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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00008
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 15, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00008
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

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~j~yricuhnura1, ftlan'factnrinq and. ndustrial Interests nf Elnrida and the Sauth.


Ilevoted to the

Vol. .--No. 8.


New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.


Price 5 cents.


Monday, May 15, 1882.


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.


A Florida Vista. representative of those interests should have. a
The "oak openings" of Michigan, (our place in the Cabinet of the President.
north-western peninsula,) have been made Mr. Kenna, of West Virginia, spoke in favor
famous in song and story; but the beautiful of the substitute offered by him providing for
"oak openings of Florida are very different a department of industries to consist of a divi-
from those, and far more striking and pictur- sion of agriculture and a division of commerce.
esque. One of these the engraver has endeav- Speeches in favor of creating the Department
ored to represent in the little picture annexed, of Agriculture were also delivered by Messrs.
which, we believe is an actual sketch of a small Carpenter, of Iowa, Gedde, of Ohio, Rich, of
portion of the road from Fernandina to the Michigan, and Grout, of Vermont, and then at
neighboring sea beach. The spreading and 5 o'clock the House took a recess until 7:30,
over-arching old live-oaks in the foreground, the evening session to be for debate on the same
and the two solitary (?) horsemen and trail- subject.
ing vines in the distance, make a pretty little
scene, the familiarity and general vraisemblance -
of which will be readily recognized by all who
have traveled through our seaboard country.

Agriculture in Congress.
On the 8th of the present month, the U. S.
House of Representatives took up the bill to
enlarge the duties and powers of the Depart-
ment of Agriculture.
Mr. Anderson, of Kansas, explained and ad-
vocated the bill.
Mr. Aiken, of South Carolina, supported the
proposition of elevating it to the dignity of an
Executive department. The Bureau of Agri-
culture which represented the great farming in- A Land Agent's Story.
terest in which rested the welfare of the gov- A pretty good story is told about Land Agent
ernment. Milner, of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe
Mr. Muldrow, of Mississippi, advocated the Railroad, who one day had a party of Eastern
pending bill, maintaining that no good reason farmers in tow, trying to sell each of them a
could be shown why the Department of Agri- farm in the rich Arkansas Valley. Milner had
culture should be of an inrior grade in corn- taken them into his light wagon, and behind
culture should be of an inferior grade in con- his spanking team of bays, had given them a
prison with the Executive Departments of the grand ride, lasting all day. He had done his
government. Agriculture was the paramount best to make them enthusiastic by rehearsing
interest of the country, and this fact should be I the stories, which he had at tongue's end, of the
recognized in the legislation of Congress. The marvelous crops of the valley, but to all intents
with foreign coun- it was "love's labor lost," for they would not
treaties of this government withforeign coun- 'thuse. This annoyed Milner, but he had his
tries are of vast importance in their effects on revenge in his reply to one of the party, who,
agricultural interests, and he contended that a with a sardonic smile, asked :


"Well, Mr. Agent, is there anything that
won't grow here ?"
"Yes," replied Milner, "pumpkins won't."
"What !" exclaimed the cynical land-buyers
together, "pumpkins won't ?"
No," said Milner, there are men in this
county who would give $250 an acre for land
that would mature a crop of pumpkins.
They never have been able to get a crop since
I've been here, and that's ten years."
"(Well, how strange! How is it ?" said land-
buyer No. 1.
This was Milner's chance, and with a serious
expression, He replied: Well, sir, the soil is
so rich that the vines grow so fast they wear
the pumpkins out dragging them over the
ground.-F. S. Presbery in Kansas Sketches.

Two STRANGE RAILWAY ACCIDENTS.-A
strange accident happened on the railway be-
tween Rouen anxd Amiens, France, during the
storm which raged there on the 26th ult. A
workman named Deteaut, had taken temporary
refuge in a cutting close to the line.' The tele-
graph wires were just then blown down and
Deteaut got entangled in them. A few min-
utes after, before he could extricate himself, a
train came along, and the wires catching in the
wheels the unfortunate man was dragged under
the wheels and crushed to pieces.
As a westward-bound express train on the
Pittsburgh, Ft. Wayne & Chicago was passing
through the parks in Allegheny recently, a
singular accident occurred to a baby of Mrs.
T. L. Bender, one of the passengers. She had
the car window open and her little child was
sitting on her lap leaning out of the window.
The infant suddenly made a lurch forward, and
before the mother could act, it had fallen out
head foremost. Mrs. Bender sprang up and
pulled the bell-rope, bringing the train to a
stop. Upon going back the baby was found
uninjured in the middle of the track. There
were only a couple of bruises on its head, and
it is a mystery how it was saved at all, as it
rolled under the train between the wheels. The
mother proceeded on her way rejoicing.

The Dispatch has the largest circulation of any
paper in Florida; it is therefore the best adver-
tising medium in the State.


r





14THEPLO kItA DIzIATC141


Cotton Seed Oil Manufacture.
ITS ttIOR` AND PROGRESS
The following extracts, taken from a paper
read before the Southern Underwriters' Asso-
ciation, at Atlanta, Ga., May 26, 1880, by Mr.
Henry V. Ogden, of New Orleans, La., show
that the manufacture of oil from cotton seed is
not a new enterprise. He says:
There is every reason to believe that the
first move toward the extraction of oil from
cotton seed was made at Natchez, Miss., in the
year 1834. So far as we have been able to as-
certain, the great honor of this first attempt be-
longs to Messrs. James Hamilton Couper and
Samuel Plummer, of Georgia, and associated
with them were Mr. Follett, of Norfolk, Va.,
and Major Anderson Miller, of Louisville, Ky.
The late Archibald Dunbar, and other promi-
nent citizens of Mississippi, invested liberally
of their means, and shared the pecuniary loss
that followed. The few who remember Mr.
Couper speak of him as a man wonderfully
gifted in general intelligence and business
capacity. His large resources gave an impulse
to the enterprise, and resulted in the putting
up of the first mill and machinery. In every
respect, so far as known, the attempt was a dis-
astrous failure. * When you are told
that in this first mill the pressure to extract the
oil was obtained from the simple wedge princi-
ple, you can easily imagine how rude and in-
adequate to success were all the other appli-
ances.
In the year 1852, just eighteen years later,
it attracted the attention of Wm. Wilbur and
Frederick Goode, citizens of New Orleans.
These gentlemen, as strong in their faith in the
original idea as their predecessors had been,
embarked their all in a new attempt to give it
practical value, and they conceived and carried
out the plan of a mill, machinery, and process
of extraction, crude and imperfect, perhaps, but
still a greater improvement over the Natchez
mill of 1834, and which has been the inspira-
tion of much that has followed. Their im-
provements enabled them to make oil and
clarify it; they made the first soap and sold the
first oil cake, but they did so only to share the
fate of their predecessors of 1834, for like them,
they were pecuniarily ruined. They had, how-
ever, succeeded far enough to convince them-
selves, and demonstrate to others, the possibility
of the industry.
"In the year 1855, Mr. C..W. Bradbury, of
New Orleans, engaged in the enterprise. En-
ergetic and intelligent, he was notably the first
to demonstrate beyond any question the feasi-
bility of the manufacture. Laboring under
many disadvantages, not the least of them the
lack of capital necessary to efficiently carry out
his own ideas of the business, he was unfor-
tunately obliged to suspend operations for the
time being, resuming again under better aus-
pices only to be interrupted and ruined by the
breaking out of the civil war."


Messrs. Paulin Martin, F. M. Fisk, Paul
Aldige, and A. A. Maginnis, of New Orleans,
engaged in the business, and were also inter-
rupted in its successful prosecution by the war.
In 1855 a mill was established in Cincinnati
and successfully operated. Capt. Jackson
Warner, who was an agent for the purchase of
seed for this mill, says that on visiting the farm
of Mr. Joseph Davis, of Mississippi, for the
purchase of seed, his attention was called to the
dwelling of Mr. Davis, which was handsomely
painted twenty years before with paint in which
cotton seed oil was used. Mr. Davis told him
that the oil was expressed on his farm by ma-
chinery in which the power was obtained by
the use of the wedge. It was used at 'Athens,
Ga., for the same purpose by Dr. Camak.
These facts are to-day of special interest as
showing that the extraction of oil from cotton
seed is not a new industry, though, as is the


case with many new enterprises, the first at-
tempts were not crowned with success.
PRODUCTS OF THE OIL MILLS.
The first 9tep in preparing the. seed for the
mill is the removal of the lint left by the gin.
This is done by a gin constructed for the pur-
pose, with saws closer together than in the ordi-
nary cotton gin. An average of twenty-two
pounds of short lint is taken from a ton of the
seed. This product, called "linters," brings,-
on the market, 61 to 7 cents per pound, and is
used in the manufacture of cotton batting.
The next product is the hulls, which are re-
moved from the kernel and used as fuel for the
engines which furnish the power for the mills.
The hulls constitute about half the total weight
of the seed. From their combustion results
two qualities of ashes, averaging in price at the
mill $12 per ton.
The mills average a yield of thirty-five gal-
lons of crude oil to the ton of seed, which
wholesales at the mills at 35 cents per gallon.
This loses in the process of refining eighteen
per cent.-:so that the yield in refined oil is
28.70 gallons. The refined oil sells at the mills
at 55 to 60 cents per gallon.
A ton of the seed yields' after extracting the
oil, 700 pounds of oil cake or cotton seed meal,
which is simply the cake ground. The cake
or meal at present sells at the mills at $20 per
ton. The average consumption of the mills is
about 6,000 tons each per annum. The mills
generally operate only about six months in the
year, and hence their average capacity is 12,000
tons per annum. The consumption is, there-
fore,. 350,000 tons per annum, with a capacity
for twice that amount.
There are fifty-seven oil mills now in opera-
tion or being constructed in the South and
along the Mississippi River, distributed as fol-
lows: 10 in Tennessee, 9 each in Mississippi,
Louisiana and Texas, 8 in Arkansas, 6 in Ala-
bama, 2 in Georgia, 2 in Missouri, and one
each in South Carolina and Illinois.
In 1880, 6,997,796 gallons of cotton seed oil
were exported from the United States, while
only 38,431 gallons of linseed oil were exported
during the same year.
During the same year, 453,023,225 pounds
of oil cake were exported. Taking the com-
parative quantities of cotton seed oil and lin-
seed oil exported as an index of the compara-
tive quantities of cake exported, and it will be
seen that nearly the whole of this exported
cake was from the cotton seed.
Mr. Ogden says cotton seed oil "is the basis
of nitro-glycerine and of various other ex-
plosive compounds. Cotton seed oil is the best
material known for making glycerine. One
gallon of crude oil returns three and one-half
pounds of pure glycerine."
It will no doubt surprise many readers to
learn that in 1878, 16,757,634 pounds of cotton
seed were exported; in 1879, 16,397,938
pounds; and in 1880, 12,142,137 pounds. On
this subject, Mr. Ogden remarks: "It is al-
leged that in France methods have been dis-


covered for procuring a valuable blue dyestuff
from cotton seed."
The fifty-seven mills now in operation or be-
ing constructed will consume an average of
6,000 tons of seed per annum, running half the
year. They have a capacity of 12,000 tons
each. Assuming 6,000 tons as the average con-
sumption, and we find that 342,000 tons are
now used by the oil mills per annum. These
cost at the mills ten dollars per ton, or an ag-
gregate of $3,420,000.
They yield 35 gallons of crude oil per ton,
or 11,970,000 gallons, which sells at the mills
at 35 cents per gallon. The annual oil pro.
duct, therefore, of the 57 mills will be worth
$4,189,500.
The seed are reginned at the large mills, and
22 pounds of short lint per ton, called linters,


yielded. These bring 61 cents to 7 cents per
pouhd.. The yield of linters from 342,000 tons
of seed is, therefore, 7,524,000 pounds, which,
at 7 cents per pound, is worth $526,680.
Each ton of seed yields 700 pounds of cake,
which sells at one cent per pound at the mills.
342,000 tons of seed would, therefore, yield
$2,394,000 worth of cake. The annual pro-
duct of the 57 mills running half the year will,
therefore, be as follows:
7,524,000 lb. linters, at 7 cents per lb..........$....$ 526,680
11,970,000 gallons crude oil, at 35c. per gallon..... 4,189,500
239,400,000 lb. cake, at 1 cent. per pound ............ 2,394,000
Total.......... ............................................. $ 7,110,180
Deduct cost of the seed................................. 3,420,000
And we have values added by the mills..........$ 3,690,1$0
The 342,000 tons of cotton seed consumed by
the mills yield 171,000 tons of hulls, which are
burned in the engines, and supply the fuel nec-
essary to run the machinery. Each ton of
hulls yields 70 pounds of ashes, which are very
rich in potash.
As the oil is valueless as a fertilizer, every
gallon extracted from the seed is so much clear
gain. All that is valuable as a fertilizer in the
seed is found in the cake and in the ash of the
hulls. The $4,189,500 received for the oil, and
$526,680 received for the "linters," thus come
from products that are ordinarily wasted.
For convenience of calculation (and it is not
likely to be less in the future), a crop of 6,000,-
000 bales is taken as the basis of the following
estimates:
Assuming that the bales average 450 pounds
each, their production involves the production
of 2,700,000 tons of seed, estimating 9,000
pounds seed to the bale, or two of seed to one of
lint.
According to the census of 1880, 14,462,431
acres were planted in cotton ; allowing two bush-
els per acre for planting this area, 28,924,862
bushels, or 432,872 tons of seed are required for
that purpose.
Deduct this quantity from the whole amount
produced, and there remain 2,266,128 tons of
seed to be utilized as manure or stock feed.
Supposing the whole of these to be used by the
oil mills, and the following analysis of the pro-
ducts will not be devoid of interest. While it
is not now practicable to so ntilize them on ac-
count of the difficulty of transporting them to
the mills, the day is not far distant when nearly,
if not all, the crop will be so utilized.
The 2,266,128 tons of seed will yield, at 22
pounds per ton, 49,854,816 pounds of linersrs"
which at 7 cents per pound, will bring $3,489,-
837.12.
The same seed will yield 35 gallons of crude
oil per ton, or 79,314,480 gallons of oil, which
sells at 35 cents per gallon at the mill. From
this, therefore, will be realized $27,760,068,
which, as the seed are generally used, is entirely
wasted, since the oil adds nothing to the value
of the seed as a fertilizer.
The same seed will yield 700 pounds of cake
per ton of seed, or 1,586,289,600 pounds, which,
at $20 per ton, will be worth $15,862,880.


From the hulls of each ton of seed 35 pounds
of ashes are obtained, or 79,314, 480 pounds of
ashes, which are worth at the mill an average
of $12 per ton, or $475,904.
The account with the seed under the suppo-
sition that the whole crop, except enough to
plant, are utilized for the extraction of oil, will
stand about as follows:
From 2,266,128 tons of seed the mills will
turn out-
49,854,816 lbs. "linters," at 7c.................................. 3,489,837
79,314,480 gallons crude oil, at 35c....................... 27,760,068
793,141 tons oil cake at $20........... .... 15,862,880
39,657 tons ashes, at $12...................................... 475,904
Total value of products.............................$47,588,689
2,266,128 tons seed, at $10 per ton........................ 22,661,2
Increase of value by manipulation in the
oil m ills............. ......... ........................$24,917,409
It will be seen, therefore, that the value of
the crop of cotton seed of the Southern States is





TllIj F LORIDA D19PATCHJ


increased by the; manipulation of the oil mills
$24,917,409, and that this increase is.greater by
more than $2,000,000 than the marketable
value, of tlheseed in their original form. It will
be observed also, that the yalue of the crude
oil is- more than $3,000,000 greater than that of
the whole seed from which it is extracted, pre-
viouis to such manipulation.
COST OF MILLS.
The principal obstacle in the way of the gen-
eral utilization of the crop of cotton seed is the
cost of mill and machinery necessary to extract
the oil. No doubt this will be remedied in time,
but at the present stage of the industry, those
who have had experience in the matter agree
that a capital of at least $30,000 is necessary to
establish and conduct an oil mill successfully.
They agree that a mill with four presses, car-
rying six boxes each, is the smallest that will
pay. The machinery required for such a mill
embrace a 50-horse power engine, four presses,
six heaters, two linters, with hullers, crushers.
mats, elevators, conveyors, vats, mills for grind-
ing the cake, etc., all of which will cost about
$20,000. .The buildings necessary are one or
two stories, about 40x60 feet, and a seed room
60x100 feet. These will cost according
to character and locality. Another diffi-
culty lies in the uncertainty of secur-
ing a sufficient quantity of seed to 'keep
the machinery running a reasonable number of
months in the year. As the business becomes
more firmly established and the products be-
come more generally used, there will be less
difficulty in procuring the seed, and better
prices realized by the farmer for them, and
greater profits made by the millmen.
The refined oil is being rapidly introduced
into general use for various purposes, including
its substitution, when highly refined, for olive
oil on our tables, as well as the use of a grade
lower as a substitute for lard. Its entire sub-
stitution for the latter seems not improbable,
for the reason that it is more delicate, involves
less risk of injury to health, is cheaper, and
keeps sweet longer. Very few who once try it
return to the use of lard. It is equally as good
as lard for any purpose for which the latter is
used, and for many purposes far superior to it.
THE COTTON SEED CROP OF GEORGIA.
According to the returns of the tenth United
States Census, 2,617,138 acres were planted in
cotton in 1879. On this area, 814,441 bales of
cotton were produced. Each of these bales
represents 900 pounds cotton seed. The pro-
duction of the State was, therefore, 366,498
tons. Allowing twt bushels per acre for plant-
ing, 7^8,464 tons were required for the purpose.
Deducting this quantity from the whole number
produced in the State-366,498 less 78,464-
and 288,034 tons remain for use as manure, or
for feeding stock. These, at 15 cents per bushel,
or $10 per ton, are worth $2,880,340.
The-oil that may be extracted from the same
number of tons of seed would sell for $3,528,-


416; the linters from the same, $443,572; the
oil cake or meal from the same, $2,016,240, and
the ash from the hulls, $60,480.
The account would stand as follows, if the
whole surplus crop of seed produced in the
State, after reserving enough to plant:
6,836,748 lbs. litersrs" at 7c.............. ...... 4. 3,752
10,081,190 gallons oil, at 35c...................................... 3,528,416
100,812 tons cake, at $20............ 2,016,240
5,040 tons ashes, at$12........................... 60,480
Aggregate value of products......... .....$6,048,708
Value of seed unmanipulated, $10 per ton...... 4,880,340
Value added by manipulation of mills......... $3,168,368
While it would be bad policy for farmers to
part with their seed without replacing them
with their equivalent in manurial value, it will
be seen by the above statement that the mills
can afford to take the seed from the plantation
For much valuable information connected with the
manufacture of cotton-seed oil, I am indebted to Col.
Geo. W. Scott, of Atlanta, Ga.


and return the cake or meal and ash without
cost to the planter. This is plainly shown by
the following analysis of the above figures.
Under the present plan of purchasing the seed
at $10 per ton, the mills would! pay for the
surplus crop of seed of Georgia after reserving
two bushels per acre for planting, $2,880,340.
From these they get $3,528,416 worth of crude
oil, estimating it at the selling price at the mills,
$443,572 worth of linters, $2,016,240 worth of
cake, and $60,480 worth of ash from the hull.
The oil and linters, which would be wasted if
the seed were used whole as manure on the farm,
are worth at the will $3,971,988, and the cake
and ash together are worth $2,076,720. Now,
supposing the planter exchanges his seed for the
cake and ash, the mill men paying all expenses
of seed and cake or meal and ash both ways, he
loses nothing of value as a fertilizer, and gets
his meal and ash in a form easily applied and
readily assimilable by the plant; the mill men
get the oil and linters to pay for their trouble
and expense. They get $3,971,988 worth of
oil and linters, and return to the planters $2,-
076,720 worth of meal and ash, leaving $1,885,-
268 profit, less freight on seed and cake. If
they buy the seed at $10 per ton at the gin-
house, and keep oil, cake, linters and ash, they.
clear $3,168,368, less freiglits on seed and run-
ning expenses. This indicates that a better
price might be paid for the seed than is now re-
ceived by the planter. Some of the Western
mills are paying $13 per ton for the seed,
and offering to exchange 1,000 pounds of meal
for a ton of seed. They can well afford to pay
$15 per ton for seed, and still make a very
heavy profit.
Three qualities of soap made from cotton-
seed oil, crude and refined, and from the resi-
dumn of the manufacture, have been presented
by Mr. Geo. T. Lewis, of Philadelphia, through
Dr. N. A Pratt, of Atlanta. These soaps were
made in 1848. They are very neat and well
preserved. Messrs. Lewis, of Philadelphia,
make oil from seed procured from the Butler
estate in Georgia, in 1848, with remarkable re-
sults as regards the yield per bushel. They got
an average of nearly a gallon of oil to the bushel
of seed, while the average obtained now is only
a little more than half a gallon per bushel. The
difference is due, probably, to the fact that the
seed used by Messrs. Lewis was of the sea island
or black seed variety. They did not decorti-
cate the seed, and used the old-fashioned wedge
press.
Experiments were made at the same time
with the meal as food for cattle, with, to them,
satisfactory results. They fed as much as three
pecks of the cotton seed cake meal per day to
cattle-Imore than one would dare to feed of
modern meal. Samples of oil in this office, re-
ceived from Mr. Geo. T. Lewis, appear to be
equally clear as the modern article. The crude
oil of the manuifacture of 1848 is dark, but the
refined is apparently very nice.- Georgia Agri-
cultural Report.


DON'T WHIP A FRIGHTENED HORSE.-It
seems to be a characteristic failing of most
coachmen to lay the lash on a horse that ex-
hibits fear at an object in the street or beside
the road. Mr. Bergh, president of our society
for the prevention of cruelty to animals, says
in the organ of that society, what every reason-
ing being ought to know, and that is never to
whip your horse for becoming frightened at
any object by the roadside, for if he sees a
stump, a log, or a heap of tan-bark in the road,
and, while he is eyeing it carefully, and about
to pass it, you strike him with the whip, it is
the log, or stump, or the tan-bark that is hurt-
ing him in his way of reasoning, and the next
time he will be more frightened. Give him
time to smell all these objects, and use the
bridle to assist you in bringing him carefully
to those objects of fear.--Scientific American.


Necessity of Agriculture. .
Professor Wm. H. Yeomans, in the Practical
Farmer, says :
What the foundation is to a building, agricul-
ture is to all other kinds of business. In the first
place, although there are localities in w iich the
natural productions of the earth would suffice to
sustain the life of man, with the fruits of hunting
and fishing, it would reduce him to an unnatural
condition-to one repulsive to his high state of
civilization. His nature would soon revolt at the
idea of subsisting upon those products, which, in
their natural condition, are unpalatable, and yet
so much improved by cultivation; but in order
to accomplish which, agriculture becomes a nec-
essary occupation.
Again, it is very certain that many of the in-
dustries of the land depend upon the produc-
tions of the farmer. The wheat that keeps the
mill in operation, the wool that keeps the wool-
len factory and the cotton that keeps the cot-
ton and thread factories ; the silk that keeps
the silk factory ; the leather that keeps the tan-
nery and shoe factory; the lumber that keeps
mechanics and wooden manufactories at work,
all are products of the farm, or come from the
farmer. And so too, the necessities of the far-
mer furnish employment in the manufacture of
various implements and machines required in
his business. Hence agriculture becomes a
necessary occupation.
Still again, where there are so many and di-
vers professional occupations that employ so
large a number of hands who, when so employ-
ed, are unable to produce from the soil the nec-
essaries of life, another portion must be employ-
ed in tilling the soil, or else in a short time star-
vation and famine would prevail. So again
agriculture becomes a necessary occupation.
But according to the. generally received def-
inition, the tilling of the soil in all its forms,
such as the production of crops, the raising and
improvement of stock for the dairy, and other
purposes, is denominated agriculture ; therefore
no other conclusion can be arrived at, than that
agriculture is a necessary occupation, and as
such should be properly respected, and receive
a due share of attention and regard from other
professions and occupations, for according to
present indications but few years will elapse ere
the power of the agriculturist will be felt from
one end of the land to the other, and will 're-
ceive a full share of respect to which he is enti-
tled, but which in years gone by, has been with-
held.
PENNYROYAL.-The Southern Live Stock
Journal says: Although a very old remedy, it
seems there is yet a good many persons that do
not know the value of pennyroyal. It will
clear all kinds of stock of all kinds of vermin,
hiorse-flies, gnats, fleas on dogs, lice on stock or
poultry, &c. No farmer can reasonably do
without it. To one ounce of oil of pennyroyal
add four ounces of any other mild oil; lard oil
is good, give each plowman a vial of this and a
feather to touch the horse about the head, ears,


flanks and legs with, just a little every two or
three hours, and I will guarantee all insects will
leave at once. I think if you will publish this
remedy many of your readers will thank you.
THE LE CONTE PEAR.-This variety seems
to be growing in popularity among fruit grow-
ers, owing to its vigorous growth, early habit,
extreme fruitfulness. and apparent freedom
from blight. Mr. H. W. L. Lewis, of Tangi-
pahoa Parish, informs us that he is propagating
this variety largely, and proposes to set out ex-
tensive orchards. He grows it entirely from
cuttings and will be prepared to set a thousand
trees next year. We have cuttings from the
Le Conte growing in our gardens in the sixth
district of New Orleans, and thus far they
promise well, being exceedingly thrifty in ap-
pearance and growing rapidly into young
trees.-N. 0. Commercial Bulletin.


I5..


OWN"=


..w





Lel.0 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Meteorological Report.
Weather for week ending May 13, 1882.
OFFICE OF OBSERVATION,
SIGNAL SERVICE, U. S. A.9, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Thermn. 7'3 T Wind.. .
a | Y
DATE. O


Sunday 7 ........ i30071 8667' 77.0: 81.0 0.31 E 20Clear.
Monday 8........ 30.157 83 72 76.7 81.0 0.21 E ll|Fair.
Tuesday 9P....... 30.0 :i w 72 78.7 77.0 0.00 E :15 Fair.
Wednesday 10129.960 87'75 8).7,77.3 0.19 W il1 Fair.
Thursday 11... 129.853 85 69 75.3 82.7 0.6-14 S\ 20 Fari.
Friday 12........ 29.808 84 74 79.0 57.7 0.00 SW 161 Clear.
Saturday 13...... 129.820 73 60 75.1 51.31 0.00 SW 161Clear.
Highest barometer 30.178, lowest 29.777
Highest temperature 87. lowest 60.
NOTE.-Barometer reading readinreduced to sea level.
J. W. SIrriH, Signal.Observer U. S. A.

Argument for a State Board of Health.
Numerous efforts have been made in the last
few years to secure a State Board of Health for
Ohio. In a recent argument for its establish-
ment, R. C. S. Reed made the following points:
The business of a State Board of Health,"
said he, "is to supervise the health interests of
the people. This can be done; first, by investi-
gating the causes of disease, the sources of mor-
tality, and the effects of localities; employment,
conditions, ingesta habits and surroundings
on the health of the people of localities, or of
the whole State; second, by advising officers of
the government and others in regard to the lo-
cation, drainage and water supply; disposal of
excreta, heating and ventilation of public and
other buildings; third, by disseminating useful
information on sanitary subjects among all
classes of people, and fourth, by devising means
to prevent the introduction and dissemination
of contagious and infectious disease in the State.
Now, why should the State create and main-
tain a State Board of Health ? I answer: Be-
cause the State is morally bound to protect the
individual in all matters of health where he is
powerless to help himself. He cannot investi-
gate and remove the causes of local epidemics
where the same exist beyond his premises. He
cannot ventilate a school-house into which he
is forced to send his children for instruction.
He has no authority to quarantine or use other
means to prevent the introduction into his neigh-
borhood or his door-yard, of yellow fever, cholera,
small-pox or other forms of contagious disease.
The State gives him information in regard to
agriculture; why should she not instruct him in
matters of health ? The State provides an asy-
lum for the feeble-minded youth, and a prison
for the insane; why should she not furnish her
citizens such information as would afford in-
struction calculated to prevent the birth of
idiots and the insanity of adults ? She protects
her citizens in their rights of property; why
should she not protect them in their dearer
rights of health? I apprehend that the time
is fast approaching when that government which
fails or neglects to aid in the moral, physical,


and mental endowment, development and
health of her people, will be regarded as an ob-
ject of censure. I respectfully submit that no
Legislature is complete in its equipment for
work which has not a standing committee on
public health. In addition, the reasons why
every State should have a State Board of
Health, there is a special reason why such a
board is demanded in Ohio just now.
"Other States, to the number of twenty-
seven, have such organizations in active opera-
tion. A number of these States are contiguous
to or nearly surround Ohio. The venders of
adulterated drugs, and foods now being pros-
ecuted and convicted of frauds in these States
will have to get out of reach of these boards.
At present our State is a most inviting field for
them to enter, and in a short time we shall not


only have our own frauds, but those from
States having Boards of Health will soon be
plying their wicked vocation in our midst.
Pardon me, genttemen, for the liberty I
take in reminding you that public health should
not be neglected and public morals should not
be debauched by permitting these wrongs to
be inflicted on our people."
The arguments above are equally applicable
to Florida to-day as to Ohio.-[ED.

Parasites.
Professor Arnold Heller, of Kiel, has recently
published an interesting work on parasites,
with particular reference to their import to men.
It is only lately that the true origin and char-
acter of parasites have been at all adequately
understood. Not very long ago they were sup-
posed to be formed out of the substances of the
body; and in the condition of knowledge at the
time it was hard to account otherwise for their
presence in certain parts of the system. They
have also been supposed to be received by in-
heritance; and it has not been fully proved
that, in rare instances, this may not be the case.
It has, however, been shown that, as a rule,
they are introduced into the system, either di-
rectly or through germs taken in with the food,
breathed in the air, brought by unclean hands
or with unclean dishes, or blown in with dust.
They are generally dependent on moisture for
their vitality, and, finding in the bodily juices
a favorable environment, may become suddenly
active after having been long dormant in un-
congenial situations. Most, if not all of them,
probably existed originally in a free state, and
have become wonted to what is now an exclu-
sive abode by gradual adaptation in long time;
in such cases, they seem to have lost some of
the organs, such as those of locomotion, which
they originally possessed, but which have be-
come of no further use to them. Some of them
have been made useful to man. The leech
serves a valuable purpose in the healing art;
the cochineal aphis furnishes a valuable dye;
the tape-worm of the snipe tickles the palate of
the hunter and the epicure as "maccaroni-
piatti"-flat maccaroni; and the worms of
fresh-water fishes are esteemed as food in some
parts of Italy. The ichneumon flies and their
tribe are of inestimable benefit in destroying
the insect enemies to vegetation; and helpful
moths have been discovered which prey upon
the moths and other insects in the furs of
rodents and the feathers of birds. Among
vegetable parasites, ergot is valuable in medi-
cine, and the mistletoe-berry is used in making
bird-lime and fly-paste. It has been suggested
that even intestinal worms may be good for
children by helping to consume the excess of
slime; and Jordan, of Mayence, has set forth
that the animals that infest the skin of man
may be beneficial by forcing him to look after
the cleanliness of his person and clothing,
and his intestinal worms by making him care-
ful of his food. This view cannot, however, be


justified, even when we admit that parasites in
many cases do no perceptible harm. To these
cases may be opposed the numerous instances
in which they have proved destructive to their
hosts, whether animals, birds, or men, often
carrying off multitudes of creatures when they
become excessively abundant on a species; and
in the most favorable cases they give the host
discomfort and inconvenience, though their
work may be overlooked in the presence of his
superior vigor. As a rule, parasites belong to
the lower orders of animals-worms or insects.
Sometimes an arachnoid or a crustacean will
join the company; but a few small fishes are
the only creatures among the vertebrates that
ever assume that relation. The stories that
have been told of the existence of other inhabi-
tants in the system are either fables or have
originated in the accidental presence of single
individuals who were probably as much aston-


ished as their host at finding themselves in
such a home.---Popular Science Monthly.

The Cause of Consumption-An Important
Discovery.
Professor Tyndall's letter on the nature of
turbecular disease, which is reprinted on an-
other page from the Times (London), is an im-
portant contribution to medical science. It
embodies the results not of his own but of Dr.
Koch's masterly investigations which have
been conducted in Berlin in relation to the
deadliest of modern diseases. This German in-
vestigator, having successfully traced a parasite
through all its stages of development in splenic
fever, has applied the same method of study to
the great class of tubercular diseases. He finds
that consumption of the lungs and cognate dis-
eases of the liver, kidney and intestines are
caused by the presence in the blood of a living
parasite analogous to that which is developed
in intermittent and other fevers. In the centre
of the tubercle cell is the microscopic organism
which has created it. The tubercle is in fact
infested with red-shaped parasites, which do
not depend upon any vices imbedded in the
diseased organ. Dr. Koch, having discovered
these organisms, cultivated them artificially, and
after developing several generations of them
without the intervention of disease, introduced
them into the blood of healthy guinea-pigs,
cats, rabbits and other animals. The result in
every case was the reproduction of the parasite
and the rapid development of tubercular dis
ease. This was a practical demonstration of
his theory that tubercular disease is due to the
presence and reproduction of the bacillus, and
that the parasite does not depend on a diseased
condition of the organ.
While Dr. Koch has not been the first in-
vestigator to identify pulmonary consumption
with ordinary eruptive fevers, or even to at-
tribute the infective property of. turbercular
disease to the presence of microscopic organ-
isms, he has made a tenable theory out of what
was at best an ingenious surmise. He has
found the disease-producing bacillus and culti
vated it, not only from diseased lungs but even
from matter expectorated by consupmtive pa-
tients, and has proved that tubercle can be
communicated by inoculation.' Professor Tyn-
dall confines his attention to the scientific re-
sults of the German's investigations, and makes
no attempt to anticipate the practical benefits
which may be derived from the development of
this new theory of tubercular disease. Dr.
Koch has not succeeded so far in producing by
cultivation a mild form of the disease. Al-
though he has bred artificially as many as
eight generations of the parasite, the effects of
purification were not apparent. In the eighth
generation, as in the first, decided and in most
cases virulent tubercular disease was the result
of inoculation. Nevertheless it is a well estab-
lished fact that parasites which produce anala-


gous diseases in animals and in the humansystem
can be modified by cultivation until they fin-
ally produce a mild form of those diseases, and
in this way a protection may be afforded
against virulent conditions. The analogies of
diseases imply that it may be possible to pro-
cure from guinea-pigs or rabbits an effective in-
oculent against consumption, precisely as small-
pox germs are cultivated in the cow or splenic
fever germs in sheep. It is the possibility of
converting the occupant of a tubercle cell into
a prophylactic or preventive agent that lends
importance to these interesting experiments.
This possibility is not outlined in Professor
Tyndall's letter, but it may readily be inferred
from the vigorous rebuke which he administers
to the anti-vivisectionists in his closing para-
graph. In the extract which we print from
the Medical News this possibility is, however,
distinctly set forth as the hoped for result of
Koch's researches.-N. Y. Tribune.


r





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 11


plied on account of the diversified traffic of the I0
transportation lines. We have experimented To the Farmers of Floi
extensively in their construction, and have now TocoI, ST. JOHN's Ri
decided to equip the line -with this style of car. A
It is ventilated at sides and ends at the top of Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
the car. On the principle that hot air rises, The heavy losses sustained by t
.vegetable growers of Florida the f
and cold air seeks the bottom, also that the air by their shipments to glutted mar
entering at the top of the car has less dust than sponsible agents, renders it necess
at the bottom or lower part. The cars are means must be resorted to to
ceiled inside, creating a space of about four losses. I propose to suggest a ]


inches between the outer and inner surface
throughout the car. There is also a ventilated
and solid door. This makes it a combination
car for use in transporting fruits and vegeta-
bles North and merchandise South. When in
use for transporting such articles as may be
damaged by thorough ventilation, by closing
the ventilators and using the solid door, the car


rida I
VER, FLA.,
pril 27, 1882.

the fruit and
past few years,
'kets and irre-
ary that some
prevent those
plan for their


oJ~lcl~ LI r ll.
It has been a favorite theme among the far-
mers of Florida to dissolve the problem of how
to dispose of their fruits and vegetables to the
best advantage, and to prevent the heavy losses
that many of them yearly meet with by ship-
ping to glutted markets and irresponsible par-
ties.' There is a demand, which is yearly in-
creasing, for every orange and every bushel of
early vegetables that can be raised in Florida


For rates of freight on South bound busi-
ness from any point North, apply to any agents
of the line, or address Jas. S. Taylor, General
Freight Agent S., F. & W. R'y Co., Savan-
nah, Ga.


at remunerative prices, if a proper system was
inaugurated for distributing them over the coun-
try, particularly to the Western cities, through
the numerous railroads recently completed.
The one great difficulty has been to mature
some plan for effecting a Co-operative Union,
and a bond strong enough to hold them to-
gether.
CO-OPERATION.
The lawyers, doctors, merchants, and even
the burglars, and boot-blacks, have their trade
unions for co-operative and mutual protection.
Then why not the farmers of Florida ? Direct
trade between the producer and consumer has
been the favored theme of the leading political
economists for years, and they have declared it
to be necessary to our well-being and prosper-
ity. Cheap means of transportation, and greater
facilities for distributing the produce and you
will realize better profits. You must place your
produce in the hands of the consumer at the
minimum expense, and consequently at a max-
imum profit to the producer. It has always
been the misfortune of the farmer, that he has
only devoted his energies to the making of good
crops he never once thinks about the great ne-
cessity of finding the best markets for the same,


ket can..be overstocked, which would frequently
be done if not judiciously distributed by your
agents. Now, let us take for example the city
of Atlanta, of 45,000 inhabitants; it has radi-
ating from there seven railroads that supply
over one hundred towns, and I have seen that
market overstocked with oranges at 11 cent
apiece, when in Marietta, only twenty miles
distant, oranges were selling at from 5 to 8
cents apiece. If you had an agent at Atlanta
who would look after your interest, he would
have his sub-agents at a hundred different towns
which are supplied from that point, and who
would distribute five hundred boxes a week to
those points for sale at remunerative prices.
There is not a single commission house in At-
lanta whose principal business is selling fruits
and vegetables on commission. There are a
number of produce merchants who will receive
and sell fruits and vegetables on commission,
but as groceries are their principal business
they will only sell your produce in that market,
and will not ship it to other markets when their
market is overstocked, for they would lose their
commission. There are large fruit dealers there,
but it will not do to ship to them, as they ex-
Continued on page 121.


I


P-M
=::Raft


is perfectly closed. The ventilation is so ar-
ranged that it is thorough without admitting
rain, and can be- opened or closed from the
outside of the car. There are many articles
coming South that will arrive in better order
by ventilated cars than the old style of close
cars, such as butter, lard, bulk meats, etc. The
great want has been for a car that was not too
expensive that would answer all purposes. In
this we believe we have succeeded. The roads
comprising the Florida Dispatch Line will
be fully equipped, hence shippers of perisha-
ble matter requiring ventilation can be assured
that the S., F. & W. R'y Co. is fully up to
the necessities of the traffic, and will ever be
found preparing for and anticipating its
patron's wants. These cars are furnished with
adjustable bearings that will admit of the body
of the car being transferred to any guage of
trucks, thereby enabling the delivery of matter
to any destination without breaking bulk. For
rates of freight North on perishable matter,
refer to tariff herein published.


1


Florida Dispatch Line.
We call attention to the cut herewith illus-
trating the ventilated fruit and vegetable cars
in use by the Florida Dispatch Line. It has
been a long felt want and one not easily sup-


and is, therefore, prey of the spectator and mid-
dlemen, who realize the lion's share of the prof-
its from the sweat of your brows. Is this to last
forever ? The large yearly increase of the pro-
duction of oranges and early vegetables must ne-
cessitate your finding new markets for the same.
Your shipments have heretofore been sent
chiefly to New York, Philadelphia and other
Northern points, where your oranges and vege-
tables come into competition with foreign im-
portations. You will find your best markets in
the Northwestern cities, which you can now
reach by the numerous railroads recent built.
These roads are now giving every facility for
shipping fruits and vegetables at low rates. Mr.
Blackshear, the largest producer of strawber-
bries in Georgia, at Thomasville, has recently
said: Last year I shipped heavily to New
York, this year chiefly to the West. My straw-
berries are now selling at 40 cents in Cincin-
nati and Louisville, and only 20 cents in New
York." There are hundreds of small towns
lying along the railroads from Macon to St.
Louis and Chicago, of from one to ten thousand
inhabitants, from which radiate a larger terri-
tory to be supplied with fruit and early vegeta-
bles. These towns can only be reached by a
judicious system of agents, so that no one mar-





, THE FLORIDA DISPATCH,.


three hands,and went to work himself with a vim.
The following year, he took a large place, and
hired more hands, and so he continued to en-
large his operations from year to year with
varying success, but with indomitable deter-
mination and untiring energy; and to-day he
is the largest farmer in the county, having
from 4,000 to 5,000 acres in cultivation this
year.
The future of the class representing the old
South is indeed dark, gloomy, hopeless; but
the outlook for the new South is bright. In
neighborhoods where the sentiments, habits,
and practices of the old South prevail, a listless
lethargy and want of the appearance of thrift
are exhibited. Decay is written everywhere,
and good improved lands are valued at $2 to
$4 per acre. In sections where influences have
caused the people to adapt themselves to the


The Old and New South.
W. J., in Country Gentleman, writes thus of
the Old and New South:
Six miles from where I write is the village of
W- now in a dilapidated condition. In
1860 this village was in its prime, and the
seven or eight planters who resided there rep-
resented a capital of half a million of dollars,
in slaves, lands, mules, cotton, money, etc. Be-
ing Presbyterians, and from the same district
of South Carolina, they planned the village and
built residences or cottages there-the better to
enjoy the privileges of each other's society, a
church and school. Their plantations lay
within a circle of a few miles of the village.
There was no railroad then within many miles,
and marketing was done with four and six-mule
teams. They arrived from South Carolina
with their slaves and goods about the year 1850.
They prospered in their new home, and in 1860
the village and the neighborhood was a little
world of itself-a very hospitable little world,
and apparently very happy.
Four years of war followed, with terrible re-
sults to this abode of peace and plenty. Many
of its young men died on battle fields; its slaves,
numbered by hundreds, were freed; its hard
cash had been converted into Confederate
bonds; its currency was worthless paper. Their
lands and a few old mules constituted their en-
tire wealth. With two exceptions, the same
planters, or their descendants, reside in the
village now, but they could never adapt them-
selves to the new order of things. With them,
since 1865, it has been a struggle for a respecta-
ble existence, and to-day twenty thousand dol-
lars would buy the entire village and lands be-
longing to the same planters and their descend-
ants. In 1860 their plantations were valued at
$20 to $30 per acre; now at $3 to $4 per acre.
The northern farmer will ask, why did not
these people go to work and economize and
manage as we do ? Their experiences did not
lead them in that way, and surrounding influ-
ences were not favorable. In other words,
they did not know how. They had never been
used to practice economy; they had never been
dependent upon their own industry; they
knew nothing of farming as practiced in the
Northern States. They fully realize one great
truth which dwarfed everything else into com-
parative insignificance. They had staked their
all upon the success of the Confederacy and
had lost. And for this mistake they suffer in
silence like grand gentlemen, as most of them
are.
THE NEW SOUTH.
In the spring of 1866 there came into this
country from Middle Georgia a young man
who had spent the flower of his youth in the
SSouthern army. He had been carried through
Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio and Indiana to
Camp Morton as a prisoner of war. He came
here without money, but full of hope and de-
termination. He hired a small farm and two or


W. R. Stuart, of Ocean Springs, we learn that
he is shipping from twenty to twenty-five pounds
of Jersey butter to New Orleans every week,
for which he obtains $1 per pound. We should
judge this to be a profitable business.
MORE JERSEY BUTTER.-The Selma (Ala.)
Times states that Col. James Crook, of Jackson-
ville, Ala., is selling 40 pounds of Jersey butter
weekly, in New Orleans, at an average price of
75 cents per pound. A gilt-edged article will-
always bring a first-class price.

-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, published by
Ashmead Bro.'s, Jacksonville, and edited by
D. Redmond, D. HI. Elliott, and W. II. Ash-
mead, has been enlarged and much improved,
and does credit to its managers.-Ex.

-If every person would be half as good as
he expects his neighbors to be, what a heaven
this world would be.


actually existing conditions, prosperity is every-
where indicated, and lands are worth $6 to $12
per acre.
The Florida "Boom."
The Fernandina Miiirror reviews our present
status, and gives reasons for the great "boom"
in Florida affairs and prospects:
The season of our winter visitors has about
closed. It is generally conceded that a larger
number of people have visited Florida this win-
ter than ever before The hotels at Jackson-
ville have been crowded as never before, and St.
Augustine, Palatka and Green Cove, and all the
other winter resorts have been full to repletion.
The travel by cars and boats has been continu-
ous. Of course, much the larger portion of them
have been here simply for health and recrea-
tion, but a very considerable number have been
seeking to establish winter homes, and to make
investments for themselves and relatives. The
transactions in real estate have been extensive.
The public lands have been rapidly entered up,
large bodies of land have been purchased for in-
vestment, and a decided boom of prosperity has
pervaded the State. And towns and cities are
growing rapidly. New towns are established,
orange groves have been purchased or planted
out on a large scale, and vegetable culture has
been spread over a large area; great activity
has prevailed in the manufacture and shipment
of lumber, while the many demands have been.
very great.
New lines of railway have been projected,
surveyed and in part constructed. Within a,
twelve-month, the number of miles of railway
in the State will have been made double. The
next crop of oranges will probably be one-third
larger than any previous crop, and will increase
from year to year.
We see no reason why this onward career of
prosperity and growth in Florida should be di-
minished. The advantages for fruit and vege-
table culture are now fully recognized, its cli-
mate is an attraction which cannot be under-
valued. Its forests of pitch-pine open up an
immense and profitable manufacture. Its va-
ried productions give full scope to every choice.
The largest State in area east of the Mississippi
opens up an immense territory for occupation,
and the value of its products, in proportion to
the ground occupied in their production, gives
place for an immense population. Italy is one
of the most thickly settled portions of Furope,
and our American Italy will doubtless in time
rival its European sister, in population and pro-
ductions.
Southern-Made Butter.
There seems to be no good reason why butter
may not be made for home use by many of our
country residents. Note the following from
Mississippi and Alabama,. The New Orleans
Commercial Bulletin says:
JERSEY BUTTER.-From our old friend, Col.


For that, said he, my love, I guess
You cannot, cannot love less;
Give me the little hand I press!
'Tis thine, she said, with glance oblique,
While blushing roses died her chique-
The twain will be made one ne xt wique.
-Somnerville (Mass.) Journal.
-"A three-year-old discovered :the neigh-
bor's hens in her yard scratching. In the most
indignant tone she reported to her mother that
Mr. Jones's hens were "wiping their feet on our
grass,".-
-Bulwer says: We live in an age of over-
mental culture. We neglect too much simple,
healthy outer life, in which there is so much
positive joy. In turning to the world within us
we grow blind to the beautiful world without.
-"Mamma, do you know what the largest
species of ants are ? You shake your head. Well,
I'll tell you. They are eleph-ants."


...-~ ... .


7


Bee-Keeping in the South.
It is claimed that honey is one of the most
healthful sweets that can be found. As the
honey bees feed upon the pure juices of healthy
plants, it is clear that the honey must partake
of the quality of the blossoms from which it is
extracted. The sugar in honey is of a highly
nutritive character. It is a sweet of rare
purity, and it has been regarded with peculiar
favor from the remotest antiquity.
That the South is: highly adapted io bee-
keeping is evident from the natural condition
of the country. The climate is promotive of
rare exuberance of vegetation and of a flora
varied, rich and abundant. In the South the
bee finds not only this abundance from which
to gather delicious sweets, but there are many
plants, shrubs and trees, such as basswood, pop-
lar, persimmon, holly, black gum, blackberry,
wild cherry, etc. In addition to these there are
numerous honey-producing perennials.
Again, the season of labor is much longer
than at the North. Neither does the bee. suffer
from the severity of the weather to the same
extent as at the North. The economic aspects
of the subject are largely in favor of the South
as a place for the successful pursuit of the
business.
A Florida bee-keeper states that he started
the season of 1881 with thirty-five colonies,
which increased during the year to eighty-six.
During the same season he took from them
sixty-five hundred pounds of honey. He at-
tributes his success more to the natural advan-
tages of the country than to any skill on his
own part. His experience need not be excep-
tional if the people of the South will devote
themselves to so profitable an occupation.
To insure success, bee-keeping requires in-
telligent attention and aptitude for the busi-
ness. Those who undertake it without apply-
ing the proper means are likely to fail in this
pursuit as in others. Theoretical knowledge is
valuable, but practice is essential to a true com-
prehension and to the best results. The bee is
endowed with wonderful instincts, the study of
which is replete with interest. While reaping
large profits from the pursuit, the bee-keeper
Jday at the same time acquire a store of knowl-
dge of the mysteries of nature.-The South.



-My fairest child, I have no song to give you;
No lark could pipe to skies so dull and gray,
Yet, ere we part, one lesson I can leave you .
For every day:
Be good, sweet maid, and let who will be clever;
Do noble things, not dream them all day long;
And so make life, and death, that vast forever,
One grand sweet song. .
-Professor Doremus says that elephant milk
is 100 per cent. richer in butter than the milk of
of a Jersey cow. But the drat of it is that an ele-
pharnt is 100 per cent. worse than a cow to milk,
having a tail at both ends to slosh around in a
feller's eyes.
She said he had a flattering tongue,
As to his arms she fondly clongue,
And love's sweet roundelay she songue.


I
IL


Li





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.1


Culture of Sorghum.
Here and there, throughout the South, where
the land is unsuitable for the true cane, and
where seed-cane cannot be readily obtained, it
may be well to put in a crop of the Amber cane,
or some other Sorghum, and we, therefore, give
these close figures as to cost, profit, etc., from
the Texas Farmer:
As it is about the time for planting Sorghum,
I will give the figures on raising and making
up one acre of the Honduras variety last year.
I planted late and the drouth injured it materi-
ally. One part of it had to be planted a second
time, which made it very late:
To breaking and plowing one acre.................$ 2.25
Seeding, brushing and first plowing................. 1.00
Hoping, second plowing and hoeing............... 2.25
Stripping and cutting 5o days........................ 7.00
Hauli ng inding 6 days............ ........ 13.00
Foreman $3, toll to mill 34 gallons.................. 20.00
W ood, and chopping same............................... 7.50
ent of land........... ...................................... 3.00
Total cost of crop..........................................$56.00-$56.00
By seed and fodder............. 3.60
136 gallons syrup at 50 cents......................... 68.00
Total receipts from crop.....................$71.60--71.60
Thus it will be seen that after paying all the
expenses, including my own labor, I have real-
ized a net profit of $15.60.
Now some of our farmers do not like Sor-
ghum; they will not have it at any price, while
others prefer it to any they can get. One thing
we do know-syrup from the Sorgo cane will
not poison any one, which is more than can be
said for the syrups generally on our market.
Some farmers will not allow their lands planted
to Sorghum, but I notice they allow weeds to
to grow on their farms that are a great deal
worse than the Sorghum plant. My rule is to
hold the seed off the land when I cut the cane,
and plant the land to cotton the following
spring, and the thorough cultivation necessary
to grow a crop of cotton will exterminate the
Sorgo plant. There is another advantage in
growing Sorghum for syrup; we not only have
a pure article, but it does not have to be paid
for out of other crops. The farmer who raises
cotton to buy flour, doesn't eat many biscuits.
One-half acre in Sorghum will yield plenty
syrup for any ordinary family, and I do not
think one-half acre planted to anything else
will yield a better profit. It will beat corn, cot-
ton, wheat, oats, barley or millet. And if any one
should. ask why I do not plant my entire farm
to Sorghum, I can only reply that, diversified
Swarming is the most pleasant, interesting and
profitable. No sensible farmer will ever stake
everything on one crop. If he did, the entire
labor of the season would be crowded into a few
week$.

The Florida Season.
Conversing the other day with one of the
most experienced and intelligent hotel mana-
gers that has ever resided in Florida,he remarked


to' us that the observations of nearly ten years
had confirmed his early impression that the
great majority of persons who come to Florida
for climatic reasons failed to derive benefit from
the experiment, and that the primary cause of
this failure is the fact that they return to the
"North too early in the season.
Experiencing the bland mildness of our Feb-
ruary and March days, and seeing the trees in
the fresh foliage of the spring spreading their
umbrageous canopy everywhere, sojourners
here forget that the New England, Middle and
Western States are just at that time passing
through the very worst phases of their winter
weatheif; and the first news of a spdll of
mild' weather at their homes sends them back
,by hundreds, there to encounter the searching
and'penetrating bleakness of. a Northern so-
caled spring.
The effects of this are all the worse because a
residence of only a few weeks in a climate so


much milder unfits the system for the rough
usage of real wintry weather. The difference
of temperature, the change of diet, the eating
of oranges and other acidulated fruits, speedily
render even the robust pleasure-seeker compar-
atively sensitive to the piercing cold and to
sudden changes of temperature; and, of course,
the effect upon an invalid is much more marked
and injurious. It is owing to this and not to
any deficiency in our climate, that so many in-
valids who come to us for the season suffer a
sort of collapse immediately upon their re-
turn to their Northern homes.
The moral of this is that visitors to Florida,
especially those who come from considerations of
health, even if they do not "come early," should
"stay late." As the gentleman referred to at the
beginning of our article puts it: If the visitor
can spend five months in Florida, he should se-
lect December, January, February, March and
April; if he can spend four, they should be
January, February, March and April; if three,
they should be February, March and April; if
onlyltwo., they should be March and April; and
if but one, then that one should be April.
By following this programme the visitor not
only avoids the sudden change in returning to the
North, but secures the opportunity of enjoying
the most delightful weather of the Florida year.
Certainly April has been incomparably the
most charming month of the season just clos-
ing. There is nothing like it but the very
blandest weather of early June in the Middle
States; and we are assured that this is the case
season after season and year after year. Many
of these impatient persons who flitted North-
ward in February and March, and who are now
probably speaking disparagingly of Florida's
climate, would, if they had remained until
now, havereturned filled with enthusiasm and
voluble with praise.-Florida Daily Times.

Recommendations of the Lightning-Rod
Conference.
The recently issued report of the Lightning-
Rod Conference, which was composed of dele-
gates from the Meteorological Society, the Roy-
al Institute of British Architects, the Physical
Society, and the Sociely of Telegraph Engineers,
is of international importance and of great in-
terest to all owners of buildings supposed to be
protected by lightning conductors. The subject
matter is divided into three sections : (1) The
purpose which a lightning rod is intended to
serve ; (2) a statement of disputed points in the
construction and erection of lightning conduc-
tors, and the decision of the conference there-
upon; (and 3) a code of rules for the erection of
lightning conductors. The minimum dimen-
sions fixed by the conference are-copper : rope
I in. diameter; round rod, in.; tape ixi in.;
iron; round rod, 9-10 in. The weight of the
latter will be 35 oz. to the foot, while none of
the copper materials will exceed 7 oz. to the
foot. The conference considers that in most


cases copper is the cheapest and best material.
The lightning rod recommended by the con-
ference has no terminal points, but the rod' it-
self is carried to the full height required, and
then simply beveled off. About a foot below
the summit a copper ring is soldered, carrying
three or four copper needles, 6 in. long, and ta-
pering from I in. diameter to as fine a point as
possible, the points to be platinized, gilded, or
nickel-plated. The summit of the conductor
will thus have the full electrical conductivity of
the rod to receive a flash of lightning, while the
points below will tend to promote the "silent
discharge as in the usual arrangement. In a
great many cases it would be advisable to pla-
tinize or gild, rather than nickel-plate the cop-
per needles, for in large towns where coal is
consumed, the moist sulphur gases in the coal
smoke would be nearly certain to destroy the
thin coating of metallic nickel sooner or later.
Novel and definite recommendations are made


as-to the earth connection, which ought to have
serious consideration froln any one thinking of
erecting a lightning conductor. Owing to want
of sufficient data the conference makes no defi-
nite numerical estimate of the area protected
by a lightning rod, but states that, except in
two doubtful cases, there is no recorded in-
stance of a building being struck within a con-
ical space of radius whose base is equal to its
height. Examination and testing of conduc-
tors at intervals are insisted on as essentials. A
statement is made that a copper lightning con-
ductor, one inch in diameter, having its base
thoroughly connected with moist earth, may be
clasped with impunity while the top of it. re-
ceives a powerful flash of lightning; but the
assurance of the conference notwithstanding,
most people would be somewhat diffident of try-
ing this experiment.
"Pien-To and "Honey" Peaches.
The senior editor very thankfully acknowl-
edges the receipt of a small box of the celebrated
Pien- To; or "Flat Peach of China," from W.
B. Lipsey, Esq., the well-known nurseryman
and fruit-grower, of Archer, Florida.
These peaches were received here on the 5th
of May ; but we believe Mr. Lipsey had ripe
specimens of this unique and beautiful little
peach as early as the 20th of April.
The Pien-To" is a fruit of peculiar appear-
ance, having what some one calls a sort of
" Noyau" flavor-a slight taste of bitter
almonds-quite pleasant and agreeable, but un-
like that of any other peach with which we are
acquainted. We do not consider it equal in
qualityto the Early York, Rivers or Tillotson;
though many differ with us in this matter. But
it is a great acquisition, on account of its
beauty and extreme earliness, and also because
it seems better adapted to our Florida soils and
climate than any peach recently introduced.
This peach, (now beginning to be widely
scattered through the lower South,) was raised
from Australian or Chinese seed by P. J. Berck-
mans, of the Fruitland Nurseries," Augusta,
Ga.,who sent a few trees to the Messrs. Yinestra,
of "Belle View,'' on Escambia Bay, near Pen-
sacola, Fla. These gentlemen first fruited the
Pien-To and brought it into notice in the sum-
mer of 1875 or 1876, and from their (now) old
bearing trees, we believe, the variety has been
generally disseminated.
The "Honey Peach," another Chinese (early)
variety of peculiar delicacy and sweetness, was
raised by the late Henry Lyons, Esq., of Colum-
bia, South Carolina, and introduced to the trade
and the public by the writer some years "be-
fore the war,"

MASHED SALT CoD.-Take some salted cod-


fish, that has been soaked for at least twenty-
four hours. Boil it in plain water, drain it,
carefully pick out all the skin and bones and
separate the fish into small flakes. Put the
flakes into a basin, and work them .with a fork
until every flake is broken into little pieces.
Rub the saucepan freely with garlic, put the
fish and' a small quantity of fine salad oil into
it, stir well with a fork. Place the saucepan
on a very slow fire,. and never cease stirring the
contents; pour into it salad oil and milk alter-
nately, in the smallest possible quantities, but
continuously, until the mixture assumes the ap-
pearance of a thick, creamy paste. Season
with white pepper, add some lemon juice, and
never leave off stirring; for it is upon the
thoroughness of this operation that the suc-
cess of the dish depends. Serve piled on a
dish, with bread sippets fried in butter.


_ 1






12 TH LRD IPTH


Phe glarida fjispalch.
JACKSONVILLE, MAY 15, 1882.
EDITORS:
D. REDMOND, D. H. ELLIOTT, W. H. ASHMEAD.
Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.
RATES OF ADVERTISING.
SQUARES. 1 TIME. 1 MO. 3 MO. 6 MO. 1 YEAR
One........................$ 8 1 00 2 50 3 5 50 $1000 $ 18 50
Two........... ........... 2 00 5 00 10 00 18 00 34 00
Three...................... 3 00 700 14 00 25 00 46 00
Four...................... 4 00 900 17 501 3000 5800
Eight..................... 8 00 16501 30 001 50 00 10000
Sixteen.................. 16 00 30 00 50 001 80 00 150 00
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the best ad-
vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.
5,000 TO 8,000 COPIES ISSUED EVERY WEEK.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.
MR. FRANK JORDAN, No. 9 East Fifth St., Cincin-
nati, Ohio is our Western Agent, and is authorized to
receive subscriptions and advertisements to THE FLOR-
IDA DISPATCH.
Upland Rice.
It is now full time to prepare for a late crop
of upland rice. It may be planted at any time
from this date until the 10th of June-the
sooner the better. We copy the following
from an exchange which credits it to a Geor-
gia paper," and we give, below, the method of
a very successful grower in this neighborhood:
I have been quite successful in the culture
of upland rice, on my place here. On my best
land I have grown it at the rate of ninety-three
and one-half bushels per acre. The common
impression that it requires damp land is errone-
ous, as my best yield was on land which was as
dry as any on my valley farm. I prepare the
land thoroughly in the spring, plowing deep,
and if the land is disposed to be cloddy, har-
row well after plowing. Lay off in shallow
drills twenty-four or thirty inches apart, and
cover lightly. Sow the seed as soon as the
danger of frost has passed. In the first work-
ing great care must be taken to remove all
grasses and weeds, as the rice plant is delicate.
Afterwards, good hoeing and plowing with a
narrow bull-tongue plow is all that is necessary.
In the fall see that none of these little morning-
glory vines which infest our bottoms are al-
lowed to remain in the drills, as it is impossi-
ble after cutting to separate the vines from the
rice straw, and the seed being black injures the
appearance of the rice."
The mode of culture adopted by our Duval
County neighbor is as follows: He plows his
ground moderately deep, harrows and pulver-
izes well, and lays off his rows three feet apart,
throwing up a flat bed. Shallow hills are
made along this bed twelve to fifteen inches
apart, with a slight scrape of the hoe, and ten


or fifteen grains of seed are dropped in each
hill, and covered lightly, patting down the
earth with the hoe, after covering the seed.
When the young plants are well up, lightly
chop out any weeds or grass that may have
grown between the plants or on the side of the
ridge, scraping the ridge after the manner of
scraping cotton. When the plants are thus
brought to a clean stand and started to grow
off vigorously, he runs along the rows with a
half-shovel or light turning-plow, throwing
earth to the stems of the rice and hilling up
around them slightly. If this is done when the
rice is twelve to fifteen inches high, it will sus-
tain and hold up the stalks until the grain is


matured; and after this slight chilling up, little
or no work need be done on the crop. Growing
thus, in hills or bunches, the rice is much more
easily harvested, and our friend strongly ad-
heres to this mode of culture, after four or five
years' experience.
" PICTURES BIG ORANGES HIGH
ART," &c.
Putnam County to the Front I
Speaking of pictures and things,"
the very sprightly, sensible and well-informed
Putnam County correspondent of the Ljnion,
("Solon,") writing from Fort Gates a few days
since, shies a chunk'" at some of the big or-
anges pictured in a late DISPATCH. He says:
"In looking over that excellent paper, THE
FLORIDA DISPATCH, of April 24th, we notice
the cut of a train of cars running through an
orange grove. The picture is very good, but is
rather incomplete. There are undoubtedly
three or four men under these trees somewhere
watching the two men pick oranges, but the ar-
tist failed to put them in where they could be
seen. Then, also, the picture would look more
natural if there were several Florida razor-
backs, either racing the train or eating the or-
anges which lie on the ground. By the way,
those oranges are as large as the ends of the
cross-ties under the track. Large oranges
those, but we can raise them in Putnum
County."
Our good-natured censor scarcely makes due
allowance for perspective," fore-shortening"
"chiar-oscuro," etc., etc., in comparing those
" Magnum Bonum oranges in the right fore-
ground with the protruding ends of the cross-
ties in the left distance "- but, as our
artist in depicting what he evidently intended
for the "oranges of the future," has set up and
established a standard of size for "Putnam
County" to work up to, and as she says
(through her worthy representative,) that she
" can raise them," we will cry quits for the
present and wait patiently for her full and per-
fect development.
It occurs to us, "just here," that, in this
matter of pictures," our respe ted brethren of
the interior are a little inclined to be hyper-
critical and exacting; and that they do not,
somehow, seem to fully appreciate all "we"
of the "metropolitan" press are trying to do
for what a Henglish acquaintance of ours calls
" 'igh hart." Only listen to the Ocala Banner,
on a late "illustration" in the Daily Times:
"The issue of the Jacksonville Sunday Times
of April 30th, has on its first page a picture of
an alligator, or the great sea serpent, we are
not sure exactly which it is meant for-attack-
ing a ruined saw mill, while a stately giraffe in


the back ground, looks as if he had come for a
bill of lumber and was sorry to see the mill
destroyed. It is a picture that will make
Pratt weep."
[It seems scarcely necessary to say that the
"Pratt" somewhat irreverently alluded to, is
our great Saurian Investigator and Philoso-
pher, of the Palatka Herald, sometimes pro-
fanely styled "Alligator Pratt!"]
NEW YORK, May 8, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
The Steamship Gate City left Savannah
Wednesday at 6:30 a. m., and arrived in New
York Friday, the 5th inst., at 7 o'clock p. m.
WINTER PARK now has a post-office.


Poultry Journals.
The Poultry World is published monthly, at
Hartford, Conn., by H. H. Stoddard, at $1.25'
per year.
The Poultry Yard, a weekly journal, devoted
to the interests of poultry raisers, and full of
practical and valuable information, is published
in the office of the Poultry World by H. H.
Stoddard, at $1.50 per annum; or, both pa-
pers for $2 per year.
The Poultry Monthly is published by the
"Ferris Publishing Company," in Albany, New
York, at $1.25 per annum.
The Pet Stock, Pigeon, and Poultry Bulletin,
for the Fancier and Family, is published at No.
62 Courtland Street, New York, at $1.25 per
year. Address Charles R. Harker.
The American Poultry Journal is a very
tastefully printed and well-filled monthly, pub-
lished in Chicago, Ill., at $1.25 yer year, by C.
J. Ward.
These are the leading poultry journals of the,
country, and all who keep fowls for either pleas-
ure or profit should subscribe for one or all of
them.
What Builds Up the Country.
Producers of wealth, says the Corinth (Miss.)
Herald, build up the country. The tillers of
-the soil add the results of their labor to the
public, as well as to their individual wealth.
And the manufacturer who takes the raw ma-
terial, and by working upon it, increases its
value, is a producer of just so much wealth. If
the farmer by producing a bale of cotton .adds
$50 to the public wealth, the one that manu-
factures it doubles its value, and the two com-
bined have produced $100. To build up the
country, then, it is not only necessary to have
the farmer, but the mechanic, machinist, and
manufacturer also.
The possible productiveness of a country is
only reached when the raw material of every
character is subjected to the manufacturer.
That country is not prospering as it should
which sends off all its cotton, wool and hides
to be manufactured in other States and lets its
own timber rot in the forest while it sends
abroad for furniture, wagons, buggies, plow-
stocks and axe-handles.
Towns belong to the country, and add more
or less to the building up of the country. But
merchants alone cannot build up a town. Town
and country are both interested in the establish-
ment of factories, both are benefited by the in-
creased productions as well as the convenien-
ces.


The country cannot succeed with all its people
farmers, nor a town with its whole population of
merchants. Diversity of calling is essential;
one is dependent on the other, and each derives
a support from the others. There is no need of
encouraging men to become merchants; the de-
mand is always supplied. But encouragement
is needed to get our people into manufacturing,
that the greatest possible value may be pro-
duced, and the country be built up and grow
wealthy.
"PIEN-To" PRICES!-As an indication of
the value or market-price of rare and extra
early fruit, we may mention that Mr. W. B.
Lipsey, of Archer, Fla., writes us that a small
lot of Pien-To peaches sent to A. J. Barnes &
Co., of Philadelphia, sold at 75 cents each I
Mr. Lipsey remarks "that is good enough,"
and we fully agree with him.


- ----- ------------- ~-~---


120


THE F O I..D S.T H





TEFOID DIPTH 2


County (says the Marianna Courier) has sheared
eight pounds of wool from a common piney-
woods sheep. These animals thrive, and are
not molested by dogs in that county. [We
respectfully ask the Courier to fall a snake
or two on that fleece. We cannot believe
that a "common piney-woods sheep" ever
yielded eight pounds of wool at one shearing.
There must have been a strong dash of Spanish
Merino blood somewhere around that sheep
ranch, dogs or no dogs.-EDs. DISPATCH.]
- GLYCERINE.-It is stated on good authority
that not less than 3,200,000 pounds of glycerine
is produced in the candle factories of the Uni-
ted States and utilized every year in this coun-
try, and yet so late as the year 1854 it was run
off into the sewers as a waste product.


Continued from page 117.
pect to purchase at the lowest prices and sell at
the highest, and when they buy at 2 cents they
are se lling at 4 to 6 cents, They are getting the
lion's share of the profits. Such difference is
too great between the buying and selling
prices, for at those high prices the consumption
is materially decreased, and until you have
your own agents, such will continue to be the
case. What I have demonstrated in Atlanta
will apply to all the large cities that are
reached by the Western railroads. The smaller
towns cannot be reached by individual farmers,
for if a dozen were to ship at the same time to
one small town it would glut the market.
THE REMEDY.
Get up a "Co-operative Union among the
farmers with a capital of say, $10,000, with
shares of $10 each, so that every farmer can
take one or more shares and appoint your own
agents for distributing and selling your produce.
Let there be meetings in every county in the
State and start it.
In my next I will demonstrate the great ad-
vantages to be derived from co-operation.
Respectfully, E. T. PAINE.
MIDDLE FLORIDA FAIR.-The report of the
late Fair at Tallahassee, written expressly for
THE DISPATCH, and published in present num-
ber, is by far the most comprehensive and sat-
isfactory account we have seen of a very at-
tractive and encouraging display of our native
resources; and we hope it will be generally
read throughout the country. What man
has done, man may do!" -and the bright exam-
ple of our Middle Florida friends should stimu-
late Floridians and Southerners everywhere. In
this connection, we would state that there is an
error in the report of the fair, alluded to above.
Capt. P. Houstoun is still President of the As-
sociation, and not Judge D. W. Gwynn, as we
have printed it on page 122.
THE Gulf Coast Progress says that "Mr. W.
F. Burts placed on our table, recently, a few
cans of guavas prepared by him for market.
They were carefully and nicely prepared in
syrup, and as a table relish are unexcelled. Mr.
Burts, if we may judge by his accustomed thrift,
is bound to make a success of this business. If
the public can be made to appreciate this trop-
ical delicacy, it can be brought before them in
various forms of marmalade and jelly, that, in
cheapness and excellence, far excels that im-
ported from the West Indies. There is an
abundance of fruit, and we would like to see a
man of Mr. Burts' intelligence and enterprise
try the experiment."
A HEAVY FLEECE !-A farmer in Jackson


in knowing this we know enough to know'that,
notwithstanding their incomputable losses by
the war, the former slave States of this Union
will, within another generation, be enjoying a
degree of prosperity that will excite the wonder
of the world.-Industrial South.
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.-One of the neat-
est newspapers in this State is the above,
printed and published by Ashmead Bros., at
Jacksonville. It is a sixteen-page weekly and
principally devoted to agriculture, fruit rais-
ing, etc., at the astounding low rate of $1.00
per year. Address Ashmead Bros., Jackson-
ville, Fla.-Key of the Gulf.
CONCH PEAS.-C. C. Pearce, of Tallahassee,
advertises Conch Peas, in a late number of the
Floridian.


Getting Rid of the Stumps.
L Bro. Wiggins, of the New Orleans Commer-
cial Bulletin, thus sums up the most feasible
ways of getting rid of the unsightly and obstruc-
tive stumps:
Plowing in stumpy ground where the imple-
ment strikes a root or stump every few feet, is
anything but a pleasant operation and is par-
ticularly unpleasant, if the day happens to be
hot and dry. There are several ways to get rid
of them, all of which are practical enough and
will do the work. First: Blow them up; gun-
powder will not do this, and you must use dyna-
mite. A careful man can use this article with-
out any great danger, but an hireling or heed-
less fellow must be watched or he will not only
blow himself up, but any one standing near.
The process is this: Place a cartridge of dyna-
mite in a cavity made by a long, straight crow-
bar underneath the stump, tamp well, and ex-
plode the cap, using a small electrical apparatus
therefore. Be sure always to retreat a safe dis-
tance from the scene of explosion. Second :
Make a sheet-iron chimney about five feet high
and wide enough to go over the stump, build a
fire on the inside and the draft will cause it to
burn up without any further trouble. Third:
Bore a hole in the stump and fill it with coal
oil or saltpetre, plug up and leave for a few
months, fire, and it is said they will burn even
down to the roots.
IMPORTANCE OF READING.-No matter how
obscure the position in life of an individual, if
he can read, he may at will put himself in the
best society the world has ever seen. He may
converse with the greatest heroes of the past ;
.with all the writers in prose and poetry. He
may learn how to live, how to avoid the errors
of his predecessors, and to secure blessings, pres-
ent and future, to himself. He may reside in a
desert far away from the habitations of man ;
in solitude, where no human eye looks upon.him
with affection or interest, where no human voice
cheers him with its animating tones if he has
books to read, he can never be alone. He may
choose his company, and the subjects of conver-
sation, and thus become contented and happy,
intelligent, wise, and good. He thus elevates
his rank in the world, and becomes independent,
in the best sense, of all debasing associations
and influences.
NECESSITIES OF THE SOUTH.-The necessi-
ties of the South are the necessities of a country
unsurpassed in anything and everything that
can contribute to prosperity and power, and
only needing proper agencies and influences to
bring out her inherent elements of strength into
full force and effectiveness. These necessities
will soon be supplied. Intelligence and energy
are both busily at work throughout the length
and breadth of our sunny Southern land: and


-There are eighty-four silk firms in New
Jersey consuming 1,572,078 pounds of raw silk.
There are $7,525,200 capital invested in the
silk business, and the value of the products,
$18,053,210. There are 14,152 hands employed.
In the entire United States there are 383 silk
mills, employing 31,300 hands, who are paid
$9,000,000.
-An exchange truthfully says that the poor-
est kind of a citizen is he who is eternally run-
ning down his own town. He can see nothing
good in it. Taxes are too high; there is no
business life; no spirit of enterprise; the news-
paper is dull and worthless; nobody to take
the place of the business men when they die;
the whole concern is going down hill at.a break-
neck speed, and nobody has sense enough to
put on the brakes.


READ carefully the very complete and ex-
- haustive article on Cotton Seed, its manufac-
ture, ruses, etc., in present number.
BEAUTIFUL FRUIT.-Our friend, Bidwell, of
the Arlington Nurseries, near this city, handed
us, the other day, a few very beautiful speci-
mens of the "Cayenne Cherry." The shrub or
small tree that bears this fruit is an evergreen,
with delicate lanceolate leaves; and though too
tender for open air culture in this vicinity, it
could, doubtless, be very successfully grown in
South Florida. Botanically, we believe the
plant is known as Eugenia Mitchellii, having
many synonyms, according to the locality in
which it is grown, as Pitanga, in Brazil,
"Surinam Cherry," elsewhere, etc., etc. Though
very lovely to the eye, the fruit cannot be
highly recommended for the dessert; but a
few bushes, in full bearing, scattered through
the grounds of some of our Tampa and Key
West readers, would be very attractive.




-The Texas wool-growing interest is repre-
sented by the Texas Live Stock Journal to be
in a flourishing condition, the mild winter hav-
ing caused no damage and the dry spring being
very favorable to the lamb crop. The spring
clip will be the largest ever produced and of a
better quality.
-The United States Consul at Buenos
Ayres, who has made a study of the subject of
ostrich farming, is confident that the industry
would prove profitable in California, Texas,
and most of the Southern States.
-It is commonly known that feeding cows
heavily with turnips imparts the flavor of the
turnip to the milk, but if given in moderate
quantities just after milking, so that twelve
hours shall elapse for the effect to pass off, little
difficulty is experienced.
CORN ON OVERFLOWED LANDS.-A corres-
pondent of the N. 0. Picayune says: How tp
produce good corn on lands lately overflowed,
and how to keep away the cut worm so fatal to
such crops, is of the greatest importance.
1. Cover the seed corn thoroughly with pine
tar. Let every grain have a thick coat of tar
all around it.
2. Stir the corn thus covered with tar with
pulverized guano untill the tar upon the corn
shall be thoroughly saturated therewith, and
thus made easy to handle. Perhaps meal made
from cotton seed oil cake will answer the same
purpose.
Cut worms will not molest growing corn
springing from seed thus prepared.
Keep the information before the country un-
til all the overflowed lands shall be planted.


Im


THE.FLORIDA -I.,T H


121








THE MIDDLE FLORIDA FAIR.
The Spring Fair of the Middle Florida Agri-
cultural and Mechanical Association.
The Middle Florida Agricultural and Me-
chanical Association is one of the fixed institu-
tions of Florida. Beginning its career in 1878
with a stock subscription of about $3,000, it
has held five or six fairs, all successful, finan-
cially and otherwise, and besides paying for its
beautiful and extensive grounds and the taste-
ful and substantial improvements thereon, has
actually disbursed in premiums some $5,000 or
$6,000, and is now clear of debt and with a
handsome cash surplus on hand. Its manage-
ment has been in the hands of some of the most
prominent and efficient business men and agricul-
turists of Leon Co., and they have succeeded in
fully demonstrating the actual, practical value
of such exhibitions to any agricultural commu-
nity, as might easily be proven by the mention
of the fact that almost every agricultural in-
terest in the country is in a more prosperous
and satisfactory condition to-day than at this
season five years ago. Planters are not. only
giving more attention to the diversifying of
crops, but are rapidly introducing improved,
labor-saving farm machinery, and making bet-
ter profits from small acres than they ever be-
lieved it possible to do.
Among the pioneers in the introduction of
the new methods of agricultural occupation
which now prevail, and which are rapidly
taking the place of the old system of '' all cot-
ton," long credits, scanty and slovenly cultiva
tion and frequent failures, may be mentioned
Col. John Bradford, of Bradford, Co., with his
brother, Dr. W. H. Bradford, and R. F. Brad-
ford, T. J. Roberts, J. P. Roberts, A. Hopkins,
Capt. P. Houstoun, Win. C. Robinson, D. W.
Gwynn, R. A. Shine, Jno. S. Winthrop, C. C.
Pearce, Jno. A. Pearce, N. W. Epps, and a
number of others, whose efforts in behalf of the
new order of things have worked a revolution
in agriculture, the effect of which may now be
seen throughout the entire county. Other en-
terprising citizens in the adjoining, counties of
Gadsden, Jefferson and. Madison, have' been
doing good work in the same direction; nota-
bly, Governor Drew', at Ellaville, Capt. Jno.
L. Ingliss, at Madison, Col. W. C. Bird and 'E.
W. Baily, at Monticello,;'and Judge P. W.
White, arid others, in Gadsden County.
Besides the eminently satisfactory resultss of
the establishment of the Fair Association, the
new system is bearing fruit (literally) of a
much more practical description, evidenced by
the fact that up to this date the present season
there have been shippedaff to Northern mar-
kets no less than 2,50T packages of early vege-
tables, including over 1,000 barrels of potatoes
and 700 barrels of cabbages, and the shipments
of the last two named will continue some
time longer. Several planters have engaged'
the services of skilled gardeners, and others are
endeavoring to do the same, and without rely-
ing at all on immigration, the prospect is that
before many more years have passed Middle


Florida will be dotted over thickly with flour-
ishing vegetable farms, Qultivated after the
most improved methods, and yielding their
fortunate proprietors handsome incomes; and all
without the slightest interference with the regu-
lar production of the great staple crops of corn
and cotton.
The foregoing facts and reflections have been
suggested by the very successful Spring Fair"
just held, (on Wednesday and Thursday, 3d
and 4th inst.) by the Association, and the char-
acter of the exhibits seen there.
THE SPRING FAIR.,
The weather,' upon which so much depends
always, behaved itself beautifully, and was in
itself a grand success, The attendance was
quite as large as waN anticipated, a considera-


ble number of visitors being present from
Thomas County, Georgia, and from the adjoin-
ing counties of Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson
and Madison. The arrangements were com-
plete and effective, as might have been ex-
pected under the arrangement of Hon. D. W.
Gwvnn, the President of the Association, Cap-
tain P. Houstoun, its late President, and Mr.
H. S. Elliot, the efficient Secretary. The pro-
gramme was an excellent one, consisting, be-
sides the exhibition of products, of a trotting
race on Wednesday and a running race on
Thursday, for Florida or Thomas County (Ga.)
horses only; a shooting-match for a handsome
$50 gun, by amateurs, on Thursday; a Baby-
Show, and an interesting trial of numerous im-
proved agricultural implements.
THE EXHIBITS.
A number of the improved labor-saving farm
implements recently introduced in the county
were on exhibition, among which were the
" Chicago: Screw Pulverizer," exhibited by
John S. Winthrop, Esq.; the "Acme Improved
Harrow," by E. W. Gamble, Esq.; the
" Thomas Smoothing Harrow," and a number
of seed planters and other implements by B. A.
Meginniss; the "Oliver Chilled Plow," A. W.
Coates & Co.'s "Patent Iron Horse Rake," by'
C. C. Pearce, Esq.; a model of a Rice Mill, by
the inventor, Mr. W. H. Shelter, of Gadsden
County ; a machine for the manufacture of bed
springs from copper wire, and a number of
other interesting and useful articles, most of
Which were given actual tests upon the grounds,
and all of which attracted much interested at-
tention, especially on the part of those to whom
such things (familiar as they are to the farmers
of the North and West,) were a novelty and
a revelation.
Some twenty or thirty different exhibits were
made in the vegetable and farm product de-
partment, comprising vegetables of all kinds-
Irish potatoes and cabbages being foremost in
quantity and importance. Ten barrels each of
potatoes were exhibited by Col. John Bradford
and N. W. Eplpes. Those of the latter were
perfectly wonderful in size, and in the opinion
of most persons who were present appeared to
have been distinctly entitled to the handsome
premium offered by the Association, $15; but
the 'exhibit of Col. Bradford was so fine that,
the committee of judges declared themselves
unable to decide between them, and so "conm-
promised" by1 dividing the premium between
the two exhibitors. Some of the cabbages ex-
hibited by Mr. E. W-. Gamble, whosee "patch"
of six acres is a source of constant admiration
to: those who see it,) were perfectly immense,
many of them being -too large to fit comforta-
bly into a half bushel measure, after the re-
moval of all outside leaves.
Some specimens of rye, nearly ripe enough
for harvesting, exhibited by Messrs. Johnson
and Woodward, and sheafs of oats, heavily
headed and very fine, exhibited by Col. J. B.
Gamble, were the subjects of considerable aston-
ished admiration. Celery from the garden of


Professor J. N. Whitner, took the premium.
Green corn exhibited by N. W. Eppes and W.
L. Robinson looked luscious and inviting, the
former capturing the premium, of $3. W. T.
Webster exhibited the best bushel of cucum-
bers. Mr. R. C. Long, Secretary of the State.
Bureau of Immigration, exhibited the best
bushel of beets, carrots, and. specimens of the
Mangel Wu'rzel beet, for stock, of immense
size. Col. J. B. Gamble also took the pre-
miam for the best bushel of green peas.
The exhibits of butter were a feature of the
fair which attracted great attention. They
were made by Miss Bettie Bradford, Mrs. F.
A. Roberts, R. F. Bradford, Mrs. P. Houstoun
and Mrs. C. C. Pearce. The premium was
awarded to the exhibit of R. F. Bradford.
Miss N. Roberts was awarded a premium for


the best peck of blackberries. Interesting
specimens of soils were exhibited by Mr. John
P. Roberts, and a sample of bird guano from
the property of Mr. J. B. Collins, of Tallahas-
see, situated in Hillsboro' County, attracted at-
tention by its novelty, and evidently rich ferti-
lizing properties.
There were a great number of exhibits not
here mentioned, (not because of their insignifi-
cance, but for lack of space,) which filled' this
department to overflowing, and demonstrated
beyond the shadow of a doubt the capacity
of Middle Florida soil for the production
of the finest specimens 6f vegetables
of all kinds, in and out' of season, and the
facility with which our plantations, by a little
careful culture and less fertilizing than is
needed in any other portion of the.South, can
be made astonishingly productive of the best
paying crops of vegetables of every description.
THE FLORAL DISPLAY.
The main feature of the fair was, of course,
the display of flowers, and in: this department
Tallahassee fairly maintained .its well-known
and well-earned reputation as the Floral
City." The exhibits of cut flowers, flowering
plants and pot plants, although not as large as
at the Spring of 1880, were rare and beautiful>
In strong competition with it, however; was the
exhibit from the Nacoosa Nurseries, located at
Monticello, and owned by Col. W. C. Bird and
Mr. C. H. Jaquot, the latter, a native of
" Sunny France," and a professional florist and
gardener of rare skill and long experience.
This exhibit was one,of the .finest ever seen in
this section, and although most of the specimens
were young, (the Nurseries having been in ex-
istence less 'than a year,) they evinced the
care and training' and fine taste of a master of
this beautiful and enchanting art. Entries'
were made from this exhibit for the .best dis-
play of pot plants, the best display of camellias,
(for which the only premium was awarded,)
best display of ger-aniums and best 'display of
flowers.
Entries were made from Tallahassee collec-
tions of pot plants by Mrs. Bouglass, (premium);
cut roses by Mrs. Douglass, (premium) ; cut
flowers by Mrs. Douglass, (premium); and
geraniums by the same lady, whose. collection
has long been noted for its choice specniens
and the tender and loving care with which it
is kept up. Mrs. J. B. Hall'entered cut flow-
ers, (premium awarded); ,geraniums; (pre-
mium) and a fine 'collection of pot plants.
Miss Sarah Beard entered brilliant displays.of
pansies and violets, arranged with. conmnDate'
taste, both of which took premiums, as well asi
a magnificent bouquet also 'it ered by'h'ei. Miss'
Emma Wilson 'took a: premium on itansies, and.
had also a rich display of cut roses. .Miss
Fannie Perkins entered a large variety of pot:
plants, and took a premium on her geraniums,'
which certainly was well-deserved. The second
premium for display of pot plants was awarded
to Miss Annie Flagg, who also entered some


rare geraniums. Miss Perkins also took the'-
second premium for a lovely bouquet. Miss
Mattie Houstoun captured the premium for1
the best bouquet of native wild flowers. Miss
Mary Lewis entered a most beautiful display
of cut flowers of great variety, and contributed
greatly, in conjunction with Miss Ames, to the:
decorations of the hall by the presentation of!
a rich and tastefully constructed floral mono-!
gram, F. C. (" Floral City "), composed of star-
jessamin and pomegranate blooms on a ground
of ivy leaves .
The floral decoration of the hall, accom-'
plished by the united efforts of the Tallahassee
ladies, fully sustained their well-known reputa-
tion for good taste and patriotism, and were
very much admired.
THE BABY SHOW. '
Premiums of, handsome, five dollar silver


12 ~ ..HEFLOI0 DISPABTCRO.- ;


i~..-.-;---r :. .r -1;~ . r. u






STHE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 12


cups were offered for the finest babies of either
sex, and there were a number of entries for
e.ch prize. The anxious parents kept a weather
. eye upon the unfortunate individuals who were
detailed to act as judges, and there were fears
for their safety; but they delayed their deci-
siOri uftil the last moment and slipped away
through the crowd before it was announced.
Master Samson Harrison, four months old, took
one prize, Miss Mary Henry, thirteen months
old, so closely contested the claims of Miss Lily
Ethel Bowen, (daughter of Mr. N. M. Bowen
of the Floridian,) that the judges adopted the
tactics of the potato premium committee and
declined: to decide JAetween them, leaving this
awful question for the Directors to decide.
The result is not yet known.
THE SHOOTING MATCH.
The match for the handsome $50 double
shot-gun, 'was -hotly contested' by some of the
best amateur shots of Leon County,. and was
won by Mr. E. K. Hollinger, of the Florida
CentrakLand Western Railroad. .
,* THE RACES.
Several excellent horses were entered for the
ruimi ig race, which was won by' "Fbx," a
handsome saddle horse belonging to Mr. Geo.
Walker, a young lawyer of Tallahassee, and.
nephew -of ex-Governor Walker. 'Theie was
no trotting race.
THE TOURNAMENT. AND BALL. '
The tournament was a well-conducted affair,
reflecting much credit upon the young gentle-
men having it in'charge. Mr. L. A. Perkins
came out best in the lists, and Mr. A. Hopkins,
Jr., second; Mr. John Williams third and Mr.
W. F. Papy fourth. The first named Miss
Lisa Williams, Queen, and the others in order
as follows, the following named young ladies as
maids of honor: Miss Annie Papy, Miss
Lettie Shepherd and Miss Jennie Wilson.
This last ceremony, as usual, took place at the
g. rand ball given by the young gentlemen at
Gallie's Hall on Thursday night, which was
one of the nicest entertainments of the kind
which has occurred for a long time. This ball
was to havebeeri given at the new hotel, but
owing to thq fact that no provision for lighting
it "dould 'yet be made, the opening" of our
new hostelry hadto ,be. postponed to a later
day.




-2Go North, go South, go East, go West, and
not onie State can be found which will equal
' Florida ini variety and quality of its produc-
tions, its general healthfulness, its climate, and
that freedom from care that, as a rule, attends
the new settler in other sections. As a home of
the citrus family it possesses no superior, and'
for pine-apples, bananas, cocoanuts and other
tropical fruits, it cannot be surpassed. Cotton,
tobacco, sugar-cane, and various other staples
are indigenous to the soil. In the matter of corn


and other grains it is the equal of any of the
Southern States. It is the true home of the ag-
riculturist, who will realize triple from the pro-
ducts .of his toil what he may in the cold North-
ern climate. We, therefore, put the question
bluntly: Why linger and hesitate any longer?
Follow our advice and. "go South-go to
Florida." Be assured that, though the results be
small in the first year, in the years to come you
will never regret the step which you have taken.
-Pathfinder.
'-"Heavy trains of lumber," says the Union,
arrive here daily, from points on the Florida
Central and Western, and there are about teni
vessels at the railroad wharf loading with lum-
ber." -
-The success of the artesian .well in the
plaza at St. Augustine has induced a number of
property holders to sink wells on their prem-


ises. Besidso the one before reported as being
driven by Mr. H. P. Ammidown, Capt. E. E.
Vaill, of the St. Augustine Hotel, is boring one
for the use of that hostlery.
LAKE JESSUP ITEMS.-The citizens of Lake
Jessup formed a joint stock company last Tues-
day to secure for themselves better transporta-
tion. The Board of Directors consists of W.
G. White, Geo. Fox, A. Aulin, A. Solary, and
J. H. Lee. The Directors elected W. G. White,
President: A. Aulin, Vice-President, and Geo.
Brown, Secretary and Treasurer. Among the
prominent stockholders we mention Dr. Henry
Foster, of New York; Dr. J. F. J. Mitchell, of
Lake Jessup; A. Solary, of Jacksonville; A.
Aulin, W. G. White and Gen. 0. H. Brewster.
The company have purchased the substantial
iron-hull freight and passenger steamer Isis,
which is now running between this city and
Lake Jessup twice a week. Other steamers will
.be added .as the increasing demands require.
Messrs. Brewster and Fox have recently pur-
chased and are erecting a steam saw-mill.
"-The Faber Brothers, celebrated pencil
manufacturers, have established a colony of
about' fifty German families on an Island that
they have purchased off Cedar Keys, Fla. It
is called Atsenna Island, and they have put
up saw-mills and machine shops, and have their
workmen engaged in cutting and preparing the
cedar wood for Faber's famous cedar pencils.
The colony is a flourishing one, and is as busy
as busy can be.
-A company has been formed in South Flor-
ida to 'manufacture an active fertilizer from
the shell marl which is found in large quanti-
ties on some portions of the upper St. John's.
It is proposed to grind the shell, and supply
ammonia by adding the decomposed flesh and
bones of fish, which can be obtained in large
quantities in the lakes of the upper river. A
large area of land in the vicinity -of Green Cove
Springs is underlaid with shell marl, easily dug,
and hitherto well tested as an excellent ferti-
lizer for orange trees; it is lacking, however, in
the ammonia necessary for the growth of vege-
tables and other truck-growing plants.- Green
Cove ")Spring."
-They are calling for proposals for the clear-
ing of the right-of-way, grubbing and grading
on the line of the Tropical Florida Railroad,
from Panasofkee to Tampa, Florida, about
seventy miles. Profile and specifications may
be seen upon application at the office of the
Engineer, D. E. Maxwell, at Ocala.
-The Pensacola Union depot is one of the
finest in-the South. It is now receiving its rich
and costly furniture.
-The Tampa Progress tells about a gentle-
man of that section who has a mango tree four
years old that had 116 mangoes on it this year.
-Daily trains are now running on the South
Florida Railroad from Sanford to Kissimmee
City. Train leaves Sanford at 8:40 a. m.; re-
turning, leaves Kissimmee at 4 p. m.
-Mr. C. IH. Foster is said to have the larg-


est orange grove in Manatee County. It con-
tains 2,700 trees, most of which are bearing.

-The pen is sifiple, yet sublime!
It writes its story on the page,
And sends it down the stream of time
In statesmen's lore-in minstrel's rhyme-
As echoes of the passing age.
It, too, has power to crown a king,
'And uncrown kings in realms of earth!
By lifted finger it can bring
A word to silence or to sing
An anthem of immortal birth.
The lustre of the sword is dim
Besides the lustre of the pen;
The mountain's crown, the ocean's rim,
SEcho the universal hymn
That lifts its highest among men.

PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH: WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


Agricultural, HIorticultural and Pomnological
Associations.
Florida Fruit-Growers' Association-Office at Jack-
sonville-D. Redmond, President; W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; W. H. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding See-
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee-Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, 0. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official organ-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA STATE GRANDE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICES.-Master, Win. H. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Win. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B. F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Field-
ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. H. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate
Keeper,- Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Win. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T. W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H.
Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Geo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Unistead, Hous-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville.-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J. C. Greeley, Treasurer.
Directors-J. H. McGinniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro, P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney. Annual meeting-
Last Friday in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' A.tso.ia-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; 0. E.. Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. 0. Taylor, Secretary and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Floridn.-President, A. B. Bartlett, Georgetown; Vice-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. Hawkins, Lake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George; George W. Thorn, Treasurer,
Georgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
mond, Fort Gates.
Picolata Agricultural and Horticultural Society.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, W. N. ParKer, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Corresponding Secretary,
N. H. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., Recording Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer. Meets first Saturday in each month.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
ti'on.-G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. Mathers, Second Vice-President; B.
W. Well, Corresponding Secretary; B. F. Jordan, Sec-
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical Fruit Growers' Association of Monroe County,
Florida.-Home office, Myers, Florida; F. A. Hendry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson,
President; Thomas Tillis, First Vice-President; J. B.
Sutton, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary; J. M. Barco iRecording Secretary;
L. W. Hamlin, Assistant Recording Secretary.
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Association.-
John Bradford, President, Bradfordville, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida. .: :
Pinellas, Florida, Fruit Growers' Association.-D. W.
Meeker, President; Win. P. Neeld, Secretary.
Bronson Agricultural Union Bronson,. Florida.-Jo-
seph Hirst, President; L. W. Hfamlin, Secretary; semi-
montjhly meetings, first and third Saturdays.
Central Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida.-Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
' Evergreen Horticultural Society, Dunedin, Florida.-
J. W. Matchett, President; W. Tate, Vice-President;
Geo. L. Jones, Secretary. : '
Decatur County Fair Association, Bainbridge, Geor-
gia.-Maston O'Neil, President; L Kwilecki, Secretary.
Lake Wier Agricultural and Pomological Society (of
Marion County, Florida).-Captain J. L. Cainy, Presl-
dent; Dr. L. M. Ayer, Corresponding. Secretary.
Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Higgint, Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Association; Albany,
Georgia.-L. E. Welch, President; T. M. Carter, .Secre-
tary.
Sumter County Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation.-D. L. Hubbard, President, Leesburg; W. C.
Dodd, Recording Secretary, Leesburg; A. P. Roberts,
Corresponding Secretary, Leesburg.
Florida Central Agricultural Society.-Thos. F. King,
President Gainesville; Cre n Secretary, -
; W. K. Cessna, Corresponding Secretary, Gaines-


ville.
Archer Agriculturil Association.-J. W. Williams,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine, Secretary ; I. C. Neal,
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President; John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewis, Treasurer, Tallahassee.
Indian River Agricultural and Pomological Society.-
A. P. Cleveland, President; W. H. Sharp, Secretary,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
Association.-R. J. Mays, President; Frank W. Pope,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
Orange County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred. L. Robertson, Corresponding
Secretary.
Albion Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Associa-
tion.-Joseph Iirst, President; S. Frei, Secretary. Semi-
monthly meetings first and third Mondays.
Gadsden County Fair Association.-Jesse Wood Pres-
ident; W. H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R. Harris,
Second Vice-President; J. W. Kendricks, Secretary; E.
C. Lou, Treasurer.
South Georgia Agricultural arid Mechanical Associa-
tion, Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
which we may have fallen in the naming of officers, &c.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH?]


1 _






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


BAKED SPONGE PUDDING.-Three eggs,
their weight each in butter, sugar and flour,
beat the eggs very light; add the butter beaten
to a cream, then sugar and flour. This will
make four large cupfuls; fill them half full
bake in a moderate oven ten minutes and serve
with same.
TROPICAL FRUITS IN NEW ORLEANS.-Oui
fruit trade is certainly growing rapidly, there
passing no week that does not witness the ar-
rival of several vessels with large cargoes
steamers in the trade, which are becoming more
numerous, bring in as many as 25,000 to 30,
000 boxes of oranges and lemons at a single(
trip. The greater part of our fruit arrivals arn
almost immediately forwarded to the Westermi
cities in specially constructed fruit cars, via th(
Jackson route, and arrive at their ultimate(


MAYONNAISE FOWL.-Cut a fowl in pieces,
separating each joint; put into a stewpan with
a wine glassful of olive oil and fry till brown.
Dredge in a teaspoonful of flour; add a teacup
of boiling water, cover closely, simmer half an
hour, season with pepper, salt and minced
onion, then a tablespoonful of mushroom cat-
sup. Take out the meat, arrange on toast;
boil gravy up once, pour over fowl and toast;
serve hot.
CREAM PIE AND ORANGE DESERT.-Cut the
oranges in thin slices and sprinkle sugar over
them; let them stand for two or three hours ;
serve on ordinary fruit plates. The pie is made
with a bottom crust only, and that not thick
but light and flaky. Take one coffee cup of
thick, sweet cream, half a cup of pulverized
sugar, a tablespoonful of flour, one egg; flavor
with lemon extract; bake until you are sure
the crust is brown and hard, so that it will not
absorb the custard.
LEMON JUMBLES.-One egg, one half tea-
cup butter, three teaspoonfuls milk, two tea-
spoonfuls baking powder, two small lemons
(juice of two and grated rind of one); mix
rather stiff roll and cut out with a cake-cutter.
CRUMPETS.-Mix a quart of good milk with
water to make a batter; add. a little salt, an
egg, and a teaspoonful of good yeast; beat
well, cover it up and let it stand in a warm
place to rise. Clean the muffin plate, or, not
having this, a frying-pan, while warm, over the
fire, and rub it with a greased cloth or a little
butter tied up in a piece of muslin; pour a cup-
ful of the batter into the pan or on the plate;
as it begins to bake raise the edge all around
with a sharp knife. When one side is done,
turn and bake the other side. Crumpets are
generally now poured into proper sized rings of
tin, which makes them all of a size alit thick-
ness.
COMMON CAKE (nice for children).-Bake
ginger cake in tins as for jelly cake. Spread
golden syrup between the layers. Frosting
made from the yolk of one egg gives it a nice
finish. The yolk of an egg is just as nice for
frosting as the white.
To MAKE A NICE DISH.-A nice dish for
supper is made of sweet or Irish potatoes, which
have been left from dinner (either baked or
boiled). Slice them, but not in very thin
slices, lay in a baking tin or pudding dish, and
cover each layer with little lumps of butter and
with pepper and salt. If you like the flavor of
pork put two or three thin slices of salt pork
on the top. Bake for half an hour. Raw
potatoes may be prepared in the same way, but
will require a longer time to bake them. To
give an excellent flavor to warmed-over pota-
toes take some of the fat that you cut from
slices for beefsteak, fry in the pan till you
have as much as you need, then take out the
scraps and put in the potatoes. This is better
than butter.


Vegetable Quotations.
FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE, )
315 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, May 10, 1882. -
Receipts of vegetables, etc., at this port via Florida Dis-
patch Line and Southern Express Company, week
ending 9th inst. Vegetables, 5,250 packages; -strawber-
ries, 1,500 quarts.
Strawberries from Florida and South Georgia coming
poor in quality, and best selling at 20c per quart.
Potatoes coming in fine condition and selling at $1 00@
5 00 per barrel for prime; small at $2 75.
Cucumbers coming in increased quantities and fall-
ing off in quality and price, selling at $1 00@2 00 per
crate.
Tomatoes selling well for good stock, bringing $1 50@
3 00 per crate.
Beans-Florida, $1 00@1 50; Charleston and Savannah,
$2 00@3 00 per crate.
Egg-plant, $2 00@2 50 per crate.
Cabbages, $3 00@4 00 per barrel lor prime quality.
Beets, $1 75@2 00 per crate.
Squash, 75c@1 00 per crate.
Respectfully,
C. D. OWENS,
General Agent.
Jracksonville Wholesale Prices.
Corrected weekly, by JONES & BO WEN, Wholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.
SUGARS-Granulated ......................................... 11
White Ex. C........................................ 10
G olden C............................................. 8%
Powdered ........... ..... 11
Cut Loaf............................................. 11Y
COFFEE, Rio-Fair ... ........................... 11
G ood ............................................. 11
Choice ........................................ 121
B est .............................................. 13
Java 0. G................................................ 25
M ocha ................................ .................. 5
Peaberry............................................... 18
M aracaibo........................................... 18
Any of above grades roasted to order.
FLOUR-Snow Drop, best.................................... 9 50
Oreole, 2d best....................................... 8 50
Pearl, 3d best....................................... 5 8 25
M EATS-Bacon..................................................... 11% @ 12
Hams (Merwin & Sons)................... 15
Shoulders.... ..... .. ......................... 11
HOMINY- Pearl, per bbl................................ 5 40
M EAL -per bbl.................................................... 5 40
LARD-Refined in pails...................................... 13V
BUTTER-Very best, kegs............................. 35
CHEESE-Full cream ......................................... 15
Half cream........................................ 132
TOBACCO-Shell Road......................................... 55@56
Florida Boys, 11 inch 5's.................. 40
Florida Girls, bright twist, 14 to lb.. 50
Smoking in packages, 8 to lb ........... 45
SOAP AND STARCH-Colgate's 8 oz., per box... 3 50
Peerless, 8 oz., per box............................ 3 50
Starch, lump, per lb........................... 5@6c
HoPs, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS-
Hops, per lbf....... .................................. 15@22c
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz.......... 60c
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
doz. 1 lb ..................................................... 2 25
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. 1 lb. 2 25
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. 4 lb..... 2 70
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. l ...... 1 50
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl................................... 3 25
CHICKENS, each................................................... 25 45
EGGS- Per doz..................................................... 15
HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lb., first class 13
Country Dry Salted, per Ib................ 911
Butcher Dry Salted, per lbf.................... 9@10
Damaged Hides....................................... 6
Kip and Calf, 8ibs. and under................ 10
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb.................. 35
Deer Skins Salted, per lb........ ...... 26@30
FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter........................................................ 1 50@ 4 00
Raccoon, each........................................ 5@15
W ild Cat, each....................................... 10@20
Fox, each ................................................ 5@ 15
BEESWAX-per lb.. ...20
WOOL-Free from burs, per l)b..................... 17@22
Burry, per lb........................................... 11@ 15
GOAT SKINS-Each per lb ................................... 10
Bacon and flour advancing rapidly-buyers will do
well to make their purchasesnow.______
[4-347.]
1\Totice for "EhL."blicatiozn.

LAND OFFICE AT GAINESVILLE, FLA., May 3, 1882.
N OTICE is hereby given that the following named
settler has filed notice of his intention to make final
proof in support of his claim, and that said proof
will be made before T'i. E. Buckman, Clerk Circuit Court
at Jacksonville, Florida, on Saturday, June 24th, 1882,
viz.: Jacob Robinson, Duval County, homestead entry
N9. 561, for the Nw of Nw , section 6, township 3s,


range 27e.
He names the following witnesses to prove his con-
tinuous residence upon, and cultivation of, said land,
viz.: Calvin Hughes, Samuel Anderson, Andrew Sess-
ions, Lee Clark, all of Jacksonville, Florida.
L. A. BARNES,
May 8 tf Register United States Land Office.


destination in less time than the fruit could
have reached New York from the original
point of departure.
In this connection we are glad to notice that
the L. & N. Railroad has ordered a number of
special fruit cars, two of which came in a few
days ago. It is understood that the L. & N.
will soon begin running a fast freight express
between here and the North, in order to accom-
modate dealers in tropical fruits.-N. 0. Com.
Bulletin. _______


HUAU & CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF

FINE IKEY WEST CIGARS
-AND-

WHOLES.ALE LEAF 1E.ALE6RS.


Proprietors of Factories Nos. 29, 61 and 81, District
of Florida,
Jacksonville, Florida,
The Most Extensive Manufacturers in the State.
lyr to april 23, '83.
INTER PA s a new towa in Orange
WINTLER Pr I County, Florida eighteen
miles south of Sanford, on the South Florida Railroad,
with a frontage of two miles upon three beautiful Lakes.
WINTER HOMES in the midst of Orange Groves, for
Northerners, is the main idea. For Pamphlets and
Maps giving particulars, address
CHAPMAN & CHASE,
to July 17, aitland, Orange Co., Fla.
to July 17, '82


THE
FLO ZXDA

DAILY TIMES.


THE TIMES is the official paper of the city and the
leading paper of the State. It has the largest circulation
in Florida, and reaches all parts of it. It is not merely
a local newspaper, but aims to advocate the interests
and promote the prosperity of Florida as a whole.
Its reputation outside the State is very high. It has
taken rank among those Journals whose columns are
looked to for news, and whose comments are quoted
with respect throughout the country.
Its editors have had wide and varied experience in
journalism North as well as South; its advertising pa-
tronage is liberal and of the best character; and its re-
sources, financial and other, are ample. It will furnish
Florida with a live, progressive, outspoken, and reada-
ble newspaper, the peer of any.

ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.
THE TIMES has secured by special contract the full
despatches of the ASSOCIATED PRESS. Besides that
its Editor is Agent of the Associated Press for the State
of Florida, which gives him great advantages in obtain-
ing the freshest and most important State news.

SPECIAL DESPATCHES.
With representatives in the leading news centres of
the country, THE TIMES is well served in addition to
the regular Press reports. During the past winter it has
received a very large number of telegraphic specials."
CORRESPONDENCE.
Its regular correspondence from Washington, New
York and Boston, is of noteworthy excellence; and its
State correspondence has attracted much attention.
This feature will be extended and improved; and to
this end correspondence containing news or items of
information of any kind is solicited from all quarters.

"OLt) SI."
In addition to his editorial work, Mr. Small will write
regularly for THE TIMES, and in its Sunday issues the
famous "Old Si'" will disseminate wisdom in chunks
to the Florida public.
TERM (strictly in advance): One year, $10; Six
months, $5; three months, $2.50; one month, $1. sent
one month on trial for 50 cents.
Remittance should be made by draft or post-office
order, or in a registered letter. Address
JONES & SMALL.
to sept 26,'82 Jacksonville, Fla.


1241


_1 _ _ I


lm


1


m


VIEWS OF FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In Book Form, Containing 12
Views Each.
Souvenir of Florida, (small size).......................25c.
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size)........ ... .25c.
Souvenir of Jacksonville,( large size).................50c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine,(large size)...............50c.


Stereoscopic Views, per Doz. $1.5O.

Address

ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
J C KS 0 NVILLE, FLA.






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.
Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTERt & BEAN,
Agents for the State of Florida.


ir'Analysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


to sept 26, '82


GULF NURSERY
Has thirty thousand three and four year old orange
trees prepared for summer setting. Send in your
orders.


DUNEDIN, FLORIDA.


Sportman's Emporium.





W. C. PITTMAN,
No. 3 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.

Ouns, Pistols, iRIfes and Cutlery,
Shlooting and Fishilng Tackle.

SHELLS LOADED TO ORDER.
1 yr to April 23, '83


DEALER IN
PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,
GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, 00PPI RAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emery Papers, &c.
AGENT FOR
PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000o, FIRE TEST.
Joh0non'8 Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, Martinez and Longman '8
Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
to mar 25,88, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

D. G. AMBLER. J. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOOKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as
AMBLER'S BANK.
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New'
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf

LIZSTER B^O.'S

Soluble Ground Bone,
THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

F IRTILLIR FOR ORAN1 TR EI


BUY THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

-0-

GOULD & CO.IS


FERTILE ZER
-AND-
INSEOT E-nZTEI:M1VIINAT WOM,
Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange Growers and Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, con-
tains potash, lime, phosphoric acid, ammonia and the other essential elements of Plant Food, making a com
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & Bro.'s, and other high-priced Fertilizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity, and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $4 per barrel, 032 per
ton.
All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.
MESSRS. GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-I used one-half ton of your Fertilizer, in connection with the same amount of Baker & Bro.'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gave as good results as the others, which are much higher priced fertilizers-costing
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $51.50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12, 1881.
LEESBURG, SUMTER CO., FLA., March 6,1882.
GOULD'& Co.:
Gentlemen-Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed your
agents at this point (Messrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer,
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its fostering care, I having had the honor
to win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer better and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer kills two birds with one stone," inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies
at one'and the same time. I bave been testing it in the field, garden and orange grove for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For my partpI ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. if I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork.
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOURT.
GOULD & CO.,
to aug 27, '82 NO. 6 W. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


125


_ _ L


I ,


W. L. DAVIDS,


Broker and Commission Merchant,


Oysters, F ruits nid Yo otI blos niQo Guooml Grocors Spiillos,

P. o. Box 862.] Jacksonville, Florida.

PEj .IBS"EO.CTIO 1?10T S C0 AZ m E .

No. 3. No. 4. No. 5.7
CAPACITY. ounounce t ounce to 1 ounce to
i11 lbs. 22 lbs. 55 lbs.

Tin Scoop, Brass Beam ..........$ 12 00 $ 13 00 $ 14 00
Brass 12 75 14 00 15 00
-z Brass (seamless) ......... 13 50 15 00 16 00
--" Nickel Plated Scoop and Beam.......... 14 75 16 50 17 50

Ocean Steamship Company.

SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.




The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
GATE CITY, Wednesday, May 3d, 6:30 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, May 6th, 8:30 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, May 10th, 12:00 noon.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, May 13th, 3:00 p. m.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, May 17th, 6:30 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, May 20th, 8:30 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, May 24th, 12:00 noon.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, May 27th, 2:00 p. m.
GATE CITY, Saturday, May 31st, 5:30 a. m.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway, and close connections with the new and elegant steamers to Florida.
Freight received every day from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m., at Pier 35, N. R.
H. YONGE, G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.
Agent of Line, and C. R. R. of Ga., Office New Pier 35 N. River, N. Y.
W. H. RHETT, General Agent, 317 Broadway, New York.
H. R. CHRISTIAN, Gen'l Soliciting Agent. C. D. OWENS,
12-2m Gen'l Ag't Sav'h, F rida & Western Ry. Co, 315 Broadway. N. Y.
F. S. CONE, A. H. MANVILLE, E. A. MANVILLE,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer

Lake George, Florida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums,
APeaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, and over one hundred varieties of the Citrus.
ORANGE A1ND LEMON TREES a specialty.
Catalogue free. to apr 17, '83


m


I


ILI


o t May 31 82*





..jas tmjaili.
Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at................ 9:00 a. m.
Arrive Jacksonville at............... 5:40 p. m.
Leave Callahan at......................... 944 a. m.
Arrive Waycross at......................11:57 a. m.
Arrive Jesup at............................ 1:40 p. m.
Arrive at Brunswick at................. 6:00 p. m.
Arrive Savannah at................. 3:40 p. m.
Arrive Charleston at................... 9:10 p. m.
Arrive at Augusta at............ 5:20 a. nm.
Arrive Macon at........................... 7:50 p. m.
Arrive Atlanta at........................ 3:50 a. m.
A rrive Louisville at....................................
A rrive Cincinnati at....................................
Arrive Washington at................. 9:30 p. m.
Arrive Baltimore at..................... 12:25 p. m.
Arrive New York (limited express)........ ...
Arrive New York P. R. ....... 6:45 a. m.
Arrive it. Louis at......................................
Arrive Chicago at................ ...........
LTIME.
To Savannah...... .....................................
To New York.........................
To Washington................................ ....
To Chicago................................... ................
To St. Louis.................................................;.


JacK'lle Ex.
Daily.
5:40 p. mn.
8:15 a. m.
6:45 p. m.
9:15 p. m.
11:25 p. tn.
5:30 a. in.
2:35 a. m.
9:05 a. m.
1:30 p. inm.
7:00 a. m.
12:50 p. m.
8:00 a. m.
7:00 a. in.
9:10 a. m.
12:05 a. m.
3:50 p. in,
5:20 p. m.
7:00 p m'
7:00 p. m
6:40 hours.
45:45 hours.
36:30 hours.
49;00 hours.
49:00 hours.


THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
".,Jacksonvijle to Savannah.
Aj-Jacksonville to Louisville.
46 i-Jacksonville to Washington.
i, Jacksonville to Cincinnati.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
Passengers taking Savannah sleeper can remain in the
car until 7 o'clock a. m.
Parlor and Drawing-Room Car on morning train
from Jactsonvi lle through to Savannah, connecting
daily with through Pullman sleeper for New York.
The Dining Car attached to the train between Savan-
nah and Charleston affords supper to passengers going
North, and breakfast to those coming South.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to Montgomery and New Orleans
take the evening train.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. m. and arriving at Savannah at 2:35 a. m., or train
at Jacksohville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vaninah at 3:40 p. m.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia.; Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, at Depot Ticket
Office. J. E. DRAYTON,-
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*] Ticket Agent.


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
-0

MERCHANTS & MINERS


TRANSPORT ATOIOMNOIPANY!







The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail
From BALTIMORE for SAVANNAH

EVERY FIVE DAYS,
and from SAVANNAH for BALTIMORE, as follows:
Tuesday, May 2d, at 5 p. m.
Saturday, May 6th, at 10 a. m.
Thursday, May 11th, at l p. m.
Tuesday, May 16th, at 5 p. m.
Monday, May 2k2d, at 11 a. m.
Saturday, May 27th, at 2 p. m.
Thursday, Juiie 1st, at 5 p. m.
Tuesday, June 6th, at 11 a. m.
Monday, June 12th, at 3 p). n.
Saturday. June 17th, at 8:"30 a. m.
Thursday, June 22d, at 11 a. m.
Tuesday June 27th, at 3 p. m.
Monday, July 3d, at 9 a. m.
The steamers are first-class in every respect, and every
attention will be given to passengers.
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $15,
Including Meals abd Stateroom.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the lpincipal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Bal timore.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
column.
JAS. B. WEST & CO., Aaents.
Savannah, January 8th, 1878. 30-tf

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA




WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1882,
Passenger Trains will run over" the Waycross Short
Line as follows;
Mv- Ar T--I:Yl


DESTINATION.


Baltimore, Md.........................
Philadelphia, Pa...... ...........
Roston, Mass..... ...................
New York, N. Y............... ..


From lan d-j Fla. Transit & iFrom Statiofs iFrom -Stations
ings on St. Jacksonville. Peninsular on J., P. & on S., F. &
Johns River. Railroads. M. R. R. W. Railway.


Jo.h s i ama .

64 $127 50 $106 63 $121 63 $121 53 $1 05
... 64 1 27 53 1 06 13 41 21 63 1 21 53 1 05
71 143 60 1 22 70 1 37 70 1 37 60 1 22
. 61 1 23 50 1 02 60 1 17 60 1 17 50 1 02


To make through rates from Tampa and Manatee, add for boxes 15c., and for barrels 25c. to rates from
Florida Transit Rrailroad. Single packages will be charged $1 each.

To make through rates from points tributary to the St. Johns River and Florida Transit Railroad, add the .
rates for transportation lines connecting to above rates.
Stencils, shipping receipts and information furnished on application to any Qf the agents of the Line.

Fruit and Vegetable Shipments Through in Ventilated Cars.

Between Jacksonville and Savannah daily. TRANSFER TO SHIPS' SIDE AT SAVANNAH WITHOUT
BREAKING BULK.
Rates always as LOW AS BY ANY OTHER LINE. Take out Bills Lading via Savannah, Florida and West-
ern Railway to insure ADVANTAGES OF THF ALL-RAIL ROUTE.
Days of sailing subject to change without previous notice. For further information, if needed, apply to
GEO. YONGE, Agent Central Railroad Steamships, 409 Broadway, New York. Gen. W. L, J AMES, Agent,
25 South Third St., Philadelphia. A. L. HUGGINS, Agent Merchants' and Miners' Line, Baltimore, WM. H.
RING, Agent Boston and Savannah Steamship Line, 18T Wharf, Boston. 0. G. PEARSON, Agent S., F. & W.
Railway, 219 Washington St., Boston. C. D, OWENS, General Agent S., F. & W. Railway, 315 .Broadway, New
York. J. B. ANDREWS, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, 43 German St., Baltimore. J. M. CLEMENT, Agent S., F,
& W. Railway, Pier 41 South Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, or to either of the undersigned.
W. 0. AMES, General Freight Agent, Jacksonville.
F. B. PAPY, General Freight Agent, Fernandina, Fla.- .
JAS. L. TAYLOR, General Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga:;-
D. H. ELLIOTT, General Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent, Jacksonville, Fla.


Through Tariff on Vegetables Only.

VIA THE


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE.

ALL-RAIL VIA ATLANTA OR MONTGOMERY.
IN EFFECT MARCH 15, 1882.


FROM 7
JACKSONVILLE, CALLAHAN JUNCTION, LIVE OAK AND STATIONS S., F. & W. R'Y. c
TO 0'


M acon ............................... . ........................... ...... ..... ...... ............ . .......... ............. -... ............... 5 50$ 50 )O
Augu.ta........................................... ........ . .. ............ 3 60 60 00
A ug ustata ........................................ ............................ ................................ ........ .3.....5 ...... ........ .......................... 30 60 60 00
A tolum bus, Gaanta................................................................................................................................ ............. 35 70 70 00
CMo ntgom ery, A la........ ...................................................... ........... ...................................................................... 35 70 70 00
M ontgobil e....ry, A a............................. .......................................................................................................... 40 8 7 0 00
M o b ile ...................................................................................................................... .......... .... .8......0........... .. 0" 8 8
Chattanooga, T enn.................. ....... ............................................................................................................. 40 1 80 80 00-
K noxville, T enn ............................................................................................................................................... 45 90 90 00
N ew O rleans........:..................................................... .................................... ........................... .................. 45. 90l 90 00
N ashville, Tenn.. .................................................... .................................... .. ..................... 45j 90 90
M em phis, Tenn.... J..... .......... ................................ ....................................... ... 15 90 0Q 70
Louisville, K y......................... .... ................ .............................. ..... 5 1 00 100 00
Cincinnati, O hio........................... ............................................... ............................................. 55 00 00
H enderson, K y................................... ...... ... ........ ................................... 55 1 00 100 00
Columbus, Ky........................................... ...................... 55l 001100 00
Hickman, Ky.... ............-..... ....... ... .. 00 1100 00
M a d iso n In d ... ..... ........................ ... ... ... ... ... ............................. ............................................................................................... 60 1 10 110 00
Jetatirsonon ville, Ind......... .... ...... ...... ............ ................................... .............. ..................................... 60 1 10 110 00
E vansville, Ind.... ................................... ................................................................ ................... .. 60 1 10 110 00
Cairo, Ill................. ......... .... ............... .... ........................................................................................... ................. 60 1 1 .10 00
Ind ian apo lis......................... ................................................................ ............................... ........................ 60 1 10 110 00
Terre H a u te ...... .................................................................................................................................................. 60,1 10 10 00
Colum bus, O hio.............................. .........................................................1...1................... .......... ............. 65 1 5 15 a 00 -
S t. L ouis..................................................................... ................................................................... ...... ............ 65 1 15 115 00
C h icago ..................................................................................................... .............. ............................................ 65 15 11115 00
P eoria, 111................................................................................................................................... ........... 65 1 15 115 00
Cleveland.................................................................... ............................... ............... ................. ........701 20120 00
Toledo.................................................... .......................7 1 20 12( 00
Detroit.......................... ..................... ................. ..................... ...70i 20 120 00

TO SAVANNAH. TO CHARLESTON.
FROM
ROM* Per Box. Per Bbl. Per Box. Per Bbl.
Jacksonville2.. .......... ... .. ............ ................... ......... 20 40 25 50
Landings on St. Johns R iver................................................................................. 30 50 35 70
Stationson Florida Transit R. R.... ................................... 30 50 35 65
Tam pa and M anatee.................................................................... .......... 45 75 50 90
Stations on the J. P. & M R R.................................................... ....... 30 50 35 65
Stations on S., F. & W Railway............................................................ 25 50 35 75

The dimensions of the Standard Box for Vegetables are 8x14x22 inches, and the weight is estimated at 50
pounds.
The Standard Barrel is double the capacity of the Standard Box.
Excess of capacity over the above will be liable to pro rata excess of charges.
The Car-load is estimated at 20,000 pounds. Excess of this amount will be charged for pro rata. Car-load
shipments must be to one destination and to one consignee.
Prepayment of raeight will not be required, but good order and condition of shipments will be an absolute
requirement. It is clearly understood between the shippers and the transportation companies that no respon-
sibility shall attach for loss or damage, however occasioned, unless it be from gross negligence, and that such loss
must attach solely to the company upon whose line such gross negligence may be located.
The above points are the only points to which rates are guaranteed, and to which Bills Lading will be issued.
The Bills Lading will be issued only by the Agents of this Company, guaranteeing rates from those points only.
The charges advanced by this Line in good faith to connections at those points will net be subject to correc-
tion by this Line.
Unless otherwise instructed by the shippers, the original Bill Lading will be mailed the consigee at desti-
nation, and all claims for overcharge or loss and damage must be presented at destination, accompanied by the
original Bill Lading.
Shipments of single packages charged double rates.
In every case the full name and address of consignee must be given for insertion in Bill Lading and on the
Way-bill.
Where the route by which shippers desire their packages forwarded is not marked on the packages them-
selves, the Florida Dispatch Line" will forward same by the route by which the best interest of the shipper
will be served.


RATES VIA FLORIDI)A DISPATCH LINE AND THE ATLANTIC COAST LINE.


THt L R I)A D1S .C141


_ __ - -- I- I





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH 2.1


Continuation of Through Freight Tariff on Vegetables via Florida Dispatch Line, in connec-
tion with Ste'amers direct from Sayannah. Transfers to Ship's side without breaking bulk.

IN CONNECTION WITH STEAMSHIPS DIRECT FROM SAVANNAH.


* Boston ....... ...............................
Boston. via NeW York...............
N ew Y ork............. ......................
SPhiladelphia...................................
Baltim ore................................. ....


IN CONNECTION WITH


TO


From Jackson-
ville '
& S.F.& W.Sta.


8m ^p
0- -


40
60
40
40
40


*80
1 20
80
80
80


Fro i
ings
Johns


Land-
on St. From Florida From Tampa From J., P. &
River. Transit RI. R. and Manatee. M. R. R.


0 0 0-5 80 01 5 I

S85 45 85 60 $1 10 45 $ 85
1 25 65 125 80 1 50 65 125
85 45 85 60 110 45 85
'85 45 85 60 1 10 45 85
85 45 85 60 1 10 45 85


STEAMSHIPS OF M. & M. T. C(
VIA BALTIMORE.


From
I Jacksonville.
&S.F & W.Sta.


,*L ] 7 *


F ro m Land-
ings on St.
Johns River.


From Florida
Transit R. R.

8 -


). FROM SAVANNAH


From Tampa From J., P. &
and Manatee. M. R. R.

SI -


Philadelphia....... ....................... 5:3 $1 05 58 $1 10 58 $1 10 73 $1 35 58 1 10
Providence....................................... 55 1 05 60 1 10 60 1 10 75 1 35 60 1 10
W ashington..................................... 52 1 05 57 1 10 57 1 10 72 1 35 57 1 10
W ilmington, Del............................... 50 1 00 55 1 05 55 1'05 70 1 30 55 1 05
York, Pa........................................... 59 1 101 64 1 15- 64 1 15 70 1 40 I 64 1 15
Harrisburg, Pa................................ 63 115 68 1 68 1 20 83 1 45 68 1 20
Pittsburgh, Pa.... ..................... 72 1 20 77 1 25 77 1 25 92 1 50 77 1 25
Erie, Pa....... ................ 72 1 20 77 25 77 1 25 92 1 50 77 1 25
Steamship connection" from Savannah for New York every Wednesday aud Saturday. For Boston every
Thursday. For Philadelphia every Saturday. For Baltimore Tuesday and Friday.
STEAMSHIP DEPARTURES FROM SAVANNAH.
FOR NEW YORK. FOR PHILADELPHIA.
Wednesday, May 3, 6:30 a.m. Saturday, May 6th, 9:30 a. mn.
Saturday, May 6, 8:30 a. m. Saturday, May 13th, 3:00 p. inm.
Wednesday, May 10, 12:00 noon. Saturday, May 20th, 9:30 a. m.
Saturday, May 13, 3:00 p. m. Saturday, May 27th, 1:00 p. m.
Wednesday, May 17, 6:30 a. m. Saturday, June 3d, 7:00 p. m.
SSaturday, May 20, 8:30 a. inm.
Wednesday, May 21, 12:00 noon.
Saturday, May 27, 2:00 p m.
Wednesday, May 31, 5:30 a. m.
FOR BALTIMORE.
Tuesday, May 2d, at 5 p. m.
Saturday, May 6th, at 10 a. m.
Thursday, May llth, at 1 p. m.
Tuesday, May 16th, at 5 p. m.
Monday, May 22d, at 11 a. m.
Saturday, May 27th, at 2 p. m. BOSTON AND PROVIDENCE.
Thursday, June 1st, at 5 p. m.. Thursday, May 4th, at 7:30 a. m,
Tuesday, June 6th, at 11 a. m. Thursday, May llth, at 2 p. m.
Monday, June 12th, at 3 p. m. Thursday, May 18th, at 7:30 a. m.
Saturday, June 17th, at 8:30 a. m. Thursday, May 25th, at 1:30 p. m.
Thursday, June 22d, at 11 a. m. Thursday, June 1st, at 5 p. m.
Shipments via New York will be charged at the current rates from that point, with cost of transfer added.
Single packages will be charged $1 each to Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore. If shipped be-
yond, they will be charged in addition the single package rates of connecting lines and cost of transfer.



Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide.

H. D. BOUNETHEAU, PROPRIETOR


NORDYKE

MILLS
-MANUFACTURE-

FreshGround

FEED, GRITS,

MEAL,
(Bolted or unbolted.)
Pearl Hominy.
GRAIN, HAY, COAL AND
WOOD-YARD.


FLORIDAg CHEMICAL OIL AND SOAP WORKS,
MANUFACTURER OF
Lubricating and Boiler Compounds, Compressed Soaps, Car and
Axle grease.
ALSO SOLE MANUFACTURER
of the best Orange Tree Wash and Insecticide extant-

made from Whale-Oil Soap, combined with other powerful ingredients known
to be most effectual for destroying the Scale" and other insect pests and
parasites of the Citrus family. It will also put the tree in a healthy and flour-
ishing condition. Prepared for immediate use. Perfectly harmless to the
youngest tree or plant. In packages of from 25 to 300 pounds. Price, 10 cents
per pound. Discount to the Trade. Full directions for use accompany
each package. Address .

H. D. BmOUNETIHEAU.


P. O. BOX 984, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


to july 31 '82


Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
0-
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
-o-0
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers are appointed to sail:
JUNIATA, May 6th, 9:30 a. inm.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, May 13th, 3:00 p. m.
JUNIATA, May 20th, 9:30 a. inm.
CITY OF SAVANNAH. May 27th, 1:00 p. m.
JUNIATA, June 3d, 7:00 p. m.
Days and hours subject to change, without notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, WM. HIUNTElt & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphi'.. Agents at Savannah.


iBoston altiSaManna Stamshin lIn


-- --


0. L. KEENE,

MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS
NOTIONS,


GOODS,


Laces, Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF

I-, V/ S
67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
to feb 20, '82
M. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the
of the Marshall House. Screen Ilouse.
THLE HAltNETT hOUSE,
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARNETT & GEORGE, Proprietors.
RATIh S, $2 PER DAY.
This favorite family Hotel, under its new manage-
ment, isrecommended for the excellence of its cuisine.
homelike comforts, prompt attention and moderate
rates, to sept 4,'82


Wholesale and Retail Drug Store,
35 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
PURE DRUGS, RELIABLE MEDICINES, FANCY
Goods, Proprietary Articles, at lowest market prices.
Specialties-Norton's Salt Rheum Ointment, Melen's
Infant Food, Burnett's Cod Liver Oil. A Trial solicited.
to aug 20, '82


I


-


'I 1--l


- I-


11


ONLY DIRECT LINE BETWEEN
SAVANNAH AND BOSTON.
Transhipment and extra handling saved. No danger
of fruit ,beinggrozen. Cars are unloaded at the steam-
ship- wharf in Savannah, avoiding drayage.
CABIN PASSAGE, $18.
SAILING FROM SAVANNAH.
Semninole, Thursday. May 4th, at 7:30 a. nm.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, May 11th, at 2:00 p. m.
Seminole, Thursday, May 18th, at 7:30 a m.
Chas. W. Lord, Thursday, May 25th, at 1:30 p. m.
Seminole Thursday, June 1st, at 5:00 p. m.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
44-tf Savannah, Ga.

DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

The largest stock in the State. Country
buyers will consult their own interests
by corresponding with me. All orders
promptly filled at prices to compete with
any house south of Baltimore. Remem-
ber my only Florida address.
-GEO. HUGHES,
to june 26, '82 Cor. Bay and Ocean, Jacksonville, Fla.

PIANOS AND ORGANS
&. M. C0 _M./r-2 ".T1,
15 3East 1ay .Tacksonville.
SOLD ON INSTALLMENTS, AT LOWEST PRICES-
branch of Ludden & Bates, Savannah-EXACTLY
SAME PRICES AND TERMS, Sheet Music, Strings
and small instruments of all kinds. Send for cata-
logues, prices and terms. TUNING AND REPAIRING
a specialty. My tuner will make regular tours through
the State, and my customers will thus have my repre-
sentmtive at their doors, a great advantage to purchasers
of instruments, to sept 26, '82

BELL & HALLIDAY,

MANUFACTURERS


FRUIT AND YEIGETABLE BOXES,

CAIRO, ILLINOIS,

4-Send for Illustrated Price-Listj
to june 12, '82


- - - - - - - - - - -


~ _~


,,


,.- ....


--- ~.. . --. - --- . r ; . . ... .r. .:.: -.~.- ~;; r :-r





2S THE FLORIDA DISPATCH,


PTTEE F3IE GO'TT$D eBOE, 3$.50 per Ton,
(Guaranteed Pure.)

COTTOT ~ SD La, $3S p$ T : onper O.,
(100 Pound Bags.)

(The Bet Potash in U, $27se pe To.),
(The Best Potash in Use.)


A FEW CHOICE LOTS OF TEN (10) OR MORE
acres, river fronts, affording attractive and lovely
building sites, and admirably suited to the growth of
oranges, figs and other Florida fruits, may still be ob-
tained on reasonable terms.
"HOLLYWOOD" is south of "Point La Vista," on
the eastern shore of the St. Johns River, four miles from
Jacksonville. For circulars, terms, etc., address
D, REDMOND
apr 3-tf Box 257, Jacksonville, Fia.
4 fB THE JONES
THE JONES
SP,.TENT VENTILATED
TRUSS.


AND

SW POTE RS,
ARE THE


AND

BEST IN THE WORLD!.
For sale by I>R. J. C. L'ENGLE,
Wholesale Druggist, Jacksonville, Fla.
*-Send for Circular. mar 25-tf

W. H. PILLOW,

STRAWBIERRIY SHIPPING AGENCY
AND PROPRIETOR OF BOWEN BRO.'S PATENT
LRefrigerators. Fruit and Vegetable Repacking and
Commission House, Astor Block, Jacksonville, Florida.
REFERENCES-Bank of Jacksonville, Florida Savings
Bank, Col. H. T. Baya, Jacksonville. (P. 0. Box 340.)
to mar24, '82


MERCHANTS.


So'atlterna 'r'Uit snzd. 7eg-etables a Specialty.
360 and 328 North Delaware Avenue, Philadelphia.
to Jan 6,'83

JfO ES dc BO WENY,


WHOLESALE GROCERS,
AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


ACER'S


DRY HOP


YEAST CAKES,


60c. PER


DOZ.


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND


ST. MARK'S HOTEL, SOW-)VROP PATENT FLOUR.


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
---


0


CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.


OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
1 yr to April 23, '83


NEW BEAUTIFUL OLEb, .
SPLENDID COLLECTION-THE MOST MAGNIFI-
cent Show Plants during our summer and autumn,
for only a little outlay, 5Oc. per dozen. VERBENAS,
all colors, same price.
Tlaree EMooellent Roses.
"Marechal Niel," bright golden yellow.
General Jacqueminot," brilliant crimson.
"Perle des Gardin," beautiful straw color.
Strong plants, from five inch pots, 50c. each.
A good assortment of ever-blooming Roses. The very
best Tea-scented, from five inch pots, 30c. each..
-uilalia and.d. Paxn.pas,
The most effective and stately of all the Ornamental
Grasses, 25c. each.
3o=t--rOWn Xrr=r' it Trees
IS NO RISK IN TRANSPLANTING.
Japan Plums, 30, 50 and 75c. each.
Japan Persimmon, 75c. each.
Satsuma Orange, $1 each.
Black Hamburg and White Sweetwater Grapes, 40c.
each; Figs, 25c. each.
Packing and boxing free. Address
A2kNOLN>TD PIE9TZ,
mar 25-tf Jacksonville, Fla.

RUBBER STAMPS
Are manufactured right in our establishment in the
best manner and at the shortest notice.
4--Send in your orders.
ASHMEAD BROS.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
May 1-tf


I'irst I-an.dcs on. 'Finrest Quality

Dairy Butter from 1 to 87c. per Lb.,

Iept in. tlie Zjargest efrigerator in. t1.e State,

No. 7' West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
To sept 27, '82

ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,

PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS
PRINTERS AND BINDERS,
AND DEALERS IN

TOYS AND FANCY ARTICLES.

NEWSDEALERS.-We keep all the latest Daily and Weekly Papers from Boston, New York, Philadelphia
Baltimore, Chicago, St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, New Orleans, Charleston, Savannah and Jacksonville, and
take subscriptions to all publications at publication price. Orders by mail promptly attended to.
LIST OF BOOKS ON FLORIDA.
FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, INVALIDS AND SETTLERS (Barbour, Profusely Illustrated)..............Price $1 50
FLORIDA: ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE AND HISTORY (Lanier)..... ............................... ........... Price 1 50
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paper......................................... .................................................. Price 10
FAIRBANKS' HISTORY OF FLORIDA..................................................... ...............................................Price 2 50
GU IDE TO JA CK SON V ILLE............................... ........................................................................................... Price 25
TOURISTS AND INVALIDS REFERENCE BOOK OF WINTER TRAVEL...........................................Price 75
SOUTH FLORIDA, THE ITALY OF AMERICA..... ................................................................................ Price 25
DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition)enlarged and improved...............................................................Price 50
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edition, enlarged and improved).... .....................................Price 1 00
ORANGE INSECTS-Illustrated (Ashm ead, ......................................... ...................................................... Price 1 00
ORANGE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA, by A. T. Garey, (cloth).... ..........................................Price 1 25
A MANUAL OF GARDENING IN FLORIDA (Whitner).................................. ......................................... Price 50
COLTON 'S M AP OF FLORIDA ............ ............................................. ............ ........................................ Price 75
COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-the best)..................................................................... ............ Price 1
NEW ANI ACCURATE MAP OF ST. JOHN'S RIVER........................ .......................................... Price
McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST OF LAWS OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep postage extra)...........................Price 000
INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA............................................Price 3 60
Any of the above books mailed on receipt of price.
O R A N G E VW R A P -S- ......................................... ........................................ 10x10, 14c.; 11x1l, 17c.; 12x12, 20e.
LAW BLANKS.
W ARRANTY DEEDS, per dozen....................................................................................................P.c...... Price e 0
QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS, per dozen............ ...... .......Price 5m
M ORTGAGES per dozen...... .......................... .................... ............ ................................................Price S
NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, made to order............................................... ........................ ......... Price $5 00
We publish a full line of Law Blanks for Lawyers and Justices of the Peace. Price-list mailed on application.
Special prices to large buyers. Adddress
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
feb 12-tf 21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


STOCKBRIDGE FERTILIZERS for Orange Trees and vegetables, for sale by
J. E. IIArT,
to Jan 6, '83 Jacksonville, 'la.

ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]
JF. A. BAND S O.,

FRUIT AND PRODUCE


.- ------:I------. j .L--L. .L-----.-l- _-~~-r-.~_- I I._ILC1 I__~s I I--~YI-l~ 1 ~I 11 ___ ___L__. C~i_ __--- I II -- 1 I


COMMISSION