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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00005
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 24, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00005
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

Full Text






























Devoted to the Aricultural, Mtanufacturinq and Industrial Interests of Florida and the South.

Vol. 1.--No. 5. New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla. Price 5 cents.


Monday, April 24, 1882.

Orange Groves and Railways. because they contain the mouths by which the
Our engraving represents a scene on one of tree is fed, It is through the ends of the
Our enFlo rvind r epresents a scene on one f minute fibrous roots that plants receive their
our Florida railways, with the "steam horse nourishment from the soil in a state of solution.
puffing his way through an orange grove, and If a tree is deprived of these by violence, it
men busily engaged in gathering and packing lingers until nature in her efforts restores the
the golden fruit for distant markets. Like a injury. Now, while this is the ease with all
great many other pictures, it is more suggestive transplanted trees, what is to be done to aid
than satisfying; for it seems to be impossible planted with one half its roots mutilated and
for an artist to depict a real orange grove with gone, and its top entire has lost its balance.
anything like fidelity. It is very fitting and The trunk and branches of a healthy tree al-
natural that the boom" in orange culture ways contain sufficient vital power to swell its
So i buds and open the first leaves, even without
should excite a corresponding "boom "-(we material supply from the roots, but after the
really cannot find any other word so express- buds have thus burst forth, they draw up or
ive !)-in railway building; and there is now pump, (if we may use the term,) the future
a bright prospect that every portion of our nourishment for the tree, through the roots
State will, in a few years, be penetrated by from the soil. If the roots from the injury they
those great ivilizers, the iron rails, and that have received are unable to supply the demand,
those great civilizers, the iron rails, and that leaves will draw upon the vital juices, (the
thousands of choice spots, hitherto almost un- blood,) of the tree, which they exhale in the
known and inaccessible will thus be brought air, and for want of a further supply the tree
into daily contact with the great
world of thought and action outside.
Earnestly desiring to see the "waste
places made glad," and the means
of travel, social intercourse and
business transportation rapidly in-
creased, we most heartily bid all- --:-
such enterprises" God speed 5

Errors in Planting Trees.
In traveling over the country, M
one is forced to the conclusion that 0
there is a lamentable lack of knowl-
edge among those who plant trees
in regard to the laws of vegetable
physiology. We often see whole
orchards of young orange and other
trees just planted from the nursery
or seed-bed, with all the branches '
left on and tops entire. In taking
up trees, there are few nurserymen .
or tree-planters who take the
trouble to preserve entire more than .
half of the roots, and the parts that
are cut off are the most important,


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.

lingers and dies. But if the branches are
shortened and the number of leaves reduced in
proportion to the roots, the leaves exhale no
more than the remaining roots can supply-an
equilibrium is restored-the circulation goes on
healthily and the tree recovers from the injury
it has sustained, and it makes a vigorous growth.
Such trees, when planted, should have all
their surplus branches cut off and the remain-
der shortened, leaving but three or four buds to
each branch of the last year's growth.
Another class of tree planters, or the planters
of another class of trees, particularly deciduous
ornamental trees, such as we frequently see
upon the side-walks in cities and in lawns
around country residences, are very liable to
commit an opposite blunder. Trees in these
situations require to be large, and whether
nursery grown on water-oak, sweet-gums, ma-
ples, &c., taken from the woods, they are not
convenient to handle with the branches on, and
with one clean sweep the planter decapitates
his victim, leaving not a branch be-
hind. Now, as we have said before,
the leaves serve to draw from the
soil, through the roots of a tree, the
nourishment that is required to
build up its trunk and branches. If
the buds are all cut off there can be
no leaves, until nature in an undue
*effort creates new ones. This can
only be done through the vital pow-
ers stored up in the body of the tree,
and this is often found insufficient,
and the result is alike disastrous as
in the case before mentioned.
Besides the office of leaves to sup-
ply the tree with food from the
soil, they perform another import-
ant function, viz: that of breathing.
The leaves are to plants what the
lungs are to animals. Deprive a
tree of its leaves and it can neither
breathe nor eat and must necessa-
rily die.
--0--
Ag-THE DISPATCH has the largest
circulation of any paper in Florida;
it is therefore the best advertising me-
dium in the State.


I


fir






_ _THE ILORIDA DISPATCH.


Carp for the Table.
Some unfavorable opinions as to the value of
the Carp as a food fish have been expressed
through the papers. A correspondent of the
Pacific Rural Press says:
The Carp is a well-formed fish, thick body,
with few bones. Professor Baird, United States
Fish Commissioner, probably the highest au-
thority on fish in this country, says: The Ger-
man Carp bears about the same relation to or-
dinary English Carp that a North Carolina
'pine-woods' pig does to one of Berkshire breed.
In Germany the Carp is estimated as highly as
the trout, and sells for the same price in mar-
ket."
Dr. Kessel, an eminent German fish cultu-
rist, asserts that, in principal cities of Europe,
the Carp, in spite of an abundant supply of salt-
water and fresh-water fish is ever preferred to
these; and, with the exception of trout and sal-
mon, commands a price three times as high as
that of all the rest. In conclusion, respecting
their table qualities, allow me to quote the re-
marks of the editor of this paper, after munch-
ing an experimental mess. Says he: We
found ample reason in our taste to approve the
verdict which is generally given by authorities
on German Carp, and that is, that the fish is of
especial and distinctive merit for food. The fish
is exceedingly sweet and rich, and is invested
with a flavor very enjoyable and quite charac-
teristic of the fish. We have given them a fair
test and find them most excellent breakfast
timber."

Interesting Facts.
There are in the world 131 cities, having
each a population of 100,000 or more. Of
these 65 are in Europe, 34 in Asia, 3 in Africa,
28 in America, and 1 in Cuba. The United
States contains more of these cities than any
other country. The United States has 20; In-
dia, 17; England, 12; China, 10; France and
Italy 8 each; South America, 6; Turkey, Bel-
gium, Spain and Russia, 4 each; Prussia and
Scotland, 3 each; Egypt Holland, Ireland, Ger-
many, Austria and Japan, 2 each; Java, Siam,
Africa (except Egypt), Denmark, Sweden,
Cuba, Anam, Portugal, Hungary, Bohemia,
Mexico, Canada, Bavaria, Poland, Asia Minor
and Phillippine Islands, 1 each.
There are ten cities having a population of
1,000,000 or more-5 in Asia, 4 in Europe, and
1 in America. They are: London, England, 3,-
092,000; Paris, France, 2,225,000; Yeddo, Ja-
pan, 2,100,000; Pekin, China, 1,850,000; New
York, United States, 1,206,590; Berlin, Prus-
sia, 1,200,000; Constantinople, Turkey, 1,180,-
000; Chang-Choo-Foo, Foo-Choo-Foo and
Hang-Tcheou, all in China, 1,000,000 each.
There are in the United States ten cities
with more than 200,000 population each. In
the order of population with the number of
thousands of inhabitants they are : New York,


1,206; Philadelphia, 846; Brooklyn, 566;
Chicago, 503; St. Louis, 375; Boston, 362;
Baltimore, 332; Cincihnati, 255; San Fran-
cisco, 233; New Orleans, 210.

Yellow, or "Burr" Clover.
Those who have good stands of Burr clover
would do well to save the seed and offer them
for sale this summer and fall. Judging from
the inquiries of last season and those that have
already reached this office the present year, we
are inclined to think that there will be a good
demand for Burr clover seed. Raising this clo-
ver for the seed alone is very profitable. This
plant is not so valuable for hay, grazing or fer-
tilizing purposes as Red clover, but it is well
enough for every farmer to have a few acres of


it. It is green during the entire fall, winter
and spring. The crop dies down the last of May
or the first part of June. The land can then
be plowed and planted to corn without injury
to the clover which will spring up as green as
ever in the fall. Burr clover is known as Spot-
ted Medick, botanically Medick Maculata. It
is also called California clover, yellow clover.
This is not properly a clover we believe. Since
writing what we have in reference to cultivat-
ing corn we have examined Dr. Phares excel-
lent work on Grass and Forage Plants, and he
says : I have grown this plant about thirty-five
years. It furnishes good grazing. from Febru-
ary till April or May; a small lot of ground
feeding a large number of cattle, sheep, etc,
* They do not incline to eat it at first,
but it is easy to teach them, and they acquire a
great fondness for it. * For a number
of years my live stock had free access to it from
December to March, or later, with much profit.
On removing them it shot up and spread rap-
idly in April and May, in the latter month ma-
turing an immense quantity of seed and then
dying. In June the crab grass sprang up, and
in August this grass, while in bloom, was mowed.
* After a luxuriant crop of Medick
the ground is very loose and in condition to
produce a good crop of anything else. One may
cultivate land every year and make better crops
of corn and cotton than on ground not occupied
by the Medick, and still have the benefit of the
latter for winter and early spring grazing."
This plant was originally introduced from
Chili to California.-Southern Live Stock Jour-
nal.
Industrial Schools.
Mr. George L. Harrison, a well-known
philanthropist of Philadelphia, recently made
a tour through Great Britain, France and
Germany, for the purpose of examining into the
institutions for the education, reform, or pun-
ishment of the poorer classes. Mr. Harrison
brought back a remarkable collection of speci-
mens of the work of boys and girls in the in-
dustrial schools; articles made of wood, metal,
etc., as perfect as if they had come out of the
hands of the skilled craftsman. Similar ex-
hibitions were made by different countries in
the Philadelphia exhibition of 1876.
In some European countries, where educa-
tion is gratuitous, children are taught, outside
of their text-books, at least the rudiments of a
trade. Their fingers are thus trained as well
as their brains. Hence when the boy and girl
leave school they have knowledge which will
help them to earn their livelihood.
In countries where education is not furnished
by the government, these industrial schools are
often maintained by the charity of individuals.
One of the most interesting centennial exhibi-
tions was that made by an industrial school
maintained by a Russian noble on his estate,


for his quondam serfs after emancipation, in
which they were trained in all kinds of handi-
crafts, in mechanical draughting, ship-build-
ing, etc. The specimens of work submitted
were of a high order of merit.
Another quite as interesting was a pile of
enormous volumes, on whose pages, instead of
printed words, were found the miniature shirts,
dresses, stockings, etc., specimens of embroid-
ery, lace work, etc., made by the little girls of
the industrial schools of the Swiss cantons.
Each volume bore the name and coat of arms
of a canton, and each page the little girl's name
whose work was shown.
From Belgium came an exhibit of lace by
little girls, and from Sweden and Norway tiny
houses, stoves, chairs, thoroughly built and fin-
ished "by boy carpenters and smiths, and woolen
jackets, hosiery and the like, the work of the
girls. On one pair of knit stockings was a card


with the pathetic little message, Knit by little
blind Olga, aged nine. She sends her love to
all the people of America."
The people of great America could take a
useful hint from these industrial schools, and
learn how to train their own boys and girls to
future usefulness.- Youth's Companion.
They might, indeed, and there is no work
fraught with more real importance to the
future well-being of this country than that here
hinted at. It is the true way to prevent pau-
perism and crime-the way to prevent the
country from being overrun with tramps, bur-
glars and brigands. It is the way, too, to put
a stop to the enormous taxation which inability
to earn an honest living imposes, and must of
necessity, impose upon the industry of others.
It is a subject of profound interest to every
political economist in the land, and should be
to every patriot. That the inability to earn a
respectable living, resulting from an entire
ignorance of the elements of any kind of a trade
on the part of vast numbers of boys and girls
in the United States, is the real source of much
of the crime and wretchedness that prevail,
particularly in our large towns and cities, ad-
mits of not the slightest doubt whatever. Neces-
sity knows no law, and hunger will break
through a stone wall.
This great field, now neglected, the law must
explore and cultivate. It is filled now and
covered with noxious weeds which send up
poisonous exhalations. They must give way to
flowers and golden harvests; and where slimy
reptiles crawl and serpents hiss, the lambs of
innocence must be seen skipping and feeding
upon health-and-life-giving fruits, and the birds
of paradise waking the echoes of the morning
with their notes of joy!-N. 0. Advance.
Story of the Tomato.
We are not too young to remember the ad-
vent of the "Love Apple," or Tomato, as a
table luxury; and we give this brief history of
its introduction into Pennsylvania, from an ex-
change:
A good many years ago a man who had re-
cently arrived from the Bermuda Islands was
sent to York County (Pa.) jail for some offense
committed against the laws of the Common-
wealth. He had with him a few seeds which
he planted in the rich soil of the jail yard.
Before the plants which sprang from the seed
reached maturity he was discharged, and no
one knew the nature of them. They grew
luxuriantly, bearing fruit of a large size and
unusual appearance. As this strange fruit
ripened, its color changed from the green to a
brilliant red, and became an object of wonder
and admiration to, all the inmates of the jail.
Mrs. Klinefelter, the lady keeper, cautioned all
the prisoners against eating any of the fruit, as
she was sure it was poisonous, and besides
planted the seed, that she would endeavor to
preserve specimens of it for him should he re-
turn in time. Just when the fruit was fully


matured, the Bermuda prisoner revisited the
jail and asked to see the plant. This request
granted, he next called for pepper, salt and
vinegar, and to the horror of the good lady com-
menced to eat of the supposed poisonous fruit
with a relish that astonished the beholders.
After enjoying the strange repast he informed
Mrs. Klinefelter that the fruit or vegetable was
the tomato, or love apple, and it would be found
wholesome and nutritous. The seeds of the re-
maining tomatoes were carefully preserved and
distributed among the friends and neighbors of
the lady, and thus this new and popular escu-
lent was introduced into the ancient and goodly
borough of York. For many years thereafter
it was cultivated as an ornament rather than
for table use, but by degrees its merits began
to be more fully appreciated and there, as else-
where, it grew into general public favor.





ing, but that it is deserved will not be ques-
tioned by those familiar with the merits or the
authority Mr. Walter consulted.-N. Y. Com.
Advertiser.
SEWER VENTILATION.
The address of Dr. Alfred Carpenter before
the Sanitary Institute of Great Britain, in Oc-
tober, 1879, under the title of "lRemarks on the
First Principles of Sanitary Work," contains
the following remarks upon sewer ventilation:
"Stagnant air in the house drains of this
town produced more or less evil in almost every
house in the place until our home Senators were
censured of the evil. It was in Croydon that
the law for ventilating sewers was first put into


THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. ..


~~a~~3~ ~~l~a~,


Secret Remedies.
From the Sanitary Engineer.]
Secret remedies are undoubtedly among the
greatest evils of modern times. Not only is
secrecy the effective cloak of pure quackery,
but the paying sale of these nostrums can be
effected only through the most extensive adver-
tising of a peculiar kind-intended to lead the
reader to believe that the inventor of the
" great discovery is an honest as well as able
physician; that he (the reader) himself is cer-
tainly more or less affected with some one of
the ills described in the advertisement, and that
to try the preparation offered as the remedy
best adapted to symptoms which he is suddenly
convinced that he notices in himself, cannot
possibly do any harm and is a great deal
cheaper than to go to a regular" physician.
If there is any really active ingredient in the
preparation at all, it is much more apt to do
serious injury than good, for it would of course
be mere accident if the diagnosis and treatment,
both determined by the patient himself with
the aid of a random guide, should prove nearly
correct. The advertisement or description of a
secret remedy usually enumerates a sufficient
array of diseases and especially symptoms to be
sure to hit the case of any and every reader
who has the slightest inclination to think that
his system" is not right." Now were the
ingredients of the "cure" named, the confi-
dence of the patient would perhaps vanish at
once, or he might go so far as to actually make
some inquiry into the matter and change his
mind, or the gross absurdities of the claims of
the vendor might be exposed by intelligent
physicians. But so long as the composition of
the remedy is not published by the inventor
or manufacturer, it is almost certain to remain
at least partially a secret if, as is generally the
case, it is a complete mixture of organic sub-
stances, for the character and composition of
such mixtures cannot possibly be determined.
While the presence of certain substances in
such preparations may be infallibly demon-
strated and even the quantity of these ingredi-
ents determined, yet there may be other and
very active constituents in the mixture which
elude observation entirely of the character of
which can only be guessed at. As a rule,
however, it would be extremely unsafe for the
vendor of a quack nostrum to make a false
statement concerning the composition of his
cure all, for while it may be impossible to make
a complete quantitative analysis of an unknown
mixture so as to show what the real constituents
and their proportions are, it would be a com-
paratively easy matter in every case to expose
any material deception.
AMERICAN SANITARY ENGINEERING.
A great compliment has been paid to Ameri-
can engineering by Mr. John Walter, of the
London Times, who has addressed a letter to
the "The Sanitary Engineer," New York, re-
questing an opinion as to the system of ventila-
ting sewers by perforations or open gratings in
the streets. The compliment paid to American
sanitary engineers in this letter is most flatter-


operation by a local authority. But the local
authority was then in advance of the intelli-
gence of the people, and although the command
was issued, the work was generally not done un-
til much more proof of the necessity was af-
forded.
Now, the ventilation of the sewer and of the
house drain is regarded by the law of the land,
but it is not nearly so general as it should be.
These openings into sewers were first called
stink-pipes, and were sometimes taken away
because they gave evidence that the law of mo-
tion was not complied with. The foul smell
which came out, showed that the sewer was a
sewer of deposit, that it contained stagnant sew-
age; and the neighbor, like the ostrich of the
desert, who, when danger threatens, hides its
head, takes away the safety valve and tries to
smother up the evidence which the stink-pipe
gives out, and sends it into somebody's house,
instead of insisting upon the removal of the
foul sewage from the sewer. No smell will
ever arise from a properly constructed and
managed sewer, and if there be such a smell, it
is conclusive proof that there is deposit either in
that sewer or in some other in close communi-
cation with it, or in the soil around it. No
stagnation, either of air or of sewage should be
possible in any sewer.
"Assuming that sewers are necessities in a
thickly populated neighborhood, they must not
be allowed to ventilate into houses; and now a
third law comes into operation, viz : That it
shall not be possible for air to pass directly
from a sewer into any house until it has been
diluted by pure air and has had time to have
its albuminoid matters oxidized. There must
not be any communication directly between the
sewer and the interior of the house.
There is no occasion for any departure from
this law, and it should never be allowed in prac-
tice.
"There is another danger which arises from
sewers if they are not constructed of imper-
vious material. Brick sewers are open to great
objection when they pass through pervious soil
in close proximity to houses.
Unless they are very freely and efficiently
ventilated, they contaminate the air of the sub-
soil of a town until it becomes a very hot bed
of mischief. This is a frequent cause for the
continuance of enteric disease in districts in
which the water line rises and falls at distinct
intervals. 'The way in which gases travel long
distances under ground, is sometimes shown by
the distance in which coal-gas travels when a
fracture has taken place in a gas main. Sewer-
gases, which form in badly constructed sewers
are just as penetrating. The products of de-
composition find their way through the bricks
into the soil, and then into the foundations of
houses. There are some houses in this town
which are built over sewers, and which must
sooner or later be dangerous to the occu-
pants. The builder of such ought to be com-
pelled to notify the fact to every incoming ten-
ant. Ventilation should be provided in every
case in which a trap has been fixed, otherwise


grows greater. The learned professions are
full, and still college doors open to let out eager
aspirants, blue-ribbon parchments in hand, who,
with the old cry, 'Plenty of room at the top,'
rush to join the pushing, jostling crowd at the
bottom of the ladder, struggling to gain foot-
hold on the lower rounds. In all grades of life
it is the same thing."
Horace Greeley said: "I judge that most
human beings float or drift through life. They
aim at nothing and hit it."
They would be journalists! What nice,
easy, genteel work it is. Merely by the stroke
of the pen-a simple note, a small editorial, or
a pointed item-fame and fortune are secured!
Ah, yes; it is a most beautiful thing to contem-
plate. So grand! But the most successful
journalists to-day are not the prize-essayists, or
valedictorians of their class, but the once-prin-
ter's boy. The being who by hard work and
perseverance has worked his way up, until he
knows the requirements of a journalist; and
those are the ones who to-day are eminent in
the annals of newspaperism.
'Twas once said: Go west, young man, go
west." But out there the professions are all
full. A Nevada journal once said: "We
want no fine gentlemen. Send us skilled
mechanics, practical farmers, with at least a
few hundred dollars on which to begin; bona
fide laborers. For such as these there are
plenty of chances; but for professional men
there is no opening, and non-professional gen-
tlemen who cannot work had better stay at
home."
In an essay on "Phlning a Career," the once
staunch and venerable journalist, Greeley,
said: "The cruelist mistake of youth is neg-
lect to acquire skill and dexterity in some use-
ful calling. Many fancy themselves too rich
prospectivelyy) to need proficiency in some
handicraft; they expect to live on what others
have saved before them, not what they shall
earn themselves. But Nature sternly vetoes
miscalculation-sends tornadoes, earthquakes,
Chicago fires, to baffle it. Were I an Astor or
a Vanderbilt, I would have my every child
taught a trade, even though ever so confident
that he would not probably need it. If only to
arm him for the remote contingency of being
cast away on some isle previously unpeopled, I
would fortify him against disaster by imbuing
his hands with skill, and his brain with re-
sources and provisions for defying want."
But there is no excuse for being idle. There
is work of some sort for every man to do if he
really wants to work. Whatsoever you do, do
your best. "Patient, faithful labor is sure of
its reward in the end." If you cannot find
anything to do, set about to learn some trade
or profession that will yield you a living.
Franklin's penny roll, Lincoln's rail splitting,
Johnson's tailoring, Garfield's canaling-are all
historical, and go to show how great men had
small beginnings. Any employment," said
an able editor, "however distasteful or humble,


I I I


is better than nothing for the man who has his
way to make in the world. If he has pluck
and energy he will make of such a stepping-
stone to something higher."
And let me especially enjoin upon young
men not to leave the farm. How many go to
the crowded cities, without even the promise of
steady work, while their fathers at home are
compelled to hire help. Farming is the only
employment that is sure to yield a living.
This way lies the road to comfort and wealth.
William Penn advised his children to "the
useful parts of mathematics, as building houses
or ships, measuring, surveying, dialing, navi-
gation." But," he added, agriculture is es-
pecially in my eye; let my children be husband-
men and housewives; it is industrious, healthy,
honest and of good example; like Abraham
and the holy ancients, who pleased God, and
obtained a good report."


m


stagnation must arise."
Trades--Professions, Etc.
M. C. Boyer, Jr, in the Western World, of
Indianapolis, gives us this sensible talk:
I know of nothing that is more deserving of
mention than what employment the boys and
girls of to-day shall follow. I believe in educa-
tion, and pity the man that has been bred in
ignorance of this most noble gift; but I have
equally as much pity for the overly taught,
highly-educated young man, who has no knowl-
edge of a trade, but whose sole aim is for some
lazy profession, some vocation which requires
little care and trouble, but much income.
The Philadelphia Times once said : Every
year a multitude of those who stand in the
world's market-places waiting to be hired






SS THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


The "I Cant's."
"The 'I cant's '-said an old merchantile
journal-are numerous and ubiquitous." Their
numbers are astonishing. A curious statistician
estimates that about one-half of the children
born into the world are furnished by nature
with a remarkable lingual facility for the utter-
ance of this brief and cowardly sentence.
Neither time nor expense enables them to abol-
ish from their vocabulary these fatal words, and
from the cradle to the grave, they drag along a
slip-shod life, spent in accomplishing nothing ;
from the fact that they lack the energy and will
necessary to accomplish.
These human drags are recognizable any-
where, under any circumstances, and in what-
ever garb. In the palace, but more often in
the prison, especially in such enlightened coun-
tries as ours, where prisons serve as a welcome
refuge to many of them who are too utterly
worthless to get their own living. Of the re-
gal and ducal "I cant's," history furnishes too
many examples to need illustration at our hands.
Of titted members of the order, of lower degree,
the world is cursed with a less number than
formerly, for their as in that the race is dying
of mere inanity; but in the great world among
the masses, it is astonishing what a host of
drones share the honey of the bees, gathering.
Regarding everything they do as hardship, look-
ing upon labor as an evil, it seems to be a sort
of morald duty with such men to do as little as
possible, and get all they can for it. I can't,"
is their shibboleth and shield. Propose to them
the accomplishment of whatever new work any-
thing out of the beaten track, any little addi-
tion to what they have done, and see! how, like
trained jack-daws-their beak fly open-with-
out a moment's considerations of the possibility
or desirability of the doing-and out it comes!
like the "Pretty Polly !" of a pet .parrot-" I
can't !"
We have said-you may know them every-
where, in the legislative halls, on the battle-
field, in the council chamber, at the bar, in the
counting-house, in the studio, at the bench or in
the furrow, for they are spawned everywhere;
and among all classes of industrials-merchants
or mechanics, you may know I can't" as well
by what he does, as by what he will not try to
do; and a miserable-mumbling-mealy-
mouthed-mountain-raising, and mole-hill
moving mummy of a man will you find him in
any of these pursuits. He is always for delay.
"He hasn't time, or he hasn't tools; he lacks
means; or must have more help; you" had bet-
ter wait," or he knows "it is impossible;" any-
thing rather than do it. "I'll try!" never
comes into his head, as it did into Capt. Bragg's;
to try being just what he wishes to escape from;
while to say "I can't," is the easiest as well as
the meanest method of accomplishing his de-
sires.


"I can't," is a humbug and a nuisance; and
society'ought to make him sensible of the fact
by kicking him without its pale. All things
are possible-to God! and of the countless
things possible to man, through the right use
of the gifts He has bestowed upon him, not one
in a hundred have yet been accomplished; myr-
iads of failures resulting from the soullness ef-
forts and combinated blunderings of the inani-
mate host of I cant's." A boy, of sound body
and mind, ought to be punished every time he
used the phrase, by the adoption of which salu-
tary corrective, the number of the men who will
use it can materially be diminished. Can't,"
is the most contemptible combination of letters
known to the English scholar; and it may be
safely assumed that neither Alfred nor Ark-
wright; Milton, nor Maury Washington, nor
Whitney; Girard nor Astor, nor any other
among the glorious galaxy of determinate in-


dustrial stars, ever yet recognized the canting
use to which the phrase is put by such as we
describe.

The Editorial "We."
Some people are unreasonably inquisitive and
curious, especially about matters that do not
concern them in the least. For example, here
is a correspondent that makes the startling
revelation that he is a "constant reader of our
valuable and influential paper, and would like
to be informed why it is an editor or newspaper
writer, when speaking of himself in his writings,
invariably uses the plural pronoun we," in-
stead of the singular "I."
There are several reasons. Self-preservation
is the first law of nature. It begins at home,
like mother Charity. There is some human
nature about an editor, public opinion to the
contrary, notwithstanding. An editor thinks
too much of his I's to wear them in mourn-
ing, and therefore in speaking of some slab-side
six-footer as a miserable, red-nosed, pussillani-
mous, wife-beating snoozer, he considers it the
better part of valor to drop an occasional "we."
This creates in the mind of the six-footer the
impression that the editorial force consists of
a standing army, armed with dreadful
weaponsn.
Furthermore, in cases where the victim
comes around to the office to kill the writer of
any particular item, it is so pleasant to have
the guilty man's identity buried in the obscurity
of the plural "we." The editor-in-chief, the
commercial editor, the city editor, the local
editor, the reporters, the book-binders, com-
positors, book-keepers, jobber, pressmen, devil,
and all the delivery boys are thus placed on a
common footing by the little pronoun we,"
and when the enraged person looks about him
and finds how many homes he would make
desolate, how many wives he would make
widows, and how many children he would make
orphans, by killing off all included in the "we"
at one fell swoop, he sickens of the sanguinary
undertaking, turns sadly away, goes to some
bar-room, takes a drink, condemns the paper,
prophesies that it is being run into the ground,
and declares that he will henceforth exert his
political influence to squelch the sheet.- Oil
City Derrick.

Make, Save, and Use Manure.
The general principles of agriculture and
farm economy are the same everywhere, and of
very general application. Therefore, the reflec-
tions of a writer in the Agricultural World have
just at much, if not more, practical significance
for Florida as for Michigan. He repeats the
old but too-often-forgotten story that we have
been iterating and reiterating for more than a
quarter of a century-thus :
"In traveling over the country, we cannot
but notice the great want of manure' and the
want of a knowledge that it may be bought and
used in many cases with profit. It is believed


that much time which is now partially lost,
might be advantageously employed in increas-
ing the compost heaps by'the addition of mud,
peat, leaves, straw, lime, ashes, and anything
capable of decomposition. A large part of the
land in this State does not produce more than
half what it might were it well manured. One
farmer says: 'All my outlays for manure pay
great interest on the amount invested.' Is not
this the usual experience? All admit that the
principal drawback upon farming is the want of
sufficient fertilizers, and how to obtain them
should be our main study. While the value of
guano is acknowledged-especially on light
lands or old and worn out soils for the puropse
of recovering their exhausted energies-still,
the main reliance of our farmers ought to be on
their own barnyard and pig-sty; not only be-


cause this comes more directly within the scope
of their means, but also because it is believed
that their home-made manure, obtained by keep-
ing live stock, is better adapted to raising grains
and grasses, and is more useful in preventing
the exhaustion of the soil. The value of this
may be greatly increased by keeping in the
barnyard an abundant supply of meadow mud,
which is found on almost every farm. The con-
tents of the privy vault, and soap-suds and other
wastes of the kitchen should be incorporated
with the heap. The lime, or chloride, or plas-
ter, or charcoal, which are used to render in-
noxious the gases of the privy or barn, are of
exceeding value as fertilizers, and a liberal use
of them will prove profitable. But the meadow
mud, which can be had cheap and in large
quantities, is the main absorbant of the fertiliz-
ing properties of the other manures; at least, i1
is that on which our farmers may chiefly rely.
Nature has provided it in abundance, and ex-
perience has shown that no other thing involv-
ing the same expense is so advantageously ap-
plied to the land. In the fall and early part
of winter it can be drawn into the barnyard,
frozen, pulverized, mixed and trodden into the
stable manure by cattle. It not only retains
the fertilizing gases that would otherwise escape,
but it brings into activity the elements of the
sod with which it is united. We cannot too
earnestly urge upon our farmers the importance
of increasing in every way their stock of ma-
nure. He who uses the most manure can keep
the largest number of animals. He who keeps
the largest number of animals can raise the
most grain and maintain his land in the best
condition."
BoYS AND MEN !-The great bard of Rydal
Mount (Wordsworth), says: "The child is
father of the man," and nothing can be truer.
The future thinkers, writers, editors, farmers,
inventors, business men and statesmen, will be
found in our boys of to-day; the men that
move and lead the world now in all these de-
partments will soon get too old for the work, or
pass away, and younger men will have to fill
their places. In twenty, thirty and forty years
from now our boys will be in their prime. What
are the fundamental qualities and characteris-
tics they will need in order that they may fill
with honor to themselves and good to their fel-
lows the various positions of trust to which
they will be called ? Moral qualities weigh
more than all others. What we want is good
men that can be trusted; men who worship
God more than mammon; men who will not
lie; who will not steal; who will not sacrifice
every interest, public or private, to their own
interests; good and true men. Boys, who will
it be? _______
BAGASSE.-The New Orleans Commercial
Bulletin gives us the following on preparing
begasse as stock for paper-making:


Bagasse has long been considered of great
value as paper stock, but until very lately no
practical way of decorticating the fibre has been
brought to light. Recently we had the pleas-
ure of a visit from Mr. T. Harang, formerly of
Lafourche, who exhibited to us a plan of his
Universal Fibre and Bagasse Machine which
he claims will clean and thoroughly extract the
fibre from any plant, either jute, ramie, cotton
stalks, etc., or the bagasse, leaving it perfectly
free from any impurity, and ready to be placed
at once on the market. It is proposed by Mr.
Harang to build a machine of sufficient capac-
ity to prepare the bagasse for paper stock from
one of our largest sugar plantations, and at the
same time to utilize the same machine in ex-
tracting the fibre from the jute and other fibrous
plants.


_ __





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Mechanics.
The American Machinist, speaking of the
skilled mechanic and his tools, says:
No matter to what extent the refinement of
machine tools may be carried, it is in the end
the careful and painstaking operation of the
skilled mechanic that must bring the products
of these tools to a perfection that will meet the
requirements of modern demands. The lathe
will not turn so round that, in this respect, its
production cannot be improved by the hand
work of the skilled machinist, nor will the mill-
ing or planing machine produce surface so true
that he is not called upon to rectify them with
the file and scraper. Now, as ever, the beauti-
ful finish on iron and steel is the result of the
individual effort of the operator, rather than of
the perfection of tools.
Years ago, the opinion prevailed to a con-
siderable extent that the services of the highly
skilled mechanic would not be so much a mat-
ter of necessity in the future as in the past, but
those who built on such grounds built poorly.
The man will always be superior to the ma-
chine, and must always see better than he can
perform.
One man may direct the efforts of fifty skilled
workmen to the production of good work, but
fifty men cannot get good work from one un-
skilled workman. Improved tools and mechan-
ical appliances will simply assist the artisan in
the production of fine work, but the greater the
refinement of these tools and appliances the
greater must be his skill. Instead of relieving
him of his responsibilities, which would be in
every sense a misfortune, they add to them,
which makes him, in every way, the better in
being able te meet them.
Altogether, the position of the skilled me-
chanic is in every way satisfactory, in its rela-
tion to improved machine production, and the
tools and appliances of the future, however re-
fined, can never usurp his place in the indus-
tries of the world, nor relieve him of the part
he is to play in future mechanical advance-
ment.

The Florida Papers.
There recently lived in the State a Floridian
named Lacon, who was an Economist, and pos-
sessed of a strong Constitution, and at the same
time was a great tourist in Florida. In all of
his travels he invariably carried a Banner, as
well as a Mirror, and a Herald was always to be
found in Advance, who Gazette-d him wherever
he might appear. He was a Methodist, and be-
lieved that in the Union there was strength.
To keep up with the Times he kept a Journal,
though much of his News was gathered from
the Press, which was forwarded to him by Ex-
press. In politics he was a Democrat, and that
very strong-not Weekly. He believed that
justice should be administered from a Tribune
by a Recorder. He was a modern Citizen, and


as an Agriculturist considered the Bee a great
source of revenue in the Spring. He was a
great Advocate of temperance, and was quite
fond of a Flapjack or a Cracker. He believed
that Key West, though Semi- Tropical, was the
Key of the Gulf. When traveling, that his
friends might be informed of his Progress, he
would often DISPATCH a Courier, Post-haste,
and with him sent a Reporter to give all
news of any Commercial importance. He was
a profound thinker and student, and to his va-
ried accomplishments added that of a Star-
gazer, and often while studying the beautiful
silvery Crescent he has been heard to call it the
Guardian while he was the Pathfinder to the
Land of Flowers.
[The manuscript of our Spring poet having
been rejected, he immediately produced the
above; he was put to flight by the appearance
of the devil with a shooting-stick." If he
should visit the sanctums of our Florida con-


temporaries, we advise him to "lock up" his
"form."-Pathfinder. *
Our devil" is a kinder and more humane
imp. He belongs to a Florida branch of
Bergh's Society for the Prevention of Cruelty
to Animals," and upon reading the foregoing
in the Pathfinder, he approached the editor and
said: ".Boss, I just doat on a Spring poet! Let
that poor fellow come South, and 'grow up
with the country.' Tell him, if he comes, we
will not DISPATCH him, 'lock him up,' or
'chace' him out of the office. Neither shall
he be 'imposed' on. We will give him a 'sit'
-' press' him to stay-extend him the of
fellowship-let him have all the 'space' he
wants-feed him with 'pi' and phatt takes,'
-and fill his pockets with quoinss' when he
departs for some place 'below the frost line' to


start an orange grove !"
The Free-Cow Nuisance.
NEAR JACKSONVILE, FLA., April 17,


1882.


Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
DEAR SIRS : Pity the sorrows of a poor old
man," who is trying to make a living by culti-
vating a few acres of ground, but is constantly
annoyed and damaged by cattle breaking in
and eating in a short time the results of, per-
haps a month's labor.
An important question to be considered is,
have the small farmers and gardeners any pro-
tection at all except "eternal vigilance?" Take
my own case: A cow belonging in the neigh-
borhood has jumped a six-board fence perhaps
a hundred times the past season; sometimes
jumping clear, then again breaking it down by
her weight coming down on it, thereby letting
in all the other cattle. Then the only satisfac-
tion we get is-" fix up your fence." A fence
made of six-inch boards and tight enough to
keep out pigs, will not make a fence five feet
high, which is considered a "legal fence," and
just for that technicality a few cattle owners
fall back on, and five hundred gardeners to one
cattle owner have to barricade (for an ordinary
fence will not keep out strange cows brought in
every year to keep the dairies up) against them
that they may feed off the public.
As there is hardly a fence anywhere that will
come up to the requirements of the law, and to
build one would cost more than the average
value of all the land, the question is-what
shall we do ? The instructions to a grand jury
a few years ago were: That a man had the
same right to protect his property that he had
to protect his person, where there was no law to
protect him, and that is the case here. But the
dread of a law scrape deters many from doing
what must be done as soon as patience has
ceased to be a virtue. P.
REPLY.-The only remedy for such afflic-
tions as those of our suburban friend, is to stir
up our Legislative solons until they pass a "no-
fence" law. Such a one has recently been en-
acted in South Carolina. While awaiting the
action of our law-givers, we should be tempted
to try bull-dogs, shot-guns, and a few other
mild remedies, in extreme cases, such as our
correspondent describes. It is a shame and an
outrage that any one who owns a few almost
worthless "scrub" cattle, should have full license
to turn the prowling pests loose to depredate
upon the fields and gardens of his neighbors.-
[EDITOR.
Under-Ground Cisterns.
TALLAHASSEE, April 18, 1882.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
In your paper of the 10th inst., H. E., of


Palatka, desires to know if it is practicable, in
building under-ground cisterns, "to cement di-
rectly on the sand." With a desire to save
him the unnecessary expense of bricks in the
construction of his cisterns, I have thought it
might be well to ask you to publish the follow-
ing facts that have come under my observa-
tion: Some years ago it was the custom of
many families from this section to spend their
summers at a little village, called Bel Air,"
where they enjoyed perfect immunity from all
malarial complaints, in consequence, as it was
supposed, of the poverty of the soil, which con-
sisted of the poorest quality of sand, which was
of such loose texture as to make the digging of
wells a difficult matter. On the theory that
rain water was preferable for drinking pur-
poses, cisterns were numerous, and they were
built in every case as far as my observation and
memory serve me, without the use of bricks.
The one in use at my father's summer residence
was quite a large one, dug out in the shape of a
bowl and the cement applied directly on the
sand, and as long as we continued to spend our
summers there the cistern afforded a plentiful
supply of water. In Marion County, near
Orange Lake, I know of one cistern built in
the same manner that has never required any
repairs about the cement, and this one has been
used a number of years. If I desired to con-
struct a cistern in sandy soil that would be
durable, I should much prefer to apply the
cement directly on the sand without the inter-
vention of bricks.
In soils composed of clay I am of the opinion
that the use of bricks is necessary, in conse-
quence, probably, of a tendency such soils have
to crack open in times of drought. H.
"OVER-DoING" ORANGE CULTURE.-Our
poor little crop of Florida oranges is now, after
all the palaver, only about fifty or sixty millions
of the "golden apples," which is hardly a drop
in the bucket of the number imported and con-
sumed in this country. Foreign countries send
about 600,000,000 to America every year. This
number, added to Florida yield, makes the
number read 650,000,000, or 660,000,000, which
would give every man, woman and child in the
country only about fourteen oranges to suck, pro-
vided, of course, that church fairs, and home-
made cakes do not absorb their usual propor-
tion of the fruit. Florida oranges are highly
spoken of by Englishmen. A London writer
says: "I tasted quite lately some of the first
oranges that reached London, from the South-
ern States of America. They are distinctly
superior to those from either Spain or Portu-
gal."' JESS so."

ONE of the grandest minds the world has yet
produced-the contemporary and peer of
Shakespeare-glorious old Lord Bacon!-said:


God Almighty first planted a garden, and
indeed it is the purest of all human pleasures.
It is the greatest refreshment of the spirits of
man, without which buildings and palaces are
but gross handiworks, and man shall ever see
that when ages grow to civility and elegance,
men come to build stately sooner than to gar-
den finely, as if gardening were the greatest
perfection."
ROUGH RICE.-In reply to the inquiry of
H. A. P., of Archer, Fla., we would say, that
forty-five (45) pounds is the recognized weight
for a bushel of rough or unhulled rice. The
proportion of weight lost in hulling, we have
not been able to ascertain. That probably
depends, in a great measure, upon the qual-
ily, plumpness, etc., of the grain.





70 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Silk Culture.
Before the Revolution, more silk than cotton
was raised and exported from the Colony of
Georgia. Since then, only small quantities
were grown for domestic purposes. Cotton was
found to be of more profitable industry; be-
sides, there were no domestic manufacturers of
silk goods to encourage the continuance of the
industry. The excellent quality of Georgia
raised cocoons is established by competent
judges of silk, and the fact established, that our
climate and soil are as good as any in foreign
countries for its cheap production.
The manufacture of silk goods in the United
States was fairly started only about twenty
years ago. From that time to the year 1880, it
has gained an important place in the list of
manufacturing industries. A preliminary re
port upon silk manufacture from the United
States Census Office, shows that the total value
of the finished goods for the year ending June
30, 1880, was $34,420,463; number of factories,
383; amount of capital (real and personal) in-
vested, $18,999,500; looms, 8,467; the greatest
number of hands employed at any time during
the year was 34,440 ; and the total amount paid
in wages was $9,107,835.
If the same proportion existed in 1877 and
1880 between the raw material used and the
value of the manufactured goods, it has taken
over fifteen million dollars worth of imported
manufactured silk to supply the consumption
for the year 1880. All this silk entered under
our present tariff, duty free. The average duty
on manufactured silk goods is 58 per cent. of
its value.
Manufacturers-as expressed in their official
report of "the Silk Association of America"
for the year 1878, are very decidedly opposed
to giving any encouragement (by a duty) to
silk culture, and profess astonishment at such a
proposition. The only reason given by them
for their opposition is that our labor is too dear
to grow and reel it. Which means that we
could not compete in price, without a duty,
against the free raw silk from Europe and Asia.
But how would it fare with their own business
without a protective duty, the millions invested
in it, the skill and knowledge with which they
are justly credited in its management? It
would not save them from the fate of the Eng-
lish manufacturers, as told in the "Centennial
Report of th;s Association, that when England
abrogated the duty on silk goods, it caused the
closing of the mills and the beggaring of the
owners, and thousands and tens of thousands of


skilled and worthy workmen." The placing
again a duty on imported raw silk has not yet
been brought to the attention of Congress, a
strong effort for a reasonable duty will be made
before it whenever that body will take up the
tariff for revision. There are many reasons why
the manufacturer and the grower of silk should
come to an agreement by which both are fairly
dealt with. Why should all the protection of
our government be given to the manufacturer
of silk, and none to the producer of the raw
material ?
Congress has always shown a favorable dis-
position to help worthy and useful industries in
their early struggles, and will do so without
doubt again, when the subject and its import-
ance is brought properly before it for considera-
tion.
Mr. E. Fasnach, of Raleigh, North Carolina,
a practical silk grower gives the following re-
sults of facts and figures of his own experience


as to what extent silk culture can be made re-
munerative even without a market at home:
160 lbs of cocoons at $1.50......... ................... $240 00
Freight from Raleigh to New York........ ...........$ 1 00
Freight from New York to Marseilles........................ 10 00
P rim age ........................................................................ 50
Drayage and wharfages............................................... 2 75
In su ran ce ..................................................................... 2 40.
Brokerage and sundries in Marseilles....................... 6 00
Packing and incidentals............................................ 4 00
5 oz. S. W Eggs................................................... 25 00
T otal........................................... ....................... $52 15
This would leave $187.85 to make this crop,
and would require two grown persons, and part
of the time, four boys or girls. The time to
make and gather it, five weeks.
DIRECTIONS FOR SILK CULTURE.
From the large white and yellow breeds, the
best cocoons and silk are raised. Eggs should
be procured not later than February, and are
to be kept in a cool, dry place. As soon as the
mulberry leaves have begun to open, the eggs
are brought into, a warm room, and should be
inspected daily. As soon as any worms are
hatched, the eggs are spread on paper and cov-
ered with tender leaves. By noon all that will
hatch that day are out and on the leaves, and
are moved to a frame. It will take several
days before all will be out, but each day's
hatching is kept separate. The worms should
be fed every two hours during their first and
second age; afterwards every three and four
hours, beginning early in the morning and con-
tinuing until late bed-time. Every two days
the frames are covered with a net, on which
leaves are placed, when the worms will crawl
up to them, when the nets are moved to a clean
frame and the litter is removed from the other.
As the worms grow, they will require spread-
ing on additional frames, or tables if only a
few thousand are raised..
The worms go through what are called five
ages: at the end of each the molting takes
place, except at the last, when they spin their
cocoons. The first age lasts about five, the sec-
ond four, the third six, the fourth six, and the
last eight days. When the time for molting
approaches, the worms cease to eat and remain
under the leaves. No feed is given them at
this time; also, they should not be now dis-
turbed until they are through the molting, or
sleep, which will be known by their renewed
activity and appetite. Cold weather and a re-
duction of feed will lengthen the period men-
tioned. Young, tender leaves are first fed to
the worms; as they grow, larger leaves are
given them. No leaves with the dew on them
should be fed, nor wet ones, if possible to avoid.
Leaves for the morning meal are gathered the
evening before, and if rain is expected, several
meals ahead may be gathered. They are, how-
ever, to be shaken up at intervals to prevent
them heating. If only wet leaves can be had,
they should be shaken to get rid of as much
water as possible, and exposed in a windy place,
or by a fire to dry. At the end of the fifth
age, the worms begin to wander away from the
the leaves and hold up their heads as if in


search of a place to web up. Dry branches
well furnished with twigs, made into bundles,
are now put in ari upright position in the cen-
ter or at the side of the frames, but so that the
worms can easily reach them to crawl up, and
to allow the worms to feed for two or three
days longer, and then clean up the litter, as all
will not go to spinning at the same time. In a
week, the cocoons are ready for gathering and
assorting. Good cocoons are only used for
reeling; the soft, discolored and doubles, are
only fit for spinning; the finest and best shaped,
are selected for propagation. The medium size
up to the largest are taken, but none suit in
which two worms have spun up together, as the
former contain, usually, the male, and the lat-
ter the feni, le moth. These cocoons for raising
eggs, are again placed on a frame. In about
two weeks after spinning up, the moth will
burst the end of its shell and come out early in


the morning, and will soon seek its mate. By
two o'clock the same day, the couples are sepa-
rated and the males are removed; the same
afternoon the female will begin to lay its eggs.
When ready to begin, she is moved to a clean
cloth or paper to lay on. The eggs are left for
several days to dry, when they are put away in
a cool, dry place in a closet or drawer, for next
year's use.
The other cocoons, as soon as the sorting is
over, are stifled by means of steam, or in a well
spent baker's oven. Exposure in the sun, in a
place well sheltered from the wind, for several
days, is also an effective method. After the'
chrysalides are stifled, they require drying.
This is done by placing them in an airy room
on shelves or frames, stirring them several
times a week at first, and less often afterwards,
until the chrysalis becomes perfectly dry, when
they are fit to ship to any market. In an oven,
or by exposure to the hot sun, this process can
be hastened. Rats, mice, and ants are ex-
tremely fond of the eggs, worms and chrysa-
lides. Too much care against their access to
them, cannot be taken. Ample ventilation
while in the worm state, should be fully pro-
vided for, so arranged that the wind does not
blow on them. Too much light is also to be
avoided at any time, and when spinning, the
room should be darkened still more. Frames
covered with cloth placed over the windows,
are generally used to check the wind and to
subdue the light in the room.
While there are a variety of mulberry, and
leaves of other plants on which the worms can
be raised, the white (morus alba) is used in
preference to all others. The multicaulus,
which is still scattered over our State since the
time when it was the cause of a wild and sense-
less speculation, is the easiest to propagate and
grow. Worms fed on its leaves make a fair,
but not best cocoon, whereas those fed on leaves
of the white variety make cocoons which com-
mand the highest price. Any one beginning
or adding to his trees, should use only the
morus alba. It makes a useful and attractive
shade tree, and should Congress decide to give
protection to silk culture, a strong impulse
would be given to it, and these trees would
then be valuable for propagation.
Mr. E. Fasnach, Raleigh, North Carolina,
and Mr. L. Crozier, Bayou Sara, Louisiana,
are regularly in the business of silk culture,
and keep the best varieties of mulberry plants
and eggs for sale. For experiment or small
beginnings, enough of either can be sent by
mail.
Such as wish to engage more rapidly or
largely in the business, will do well before do-
ing so, to prepare themselves with more ex-
tended information than could be given in this
condensed article.
A new machine, invented by Mr. E. Saul, of
New York, is well spoken of as supplying a
needed improvement for the more economical


reeling of silk. The Women's Silk Culture
Association in Philadelphia, has formed itself
with the object of teaching the art of reeling,
and to start thereby a domestic market for the
cocoons.
JOHN STARK.
Thomasville, Georgia.

-Moist mortar destroys lead pipe. Under-
ground telegraph wires have been cased in' lead
pipe, laid in mortar, and the pipes soon become
useless. Moist mortar will eat through an
ordinary sheet of lead in a year.

-An experienced mechanic writes: "I have
tried chalk, soap, treacle and rosin, to prevent
slipping of belts, but I like oiling the belt on
the inside just before I.stop on a Saturday; it
preserves belts and beats anything I have tried
yet."


I






~~.......~~,-THE FLORIDA-i1r----.1-.~--.- ~~;-L--O- -- ..1- -.~ DISP T H 7L -:. ~ ~;- .,~.- ~., N~ ------,


THE TONE OF SOCIETY.-"Whatever may
be the customs and laws of a country,, women
must always give the tone to morals." This is
the profound remark of Aime Marion. Pierre
Vidal is not less emphatic:
If aught of goodness and of grace
Be mine, hers be the glory;
She led me- on in wisdom's-path,
And set the light before me.
WAGES-HERE AND THERE.-Replying to
the declaration made by Senator Coke, on the
tariff discussion, that wages in the United States
are nominally higher than in England, but in
fact not so, SenatorF rye introduced the follow-
ing comparison:


United States.
Per Week.
Laborers............................................. $ 7 to$ 9
Bricklayers........................................ 12 to 16
Masons.............................................. 9 to 15
Gasfitters........................ ....... 10 to 18
Carpenterso......................................... 10 to 15
Painters........................................... 12 to 16
Plasterers............................................ 10 to 15
Plumbers............................................ 12 to 18
Granite workers................................ 12 to 18
Millwrights........................................ 12 to 18


England.
Per Week.
$5 82
925
8 70
7 80
900
850
9 72
900
8 10
$7 to 10


FISH !-There is perhaps no other State where
so great a fish industry could be carried on as
in Louisiana, in consequence of the num-
ber and size of her lakes, rivers, bayous, la-
goons, springs and creeks, and the mildness of
her climate. She could supply the whole country
with fish, both fresh and cured. Where sleep
the energy, enterprise and sagacity of her capi-
talists when such a field is open before them and
inviting them to enter and cultivate it ?-New
Orleans Advance.
SOAKING CORN.-At this season of the year,
horses and mules are subject, more or less, to
lampas, and should be fed upon a softer diet
than hard corn. It is a good idea to soak the
corn before feeding until it is quite soft and di-
gestible. For hogs, all who have had any ex-
perience with soaked corn can testify to its
greater value over the hard grain.-Southern
Live-Stock Journal.
-A cure for snake bites was the other day
introduced to the notice of the French Academy
of Sciences. It consists in injecting the per-
manganate of potash under the sk;n, at the
bite, and also wherever swellings appear. The
solution to be used has a strength cf one part
of the salt to one hundred parts of water.
-According to the late census the following
States, in the order given, are the greatest
wheat producing States in the Union, counted
by millions of bushels: Illinois, 51,000,000;
Indiana, 47,000,000 ; Ohio, 46,000,000 ; Michi-
gan, 36,000,000; Minnesota, 35,000,000; Iowa,
31,000,000; California, 30,000,000; Missouri,
25,000,000; Wisconsin, 25,000,000; Pennsyl-
vania, 19,000,000. The total crop of the
United States is 459,000,000 bushels, grown on
about 35,000,000 acres of land, making an
average of nearly thirteen bushels to the acre.

-Mr. Dodge, of the Agricultural Depart-
ment, thinks that if the floods in the Lower
Mississippi region recede "in any reasonable
time" there may be a fair cotton crop,
"although, of course, late and less than the
average in quality."
-No State in the Union is making such
rapid strides in progression, immigration, specu-
lation in lands, and other enterprises, as Flor-
ida. Her attractions are spreading broadcast,
and thousands of well-to-do people are flocking
thither and making homes for themselves and
families. This is probably the only State in
the Union where one can settle down comforta-
bly on a small capital and reap early returns
from their labor. All classes of mechanics are


needed in the State, and can obtain ready em-
ployment at fair wages. This, taken into con-
sideration with the small cost of living, are rare
advantages, not to be met with in other States.
The mildness of the climate is another worthy
consideration. Especially to the young men of
our large cities does Florida extend a willing
hand, where with industry and sobriety early
fortunes and honorable positions can be won.-
Pathfinder.




ROASTING FOWLS ON A -STRING.-A story
is going the rounds in various English journals,
in which is described how M. Dumas proved
his culinary acquirements by roasting a couple
of fowls suspended by a string before the fire.
M. Dumas' plan was based on physiological
facts. Every animal has two orifices, an upper
and a lower one. To roast a fowl in first-rate
style the upper orifice must be stopped, after
the Belgian fashion, by thrusting its head into
its crop and sewing the skin over it with needle
and thread. By the lower orifice the fowl will
have been emptied. Its liver, chopped small
with parsley and other sweet herbs, and mixed
with butter, will be returned to the place of the
absent intestines. And now the cook's object
ought to be to retain the greatest amount of
gravy possible during the roasting of the fowl.
According to the plan of M. Dumas, the fowl's
feet are tied with a string and it is suspended
vertically by that string with its lower orifice
upwards and its upper orifice closely plugged;
if it is dusted with salt and pepper, and basted
with fresh butter, pouring a spoonful now and
then into the inferior orifice, all the logical
conditions will be fulfilled for having an excel-
lent roast chicken. All that is left to do is to
watch the fowl while it roasts, to cut the string
which holds it when the skin is covered with
little blisters, out of which issue jets of sweet
steam. Now deposit it on a dish and pour over
it the contents of the pan that has been placed
under it during the roasting to catch the drip-
pings.
EGGS BY WEIGHT.-Many articles have been
written in this country concerning the injustice
both to the producer as well as the consumer,
in the sale of eggs by the dozen, irrespective of
size or weight. Nothing practical has ever
been suggested in this connection, or rather
nothing which would induce dealers and the
public to depart from the old-time custom of
selling eggs by the dozen. It seems this dis-
cussion is not confined to America alone. Shall
eggs be sold by the number or by the pound, is
the momentous question that is said to be agi-
tating several Parisian scientists. It has been
learned that the average weight of twenty eggs
laid by fowls of different breeds is two and one-
eighth pounds. The breeds that lay the largest


eggs, averaging seven to a pound, are
Black Spanish, Houdans, and Plymouth
Rocks. Eggs of medium size and weight,
averaging eight or nine to the pound, are laid
by Cochins, Brahmas, Polands, Dorkings and
Games. Hamburgs and Leghorns lay about
ten eggs to the pound. Thus there is a differ-
ence of three eggs in one pound weight. Hence
it is claimed that in justice to the consumer
eggs should be sold by weight. No one dis-
putes this theory, but who will begin the re-
form ?
The Poultry Monthly says concerning fowls
and their treatment: Fowls intended for
breeding purposes should have all the exercise
that it is possible to give them." It is better
to spend your time improving one or two breeds
than to be hankering after others unless you
have abundant means and plenty of room."
"Animal food occasionally for young or old


fowls seems indispensable, but better give them
insect food when they are not able to procure it
themselves."

THE GOAT !-An association to be known as
"The British Goat Society," has lately been
formed in England. One of the objects of this
society is to establish a system of supplying
these animals to cottagers as a source of milk.
The system so far works well, the demand for
goats being much greater than the supply. The
superiority of goat's milk over that of cow's for
infants and invalids has long 'since been ac-
knowledged, and before long it will be much
more generally used than at present.

MILKING GoATs.-Mr. Watts, of South
Carolina, reports having a female Angora goat
that throughout the season gives four quarts of
milk daily, and of a quality equal in richness
with that of any Jersey cow on his farm. He
also says an Angora goat will thrive where a cow
will starve, and six goats will subsist well in a
pasture which would only afford sufficient
nourishment for one cow.-American Cultiva-
tor.

Can Insects Talk Together ?
"Two ants," says Buchner, ." when they are
talking together, stand with their heads oppo-
site each other, working their sensitive feelers
in the liveliest manner, and tapping each other's
heads." Numerous examples prove that they
are able in this way to make mutual commun-
ications, and even on certain definite subjects.
"I have often," says. the English naturalist,
Jesse, placed a small green caterpillar in the
neighborhood of an ant's nest. It is immedi-
ately seized by an ant, which calls in the assist-
ance of a friend after ineffectual efforts to
drag the caterpillar into the nest. It can be
immediately seen that the little creatures hold
a conversation by means of their feelers, and
this being ended, they repair together to the
caterpillar in order to drag it into the nest by
their united strength. Further, I have ob-
served the meeting of ants on the way to and
from their nest. They stop, touch each other
with their feelers, and appear to hold a conver-
sation, which I have good reason to suppose re-
lates to the best ground for obtaining food."
Hague writes in a letter to Darwin that he one
day killed with his finger a number of ants who
came every day from a hole in the wall to some
plants standing on the chimney-piece. He had
tried the effect of brushing them away, but it
was of no use, and the consequence of the
slaughter was that the ants who were on their
way turned back and tried to persuade their
companions, who were not aware of the danger,
to turn back also. A short conversation en-
sued between the ants, which, however, did not
result in an immediate return, for those who
had just left the nest first convinced themselves
of the truth of the report.-Contemporary.
,


-What valuable developments may be
brought forth from substances extremely cheap
in their primitive forces is strikingly illustrated
by the statement that there can be made from
only 75 cents' worth of iron $5.50 worth of bar
iron, $10 worth of horseshoes, $180 worth of
table knives, $6,800 worth of needles, $20,480
worth of shirt buttons, $200,000 worth of watch
springs, $400,000 worth of hair springs, $2,500,-
000 worth of pallet arbors (used in watches.)

-About $1,000,000 is paid every year in this
country for foreign sumac for tanning. This,
it is claimed, a needless expenditure, as a plant
grows freely in this country, and requires but
little skill in cultivation, and so might as well
be utilized.


~.- .---


I


THE LOIDA ISATH


71





72 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Eke 41Orid a W517alth.

JACKSONVILLE, APRIL 24, 1882.
EDITORS:
D. REDMOND, D. H. ELLIOTT, W. H. ASHMEAD.
Subscription $1.00 per annvm, in advance.
RATES OF ADVERTISING.
SQUARES. 1 TIME. 1 MO. 3 Mo. 6 MO. 1 YEAR
One........................ $ 1001 $ 250 $550 $10 00 $1850
Two........... ........... 2001 500 1000 18 00 34 00
Three .............. 3 00 7 00 1400 25 00 4600
Four...................... 400 9 00 17 50 30 00 58 00
Eight..................... 8 00 1650 30 00 50 00 100 00
Sixteen.......... 1600 3000 50 00 8000 15000
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the best ad-
vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.
The Dispatch has the largest circulation of any
paper in Florida; it is therefore the best adver-
tising medium in the State.
6,000 TO 8,000 COPIES ISSUED EVERY WEEK.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.
MR. FRANK JORDAN, No. 9 East Fifth St., Cincin-
nati, Ohio, is our Western Agent, and is authorized to
receive subscriptions and advertisements to THE FLOR-
IDA DISPATCH.
The First Ripe Peach of the Season.
The publishers of THE DISPATCH are in-
debted to Mr. W. B. Lipsey, nurseryman at
Archer, Fla., for probably the first ripe peach
of the season.
Read, think and ponder, ye of the boreal
regions, who have not yet been kissed by the
breath of spring; with the buds of your fruit
trees unswollen and your flowers not in bloom!
The peach is a Chinese variety known as
the Pien-To," and Mr. L. reports the crop
pretty good, but not heavily laden.
It was simply delicious, with a blush rivaling
beauty's cheek, and a fragrance, ye gods! words
fail us!
Thanks, Mr. L., and many returns of the
compliment! _
Florida Fruit-Growers' Association.
A circular to the members of this Association,
throughout the State, suggesting close observa-
tion and investigation of the growing fruit crop,
especially the citrus family, will be issued in a
few days.
In the meantime, the officers of the Associa-
tion would respectfully and earnestly request
the members everywhere to examine the grow-
ing fruit crops-make notes upon the condition
of the trees, size and quality of fruit; color of
foliage; presence or absence of insect enemies;
condition of soils and modes of culture; kind of
fertilizers used, and all other matters of interest
and importance pertaining to fruit-growing in


Florida. Brief notes embodying such infor-
mation may be transmitted to us for publica-
tion and will appear from time to time in our
columns.
Alfalfa.
A Missouri farmer, writing to Colman's
Rural on the culture of this fine grass, in 1881,
says that although the season was late and the
first week of May rainy and cool, (thus delay-
ing the cutting of the first crop of Alfalfa,
which loves the sun,) still it was in full bloom
and was cut on the 1st of May. Then he con-
tinued to cut it as wanted until the first of
June. On the 20th of June the second crop
was ready on the piece cut May 10th, but was


not cut till June 28th and July 2d and 5th.
On July 12th he finished cutting second crop
on the piece cut last three days of May and
June 1st. He says he scarcely had a rain since
May 5th, indeed the drouth almost equaled that
of 1854; even the chinch bugs of that disas-
trous year appeared. Nevertheless, the Al-
falfa, like six weeks beans, was ready for
harvest in less than six weeks from the first
cutting. This crop, on good, strong, well-
manured land in Florida may be cut at least
five times in the season, giving a range of more
than a month earlier and later than any part of
Missouri. It is, in our experience, better
adapted to Florida and the lower South than
any other "clover," and we advise our readers
who "soil" their stock and love to feed plenti-
fully, to give it a fair trial.
Agricultural Papers.
"Every farmer," says the Clarksville (Tenn.)
Tobacco Leaf, should take one or more papers
devoted to agriculture. This is an age of im-
provement; the world is making rapid strides
daily in acquiring knowledge. Farmers are
annually experimenting and making new dis-
coveries in the science of agriculture. Their
experience and their developments and discov-
eries go forth through the means of the journals
which makes agricultural matter a specialty.
The lawyer or the doctor keeps himself posted
with reference to the advancement of the science
of his profession. Why should the farmer not
do likewise ?
No farmer can make his farm a success un-
less he engages in the work with a will, coupled
with the determination to succeed. With this
determination he must study to work advanta-
geously. With the aid of the published expe-
rience of others a frequent necessity is often
supplied.
New Publications.
John Eax and Mamelon; or, The South With-
out the Shadow. By Albion W. Turgee, author
of "A Fool's Errand," "Bricks Without Straw,"
etc., etc.
The readers of Judge Turgee's earlier works
will be agreeably surprised to find that a more
intimate and familiar knowledge of the people
of the South has modified his views and opin-
ions very considerably, and that he has come to
the conclusion that some "good" may come out
of this "Nazareth." His first books, though
full of dramatic situations, and evincing a very
high degree of ability, were marred by an "irre-
pressible" and narrow sectionalism which pre-
vented the author from doing anything like jus-


tice to the noble, brave and patient people
among whom his lot was cast, and whose lives,
actions and motives he attempted to describe.
Time, which softens and changes all things, has
cleared Judge Turgee's vision and mellowed his
judgment, so that now he sees "weird fascina-
tions in Southern life; and in contrasting the
North and South aims only to "show the fusing
potency of love or the solvent power of manly
friendship." "John Eax" is, we think, fully
equal to any of the author's previous works in
vivid portraiture of character, and powerful
description, and the absorbing interest of the
narrative carries the reader rapidly along to the
end. It is a pretty volume of 300 pages.


May be obtained from Ashmead Bro.'s. Pub-
lished by Fords, Howard & Hulburt, New
York. Price, $1.00.
Mrs. Mayburn's Twins is the title of the last
production of John Habberton,'the famous au-
thor of Helen's Babies." The whole book, of
188 pages, is confined to the experience of Mrs.
Mayburn for "just one day," with her trials in
the morning, afternoon and evening." This
author is peculiarly happy in his treatment of
babies, their freaks, oddities, whims and wise,
cunning" ways, and we have no doubt that
"little Jefful," the infantile heroine of this
book will become as great a favorite as
"Budge" and "Toddy," who made "Helen's
Babies" such a household word throughout the
whole country. Price 50 cents. Published by
T. B. Peterson & Bros., Philadelphia. The
Twins" may be had from Ashmead Bros., who
have also all the Harper publications, Our Con-
tinent, Puck, North American Review, Atlantic
Monthly, Scientific American, Popular Science
Monthly, Lippincott's Magazine, etc., and a
full supply of all the best daily and weekly
papers of the United States.
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, a somewhat "prom-
ising weekly agricultural, manufactural and
scientific paper, of 16 pages, (illustrated) at
the very low price of $1 per year; may also
be ordered from Ashmead Bros., Jacksonville,
Florida. n.Specimen copies free.
Little Johnny on Dogs.
By request of a lady reader, we republish the
following. We do not remember anything bet-
ter in this line since Ike Partington's famous
composition on the horse:
One time there was a Feller bot a Dog of a
man in the market, and the Dog it was a Biter.
After it had bitt the feller four or five times,
he thru a cloas-line over its neck and led it back
to the Dog man in the market, and Hee said
to the Dog man, the Feller did: "Old man,
didn't you Yuster have this Dog ?" The
Dog man he luked at the dog, and then he
thot awhile and then he sed: Well, yes, I
had him about haf the time and the other haf
he had mee." Then the Feller was furious
mad, and he sed : "Wot did you sell me such
a Dog as this'n for ? "And the ole man he spoke
up and sed: "For four dollars and seventy-5
cents loffle money." Then the Feller he guessed
he wude go home if the dog was willing Uncle
Ned which has been in Indy and everywhere, he
says the Mexican dogs don't have no hair on
'em. Dogs howl loudern kats, but kats is more
furry and can wok on top of a fence and blow
up their tails like a bloon when they gett mad
and want to spit.


Satisfactory Transportation of Fruit and
Vegetables.
SANFORD, FLA., April 17, 1882.
D. H. Elliott, Esq., Agent Florida Dispatch Line,
Jacksonvillle, Fla.:
DEAR SIR-I wish to express to you my sat-
isfaction for the manner in which our fruit has
been handled by your line. We have sent
small shipments to several places, as Washing-
ton, D. C., New York, Philadelphia, Columbus,
Ohio, Ironton, Tontogany, Cincinnati, Chatta-
nooga, Tenn., and Atlanta, Ga., and not one
single box has miscarred or been overcharged
or delayed. I think that under all the circum-
stances you have accomplished wonders in
transporting our fruit safely and cheaply.
Yours truly,
J. 0. TABER.


I






THE FLOID DISPATCH. 73


Georgia or Florida, for fifteen cents per pound!
And we will further state that a native (Geor-
gia) sample of Mr. Jackson's tea, sent per mail
to a well-known lady of this State, was pro-
nounced of excellent quality.
The Tea plant belongs to the Camellia family,
and requires nearly the same treatment as our
out-door "Japonicas" (so-called). It should
have a good, strong soil, enriched with a com-
post of dried muck or peat, bone-dust and
ashes. The land must be well drained, and
cleanly cultivated. The seed should be planted
as soon as ripe, in mellow drills, like peas, and
may be transplanted from the seed-bed when
about a year old. The young plants do not


Tea Culture in Florida.
Editors of The Florida Dispatch:
DEAR SIIs-Was the new Agricultural Com-
missioner, Dr. Loring, correct in asserting that
the location selected for a Tea Farm by Gen.
Le Due, (at Summerville, S. C.,) is too far
North for the successful development of the
plant ? Do you think that our State is pecu-
liarly adapted to the growth of the Tea plant,
and that it can be made a profitable industry
among us ?
I have a few plants under cultivation, but
they do not seem to grow off very freely. What
manure shall I use to give them a start? How
many varieties of Tea are there ?
Pardon such a string of questions; and, if
you can find the time, please send me brief re-
plies through our new and progressive paper,
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH-the best paper, for
its cost, in the State.
Very truly yours, R. D. S.
Near Tallahassee, Fla., April 15, 1882. .
REPLY-It was not Dr. Loring who expressed
the opinion quoted. It was Mr. Wm. Saun-
ders, Superintendent of the Public Garden in
Washington, who was sent to Summerville by
the Commissioner, to examine and report upon
the progress of the experiment under Le Duc,
and who stated that if any more Government
or private attempts are to be made with Tea,
they should be made in a more Southern
locality; and further expressed the opinion
that Florida offers the best opportunities for
success. We do not agree with Mr Saunders
in this. We have cultivated the Tea plant in
the strong, rolling, clayey uplands of Georgia,
and the moist, sandy, low lands of Louisiana,
Mississippi and Florida; and we distinctly aver
that the rolling uplands of Georgia produced
by far the most rapid and vigorous growth-a
thriftier, finer and better developed plant in all
respects than we have anywhere seen in the
low country," farther South, and near the
seaboard. Mr. Saunders seems to have for-
gotten that most of Japan and the principal
Tea districts of China are farther north than
Florida, and have a lower mean temperature
throughout the year. Tea will grow anywhere
in Florida; but if we had to establish a planta-
tion in this State, we should select the undula-
ting hills near Tallahassee and northward and
westward.
We do not think Tea growing can be made
a "profitable industry" at the present price of
labor, and with our very imperfect knowledge
of culture and manipulation. It is only fair to
state, however, that Le Duc's superintendent,
(Mr. Jackson,) who claimed to be an expert in
tea-growing and manufacture, stated to us that
he could make an excellent article of Tea, in


particulars are given as to the cost of planting
the grove or the amount of attention it has had
during the years of growth. There can be little
doubt, however, that the investment was small
in comparison with the return, and the land
would otherwise have remained entirely unpro-
ductive. To the contrary the timber crop was
so much clear gain. It is clear that our national
resources might be enormously increased by tim-
ber culture of lands which are now left unused
and unproductive; and the planters would find
their groves a surer investment for the security 1
of their family possessions, than any savings 1
bank deposit." (
-A New York farmer, who is also a practi-
cal sheep grower, gives the following as a sure
cure" for grub in sheep: Turn into each nostril I
of the animal affected half a teaspoonful ofkero- I
sene oil.


stand the hottest suns very well, and it is good
practice to place them in a partly shaded situa-
tion for another year, before finally setting them
out in the Tea grove. Use plenty of the com-
post above indicated for the young plants, and
continue the same regularly in the field--espe-
cially after you begin to gather the leaves, as
that operation exhausts the tree very rapidly.
Botanists differ in regard to varieties of Tea,
but the weight of evidence goes to prove that
there is really only one variety ofthe true Tea--the
Thea Bohea; and that all the Japan, Assam,
and Chinese teas of commerce are produced
from this variety by skillful handling and
manipulation.
We thank you for the good opinion of THE
DISPATCH which you so kindly express; and
hope to make the paper more practical and
valuable as we go on, from week to week.-EDs.

Timber Culture.
In some of the comparatively treeless coun-
tries at the West, forestry associations have
been formed; and the subject of planting and
cultivating choice varieties of trees, on waste
lands, for timber, is beginning to attract atten-
tion in some of the older States. Of course
there is yet in Florida no apparent necessity
for anything like the "timber plantations of
Scotland and England; but in order to keep
our readers fully posted on the progress of all
rural enterprises, we give the following from
the Scientific American:
Hitherto the abundance of natural timber
in this country has made it easy to dispense
with timber culture, and for most part our land
owners have taken little interest in such slow
growing crops. This state of things, however,
is fast passing away. The demand for special
woods for manufacturing purposes is steadily
and naturally increasing, while the natural
supply is diminishing and must ultimately be-
come quite inadequate. Meantime there are
millions of acres of land suitable for timber cul-
ture and for nothing else, except poor pastur-
age that our land owners are allowing to lie
waste and idle for lack of a little forethought,
and too frequently our would-be thrifty farm-
ers will risk their surplus means in wild cat
speculations, promising but never yielding large
and speedy returns, when the same money spent
in planting timber would soon convert their
worthless swamps and stony places into valua-
ble properties. A correspondent writing from
Wisconsin tells, of a piece of land that was
planted with walnut twenty-three years ago.
The land was flooded every spring and summer
and was unfit for ordinary cultivation. The
trees are now from sixteen to twenty inches
through, and have been sold for $27,000. No


rich or poor; that it was as easily cultivated as
corn, and that it brought ready sale, alvway at
prices ranging from 80 cents to $1.50 per
bushel. Dr. Godfrey has ordered a few bush-
els of seed rice from Savannah, and will try four
acres in it. In addition to its profitableness in
other respects, the straw makes splendid food
for cattle and horses for winter. It is eaten as
readily by stock as Northern hay. That our
farmers must diversify their crops is so plain
that everybody now admits it. We propose
upland rice as one new thing for us to turn
our attention to. From the experience we have
had with it ourselves, as well as from our ob-
servation of this crop, we can safely say that
where it is managed right, it is obliged to be
profitable. It can be planted until May." [In
Florida, generally, until the first week in June.
-AG. ED.


73


The Hens at Kirby Homestead.
A writer in the New York Tribune describes
the careful and thorough mode of making hens
comfortable and profitable, at the North. In
lieu of buckwheat, (not grown here,) we advise
the use of rough rice-one of the best grains in
the world for poultry food. The Tribune writer
says:
A programme was arranged which was care-
fully carried out, with an astonishing increase
in number of eggs. The new system of man-
agement is the nearest perfection, judging by
results, of any we have ever practiced.
Hens are early risers. Early in the morning
they are fed buckwheat-two quarts for fifty
hens. About 10 o'clock they are given four
quarts of apples or carrots, or both, cut up fine
in the chopping-bowl with the griddle-cakes,
potato skins, etc., left over in the kitchen, and
water, also is placed before them-it would be
better if warmed. In the middle of the after-
noon they are again fed corn, two quarts, and
the eggs are gathered. A box containing oys-
ter and clam shells, slightly charred, so they
will break up easily, is kept in the hen-house
constantly, and also another box with fresh
shells in it pounded up as fine as possible. An-
other box is filled with coarse sand from which
their crops can be replenished with gravel.
Slacked lime is also accessible. We used to
keep feed before the hens all the time, but they
got too fat and were poor layers. They must
be fed early in the morning-requiring but a
little-and they must be fed with regularity.
Fowls want a variety of feed and must have
some vegetable food to be kept healthy and do
well. They are fond of apples and also of car-
rots; cabbage is excellent for a change. Buck-
wheat is one of the best kinds of grain. Feed-
ing entirely on corn is not so good. There
should always be a mixture or variety of grain.
When fed twice a day hens will not goi': them-
selves and thus produce disease in the crop and
digestive organs, as they arc apt to do when only
fed once a day. It is far better to divide the
same amount of feed into two feedings, morning
and afternoon.
For a quarter of a century we have almost
daily heard the voice of a neighbor at the break
of day calling his hens to feed them. This man
always has eggs to sell. Farmers' poultry are
too closely imbred, which makes them weakly
and impotent; and they are careless about the
old hens. Young hens will lay three or four
times as many eggs, and the male birds should
be changed at least every other year, introduc-
ing new blood. In no case should a male be
allowed to breed with is own offspring. Very
few farmers consider these things, and hence
poor returns.
UPLAND RICE.-We quote from the Cuthbert
(Ga.) Enterprise: "The culture of upland rice
engaged considerable attention at the meeting of
the Agricultural Society last Tuesday. It was
shown that it would make twice as many bush-
els to the acre as corn, whether the land be


low


I


11/


TH FORDADIPACH






T7 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH,


Unjust Charges against Transportation
Lines-An Instance of how some
are Caused.
We are advised that there were about two
hundred crates of vegetables shipped from the
Transit Railroad to the steamer St. Johns via
Fernandina on the 14th. The destination was
Philadelphia, Pa. On account of the failure
of the St. Johns to touch at Fernandina on
that date, the shipment had to be returned to
go via Florida Dispatch Line from Callahan.
This line will not reflect any credit upon itself
in the delivery of this matter on account of the
delay in receiving it; nor the shipper upon his
judgment in his selection of a route by steam-
boat. The latter is always subject to delays,
etc., incident to storms, fogs, winds and tides.
Whereas the Florida Dispatch Line is by rail
to connections that are certain as can be made
by means and energy.

A New Variety of Oats.
We were shown by D. Bowen, at Thomas-
ville, Ga., a new variety of oats. One of its
peculiar merits is that it matures from four to
six weeks earlier than any variety at present in
that section. The sample exhibited was raised
by Mr. Leon Neal, was planted about the 20th
of December, and harvested April 1st; was on
an average about five feet high. It was not as
well and heavily headed as some varieties,
but would be classed as very good among our
common oats. It seems well adapted to our or-
dinary lands. The proper name and history
we do not know, but those interested might
secure the desired information by addressing
the parties mentioned.

The Chattahoochee."
This new steel steamboat was built at Pitts-
burg, Pa., by James Reese, and finished on Jan-
uary, 1882, for the Savannah, Florida and West-
ern Railway Company for service upon the
Apalachicola and Flint Rivers, plying between
Apalachicola, Fla., Bainbridge and Columbus,
Georgia.
This is the first entirely steel steamer built
in the United States. She is 160 feet long, 31
feet beam and 6 feet hold, draft 20 inches, and
will carry 1,000 bales of cotton on a draft of
three feet. Speed, fourteen miles per hour.
The passenger accommodations are excellent
and admirably arranged in all the details that
conduce to the comfort and pleasure of ladies,
gentlemen and children, supplied as this boat is
with a nursery.
She has thirty state-rooms, doors inside and


outside, double berths furnished with best of
hair mattresses, resting upon excelsior mattress
and hair springs.
The boat is lighted by electric lights.
The saloon is neatly finished; Brussels car-
pets and upholstery of the latest designs, and,
in short, is furnished and finished in a style
commensurate with the day and age, and is the
best that money could obtain.
Interviewing the freight space of this steamer
we were favorably impressed with its adaptabil-
ity to the traffic on the St. John's River. She.
would carry 5,000 boxes of oranges any dis-
tance in perfect order, being cool, with a free-
dom from any effect from the heat of the boil-


ers. This would also be a feature in the pas-
senger accommodations; all the state-rooms
being well ventilated, and hence plenty of light
and air, and would undoubtedly be delightfully
pleasant at all seasons in this climate. We do
not know of a steamboat whose design and fin-
ish is better adapted to the wants of the St.
John's River than the "Chattahoochee."
In conversation with Captain Jim Fitzjerald
and Captain Joe Smith we learn they have just
returned from a trip on the "Chattahoochee."
They pronounce her a perfect success in every
detail. She is commanded by Captain T. H.
Moore, who, with the assistance of Mr. C. D.
Owen, perfected the plans and construction, and
which reflects great credit upon their good
judgment. She cost $60,000.

How to Cook until the Grove begins to Bear.
Pumpkin pies can be made without either
milk or eggs, by using water for milk and a
heaping tablespoonful of flour for each pie, in-
stead of eggs. The one essential thing is to sea-
son them will.
Custard pies can be made without milk by
using on extra egg or two according to size.
Sour bread makes nice puddings or griddle
cakes by using soda with it.
A cheap hearty pudding can be made with
one cup of flour, two cups of corn meal, half
cup of molasses, a pinch of salt, a teaspoonful of
soda, and the juice of a lemon, or sour orange,
or a tablespoonful of vinegar. Stir to a thin
batter, put in a covered dish, and place in a
kettle of boiling water. Boil two hours. It is
better with some kind of fruit stirred in-Zante
currants, prickly pear fruit, the rind of the
sweet lemon, or dried apple. Eat it with sour
sauce.
Bake sweet potatoes for dinner in the morn-
ing; then put them in an empty iron kettle,
cover, and let them stand near the stove and
just keep warm until wanted. They will be
much sweeter. W.
BEWARE! How You TRIM Up.-We have
seen so many beautiful orange trees slashed to
pieces and fairly butchered by ignorant and
over-zealous pruners, that we join our neighbor
of the Lake City Reporter in the warning
against the indiscriminate cutting away of the
lower branches which nature intends as a pro-
tection and safeguard to the tree. The Reporter
says: "Mr. James E. Young has a number of
orange trees just coming intd bearing, which
is the strongest argument which can be pro-
duced against trimming orange trees. These
trees have only had the suckers or sprouts cut
away annually; all the lower limbs have been
allowed to grow, and thus the trunks were


shaded from the sun in summer and protected
from cold in winter. Do not trim away the
branches from your orange trees (in this local-
ity) if you desire them to bear early."
Utah, Her Climate and Snow-Storms.
OGDEN, UTAH, April 12, 1882.
Messrs. Ashmead Brothers, Jacksonville, Fla.:
GENTLEMEN: Number 2, Volume 1, of THE
FLORIDA. DISPATCH was shown me yesterday
by a gentleman here, who,.like myself, is tired
of the six months' (seven months this season)
of winter we have here-snow, and cold sleet up
to May, and sometimes even as late as the 26th
of May, snow-then comes summer, and while for
months past the thermometer has many times


been below zero, all at once it comes hot, dry
and dusty and the mercury above 1000 day
after'day, whilst the heat is so great that it seems
as if the atmosphere could take fire. Many
call this a magnificent climate, and so forth, and
for them it may be even as a Polar bear would
prefer the icebergs of the Arctic to the pleas-
ures of a more temperate clime. Every one to
his taste.
Yesterday it was snowing and blowing, and
thus far the fruit buds are not sufficiently ad-
vanced to be injured by the heavy frost of last
night, when ice formed to over one-fourth of an
inch in thickness.
I am preparing to make Florida my home,
and desire, therefore, to obtain all the informa-
tion possible on the subject, and have made
some inquiries from gentlemen residing in your
State.
I find in the number I have seen of THE
DISPATCH, much information, and do not see
how you can print and publish it at the price.
H. W. 0. M.

Balky Horses.
A society for the prevention of cruelty to
animals recommends the following rules for the
treatment of balky horses:
1. Pat the horse upon the neck, examine the
harness carefully, first on one side then on the
other, speaking encouragingly while doing so,
then jump into the wagon and give the word
go; generally he will obey.
2. A teamster says he can start the worst
balky horse by taking him out of the shafts and
making him go around in a circle. If the first
dose of this doesn't cure him the second will be
sure to do it.
3. To cure a horse, simply place your hand
over the horse's nose and shut off the wind till
he wants to go, and then let him go.
4. The brains of horses seem to entertain but
one idea at a time; thus continued whipping
only confirms his stubborn resolves; if you can
by any means give him a new subject to think
of you will have no trouble to start him. A
simple remedy is to take a couple of turns of
stout twine around the fore-leg, just below the
knee, and tie in a bow-knot. By the first check
he will go dancing off, and, after going a short
distance, you can get out and remove the string
to prevent injury to the tendon in your further
drive.

BUTTER.
English Rules for Making.
1. The cream should be removed from the
milk before the latter has become sour. The
reason for this is easily explained. As soon as
the milk begins to turn, curd is produced, and it
is then impossible to remove the cream without


taking off some of the curd also. Curd is
cheese, and if curd is made up with cream into
butter, the latter must necessarily have a cheesy
flavor, and will in a short time become "strong"
and very inferior in quality.
2. As soon as the butter makes its appear-
ance, and while still in a granular state, the
buttermilk should be run off. Plenty of cold
water should then be thrown into the churn
and the butter washed by turning the churn a
few turns; two or more lots of water should be
used until the butter is thoroughly cleansed.
Butter is frequently damaged by over-churn-
ing. It is quite an error to suppose that after
butter once forms more can be obtained by fur-
ther churning. Every revolution after the
granules are about the size of Indian corn or
small nuts deteriorates the quality.
3. Butter should not be touched by hand.
The water should be expelled by means of a
butter worker.






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 7


I


The country razor-back prowls around in the
woods and lives on acorns, pecan nuts and roots;
when he can spare the time he climbs under his
owner's fence and assists in harvesting the corn
crop. In this respect he is neighborly to a fault,
and when his duty to his owner's crop will al-
low, he will readily turn in and assist the neigh-
bors, even working at night rather than see the
crop spoil for want of attention.
He does not know the luxury of a sty. He
never gets fat, and from the day of his birth,
sometimes two years roll into eternity before he
is big enough to kill.
Crossing the razor-back with blue-blooded
stock makes but little improvement. The only
effective way to improve him is to cross him
with a railroad train. He then becomes an im-
ported Berkshire or Poland-China hog, and if


A REMEDY FOR BURNSy

The Application of a Saturated Solution of
Soda Bi-Carbonate.
It is now many years ago that the author of
this paper, while engaged in some investiga-
tions as to the qualities and effects of alkalies
in inflammations of the skin, etc., was fortunate
enough to discover that a saline lotion, or satu-
rated solution of the bi-carbonated soda in
either plain water or camphorated water, if ap-
plied speedily or as soon as possible to a burned
or scalded part, was most effectual in immedi-
ately relieving the acute burning pain; and
when the burn was only superficial or not
severe, removing all pain in a very short time;
having also the very great advantage of clean-
liness, and if applied at once of preventing the
usual consequences-a painful blistering of the
skin, separation of the epidermis and perhaps
more or less of suppuration. For this purpose
all that is necessary is to cut a piece of lint or
old soft rag or even thick blotting-paper, of a
size sufficient to cover the burned or scalded
parts, and to keep it constantly well wetted
with the sodiac lotion, so as to prevent its dry-
ing. By this means it usually happens that all
pain ceases in from a quarter to half an hour,
or even in much less time. When the main
part of a limb, such as the hand and fore arm
or the foot and leg, has been burned it is best
when practicable to plunge the part at once
into a jug or pail or other convenient vessel
filled with the soda lotion and keep it there
until the pain subsides, or the limb may be
swathed or encircled with a surgeon's cotton
bandage previously soaked in the saturated
solution and kept constantly wetted with it, the
relief being usually immediate, provided the
solution be saturated and cold.-Practitioner.

The Razor-Back, or Land-Pike Hog.
Some Western wag, who has been traveling
in the Lone Star State," thus frees his mind
on the native swine :
To the traveler through Texas one of the
strangest and most peculiar features of the land-
scape is the razor-back hog. He is of the Swiss
cottage style of architecture. His physical out-
line is angular to a degree unknown outside of
a text book on the science of geometry. His
ears-or the few rags and tatters of them that
the dogs have left, are furled back with a know-
ing vagabondish air. His tail has no curl in
it, but it hangs aft, limp as a wet dish-rag hung
out of a back window to dry. The highest peak
of his corrugated back is six inches above the
level of the root of his tail. He does not walk
with the slow and steady step of the patrician
Berkshire, but usually goes with a lively trot.
He leaves the impression that he was late in
starting in the morning and is making up for
lost time, or that he is in doubt about the pay-
ment of the check, and is hurrying to get it
cashed before the bank closes.


You must have struck a rich spot. Three
hundred in one day! Whew! What time
did you begin ?"
Oh, about ten o'clock in the morning."
And how long did it take you ?"
"About an hour."
There was a pause, during which astonish-
ment, incredulity and worse were visible on the
faces of the crowd. Finally one man stepped
forward and said:
Did you use artillery ?"
No, sir."
A saw-mill?"
"No, sir."
"Dynamite ?"
No, sir."
Maybe you'll tell us how you did it ?"
"Yes, sir-I talked 'em to death. Please 1
call at my office for pamphlets of Florida-its
resources, fruits, cereals, alligators, people, and
hotel charges. Tra-la-la !"-Detroit Free Press.


ville.
Archer Agricultural Association.-J. W. Williams,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine, Secretary ; I. C. Neal,
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President; John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewis, Treasurer, Tallahassee.
Indian River Agricultural and Pomological Society.-
A. P. Cleveland, President; W. H. Sharp, Secretary,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
Association.-R. J. Mays, President; Frank W. Pope,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
Orange County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred. L. Robertson, Corresponding
Secretary.
Albion Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Associa-
tion.-Joseph Hirst, President; S. Frei, Secretary. Semi-
monthly meetings first and third Mondays.
Gadsden County Fair Association.-Jesse Wood, Pres-
ident; W. H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R. Harris,
Second Vice-President; J. WV. Kendricks, Secretary; E.
C. Lou Treasurer.
South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion, Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
r. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
which we may have fallen in the naming of officers, &c.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH ?J


does not knock the train off the track, the rail-
road company pays for him at the rate of $1 a
pound, for they are allowed the mournful priv-
ilege of shoveling the remains off the track.
The ham of a country razor-back is more
juicy than the hind leg of an iron fire-dog, but
not quite so fat as a pine-knot.
The city razor-back differs from his country
relative only in the matter of the quality of his
food, and in the length of his tail. The city
species prey on the roots of tropical fruits and
other garden luxuries instead of corn, and -eats
cinders and old type in the back alley instead
of acorns and pecans of the breezy woodlands,
that are assimilated in the digestive organs of
the country sus a per."
The tail of the city hog has usually been
chewed off in early life by dogs; in other words,
it has been curtailed. This, and arid patches
on his back, where the hair has been scalded off
by the enraged boarding-house cook, adds much
to the picturesque appearance of the brute. A
man once told us that the razor-back hog was
the only bird of prey that was ambitious in its
habits, and could lift a gate off its hinges with-
out ruffling a feather.
As the novelists say, much might be said on
this interesting subject," but time is money, and
we are forced to conclude for the present.
.
Comments of the Press.
We have read the second and third numbers
of THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, new series, and
find them an improvement on the first. It
promises to be a valuable addition to the Flor-
ida press. No fruit-grower should be without it.
The Weekly Union and THE DISPATCH will be
sent one year to any address, postage paid, for
$2.25.- union.
D. Redmond, Esq., long and favorably known
to Horticulturists in Louisiana and Mississippi,
in connection with the Southland Home Journal
and other agricultural weeklies, is now editor-
in-chief of THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, a neat six-
teen-page weekly published at Jacksonville,
Florida, by Ashmead Brothers, at $1 per year.
We congratulate Messrs. Ashmead on their
good fortune at securing the services of so able
and practical a writer as Brother Redmond.
THE DISPATCH has been placed on our ex-
change list.--New Orleans Commercial Bulle-
tin.
Killing Alligators.
A Detroiter who had just returned from
Florida after an absence of several months,
was asked the other day if he had any fun with
the alligators down there.
Yes, sir; dead loads of fun," he replied.
"Kill many ?"
"Well, I should say so!"
"How many did you ever kill in a day ?"
"Three hundred."
"No! You don't mean three hundred alli-
gators in one day ?"
"Yes I do."


_I-_


_ _~_


Agrlcultural. H-orticultural and Pomnological
Associations.
Florida Fruit-Growers' Association-Office at Jack-
sonville-D. Redmond, President; W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; V. II. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding Sec-
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee-Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, 0. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official organ-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA STATE GRANGE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICES.-Master, Wm. IH. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Wm. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B. F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Field-
ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. H. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate
Keeper, Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Wm. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T. W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H.
Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Geo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Umstead, Hous-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville.-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J. C. Greeley, Treasurer.
Directors-J. H. McGinniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro, P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney. Annual meeting-
Last Friday in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; O. E. Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. 0. Taylor, Secretary and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Florida.-President, A. B. Bartlett, Georgetown; Vice-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. Hawkins, Lake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George;, George W. Thorn, Treasurer,
Georgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
mond, Fort Gates.
Picolata Agricultural and Horticultural Society.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, C. W. Hodges, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Corresponding Secretary,
N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., Recording Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.--G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. Mathers, Second Vice-President; B.
W. Powell, Corresponding Secretary; B. F. Jordan, Sec-
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical Fruit Growers' Association of Monroe County,
Florida.-Home office, Myers Florida; F. A. Hendry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson,
President; Thomas Tillis, First Vice-President; J. B.
Sutton, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary; J. M. Barco, Recording Secretary;
L. W. Hamlin, Assistant Recording Secretary.
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Association.-
John Bradford, President, Bradfordville, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida.
Pinellas, Florida, Fruit Growers' Association.-D. W.
Meeker, President; Wm. P. Neeld, Secretary.
Bronson Agricultural Union, Bronson, Florida.-Jo-
seph Hirst, President; L. W. Hamlin, Secretary; semi-
monthly meetings, first and third Saturdays.
Central Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida.-Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
Evergreen Horticultural Society, Dunedin, Florida.-
J. W. Matchett, President; W. Tate, Vice-President;
Geo. L. Jones, Secretary.
Decatur County Fair Association, Bainbridge, Geor-
gia.-Maston O'Neil, President: I. Kwilecki, Secretary.
Lake Wier Agricultural and Pomological Society (of
Marion County, Florida).-Captain J. L. Cainy, Presi-
dent; Dr. L. M. Ayer, Corresponding Secretary.
Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Higgins, Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Association, Albany,
Georgia.-L. E. Welch, President; T. M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
Sumter County Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation.-D. L. Hubbard, President, Leesburg; W. C.
Dodd, Recording Secretary, Leesburg; A. P. Roberts,
Corresponding Secretary, Leesburg.
Florida Central Agricultural Society.-Thos. F. King,
President Gainesville; i Secretary, -
; W. K. Cessna, Corresponding Secretary, Gaines-


I


w


OEM






e THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


BRAIDENTOWN, FLA., April 2, 1882.
MR. ASHMEAD-DEAR SIR: I send you by
to-day's mail a box of insects. I think from
studying your book on insects, they are the
Orange Psocus, but I have no microscope, and,
therefore, send them to you. If not too much tax
upon your time, please let me know whether
they are beneficial or not. My trees are swarm-
ing with them; two broods have hatched out
since Christmas; they invariably disappear in
a few weeks after getting their wings.
Yours truly, W. R. EIALLOCK,
REPLY.-Insects sent are as you surmise,
Psoci, technically Psocus venosus, Burm. For
description see "Orange Insects," page 71.
After a careful study of the habits of the
Psoci, we are firmly convinced that these insects
may be classed as beneficial by their feeding on
spores of fungi and decaying vegetable matter,
formed on all trees badly infested with scale.

J. B. ELWOOD, New York: The insect you
mention in your letter of March 14th, as found
in your orange grove at Volusia, is probably
the Psocus referred to above. Any new facts
respecting habits are always acceptable.

WELAKA, FLA., April 14, 1882.
W. H. ASHMEAD-DEAR SIR: Enclosed
please find orange branch containing scale.
Please inform me in THE DISPATCH what kind
they are; no one seems to know the proper
name for them. Yours tuly,
J. S. NORTH.
REPLY-The branch is infested with the long
scale (Aspidiotus Gloverii). Examine it with
your microscope and you will see they are all
dead; each scale has given birth to a new
life-a fungus with spores black and well de-
veloped-the mycelium or roots of which may
be traced into and under the scale.


: M, (C .. 0 ,IFJ(a

Vegetable M1farkets.
Reported for THE DISPATCH.]
Latest special dispatches to Gibson & Rock-
well, shippers and dealers in fruits and vegeta-
bles, No. 6 Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla.:
NEW YORK, April 22.-String beans, Flor-
ida flat, $1.50@1.75; round, $1.50@2.25;
wax, $2.50@3.25; tomatoes, $1.00@3.00; cu-
cumbers, $2.00@4.00; squash, $1.00; cabbage,
$2.50@3.50 per barrel; potatoes, $5.00@7.00
per barrel. Market weak.
PHILADELPHIA, April 22.-Tomatoes, $2.50
@3.00 per crate; beans, wax, $2.50@3.25; egg
plants, $7.00@8.50 per barrel; potatoes, $4.50
@5.50; cabbage, $4.00@5.00 per barrel; cauli-
flowers, $11.00; beets, $5.00@6.00 per barrel;
cukes, $4.50@6.00. Market firm; supply


light.
CINCINNATI, April 22-New Florida potatoes,
if good, $6.50@7.50; cabbage, $5.50 per barrel;
beans, $2.00@3.50 per crate; cukes, $4.00@
5.00; beets, $5.00@6.00 per barrel. Market
good.
CHICAGO, April 22.-Toyaatoes arriving in
poor order, good stock at $3.50@4.00 per crate;
cukes, $4.50@5.50 for Florida; potatoes, $6.00
(@7.00 per barrel. Market quiet.
JACKSONVILLE, April 22.-Cabbage, com-
mon grades, in barrels, at $2.00@2.50 ; prime
hard heads, by count, 12 @15c.; beans, round,
in standard crates slow sale, $1.25@2.00; cu-
cumbers. $2.50@3.50. New potatoes have
mostly been small and inferior stock, and sales
made at $4.00@5.00 per barrel; squash, $1.00
@1.25 per crate Tomatoes have been scarce
during the week, and prime ripe lots sold at
$2.00@2.50 per crate. Local gardeners have,
in a great measure, supplied our home market.


There has been many inquiries for green corn,
but none in yet. Beets are plentiful, and sell-
ing at $2.50@3.00 per barrel. Green peas
very plentiful, and only a few choice lots find
sale. Prices are nominal. G. & R.
Vegetable Quotations..
The following quotations are from Worster & Adams,
Washington, D. C.:
APRIL, 14,1882.
Florida-Tomatoes $2.50@4.00 per crate; cucumbers,
prime, $3.50@5.50 per crate; nubbins and cull cukes, no
sale; beans, round, $1.50@2.00 per crate; beans, flat, too
old, not wanted; beets, $1.50@2.00 per crate; squash, $1.50
per crate; cabbage, $4.00@4.50 per barrel; potatoes, large,
$6.00@7.00 per barrel; potatoes, culls, not wanted.
Savannah-Beans, $3.50@4.00 per crate.
Charleston-Peas, $1.50 per crate; strawberries 25@30c.
per quart.
FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE,
315 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, April 19, 1882. J
Receipts of fruits and vegetables via Florida Dispatch
Line and Southern Express Company, week ending 18th.
Oranges, 150 crates; Vegetables, 4,000 packages; Straw-
berries, 6,000 quarts.
Florida oranges are about out of the market; not
enough coming to be quotable.
Strawberries from Florida and South Georgia about at
end of profitable shipment; Charleston berries bringing
25@30 cents per quart, Florida and South Georgia, 20@25
cents; last arrival from South Georgia in poor con-
dition.
Cucumbers in demand for good quality, bringing from
l$2. 4 per crate, some in poor condition and small and
over-ripe sold for $1.
Tomatoes, $1.50@3.50 and in demand for good stock,
many shipped too green, and some crates badly packed
containing some very green and others ripe enough for
use; such crates are unsalable and bring lowest prices.
Beans, round, $2@2.50; flat, $1.50@2; a good many stale
beans left over and on market.
Cabbage selling freely, $3@4.50 per barrel; importation
from Germany has ceased and the demand is good for
fine heads.
Potatoes coming mostly small selling from $4@6 per
barrel; some very fine Florida potatoes sold for $8; Ber-
mudas, $8.
Beets, $1@1.50 per crate.
Egg-Plants, $2.50@3.50 per crate.Res pectfully,
C. D. OWENS,
General Agent.
,Jacksonville Wholesale Prices.
Corrected weekly, by JONES & BO WEN, Wholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.
SUGARS-Granulated ......................................... 11
W hite Ex. C..................................... .. 101
G olden C............................................. 8 8
Pow dered............................................. 11
Cut Loaf.............................................. 11
COFFEE, Rio-Fair............. ............................ 11
Good................................. 12
Choice .. .......................... 13
B est ............................................. 15
Java 0. G ............................................. 25
M ocha ................................................... 35
Peaberry............................................. .. 18
M aracaibo............... ......................... 18
Any of above grades roasted to order.
FLOUR-Snow Drop, best.................................... 9 25
Oreole, 2d best....................................... 8 25
Pearl, 3d best............................. 8 00
M EATS-Bacon........................................... .......... 11. l @11l1
Hams (Merwin & Sons)........................ 15A
Shoulders.................. ........................ 11
HOMINY--Pearl, per bbl................................ 5 40
M EAL- per bbl.................................................... 5 40
LARD-Refined in pails...................................... 13
BUTTER-Very best, kegs............................ 36@38
CHEESE-Full cream .......................................... .. 16
Half cream........................................ 13Y
TOBAcco-Shell Road....................................... 55@856
Florida Boys, 11 inch 5's.................. 40
Florida Girls, bright twist, 14 to lb.. 50
Smoking in packages, 8 to lb ........... 45
SOAP AND STARCH-Colgate's 8 oz., per box... 3 65
Peerless, 8 oz., per box........................ 3 50
Starch, lump, per lb.... 5................. 52@6c
HoPs, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS-
H ops, per lb ............................................. 15@ 22c
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz.......... 60c
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
doz. llb................................................ 2 25
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. 1 lb. 2 25
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. 1 lb ..... 2 70
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. lb..... 1 50
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl.............................. 3 50
CHICKENS, each................................................. 25@45


E GGS- P er doz..................................................... 15
HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lb., first class 13
Country Dry Salted, per Ib................... 9@11
Butcher Dry Salted, per lb.................... 9@10
Damaged Hides...................................... 6
Kip and Calf, 8lbs. and under................ 10
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb.................... 35
Deer Skins Salted, per lb...... .............. 26@30
FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter............. .................5.@........1 50@4 00
Raccoon, each............. ...................... 5@15
Wild Cat, each.... .................... 10@20
Fox, each................................................ 5@ 15
BEESW AX-per lb................................................ 20
WOOL-Free from burs, per Ib........................... 17@22
Burry, per lb........................................... 11@ 15
GOAT SKINS-Each per lb.................................... 10
Bacon and flour advancing rapidly-buyers will do
well to make their purchases now.


GULF NURSERY
Has thirty thousand three and four year old orange
trees prepared for summer setting. Send in your
orders.
B. W7. M0 W"2T,
DUNEDIN, FLORIDA.
to May 31 '82.


VIEWS OF FLORIDA
(Sent by mail, postage free, on receipt of price)
In 0ook01 ForXm, Containing 1P
Views Each.
Souvenir of Florida, (small size)........ ....... 25c.
Scenes and Characters of the Sunny South, (small
size)......... .......................................25c.
Souvenir of Jacksonville,( large size).... .... 50c.
Souvenir of St. Augustine,(large size).........50c.


Stereoscopic Views, per Doz. $1.50.

Address
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
J AC KSONVILL E, FLA.


HUAU & CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF

FINE KEY -WEST CIGARS
-AND-

WHOLESALE LEAF OEALEGRS.


Proprietors of Factories Nos. 29, 61 and 81, District
of Florida,
Jacksonville, Florida,
The Most Extensive Manufacturers in the State.
lyr to april 23, '83.





ST. JOHN'S HOUSE,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0-

Hotel containing over 30 rooms; also 2 cottages; lot
162' by 105 feet, filled with orange trees, &c. Well fitted
and prospering; only reason for selling, the lady owner
desires to retire.
For full particulars, address
ALBERT S. ASHMEAD,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


to May 1


ST. MARK'S HOTEL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.

--0--

CONVENIENT TO POST-OFFICE AND ALL STEAM-
ERS ON ST. JOHN'S RIVER.



OPEN THROUGHOUT THE
YEAR.
1 yr to April 23, '83

Sportman's Emporium.





W. C. PITTI AN,
INo. 3 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
-0-
Guns, Pistols, lifles and. Cutlery,
Shooting and Fishing Jackle.

SHELLS LOADED TO ORDER.
1 yr to April 23, '83


I I I I
~-







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


DEALER IN
PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,
GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, 00PPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emery Papers, &Se.
AGENT FOR
PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIRE TEST.
Johnson's Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, Mfartinez and Longman's
Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
mar 25-ly JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
THEE


DAILY TIMES.


THE TIMES is the official paper of the city and the
leading paper of the State. It has the largest circulation
in Florida, and reaches all parts of it. It is not merely
a local newspaper, but aims to advocate the interests
and promote the prosperity of Florida as a whole
Its reputation outside the State is very high. It has
taken rank among those journals whose columns are
looked to for news, and whose comments are quoted
with respect throughout the country.
Its editors have had wide and varied experience in
journalism North as well as South; its advertising pa-
tronage is liberal and of the best character; and its re-
sources, financial and other, are ample. It will furnish
Florida with a live, progressive, outspoken, and reada-
ble newspaper, the peer of any.
ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.
THE TIMES has secured by special contract the full
despatches of the ASSOCIATED PRESS. Besides this,
its Editor is Agent of the Associated Press for the State
of Florida, which gives him great advantages in obtain-
ing the freshest and most important State news.

SPECIAL DESPATCHES.
With representatives in the leading news centres of
the country, THE TIMES is well served in addition to
the regular Press reports. During the past winter it has
received a very large number of telegraphic specials."

CORRESPONDENCE.
Its regular correspondence from Washington, New
York and Boston, is of noteworthy excellence; and its
State correspondence has attracted much attention.
This feature will be extended and improved; and to
this end correspondence containing news or items of
information of any kind is solicited from all quarters.

"OLD SI."
In addition to his editorial work, Mr. Small will write
regularly for THE TIMES, and in its Sunday issues the
famous "Old Si" will disseminate wisdom in chunks
to the Florida public.
TERM (strictly in advance): One year, $10; six
months, $5; three months, $2.50; one month, $1. Sent
one month on trial for 50 cents.
Remittance should be made by draft or post-office
order, or in a registered letter. Address
JONES & SMALL,
mar 27-6m Jacksonville, Fla.


77


WINTER PARK
is a new town in Orange County, Florida, eighteen
miles south of Sanford, on the South Florida Railroad,
with a frontage of two miles upon three beautiful Lakes.

WINTER HOMES
in the midst of Orange Groves, for wealthy Northern-
ers, is the main idea. For Pamphlets and Maps giving
particulars, address

CHAPMAN & CHASE,
WVINITER PARK,
ORANGE COUNTY, FLA.
April 17-3m
FRIENDS, in various parts of the country,
not already subscribers, to whom we send a
marked copy of this journal, are "respect-
fully invited to add their names to the long
and increasing list already on our mailing-books.
Terms-$1 per year, in advance.


AND GENERAL AGENTS FOR THE

Improvement of Florida Lands.

Lands Purchased, Cleared, Fenced, Planted and Attended to for Non-Residents.

FLORIDA HOMES SOLD TO ALL APPLICANTS UPON THE INSTALLMENT PLAN, WITH ABSOLUTELY
NO FORFEITURES.
Large Tracts of Land Furnished to Colonies or co-operative Settlers, in any Part of the State, at Low Prices.
GOVERNMENT OR STATE LANDS PURCHASED FOR ALL WHO MAY DESIRE, TITLES SEARCHED,
ABSTRACTS FURNISHED, AND NOTARY BUSINESS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
Particular attention given to the Sale or Lease of City Property, Rents Collected and Repairs Attended to.

iFull Charge Taken of Groves or Other Property for iNon-
R1esidents.
STo. 39 BMay Street: EMoo.m 13 Palmetto Block,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
feb 21-tf

BUY THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

-0-

GOULD & CO.'S


FERTILIZER
-AND-
INTSECT E"2.TEi~V.I : 1NATO S,

Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange Growers and Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, con-
tains potash, lime, phosphoric acid, ammonia and the other essential elements of Plant Food, making a com
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & Bro.'s, and other high-priced Fertilizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity, and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $4 per barrel, $32 per
ton.
All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.
MESSRS. GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-I used one-half ton of your Fertilizer, in connection with the same amount of Baker & Bro.'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gave as good results as the others, which are much higher priced fertilizers-costing
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $51.50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12, 1881.
LEESBURG, SUiMTER Co., FLA., March 6,1882.
GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed your
agents at this point (Messrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer,'
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its fostering care, I having had the honor
to win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer better and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer "kills two birds with one stone," inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies
at one and the same time. I bave been testing it in the field, garden and orange grove for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues, whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For my part, I ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. if I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork.
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOURT.


feb28-6m


T lISTE.v m BZCO.'S

Soluble Ground Bone,
THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

FERTILIZER FOR ORANGE TREES.

Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.
Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE' ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTER & BEANN,
Agents for the State of Florida.


AjfAnalysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


mar 27-6m


GOULD & CO.,
NO. 6 W. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


D. G. AMBLER. J. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as
AMBLER'S BANK.
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
SDeposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


I II I - I I - I - -


DEALERS mM REAL ESTATE,


I


F. S. CONE, A. H. MANVILLE, E. A. MANVILLE,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer

Lake George, F'lorida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums,
Peaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, and over one hundred varieties of the Citrus.
OR4 ANGE A. NID LEIBM:ION TRBJEES a specialty.
Catalogue free. apr 17-ly.

COLONEY, TALBOTT & CO.,


j





The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail semi-weekly, as follows:
FROM BALTIMORE:
Every Wednesday and Saturday, at 3 p. m.
FROM SAVANNAH:
Every Tuesday and Friday, as follows :
Tuesday, March 2S, at 2 p. m.
Friday, March 31, at 4 p. m.
Tuesday, April 4th at 8 a. m.
Friday, April 7th, at 10 a. m.
Tuesday, April lIth, at 1 p. m.
Friday, April 14th, at 3 p. m.
Tuesday, April 18th, at 5 p. m.
Friday, April 21st, at 10 a. m.
Tuesday, April 25th, at 1 p. m.
Friday, April 28th, at 3 p. m.
The steamers are first-class in every respect, and every
attention will be given to passengers.
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $15,
Including Meals and Stateroom.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS,
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Baltinmore.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
column.
JAS. B. WEST & CO., Agents.
Savan nah, January 8th, 1878. 30-tf

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA


WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1882,
Passenger Trains will run over the Waycross Short
Line as follows;
Fast Mail. Jack'lle Ex.
Daily. Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at................ 9:00 a. in. 5:40 p. in.
Arrive Jacksonville at............ 5:40 p. m. 8:15 a. m.
Leave Callahan at.................. 9:44 a. m. 6:45 p. m.
Arrive Waycross at......................11:57 a. m. 9:15 p. in.
Arrive Jesup at..................... 1:40 p. m. 11:25 p. m.
Arrive at Brunswick at............ 6:00 p. m. 5:30 a. m.
Arrive Savannah at............... 3:40 p. m. 2:35 a. m.
Arrive Charleston at................... 9:10 p. m. 9:05 a. m.
Arrive at Augusta at..................... 5:20 a. m. 1:30 p. inm.
Arrive Macon at....................... 7:50 p. m. 7:00 a. m.
Arrive Atlanta at.................. 3:50 a. m. 12:50 p. m.
Arrive Louisville at............. ................... 8:00 a. m .
Arrive Cincinnati at...................................... 7:00 a. m .
.Arrive Washington at................... 9:30 p. m. 9:10 a. m.
Arrive Baltimore at................2:25 p. m. 12:05 a. m.
Arrive New York (limited express).......... 3:50 p. m,
Arrive New York P. R. R............. 6:45 a. m. 5:20 p. m.
A rrive St. Louis at....................................... 7:00 p. in.
Arrive Chicago at.......................................... 7:00 p. In.
TIME.
To Savannah.... ........................ 6:40 hours.
To New York............................45:45 hours.
To W ashington............................................... 36:30 hours.
To Chicago...................................................... 49:00 hours.
To St. Louis.................................................... 49:00 hours.
THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
tySJacksonville to Savannah.
4-Jacksonville to Louisville.
-Jacksonville to Washington.
*qJacksonville to Cincinnati.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
Passengers taking Savannah sleeper can remain in the
car until 7 o'clock a. in.
Parlor and Drawing-Room Car on morning train
from JacRsonville through to Savannah, connecting
daily with through Pullman sleeper for New York.
The Dining Car attached to the train between Savan-
nah and Charleston affords supper to passengers going
North, and breakfast to those coming South.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to Montgomery and New Orleans
take the evening train.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. m. and arriving at Savannah at 2:35 a. m., or train
at Jacksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vannah at 3:40 p. m.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston ard Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, at Depot Ticket
Office. J. E. DRAYTON,
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*] Ticket Agent.


WA
7


M a co n ............................... ................................. ............................................................. .............. .....
Augusta........................................................................................................................................................
A tlan ta..................................................................................................................... ..........................................
Columbus, Ga .................. .........................................................................
Montgomery, .i. . . ..... ..Aa ...... ................................
Mobile ............. ........ ..................................................... ........................................................................
Chattanooga, Tennn...................................... ..............................................................................................
Knoxville, Tenn...................................................................................... .......................................................
New Orleans..................................................................................................................................................
Nashville, Tenn ............. ..................................... .................................. ........ .........................
Memphis, Tenn............................... .....................................................................
L o u isv ille, K y...................................... .......................................... .................................................................
Cincinnati, Ohio.......... . . ......................................................... ......
Henderson, Ky ................................................................................................................................................
Columbus, Ky................................................................................................................................................
HM adison, Ky........................ ......... ...... ................................................................................................................
Jeffersonville, Ind..................................................................................................................
Evansville, Ind ........................................................................................................................................
Cairo, Ill....................................................................................................................................... ..................
Indianapolis ............................................ .................. ......................... ....................................................
T erre H a utel .................................................. ...................................................................................................
Columbus, Ohio................................. .......... ...............................................................................................
St. Louis ....................................................................................................... ...... ..... ..................
Chicago......................................................................................................................................................................
Peoria, Ill.................................................................................. ..
Cleveland..................................................................................................................................................
T o led o ............................................................................................................................. ... .... ........................... ...
D etroit.................o. ............................. .............................................................................................................
1)et~roit... -............................................... ......


FROM


25 $ 50 $50 00
30 60 6000
35 70 70 00
35 70 7000
35 70.70 00
40 80 80 00
40 80 8000
45 90 90 00
45 90 90 00
45 90 90 90
45 90 90 00
55 001 00 00
55 1 00 100 00
55 1 00 100 00
551 001100 00
55 1 00 100 00
601 10 110 00
60 1 10110 00
60 1 10 110 00
601 10111 00
601 10110 00
65 1 15 116 00
651 15 115 00
65 1 15 115 00
65 1 15 115 00
70 1 20 120 00
70 1 20 120 00
70 1 20 120 00


TO SAVANNAH. TO CHARLESTON.
oPer Box. er Bbl. Per Box. 1 Per Bbl.


Jacksonville.............................................................. ............ ............. 20 40 25 50
Landings on St. Johns R iver ............................................................................ 30 50 35 70
Stations on Florida Transit It. R ............................................................ 30 50 35 65
Tam pa and M anatee................................................................................. 45 75 50 90
Stations on the J. P. & M R R.............................................................. 30 50 35 65
Stations on S., F. & W Railway............................................................ 25 50 35 75

The dimensions of the Standard Box for Vegetables are 8x14x22 inches, and the weight is estimated at 50
pounds.
The Standard Barrel is double the capacity of the Standard Box.
Excess of capacity over the above will be liable to pro rata excess of charges.
The Car-load is estimated at 20,000 pounds. Excess of this amount will be charged for pro rata. Car-load
shipments must be to one destination and to one consignee.
Prepayment of freight will not be required, but good order and condition of shipments will be an absolute
requirement. It is clearly understood between the shippers and the transportation companies that no respon-
sibility shall attach for loss or damage, however occasioned, unless it be from gross negligence, and that such loss
must attach solely to the company upon whose line such gross negligence may be located.
The above points are the only points to which rates are guaranteed, and to which Bills Lading will be issued.
The Bills Lading will be issued only by the Agents of this Company, guaranteeing rates from those points only.
The charges advanced by this Line in good faith to connections at those points will net be subject to correc-
tion by this Line.
Unless otherwise instructed by the shippers, the original Bill Lading will be mailed the consigee at desti-
nation, and all claims for overcharge or loss and damage must be presented at destination, accompanied by the
original Bill Lading.
Shipments of single packages charged double rates.
In every case the full name and address of consignee must be given for insertion in Bill Lading and on the
Way-bill.
Where the route by which shippers desire their packages forwarded is not marked on the packages them-
selves, the "Florida Dispatch Line" will forward same by the route by which the best interest of the shipper
will be served.


RATES VIA FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE AND THE ATLANTIC COAST LINE.


DESTINATION.


Baltimore, Md.................................
Philadelphia, Pa............................
Roston, Mass..... ......... ..........
New York, N. Y............................


From la nd- Fla. Transit & From Stations IFrom Stations
ings on St. Jacksonville. Peninsular on J., P. &l on S., F. &
Johns River. Railroads. M. R. R. W. Railway.


| 1 J C A' J
P-4 PIP -4 P4


--- -
1- I
-
I -
---- -
1


64 | $1 27
64 1 27
71 1 43
61 1 23


50 | $1 06
53 1 06
60 1 22
50 1 02


63 $1 21
63 $1 21
70 1 37
60 1 17


63 $1 21
63 1 21
70 1 37
60 1 17


53 $105
53 1 05
60. 122
50 1 02


To make through rates from Tampa and Manatee, add for boxes 15c., and for barrels 25c. to rates from
Florida Transit Rrailroad. Single packages will be charged $1 each.


To make through rates from points tributary to the St. Johns River and Florida Transit Railroad, add the
rates for transportation lines connecting to above rates.
Stencils, shipping receipts and information furnished on application to any of the agents of the Line.

Fruit and Vegetable Shipments Through in Ventilated Cars.

Between Jacksonville and Savannah daily. TRANSFER TO SHIPS' SIDE AT SAVANNAH WITHOUT
BREAKING BULK.
Rates always as LOW AS BY ANY OTHER LINE. Take out Bills Lading via Savannah, Florida and West-
ern Railway to insure ADVANTAGES OF THF ALL-RAIL ROUTE.
Days of sailing subject to change without previous notice. For further information, if needed, apply to
GEO. YONGE, Agent Central Railroad Steamships, 409 Broadway, New York. Gen. W. L, JAMES Agent,
25 South Third St., Philadelphia. A. L. HUGGINS, Agent Merchants' and Miners' Line, Baltimore. WM. H.
RING, Agent Boston and Savannah Steamship Line, 18T Wharf, Boston. 0. G. PEARSON, Agent S., F. & W.
Railway, 219 Washington St., Boston. C. D, OWENS, General Agent S., F. & W. Railway, 315 Broadway New
York. J. B. ANDREWS, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, 43 German St., Baltimore. J. M. CLEMENT, Agent S., F.
& W. Railway, Pier 41 South Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, or to either of the undersigned.
W. 0. AMES, General Freight Agent, Jacksonville.
F. B. PAPY, General Freight Agent, Fernandina, Fla.
JAS. L. TAYLOR, General Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.
D. H. ELLIOTT, General Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent, Jacksonville, Fla.


VLORIDA DISPATC141,


- -


l


I11


I


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
0

MERCHANTS & MINERS


TRANSPORTATION COMPANY!


Through Tariff on Vegetables Only.

VIA THE


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE.

ALL-RAIL VIA ATLANTA OR MONTGOMERY.
IN EFFECT MARCH 15, 1882.


FROMI
JACKSONVILLE, CALLAHAN JUNCTION, LIVE OAK AND STATIONS S., F. & W. R'Y. 0
TO Q
4)4 4 f)






THfE FLORIDA DISPATCH 7


Continuation of Through Freight Tariff on Vegetables via Florida Dispatch Atie, in cotinee- Q O o
tion with Steamers direct from Savannah. Transfers to Ship's side without breaking bulk. 0 dlll LI1V

IN CONNECTION WITH STEAMSHIPS DIRECT FROM SAVANNAH. ^


TO



Boston.......................................
B8ston via New York.................
N ew Y ork .........................................
Philadelphia........................ ........
Baltimore ........... .....................


From Land-
ings on St.
Johns River.





45 $ 85
65 125
45 85
45 85
45 85 '


From Florida From Tampa1
Transit R. R. and Manatee.





45 $ 85 60 $110
65 1 25 80 1 50
45 85 60 1 10
45 85 60 1 10
45 85 60 1 10


From J., P. &
M. R. R.


a A
Q iP

45 $ 85
65 1 25
45 85
45 85
45 85


IN CONNECTION WITH STEAMSHIPS OF M. & M. T. CO. FROM SAVANNAH


VIA BALTIMORE.

From From Land-
Jacksonville. ings on St. Fr(
& S.F.&W.Sta. Johns River. Tr


,4
,a
P4
AL


I.


om Florida
ansit R. R.

-----:
0 -


From Tampa
and Manatee.



P


From J., P. &
M. R. R.


a A


Philadelphia............. .......... 53 $105 58 $1 10 58 $1 10 73 $1 35 58 $1 10
Providence................................... 55 1 05 60 1 10 60 1 10 75 1 35 60 1 10
Washington................................... 52 1 05 57 1 10 57 1 10 72 1 35 57 1 10
Wilmington, Del ............................. 50 1 00 55 1 05 55 105 70 130 55 1 05
York,Pa ....................................... 59 1 10 64 115 64 1 15 70 140 64 115
Harrisburg, Pa ........................ 63 1 15 68 1 20 68 1 20 83 1 45 68 120
Pittsburgh, Pa ................................. 72 1 20 77 1 25 77 1 25 92 1 50 77 1 25
Erie, Pa....................... ..... ........... 72 1 20 77 1 25 77 1 25 92 1 50 77 1 25
Steamship connection from Savannah for New York every Wednesday aud Saturday. For Boston every
Thursday. For Philadelphia every Saturday. For Baltimore Tuesday and Friday.
STEAMSHIP DEPARTURES FROM SAVANNAH.
FOR NEW YORK. FOR PHILADELPHIA.
Wednesday, March 29th, 3:00 p. m. Saturday, April 8th, 10 a. in.
Saturday, April 1,4:30 p. m. Saturday, April 15th, 4:30 p. m.
Wednesday, April 5, 7:30 a.m. iSaturday, April 22d, 10 a. m.
Saturday, April 8, 9:30 a. m. Saturday, April 29th, 3:30 p. m.
Wednesday, April 12, 1:30 p. m.
Saturday, April 15, 4:30 p. m.
Wednesday, April 19, 7:30 a. m.
Saturday, April 22, 9:30 a. m.
Wednesday, April 26, 1:30 p. m.
Saturday, April 29,3:30 p. m.
FOR BALTIMORE.
Tuesday, March 28, 2 p. m.
Friday, March 31, 4 p. m.
Tuesday, April 4, at 8 a. m.
Friday, April 7, at 10 a. m.
Tuesday, April 11, at 1 p.in. BOSTON AND PROVIDENCE.
Friday, April 14, at 3 p. m. Thursday, March 30, 4:00 p. m,
Tuesday, April 18, at 8 a. m. Thursday, April 6, at 9 a. nm.
Friday, April 21, at 10 a. m. Thursday, April 13, at 3:15 p. m.
Tuesday, April 25, at 1 p. m. Thursday, April 20, at 8:30 a. m.
Friday, April 28, at 3 p. m. Thursday, April 27, at 3 p. m.
Shipments via New York will be charged at the current rates from that point, with cost of transfer added.
Single packages will be charged $1 each to Boston, New York Philadelphia and Baltimore. If shipped be-
yond, they will be charged in addition the single package rates of connecting lines and cost of transfer.


Ocean Steamship Company.


SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.


The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, March 29h, 3:00 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Saturday, April 1, 4:30 p. m.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, April 5, 7:30 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, April 8th, 9:30 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, April 12th, 1:30 p. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, April 15th, 4:30 p. m.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, April 19,7:30 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, April 22d, 9:30 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, April 26th, 1:30 p. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, April 29th, 3:30 p. m.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway.
These splendid new ships are 2,250 tons each, were built expressly for this trade, having great speed and
most elegant passenger accommodations.
For information at New York apply to
H. YONGE, C. D. OWENS,
Acting Agent Ocean Steamship Co., 409 Broadway. Ag't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry., 315 Broadway.
12-12m G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.



Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
--O-----
A STEAMSHIP OF, THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
-0--
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold lby all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers are appointed to sail:
JUNIATA, April 8th, 10 a. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, April 15th, 4:30 p. m.-
JUNIATA, April 22d, 10 a. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, April 29th, 3:30 p. m.
Days and hours subject to change, without notice, Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, WM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.


From Jackson-
ville.
& S.F.& W.Sta.





40 $ 80
60 1 20
40 80
40 80
40 80


0. L. KEENE,

MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS


GOODS,


NOTIONS,


Laces, Worsteds,

AND A FINE LINE OF



67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
feb 21-ly
M. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the
of the Marshall House. Screven House.
THE HARINETT HOUSE,
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARNETT & GEORGE, Proprietors.
RATES, $2 PER DAY.
This favorite family Hotel, under its new manage-
ment, is recommended for the excellence of its cuisine.
homelike comforts, prompt attention and moderate
rates. 13-ly



Wholesale and Retail Drug Store,
35 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
PURE DRUGS, RELIABLE MEDICINES, FANCY
Goods, Proprietary Articles, at lowest market prices.
Specialties-Norton's Salt Rheum Ointment, Melen's
Infant Food, Burnett's Cod Liver Oil. A Trial solicited.
feb 21-6m


ONLY DIRECT LINE BETWEEN

SAVANNAH AND BOSTON.
Transhipment and extra handling saved. No danger
of fruit being frozen. Cars are unloaded at the steam-
ship wharf in Savannah, avoiding drayage.
CABIN PASSAGE, $18.
SAILING FROM SAVANNAH.
Chas. W. Love, Thursday, April 6, at 9 a. min.
Seminole, Thursday. April 13th, at 3:15 P. im.
Chas. W. Love, Thur5day, April 20, at 8:30 a. m.
Seminole, Thursday, April 27, at 3 p m.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
44-tf Savannah, Ga.

DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

The largest stock in the State. Country

buyers will consult their own interests

by corresponding with me. All orders

promptly filled at prices to compete with

any house south of Baltimore. Remem-

ber my only Florida address.

GEO. HUGHES,
mar 18-3m. Cor. Bay and Ocean, Jacksonville, Fla.

PIANOS AND ORGANS

15 East Bay Jacksonville.
QOLD ON INSTALLMENTS, AT LOWEST PRICES-
u branch of Ludden & Bates, Savannah-EXACTLY
SAME PRICES AND TERMS, Sheet Music, Strings
and small instruments of all kinds. Send for cata-
logues, prices and terms. TUNING AND REPAIRING
a specialty. My tuner will make regular tours through
the State, and my customers will thus have my repre-
sentative at their doors, a great advantage to purchasers
of instruments, mar 18.8m.


BELL & HALLIDAY,

MANUFACTURERS



FRUIT AN VED GETABLE BOXE8,

CAIRO, ILLINOIS,

.-Send for Illustrated Price-Lists
mar 18-3m


TO


P-4
0
u"


8
0
5)


1-! -1 1-


-! I I 11 I- i-


-11


-1.


-1


11


i -- -- - -------- - "'~ LLY--LYIYYLILL-


-1





10 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


STOCKBRIDGE FERTILIZERS for Orange Trees and vegetables, for sale by


ntilateiO T ,S 31-y


AND


ARE THE


AND
3I4
BEST IN THE WORLD. 31-1


For sale by 1>R. J. C. L'IENGLdE,
Wholesale Druggist, Jacksonville, Fla.
*A-Send for Circular. mar 25-tf

W. H. PILLOW,

STRAWBERRY SHIPPING AGENCY
AND PROPRIETOR OF BOWEN BRO.'S PATENT
SRefrigerators. Fruit and Vegetable Repacking and
Commission House, Astor Block, Jacksonville, Florida.
REFERENCES-Bank of Jacksonville, Florida Savings
Bank, Col. H. T. Baya, Jacksonville. (P. 0. Box 340.)
mar 25-ly
TE YOUT WANT rpTO TTYV


Orange Groves
OF
ORANGE LANDS
Below the frost line, and where all semi-tropical fruits
succeed better than any other portion of Florida, and
where the health and society is unexcelled, address,
with stamp, M. R. MARKS,
Real Estate Agent, Orlando, Orange Co., Fla.
50-tf
VEGETABLES

ShIil6o to All Wostornl Morkots
IN
RI EFRIGER AT OR CARS.
GIBSON & ROCKWELL,


J. E. HTARWT,
Jaclsonville, Fla."


ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]
J. A. BARNES & CO.,

FRUIT AND PRODUCE


COMMISSION


MERCHANTS.


Soiatlier= ""ruxit adcl 7Vegetaboles a Specialty. .
6 and 3a8 North Delaware Avenue, Philadelphia.
ly


WHOLESALE GROCERS
AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR


ACER'S


DRY HOP


YEAST CAKES,


60c. PER


DOZ.


SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED BRAND


SNOW-DROP PATENT FLOUR.

First I-aZands o=n. 'inest QUality

Dairy Butter from 35 to 37c. per Lb.,

2eplt i3n tlbe largest =efriger.ator in. tle State,
No. West Bay Street, - - Jacksonville, Florida.
To sept 27, '82

ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,


PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS, PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA,


AVE ARRANGED TO RUN A LINE OF REFRIG
erator Cars to all Western cities during the entire
vegetable season.
Send your Vegetables to them and you will get them
into the Western markets in good condition.
feb 21-4t


NE W BEAUTIFUL OLbElUb.,
SPLENDID COLLECTION-THE MOST MAGNIFI-
cent Show Plants during our summer and autumn,
for only a little outlay, 50c. per dozen. VERBENAS,
all colors, same price.
rTZree: Ecellenrt :Eoses.
Marechal Niel," bright golden yellow.
General Jacqueminot," brilliant crimson.
Perle des Gardin," beautiful straw color.
Strong plants, from five inch pots, 50c. each.
A good assortment of ever-blooming Roses. The very
best Tea-scented, from five inch pots, 30c. each.
ME'9.lSlisi a dl c FC aspLas,
The most effective and stately of all the Ornamental
Grasses, 25c. each.
:Eot-0rown7 X 'ruit Trees
IS NO RISK IN TRANSPLANTING.
Japan Plums, 30, 50 and 75c. each.
Japan Persimmon, 75c. each.
Satsuma Orange, $1 each.
Black Hamburg and White Sweetwater Grapes, 40c.
each; Figs, 25c. each.
Packing and boxing free. Address
ARNOLD PTIUrETZ,
mar 25-tf Jacksonville, Fla.


PRINTERS AND BINDERS,
AND DEALERS IN

TOYS AND FANCY ARTICLES.

NEWSDEALERS.-We keep all the latest Daily and Weekly Papers from Boston, New York, Philadelphia
Baltimore, Chicago, St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, New Orleans, Charleston, Savannah and Jacksonville, and
take subscriptions to all publications at publication price. Orders by mail promptly attended to.
LIST OF BOOKS ON FLORIDA.
FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, INVALIDS AND SETTLERS (Barbour, Profusely Illustrated)..............Price $1 50
FLORIDA: ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE AND HISTORY (Lanier)........................................................Price 1 50
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paper.......................................... ................................................... Price 10
FAIRBANKS' H ISTORY OF FLORIDA ..........................................................................................................Price 2 50
G U IDE TO JA CK SON V ILLE ...............................................................................................................................Price 25
TOURISTS AND INVALIDS REFERENCE BOOK OF WINTER TRAVEL...........................................Price 75
SOUTH FLORIDA, THE ITALY OF AMERICA................................ ................................................. Price 25
DAVIS' ORANGE CULTURE (new edition)enlarged and improved............................................................Price 50
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edition, enlarged and improved).... ....................... ............Price 1 00
ORANGE INSECTS-Illustrated Ashm ead .....................................................................................................Price 1 CO
ORANGE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA, by A. T. Garey, (cloth) ..................................................................Price 1 25
A MANUAL OF GARDENING IN FLORIDA (Whitner)..................................................................................price 50
COLTON 'S M A P OF FLOR IDA ..........................................................................................................................Price 75
COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional-the best)......................................................................................Price 1 25
NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF ST. JOHN'S RIVER...............................................................................Price 25
McCLELLAN'S NEW DIGEST OF LAWS OF FLORIDA, (8vo sheep, postage extra).....................Price 6 00
INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA...................................Price 3 00
Any of the above books mailed on receipt of price.
O R A N E W A P S ................................................................... ......................10x10, 14c.; llxil, 17c.; 12x12, 20c.
LAW BLANKS.
W A R R A N TY D EEDS, per dozen.........................................................................................................................Price 50
QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS, per dozen............ .... .................Price 50
MORTGAGES per dozen............................................................................................................................Price 50
NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, made to order........................................................................................... ..Price $5 00
We publish a full line of Law Blanks for Lawyers and Justices of the Peace. Price-list mailed on application.
Special prices to large buyers. Adddress
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
feb 12-tf 21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


A FEW CHOICE LOTS OF TEN (10) OR MORE
acres, river fronts, affording attractive and lovely
building sites, and admirably suited to the growth of
oranges, figs and other Florida fruits, may still be ob-
tained on reasonable terms.
"HOLLYWOOD" is south of "Point La Vista," on
the eastern shore of the St. Johns River, four miles from
Jacksonville. For circulars, terms, etc., address
D. REDMOND
apr 3-tf Box 257, Jacksonville, Fia.
THE JONES


I


mom"=


m


FT 'I0Tz-TE 0-Q-CT^ 3 ) BO-T= $3S.50 per Ton.,
(Gtuaranteed Pure.)

OOdTOp SE3 2 3, $3S per Ton.,
(100 Pound Bags.)

S(The Best Potash $27in per e.),
(The Best Potashl in Use.)


JLA LN-fL L3 -1


J. J JJLL%_j U L