......................................... 35 70 70 00
C olum bus, G al ... ........................................................................................................................................ ...... 635 7 70 00
M on tgomn ery, A la..................................................... ............................................. .......... ....................... 35' 70 11 70 00
M obile .......... ...................................40 80 80................................00.............................................................................. 00
Chattanooga, Tenn.................. ................................................................................................................ 40 80 80 00
Knoxville, Tenn................... ..... ...................................................45 90 90 00
N ew O rleans ........................................................................................................................ ....... .... ........... 45.. 5 90 90 00
N ash ville, Tenn.......... ....... .. ..... ....................................................................................................... .................45 90 90 90
M em ph is, Tenn ...................................................................................................................... ............................ 45 90 90 00
L ou isv ille, K y........................................................................................................................................................ 55 1 00 100 00
Cincin nati, O h io ................................................................... ............................................................................ 55 1 00 100 00
H en person K y....................................................................................................................................................... 55 1 00 100 00
Colu m bus, K y ................................................................................................................................................... 55 1 00 100 00
Hickman, Ky.... .. ................. ..... 55701 00 100 00
Madison, nd.. ............ ............................................................60 110 110 00
Jeftickmaerso nville, InKy d.. .................... ................................................................................. ........................................ 65 t 10 100 00
E va nsvi lleso n Ind .............................................. ................................................... ...................................................... 16 0 110 00
JeCailersonville, Ind................................................................................................................................................. 60 1 10 110 00
Indian apsv olle, Inds........ ............. ................................................................................ ....................... 60 1 10 110 00
Teair o, lau...... ..........................................t...................................................... ......................................... ......... 601 1 0 110 00
Ind ianapolis .............................................. ......... ............................... ..................... ............... ... ........... 6511 10 115 00
Sterre H au teis ...... ................. .................................................. ........................................................................ 60 1 11 00
Co ... O. io.... ............................................................................. ................. ...........651 15 115 00
C h icago ...................................................................................................... .............. ............................................ 65 1 151115 00
Peoria Ill............................................................................................................................................................. 65 1 15 115 00
C leveland ................................................................................................................................................. ......... 70 1 20 120 00
T o ledo .......................................................................... ........................................................ ................................. ;7011 20 120 00
D)etroit....................................................................................... ......................................................................... 270 1 20 120 00


TO SAVANNAH. TO CHARLESTON.
FROM --I -- --- --
SPer Box.I Per Bbl. Per Box. \ Per Bbl.
Jacksonville............................................................................................ 20 40 | .25 50
landings on St. Johns R iver............................................................................... 30 50 35 70
Stationson Florida Transit R. R............................................................. 30 50 i 5Z 65
Tam pa and M anatee................................................................................. 45 75 50 90
Stations on the J. P. & M R. R.............................................................. 30 50 5
Stations on S., F. & W Railway .......................................................... 25 50 35 75

The dimensions of the Standard Box for Vegetables are 8x14x22 inches, and the weight is estimated at 50
pound.s.
The Standard Barrel is double the capacity of the Standard Box.
Excess of capacity over the above will be liable to pro rata excess of charges.
The Car-load is estimated at 20,000 pounds. Excess of this amount will be charged for pro rata. Car-load
shipments must be to one destination and to one consignee.
Prepayment of Ireight will not be required, but good order and condition of shipments will be an absolute
requirement. It is clearly understood between the shippers and the transportation companies that no respon-
sibility shall attach for loss or damage, however occasioned, unless it be from gross negligence, and that such loss
must attach solely to the company upon whose line such gross negligence may be located.
The above points are the only points to which rates are guaranteed, and to which Bills Lading will be issued.
The Bills Lading will be issued only by the Agents of this Company, guaranteeing rates from those points only.
The charges advanced by this Line in good faith to connections at. those points will net be subject to correc-
tion by this Line.
Unless otherwise instructed by the shippers, the original Bill Lading will be mailed the consigee at desti-
nation, and all claims for overcharge or loss and damage must be presented at destination, accompanied by the
original Bill Lading.
Shipments of single packages charged double rates.
In every case the full name and address of consignee must be given for insertion in Bill Lading and on the
Way-bill.
Where the route by which shippers desire their packages forwarded is not marked on the packages them-
selves, the "Florida Dispatch Line" will forward same by the route by which the best interest of the shipper
will be served.


RATES VIA FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE AND THE ATLANTIC COAST LINE.


DESTINATION.


Baltimore, Md...............................
Philadelphia, Pa..........................
Roston, Mass... .......................
New York, N. Y........ ....... ...


From land-! Fla. Transit & From Stations. From Stations
ings on St.; Jacksonville. Peninsulars on J., P. & on S., F. &
Johns River. Railroads. M. R. R. W. Railway.


1 -0

.1 6 $1 27 50 $1 06 63 $1 21 3 [1 21 53 $1 05
. 64 1 27 53 1 06 63 $1 2172 63 1 21 53 1 05
. 71 1 43 CO 1 22 70 1 37 70 1 37 60 1 22
. 61 123 50 1 02 60 1 171 60 1 17 50 1 02


To make through rates from Tampa and Manatee, add for boxes 15c., and for barrels 25c. to rates from
Florida Transit Rrailroad. Single packages will be charged $1 each.

To make through rates from points tributary to the St. Johns River and Florida Transit Railroad, add the
rates for transportation lines connecting to above rates.
Stencils, shipping receipts and information furnished on application to any of the agents of the Line.

Fruit and Vegetable Shipments Through in Ventilated Cars.

Between Jacksonville and Savannah daily. TRANSFER TO SHIPS' SIDE AT SAVANNAH WITHOUT
BREAKING BULK.
Rates always as LOW AS BY ANY OTHER LINE. Take out Bills Lading via Savannah, Florida and West-
ern Railway to insure ADVANTAGES OF THF ALL-RAIL ROUTE.
Days of sailing subject to change without previous notice. For further information, if needed apply to
GEO. YONGE, Agent Central Railroad Steamships, 409 Broadway, New York. Gen. W. L, JAMES, Agent,
25 South Third St., Philadelphia. A. L. HUGGINS, Agent Merchants' and Miners' Line, Baltimore. WM. H.
RING, Agent Boston and Savannah Steamship Line, 18T Wharf, Boston. 0. G. PEARSON, Agent S., F. & W.
Railway, 219 Washington St., Boston. C. D OWENS, General Agent S., F. & W. Railway, 315 Broadway, New
York. J. B. ANDREWS, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, 43 German St., Baltimore. J. M. CLEMENT, Agent S., F.
& W. Railway, Pier 41 South Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, or to either of the undersigned.
W. 0. AMES, General Freight Agent, Jacksonville.
F. B. PAPY, General Freight Agent, Fernandina, Fla.
JAS. L. TAYLOR, General Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.
D. H. ELLIOTT, General Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent, Jacksonville, Fla.


-TH P ht k b -9 A.T 14


I






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH


:7


TO


From
Jacksonville.
& S.F & W.Sta.

0 <1 -
i^ Ao


From Land-
ings on St.
Johns River.


rA


From Florida
Transit R. R.


0
a
p4


-C
A^
a
P4l


From Tampa
and Manatee.


a a
p4^ p4


From J.,. P. &
M. R. R.


-A
e> <3.


Philadelphia.................................... 53 $1 05 58 $1 10 58 $1 10 73 $1 35 58 $110
Providence....................................... 55 1 05 60 1 10 60 1 10 75 1 35 60 110
W ashington........:.......................... 52 1 05 57 1 10 57 1 10 72 1 35 57 1 10
Wilmington, Del...................... 50 1 00 55 105 55 1 05 70 1 30 55 105
York, P ........................................... 59 110 64 115 64 115 70 1 40 64 115
Harrisburg, Pa................................. 63 1 15 68 120 68 120 83 145 68 20
Pittsburgh, Pa.............................. 72 1 20 77 1 25 I 77 1 25 92 1 50 77 1 25
Erie, Pa........... .......................... 72 1 20 77 1 25 77 125 92 1 50 77 1 25
Steamship connection from Savannah for New York every Wednesday aud Saturday. For Boston every
Thursday. For Philadelphia every Saturday. For Baltimore Tuesday and Friday.
STEAMSHIP DEPARTURES FROM SAVANNAH.
FOR NEW YORK. FOR PHILADELPHIA.
Wednesday, May 3. 6:30 a. m. Saturday, May 6th, 9:30 a. in.
Saturday, May 6, 8:30 a. m. Saturday, May 13th, 3:00 p. m.
Wednesday, May 10, 12:00 noon. Saturday, May 20th, 9:30 a. m.
Saturday, May 13, 3:00 p. m. Saturday, May 27th, 1:00 p. m.
Wednesday, May 17, 6:30 a. m. Saturday, June 3d, 7:00 p. m.
Saturday, May 20, 8:30 a. m.
Wednesday, May 24, 12:00 noon.
Saturday, May 27, 2:00 p. m.
Wednesday, May 31, 5:30 a. m.
FOR BALTIMORE.
Tuesday, May 2d, at 5 p. m.
Saturday, May 6th, at 10 a. m.
Thursday, May 11th, at 1 p. m.
Tuesday, May 16th, at 5 p. m.
Monday, May 22d, at 11 a. m.
Saturday, May 27th, at 2 p. m. BOSTON AND PROVIDENCE.
Thursday, June 1st, at 5 p. m. Thursday, May 4th, at 7:30 a. m,
* Tuesday, June 6th, at 11 a. m. Thursday, May 11th, at 2 p. m.
Monday, June 12th, at 3 p. m. Thursday, May 18th, at 7:30 a. m.
Saturday, June 17th, at 8:30 a. m. Thursday, May 25th, at 1:30 p. m.
Thursday, June 22d, at 11 a. m. Thursday, June 1st, at 5 p. m.
Shipments via New York will be charged at the current rates from that point, with cost of transfer added.
Single packages will be charged $1 each to Boston, New York Philadelphia and Baltimore. If shipped be-
yond, they will be charged in addition the single package rates of connecting lines and cost of transfer.



Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide.

H. D. BOUNETHEAU, PROPRIETOR


NOR DYKE

MILLS
-MANUFACTURE-

Fresh Ground

FEED, GRITS,

MEAL,
(Bolted or unbolted.)
Pearl Hominy.
GRAIN, HAY, COAL AND
WOOD-YARD.
P. 0. BOX 984, JACK


FLORIDA CHEMICAL OIL AND 80AP WORK,
MANUFACTURER OF
Lubricating and Boiler Compounds, Compressed Soaps, Car and
Axle grease.
ALSO SOLE MANUFACTURER
of the best Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide extant-

made from Whale-Oil Soap, combined with other powerful ingredients known
to be most effectual for destroying the Scale and other insect pests and
parasites of the Citrus family. It will also put the tree in a healthy and flour-
ishing condition. Prepared for immediate use. Perfectly harmless to the
youngest tree or plant. In packages of from 25 to 300 pounds. Price, 10 cents
per pound. Discount to the Trade. 4I-" Full directions for use accompany
each package. Address

H. B. BOUNETHEAU.


:SONVILLE, FLA.


to july 31 '82


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
-0-
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
-o-
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers are appointed to sail:
JUNIATA, May 6th, 9:30 a. m.
CITY OF' SAVANNAH, May 13th, 3:00 p. m.
JUNIATA, May 20th, 9:30 a. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, May 27th, 1:00 p. m.
JUNIATA, June 3d, 7:00 p. m.
Days and hours subject to change, without notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, WM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.


Continuation of Through Freight Tariff on Vegetables via Florida Dispatch Line, in connec-
tion, with Steamers direct from Savannah. Transfers to Ship's side without breaking bulk.
IN CONNECTION WITH STEAMSHIPS DIRECT FROM SAVANNAH.

From Jackson- F r o m Land- !
vile. ings on St. From Florida From Tampa From J., P. &
k&S.F.& W.Sta. Johns River. Transit R. R. and Manatee. M. R. R.
TO ---- --



Bestird.....a.................................... 40' $ 80- 45 $ 85 45 $ 85 60 1 10 45 85
.. 0 0


Bdst via New York..............60 120 65 1 25 65 125 80 150 65 1 25
Ne'w York........................ .............. 40 80 45 85 45 85 60 110 45 85
Philadelphia..................................... 40 80 45 85 45 85 60 110 45 85
Baltimore......................................... 40 80 45 85 45 85 60 1 10 45 85
IN CONNECTION WITH STEAMSHIPS OF M. & M. T. CO. FROM SAVANNAH
VIA BALTIMORE.


M. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the
of the Marshall House. Screven House.
9THE1 I-A Ri]ETT HOUSE,
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARNETT & GEORGE, Proprietors.
RATi S, $2 PER DAY.
This favorite family Hotel, under its new manage-
ment, is recommended for the excellence of its cuisine.
homelike comforts, prompt attention and moderate
rates. to sept 4,'82


Wholesale and Retail Drug Store,
35 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
PURE DRUGS, RELIABLE MEDICINES, FANCY
Goods, Proprietary Articles, at lowest market prices.
Specialties-Norton's Salt Rheum Ointment, Melen's
Infant Food, Burnett's Cod Liver Oil. A Trial solicited.
to aug 20, '82


Bosto and savonali Stoa slii Linb






ONLY DIRECT LINE BETWEEN
SAVANNAH AND BOSTON.
Transhipment and extra handlIng saved. No danger
of fruit being Irozen. Cars are unloaded at the steaim-
ship wharf in Savannah, avoiding drayage.
CABIN PASSAGE, $18.
SAILING FROM SAVANNAH.
Seminole, Thursday. May 4th, at 7:30 a. m.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, May 11th, at 2:00 p. m.
Seminole, Thursday, May 18th, at 7:30 a m.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, May 25th, at 1:30 p. m.
Seminole Thursday, June 1st, at 5:00 p. m.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
44-tf Savannah, Ga,

DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
The largest stock in the State. Country
buyers will consult their own interests
by corresponding with me. All orders
promptly filled at prices to compete with
any house south of Baltimore. Remem-
ber my only Florida address.
GEO. HUGHES,
to june 26, '82 Cor. Bay and Ocean, Jacksonville, Fla.

PIANOS ANDORGANS
-a-- B-aA^ ^ E -L
15 East 13ay Jacksonville.
QOLD ON INSTALLMENTS, AT LOWEST PRICES-
u branch of Ludden & Bates, Savannah-EXACTLY
SAME PRICES AND TERMS, Sheet Music, Strings
and small instruments of all kinds. Send for cata-
logues, prices and terms. TUNING AND REPAIRING
a specialty. My tuner will make regular tours through
the State, and my customers will thus have my repre-
sentative at their doors, a great advantage to purchasers
of instruments, to sept 26, '82

BELL &, HALLIDAY,
MANUFACTURERS


FRUIT AND VEGETABbH BOXES,

CAIRO, ILLINOIS,

4iY-Send for Illustrated Price-List]
to june 12, '82

0. L. KEENE,

MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,

Laces Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF


67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to feb 20, '82


--- ~I I I - ~ I I I-


I


1-3=





-4A THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


BEST IN THE WORLD. ACER'S


Forsaleby D R. J. C. L'ENGIAE,
Wholesale Druggist, Jacksonville, Fla.
4#-Send for Circular. mar 25-tf
ST. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
--0-
CONVENIENT TO POST--OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.


OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
1 yr to April 23, '83


NEW BEAUTIFUL 6OLb]UW.
SPLENDID COLLECTION-THE MOST MAGNIFI-
cent Show Plants during our summer and autumn,
for only a little outlay, 50c. per dozen. VERBENAS,
all colors, same price.
lThree Excellernt moses.
"Marechal Niel," bright golden yellow.
General Jacqueminot," brilliant crimson.
"Perle des Gardin," beautiful straw color.
Strong plants, from five inch pots, 50c. each.
A good assortment of ever-blooming Roses. The very
best Tea-scented, from five inch pots, 30c. each.
EMilalia a&c1 l m2pals,
The most effective and stately of all the Ornamental
Grasses, 25c. each.
:Eot-Gro= V2r Mr-CLit Trees
IS NO RISK IN TRANSPLANTING.
Japan Plums, 30, 50 and 75c. each.
Japan Persimmon, 75c. each.
Satsuma Orange, $1 each.
Black Hamburg and White Sweetwater Grapes, 40c.
each; Figs, 25c. each.
Packing and boxing free. Address
ARNO(LD PUJETZ,
mar 25-tf Jacksonville, Fla.

RUBBER STAMPS


Are manufactured right in our establishment in the
best manner and at the shortest notice.
AZ-Send in your orders.
ASHMEAD BROS.,
Ma ,_-f JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


:P'T.:R:E ITE r:BOT:D BOTE, $38.50 per "Ton,
(Gu"i ranteed Pure.)

SCT QOlT MEE3D 2.E-3I.J, $3e per TIon,
(100 Poulnd Bags.)
COTTO_--T SEE3D TTLl j hASI3, $27 per Torl,
(The Best Potash in Use.)
STOCKBRIDGE FERTILIZERS for Orange Trees and vegetables, for sale by
to jan 6, '83 J t c .s on vi e, l'la.


A FEW CHOICE LOTS OF FIFTEEN OR MORE
acres, river fronts, affording attractive and lovely
building sites, and admirably suited to the growth of
oranges, figs and other Florida fruits, may still be ob-
tained on reasonable terms.
"HOLLY\WOOD" is south of "Point La Vista," on
the eastern shore of the St. Johns River, four miles from
Jacksonville. For circulars, maps, terms, etc., address
D. REDMOND,
apr 3-tf Box 257, Jacksonville, Fla.
WV. 11. PILI1OWV'S

TRAWBERRY SHIPPING AGENCY
-AND-
FRUITJ AND VEGETABLE
REPACKING AND
COMMISSION HOUSE,
Has closed till NOVEM3BER. Present address,
may 12, '82. M Ak CO N, GA.

TshJ THE JONES
PATENT VENTILATED
i ussV.ntil tdo TrB

AND

SU-PPORTE M5SP
ARE THE


Southern r'ruit a nd vegetables a Speciaulty.
3a06 and 3i 8 1 North Delaware A venie, Philadelphia.
to jan 6, '83

JONUS & m _WE ,

WHOLESALE GROCERS,
AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


DRY HOP YEAST


CAKES,


60c. PER


DOZ.


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND


SNOW-DROP PATENT FLOUIIR.

First X-ands on nFiniest Qlality

Dairy Butter from 35 to 37c. per Lb.;

elpt in. tlie Ilargest efrigerator iz thle State,
No. V West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
To sept 27, '82

ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,

PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS
PRINTERS AND BINDERS,
AND DEALERS IN
TOYS AND FANCY ARTICLES.

NEWSDEALERS.-We keep all the latest Daily and Weekly Papers from Boston, New York, Philadelphia,
Baltimore, Chicago, St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, New Orleans, Charleston, S'avannah and Jacksonville, and
take subscriptions to all publications at publication price. Orders by mail prolip(,ntly attended to.
LIST OF BOOKS ON FLORIDA.
FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, INVALIDS AND SETTLERS (Earbour, Profusely Illustrated).............. Price 3; 50
FLORIDA : ITS SCENERY. CLIMATE AND HISTORY (Lanier)................................................................ Price 150
GUIDE TO EA ST FLORIDA (Edw ards), paper.................................................................................................Price 10
FAIRBANKS' H ISTORY OF FLORIDA ...................................................................... .............................. ...... Price 2 50
G U ID E TO JA CK SON V ILL E ................................................................ ... ...... ............ .......................... ri e 25
TOURISTS AND INVALIDS REFERENCE BOOK OF WINTER TRAVE.............................................rice 75
SOUTH FLORIDA, THE ITALY OF AMERICA.................................................--------------- ri.e 25
DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition)enlarged and improved......................................................Price 50
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edition, enlarged and improved).... .................................... Price 1 00
ORANGE INSECTS-Illustrated (Ashm ea(1, ............................. ..................... ...... ..............................Price 1 00
ORANGE CULTURE IN CA IFORNIA, by A. T. are (cloth)..................................................................Price 1 2
A MANUIAL OF GARDENING IN FLORIDA (W hitner)..................................................................................Price 50
COLTON 'S M AP OF FLORIDA ................................ice 7...................................... Irice 75
COLTON'S M AP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-the best).................................... ..............................................Price 1 25
NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF ST. JOHN'S RIVER................................ .........................................Price 25
McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST OF LAWS OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep, postage extra).......................... Price 6 00
INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA.............................. ............Price 3 00
Any of the above books mailed on receipt of price.
kA N E W R A P S ................................................................... ...................10xl0, 14c.; 11x11, 17c.; 12x12, 20c.
LAW BLANKS.
W A R R A N TY D EEDS, per dozen.............................................................................. .............................. ......Price 50
Q U IT-CL A IM D E E D S, per dozen ..........................................................................................................................P rice 50
M O R T G A G E S, per dozen ......................................................................................................................................P rice 50
NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, m ade to order......... ...................................................................................Price $5 00
We publish a full line of Law Blanks for Lawyers and Justices of the Peace. Price-list mailed on application.
Special prices to large buyers. Adddress
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
feb 12-tf 21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]
. A.FRUIT AND PRODUCE .,
FRUIT AND PRODUCE


m


AND


i


MEtRC ANTS'.


COMMISllSIONI


uy -U