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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00004
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 17, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00004
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

Full Text































T3trotcd ti t1e pric~tduClral, naufa cturinij and 1dustrial fnturists. nf Ehrida and dkc Oc'th.


Vol. 1.--No. 4.


New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.


Price 5 cents.


Monday, April 17, 1882.


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.


Pea-Nuts-" Ground-Peas."
Any good sandy land, properly worked and
manured, will produce profitable crops of the
ground-pea. Lime, decomposed or pulverized
shell or shell marl, mingled with vegetable mat--
etr, suits this crop best, and, as the Farmer's Ga-
zette truly says, the quality varies to some extent
with the soil on which the crop is grown. There
are a number of sorts in cultiva-
tion, and the planter should select
those which furnish the largest,
plumpest and best filled pods. The
Virginia Pea-nut has the thickest
hull, and is usually the largest and
finest looking; but it weighs only
twenty-four pounds, and hardly
yields a quart of oil to the bushel.
On the other hand, the African Pea-
nuts weigh thirty-four pounds, and
yield five quarts of. oil to the bushel.
The Georgia Pea-nuts weigh thirty-
two pounds, and yield one gallon of
oil to the bushel, while North Caro-
lina Pea-nuts weigh twenty-eight
and thirty pounds, and yield three
quarts of oil. These last bring the
highest price, though some hand-
some Virginia Pea-nuts bring high
rates as fancy lots. The price ranges
usually from $2 to $2.50 per bushel,
though bad looking lots fall below
$2. The yield per acre averages
twenty bushels, but frequently runs
up to sixty bushels; especially near
Wilmington, N. C. They are, there-
fore, on land suitable to them, a
better crop at $1.50 per bushel than
cotton at 15 cents per pound.

Watermelons.
It is getting a little late for this
crop-but we have raised fine speci-
mens from seed planted early in
May. At the late meeting of the WINTER RESI


Georgia Agricultural Convention, Mr. Fred. well established they should be thinned down
Little, of Richmond County, said in his essay to one plant to a hill, if large melons are de-
on the subject, that, in his opinion the best sired, and this is very requisite if the melons
land for watermelon culture, was a sandy loam, are intended for sale. There are two varieties
and if possible, a piece which. had laid out for very popular in Augusta-the old rattlesnake
some time and had grown up in small pines! and the scaly bark. He had known melons to
and broom-sedge. He then proceeded to give be sold in Augusta that weighed over seventy
his method of culture. When the plants are pounds each. These always bring fancy
prices, i. He said in answer to the
question of a delegate, that the first
of April is early enough to begin
planting the seed.
The "Ivey melon, grown by a
gentleman at Hibernia, Fla., is far
superior to the Rattlesnake, in
quality.

Middle Florida Fair.
The Floridian tells us that the
Middle Florida Agricultural and
Mechanical Association are bestir-
............... ... .....ing themselves in the interest of
the Spring Fair, which commences
on the 3d of May. The premium
list will be ready for distribution in
a day or two, and all the necessary
arrangements for the fair are being
perfected.
Round-trip tickets will be on
sale at all stations on the F. C.
and J. P. & M. railroads for one
fare, good for six days, and all ex-
hibits will be transported to and
from the fair free.

GEN. BOB TOOMBS is i'eported
to have said that if there was only
one cotton seed on the face of the
earth, and it would kill him to swal-
low it he would do it. So great a
"bane does he consider the exclusive
FVILLA A-LEXANDIA. production of cotton.
DEN(E OF MRS. ALEXANDER MITCHELL.[For description. see L 5 production of cotton.


. I


Alk.


--


. ... .. L- -- .. ........."~ .... ] --






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


some of them are valued as high as $8 per acre.
Swamp lands, of which the State now has about 8,-
500,000 acres, are graded in price according to the num-
ber of acres sold. For 40 acres the price is $1 per acre;
for more than 40 and not exceeding 80 acres, 90 cents per
acre; for more than 80 and not exceeding 200 acres, 80
cents per acre; for more than 200 and not exceeding 600
acres, 75 cents per acre; for more then 640 acres, 70 cents
per acre.
There are about 12,000,000 acres of United States lands
in the State, the price of which is $1.25 per acre. The
quality of the State and government land is variable.
Some of it is very good, and a great deal of it is not
worth much, except for the timber on it.
Q1. Has not the State made some large sales of land
lately?
A. Yes. About June 1, last year, Hamilton Disston, of
Philadelphia, purchased 4,000,000 acres of swamp land
for $1,000 000. He took the lands in bodies of 10,000 acres
each. HIe subsequently sold 2,000,000 acres to English
and Dutch capitalists who are represented by Sir Ed-
ward J. Reed and Dr. Wertheim. The company formed
of these English and Dutch capitalists propose to do a
great deal for the prosperity of Florida. In connection
with their lands they have purchased the following
railways: The Jacksonville, Pensacola and Mobile, the
Florida Central and the Transit Railway, which runs
from Fernandina to Cedar Keys and Ocala-in all about
450 miles of constructed road. They have bought the
chartered rights of the Tropical Florida Road, which
runs from Ocala to Tampa, and are now constructing it.
They also contemplate building a railway from some
point on the Florida Tropical Road below Ocala, by way
of Leesburg to Indian River.


FLORIDA I

Her Statistics and Prosperity.
In publishing the following interview with Governor
Bloxham, we use a corrected copy kindly furnished us
by the Governer:
New Orleans Times-Democrat, March 11.]
FLORIDA-HER GROWTH IN POPULATION AND.EFFORTS
TO SECURE IMMIGRATION-HER WEALTH IN PINE TIM-
BER AND WONDERFUL INCREASE IN LUMBER BUSI-
NESS-HER PROGRESS IN THE CULTIVATION OF TROPI-
CAL FRUITS AND EARLY VEGETABLES-HER ORANGE
ORCHARDS AND TURPENTINE FARMS-POLITICAL, FI-
NANCIAL, EDUCATIONAL, AND OTHER MATTERS-A
DAY'S TALK WITH GOVERNOR BLOXHAM.
The following interview is with Governor William D.
Bloxham, of Florida, and is the fourth of a series of
interviews with Governors of States which are re-
garded as properly tributary to New Orleans. In this
interview the object aimed at is to present a fair picture
of the growth and resources of Florida, and of her polit-
ical, social and financial condition. The representative
of the Times-Democrat found Governor Bloxham at Tal-
lahassee, the Capital of the State. The Governor, appre-
ciating the enterprise of the Times-Democrat, and also
the benefit which would accrue to Florida from the pub-
lication of such facts as were desired, patiently and
courteously furnished answers to the questions asked
him:
IMMIGRATION.
Q4. Governor, what efforts are being made to secure
immigrants ?
A. We have an efficient Bureau of Immigration which
is doing good work in collecting and publishing inform-
ation relative to the amount, location and prices of va-
cant lands; also, facts about our soil, climate and ad-
vantages which the State hold out to those seek-
ing homes. In almost every county there is an immi-
gration society, which-is doing what it can to influence
immigration. Railway and land companies are sending
out handsome pamphlets, which contain fine illustra-
tions and valuable statistics. Large capitalists of
Europe and the North are interested in the State, and
they are doing a great deal toward giving our State a
reputation abroad. Florida, I assure you, is well ad-
vertised.
Q. How are your people disposed toward immigrants ?
A. They receive them with open arms. They under-
stand fully the value of immigrants to the State, and
they are doing what they can to induce them to come
here.
Q1. How many immigrants did your State receive last
year?
A. Of course, I can only approximate the number, be-
cause we have no way of knowing it exactly. I think,
from the information I have, that it is not far from
20,000. To show you how our population is increasing I
will refer you to our tax-books. The number of our
tax-payers in 1881 was fully 16 per cent. greater than it
was in 1880.
Q. What is the average price of unimproved lands?
A. You mean, of course, lands in private hands. They
vary in price from $2 to $5 per acre. There are lands so
located, however, and which are so well adapted for or-
ange orchards that they cannot be purchased for less
than $100 per acre.
Q1. What are the prices of your improved lands ?
A. From $4 to $20 per acre. Some of them are held at
higher figures. The price depends largely upon the lo-
cation and latitude.
Q. Do you receive a thrifty class of immigrants?
A. Yes, very. The people who are settling in Florida
now are the kind that quickly change the face of a
country.
Q. Have many of them the means to purchase land or
to commence business ?
A. The majority of them have. Some are capitalists,and
a great majority of them are in comfortable circum-
stances. The number of very poor immigrants is small.
Q. Is the majority of them foreigners ?
A. No, sir; they are almost entirely from the South-
ern, Middle and Northwestern States, with a large
sprinkling from the New England States.
Q. At what do you estimate the increase of your
population, from immigration, during the last five
years ?
A. In the last ten years the increase was 90,000. This
increase, however, occurred almost wholly within the
last five years. There is no settlement of foreigners in
the State except a settlement of Swedes on the Sanford
grant in East Florida.
Q1. What is the quantity, quality, and price of State
and United States lands open to entry or purchase?
A. The State lands of Florida, about 12,500,000 acres,
are classed as follows; School and Seminary lands, In-
ternal Improvement lands and Swamp lands. The
School and Seminary lands are subject to entry at their
appraised value, not less than $1.25 per acre.
Internal Improvement lands are sold generally at
$1.25 per acre. None are sold at less than that price, and


cated?
A. We have no colleges known as such, though the
East and West Florida Seminaries, one at Gainesville
and the other at Tallahassee, are chartered institutions,
with powers to confer degrees and grant diplomas. The
United States donated 85,714 acres of land to these semi-
naries. About one-half has been sold, from which $98,-
000 has been realized, and the income of it is available
for these institutions. The lands donated by the United
States to Florida for an agricultural college have been
sold, and the funds, which were invested, are accumu-
lating. A small portion was expended in an attempt to
establish an agricultural college.
Q. Has the administration of the Peabody fund been
satisfactory to the people of your State ?
A. It has. The fund is used mostly in aiding schools
of high grade and scholarship.
Q. What do your people think of the proposition to
aid the public school systems of the respective States
by national appropriations, to bi distributed in propor-
tion to illiteracy ?
A. They are strongly in favor of the proposition.
POLITICS.
Q1. How is your State divided relative to the voting
strength of parties?
A. In this State we have only two parties-Democratic
and Republican parties. There is not very great differ-
ence in their voting strength. At the last election the
Democratic vote was 28,000 and the Republican 23,000.
Q. What important reforms have been inaugurated by
the State administrations during the last four years?
A. We have placed our finances on a cash basis, and
we have relieved our internal improvement fund of the
incubus of a large debt which had paralyzed our indus-
tries. We have also inaugurated a system of public im-


Q. Are their lands in the market?
A. Yes, and also the Disston lands and lands held by
other companies. There are large tracts, known as
Spanish grants, which are chiefly held by non-residents,
and which can be bought at low prices.
TIMBER.
Q. Governor, can you give me a close estimate of the
extent of the timber lands of your State?
A. Nearly all of our public lands and the greater part
of our lands in private hands are covered with timber.
I should say that we have 30,000,000 acres of good timber
lands, three-quarters of which is covered with yellow
pine.
Q. What are the principal kinds of your timber?
A. Our chief timber is pine. We have also hickory,
red gum magnolia, dog-wood, cypress and several va-
rieties of oak.
Q. Can you give me some figures relative to the pine
supply of your State ?
A. Less than two years ago the number of feet (board
measure) of long-leaved pine, standing on land not cut
over, and not injured by being "bled" for turpentine,
was 6,615,000 000.
Q. About how much is cut annually ?
A. For the census year ending May 31, 1881, it is esti-
mated that 208,054,000 feet were cut. The amount cut last
year, however, was much greater. The production of
pine lumber has greatly increased in the last year.
Q. In what part of the State are the best long-leaved
pine forests found ?
A. In the central and northern portions. The forests
south of latitude 27 are at present of little commercial
value.
Q. Are these timber lands contiguous to railways,
projected railways or navigable streams?
A. The greater part of them are, and those that are
not will soon be, because new roads are being projected
and built all over the State.
Q. Is the demand for these timber lands growing rap-
idly, and what is the average price for them ?
A. The demand now is immense. The prices range
from $1 to $2 per acre.
Q. Is a great deal of Northern capital being invested
in them?
A. There is. The timber is purchased in small bodies
and in tracts of 15,000 to 20,000 acres.
Q. Has there been a marked increase in the lumber
business of the State in the last year ?
* A. There has. The number of saw-mills erected in the
last twelve months, and that is put up every month, is
simply surprising. The greatest activity in the produc-
tion of lumber, at present, is along the St. Johns River
and on Pensacola Perdido and Escambia bays- also,
along the line of all the railroads. New mills are
put in operation as fast as transportation for machinery
can be furnished. In fact the mills get ahead of the
projected roads. The transportation of lumber is the
chief business of many of the railways. There
is one mill on the railway running from Jacksonville
to Tallahassee-that of ex-Governor Drew-which fur-
nishes a train load of lumber every day.
Q. Is there not at present great activity in the manu-
factute of turpentine ?
A. There is. The price of both turpentine and rosin is
excellent, and there is, therefore, great activity in the
manufacture of turpentine. A great many new turpen-
tine farms are being opened. Trees in this State are
"bled from five to seven years.
RAILWAYS.
Q. Does the State encourage, in any way, the building
of railways ?
A. Yes, to every railway company, whose line runs
through State lands, alternate sections, within six
miles each side of the line, are given. To one railway
company the State has given as much as 20,000 acres to
the mile.
Q. What new lines of railway are in process of con-
struction or projected?
A. The Florida Tropical. From Ocala to Tampa, dis-
tance 100 miles, 30 miles nearly completed.
Florida Southern. From Lake City to Gainesville,
with branch to Palatka, and from Gainesville to Tampa
and Charlotte Harbor, now constructed from Palatka
to Gainesville; also constructed from Gainesville to
Ocala, and now being constructed from Gainesville
north to Lake City, all under contract.
South Florida Railway. From Sanford, on St.
Johns River, to Bartow, in Polk County, and thence to
Tampa; completed from Sanford to Lake Tahopekeliga,
about forty miles.
Pensacola and Atlantic. From Pensacola to Chatta-
hoochee, on Apalachicola River, connecting with the
Jacksonville, Pensacola and Mobile road; length of
road 150 miles; road is being built in sections, and road-
bed will be completed in a few months.
Jacksonville, St. Johns and Halifax River Road.
Eleven miles graded from Jacksonville, and eighteen
miles cleared.
Palatka and Indian River. From Palatka, on the St.
Johns River, to Titusville, on Indian River, work on
the road-bed commenced.


bringing immigrants and by furnishing transportation
for our lumber, oranges and other products. Our sea-
coast towns would not have reached their present size
and prosperity without the assistance of the railways.
Q. Are railway companies limited by law in their
charges?
A. Yes, both in respect to passengers and freight.
Q. What is your method of taxing railways?
A. They are taxed on a valuation made by the State.
1Q. Have you State Commissioners to supervise your
railways?
A. No.
Q. Are the railway companies doing anything to as-
sist immigration?
A. Yes; they are advertising their lands in circulars
and pamphlets, and some are furnishing to immigrants
low rates of transportation.
MANUFACTORIES.
Q. What is the feeling in your State with regard to
manufactories ?
A. The people are ready to encourage them and would
like to see them established here. The State, however,
has as yet done nothing in the way of exempting them
from taxation or of bonuses to assist them, owing to a
prohibitory provision in the Constitution.
Q1. How many cotton factories have you?
A. There is a small one at Tallahassee, in which about
$25,000 are invested. I understand that it is in a prosper-
ous condition. I think there is one other in the State.
Q. Are there any cotton seed oil factories in the State ?
A. No; but several are about to be established,
Q. What important factories have you?
A. We have in process of construction sugar refiner-
ies, starch factories and paper mills, which will make
paper out of our palmetto.
Q. Do you think that the prospects of the South be-
coming a great manufacturing section are flattering ?
A. I think they are. It is beginning to be understood
that it is much cheaper to bring the spindle to the raw
material than to take the raw material to the spindle.
The success which has attended the efforts at manufac-
turing in the South will influence the investment of
other capital in factories in this section.
EDUCATION.
Q1. What is the condition of your public schools ?
A. It is decidedly progressive. Commencing thirteen
years ago without organization we have now over 1,200
schools. Under our efficient system the remotest sec-
tions are not ignored, and wherever a sufficient number
of children can be gathered together a school is estab-
lished.
Q. In what way is public education promoted ?
A. Thus far, in some of the counties, the work has not
gone further than to establish and put in operation the
schools, and to complete our organization. In others,
however, which are more densely populated, teachers'
institutes are held, and in the high schools normal in-
struction is made a special feature.
Q. What is the aggregate amount of your public school
revenue, and from what sources does it come ?
A. The amount last year was $138,747; of this sum
$17,962 was derived from interest on our common school
fund; the sum of $104,530.40 was raised by taxation and
.$17,217.71 came from private contributions. Of the
amount raised by taxation about $30,000 is derived from
a one-mill State tax? levied by the Legislature under a
constitutional provision. The remainder is raised in
the several counties under a levy by the County Com-
missioners, who are allowed to impose from two and a
half to four mills, as they may deem proper.
Q1. How long are your schools open during the year ?
A. From three to nine months. In some of the coun-
ties the revenue has never been sufficient to permit of a
term longer than three months. In other counties,
however, the schools are operated for nine months, or
during the entire scholastic year.
Q. What is the number of educable youth?
A. According to our last enumeration the number was
84,523, divided as follows: White 44,523 colored 40,000.
Q. About what porportion attend school ?
A. Fully one-half.
Q1. What is the sentiment of the people with reference
to the maintenance of the public schools ?
A. I cannot answer that question better than by quoting
from the report of the late Superintendent of Public Ed-
ucation. After summing up the facts which go to show
a forward movement, so far as our public schools are
concerned, he says: "In addition to this the unfriendly
feeling against the public schools has, in a great meas-
ure, given way to a strong, healthy sentiment in their
favor, a fact that should never be lost sight of in connec-
tion with the growth and development of our school sys-
tem." No tax is more willingly paid now than the
school tax.
Q. Have you any normal schools ?
A. Strictly speaking, we have no normal schools, but
special attention is given to the training of teachers in
several of our higher schools, particularly in the East
Florida Seminary at Gainesville, and the Santa Rosa
Academy at Milton.
Q. What colleges have you, and where are they lo-


L.


Saville and Halifax. From Saville, on Lake George,
to Daytona, on the Halifax River; engineers now sur-
veying the route.
Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West. From Jackson-
ville to Key West by way of Tampa; construction re-
ported begun.
The Rowland's Bluff Railway. From Live Oak, in
Suwannee, to Rowland's Bluff, in Lafayette; length 40
miles; will be completed in a month or so.
The Chattahoochee and East Pass Railway. From
Bainbridge, Ga., by way of Chattahoochee, to Deepwa-
ter, Franklin County, near Apalachicola; length, 75
miles; route is being surveyed.
Orange Ridge, DeLand and Atlantic. From a point on
St. Johns River to a point near New Smyrna, on the At-
lantic coast; length of line, about 30 miles; work of con-
struction commenced.
Green Cove and Melrose. From Green Cove, on St.
Johns River, toward Gainesville; length, about 60 miles;
surveys made and work of construction about com-
menced.
Florida, Midland and Georgia. From Georgia line, by
way of Madison, to Deadman's Bay, in Taylor County;
length of line, about 75 miles; route surveyed and staked
out.
Within the last two years two roads have been com-
pleted-one from Fernandina to Jacksonville, and the
other from Waycross, on the S. F. and W. road, to Jack-
sonville.
Q. What is the rate of passenger fare ?
A. The law allows a charge of five cents; the usual
charge is three cents.
Q. What effect have the railways had on the prosper-
ity of the State?
A. Railways have done a great deal for Florida. They
have'added immensely to the value of our lands by






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


provements which will assist in developing all sections
of the State. We have started a movement looking to
the drainage of the Okeechobee Lake and surrounding
territory. This region, known as the Everglades, con-
tains several millions of acres of land belonging'to the
State, some of which is very rich and suitable for the cul-
atvation of almost all kinds of tropical fruits.
Q. Has the Greenback element any strength in your
State?
A. Not that is known. *The Greenbackers have never
put out a ticket.
ica. Are there any indications of an independent polit-
ical movement in your State?
A. The indications are so insignificant that we have
not yet taken them into account in our political contests.
There are a few individuals here and there who talk
about an independent movement.
po. Do not the colored people take as much interest in
politics as in former years?
A. I am inclined to think they do, though now a good
many of them vote with the Democratic party.
Q. What effect would the success of an independent
movement, supported by Republicans, have upon the
progress and development of your State?
A. The progress and development of the State has been
so great under Democratic auspices that I am satisfied
that the success of any mongrel movement, supported
by the Republican party, would be highly detrimental to
the best interests of the State and I do not believe that
intelligent Republicans could be drawn to the support of
any such combination.
Q. Do you hear any authenticated complaints of vio-
lence or intimidation, and'have any such complaints
been heard within the last two years?
A. I hear none now, and none of any consequence have
been heard within the time mentioned.
Q. Do your people favor free trade or protection ?
A. That question has not entered into our State poli-
tics since the war.
Q. What is the sentiment- of your people relative to
government aid for'internal improvements and partic-
ularly the improvement of the Mississippi kiver?
A. As it seems to be the policy of the government to
aid internal improvements, we are glad to get our share.
We especially favor the improvement of the Mississippi
River because some day we may, through the instru-
mentality of a barge or ship canal, make Fernandina or
Jacksonville practically the mouth of the Mississippi.
You may think this scheme rather chimerical, but if you
will take the trouble to look at the map you will see that
from New Orleans across Lake Borgne, through Missis-
sippi Sound, and through Mobile, Perdido, Pensacola.
Chocktawhatchee, St. Andrews and Apalachicola Bays
we have an almost continuous inland water communi-
cation to the mouth of St. Marks River; then by utilizing
the waters of the Suwannee and St. Marys Rivers a canal
could be constructed to one of our Atlantic seaports, and
grain barges from the Upper-Mississippi could be brought
with safety and without breaking bulk to a safe harbor
on the Atlantic coast. In fact, a charter has already
been obtained for this route, and it is being considered
by capitalists.
SQ. Are your people in favor of promoting increased
trade relations with Mexico, Central and South Amer-
ica by means of government subsidies to steamship
lines ?
A. I think they are. We would like to see the trade of
these countries controlled and developed by the United
States, because, for one reason, with either a ship or
barge canal, such as I have described to you, in addition
to our projected railways, we should be deeply inter-
ested in it.
COLORED POPULATION.
Q. How does the condition of your colored population
compare with what it was ten years ago ?
A. I think it is better. I notice a gradual improvement.
The colored people are better educated, and, as a rule,
have a clearer idea of their duties and responsibilities as
citizens. In the neighborhood of Tallahassee, however,
they are very careless about saving their money.
Q. Do they show a disposition to acquire land or stock?
A. Only a few of them.
Q. Are many of them owners of land or stock ?
A. No. We have a large colored population, and the
per cent. having property of any kind is very small.
Q. Are they anxous to have their children educated?
A. They appear to be.
Q. Are they more thrifty and industrious than for-
merly ?
A. I can't say that they are. I think, in that respect,
they are about the same.
44 Is there a disposition among the colored people to
emigrate? If so, what are their reasons and where do
they propose to go?
A. A good many have left the section of the country
about Tallahassee, and the probability is that more of
them will go. They go to other sections of the State and
to Louisiana and Texas, where they find work on the
railways under construction. They get higher wages
than on our farms, and that is the reason they emigrate.
FINANCIAL.
Q. What is the financial conditondon of your State ?
A. It is good. There is money at all times in the treas-


ury to pay our accruing liabilities.
Q. What is the amount of your bonded debt?
A. It is $1,280,000; of this nearly half is in funds be-
longing to the State, such as school, seminary, agricultu-
ral college and sinking funds.
Q,. Is the interest on your bonds paid promptly ?
A. Yes.
Q. What is the present market value of your bonds?
A. Our 6 per cent. bonds are worth $1.12 and our 7 per
cents $1.20.
Q. What is the amount of your floating debt?
A. We have none.
Q4. What is the assessed value of the property of the
State?
A. Real property $21,295,792, personal property $15,396,-
031; making a total of $36,691,823.
Q. What is the rate of taxation?
A. Seven mills on the dollar. Of this, one mill is for
public schools, two and a half for interest on public
debt, and three and a half for expenses of the State gov-
ernment.
Q. How much revenue do you derive annually| from
sources other than a tax on real and personal property ?
A. $93,000.
Q4. How is the revenue distributed?
A. Public debt, $80,000; public schools, $36,000; public
charities (asylum), Y25,000; for general expenses of the
government, 175,000.
Q. Are your taxes paid promptly?
A. They are.
4Q. Doyour tax laws secure equality and uniformity
in assessments?
A. They do not, and they are the occasion of consider-
able complaint.


ASYLUMS AND PRISONS.
tio What asylums have you, and what is their condi-
tion?
A. We have only one-an insane asylum. The build-
ing is very fine, and is supplied with all the convenien-
ces of such an institution. It was built by the United
States for an arsenal, and is a substantial structure. We
have neither deaf and dumb nor blind asylums.
Q. Where is your insane asylum located, and how
many Inmates has it?
A. It is at Chattahoochee, and contains 113 lunatics.
The location is high and healthy. There are a few other
insane persons in the State cared for by private indi-
viduals. The State makes provision for their care and
comfort.
Q. How are your deaf, dumb and blind persons pro-
vided for?
A. There are not many in the State. They are cared
for by their relatives and friends. Next winter it is
probable that the State will make some provision for
them ?
Q Is tour insane asylum managed by a commission
or by State officials?
A. It is managed by the Governor and his Cabinet.
In Florida, you know, all the heads of departments are
appointed by the Governor, and these officials are,
therefore, called his cabinet.
Q(. How much is annually appropriated for the sup-
port of your insane asylum?
A. The sum of $25,000.
Q. Are your counties provided with poor-houses ?
A. A few of them are. As a rule however, County
Commissioners pay the relatives and friends of paupers
for taking care of them.
Q. How many inmates are there in your State prison,
and is your prison leased or sustained by the State ?
A. We have no State prison. Our convicts are leased
out to a contractor, who has buildings prepared for
them. This contractor takes all the convicts and pays
the State $15 per annum for each one of them. He takes
them at the county jails and bears all the expenses at-
tached to them. The number of them varies considera-
bly. At present it is about 200. The present lease ex-
pires next fall, and then it is our intention to make the
convicts a greater source of profit to the State.
Q. Do you think that the leasing system is more ad-
vantageous to the State than the system by which the
State retains absolute and sole control of the convicts ?
A. I think the leasing system is best for our popoula-
tion, provided the convicts are properly cared for. There
are improvements needed, however, in our system of
managing convicts.
Q. What is the character of the majority of the crimes
committed in your State ?
A. Crimes against property.
Q. What proportion of your convicts is colored ?
A. About five-sixths.
AGRICULTURAL.
Q. Is the tendency toward small farms or large planta-'
tions?
A. Toward small farms. Statistics show that the per-
centage of increase of small farms in Florida is greater
than in any other Southern State. Large portions of
our State are being utilized for truck farming, and this
kind of farming, you know, is in the direction of small
farms. As our transportation facilities increase we shall
turn our attention more and more to raising vegetables
and tropical fruits. I think the time is not far distant
when we shall supply the Northern market with early
vegetables and fruits. This year we sent North toma-
toes, green peas, cucumbers and other delicate vegeta-
bles as early as February 1. We also shipped strawber-
ries as early as that date. The culture of strawberries is
increasing very rapidly, and they are found to be a very
profitable crop. There are portions of the State where
delicate vegetables can be raised every month in the
year.
Q. Are the small farms, as a rule, owned by those who
cultivate them?
A. They are.
Q. What systems of labor prevail, and which is most
satisfactory ?
A. In the cotton belt or middle portion of the State,
the share and rent systems prevail, but in South Flor-
ida, where vegetables and fruits are cultivated, the labor
is hired. In the latter locality the tenant system would
not answer at all. I think that the tenant system as it
exists in our cotton belt, is prejudicial to our agricultu-
ral interests. Many changes iu the tenant system will
be necessary to make it a success.
r. Is there a growing sentiment in favor of diversified
crops ?
A. There is, and it is very marked.
Q(. Are your farmers generally clear of debt?
A. As a rule they are. Those who still depend upon
the credit system are found among the cotton farmers.
The vegetable and fruit farmers almost wholly conduct
their business on a cash basis.
POPULATION.
Q(. What is the increase in your population in the last
10 years?
A. The census of 1880 furnishes our latest statistics. In
10 years prior to that date the increase was 84,116. Im-


migration has been so great in the last year or two, how-
ever, that I place our increase in the last 10 years at
90,000.
Q. How much of this increase is due to immigration ?
A. Not less than 90 per cent.
QN. How much of this increase in population is white
and how much colored?
A. It is almost wholly white. A very large number of
colored people have gone out of the State in the last few
years, and only a very few have come into it-so few in-
deed, that the number is not worth considering.
ATLANTA EXPOSITION.
Q. What, in your opinion, will be the effect of the ex-
position lately held at Atlanta, on the South ?
A. I think it will be very beneficial. The world there
obtained, for the first time, some idea of the greatness of
our undeveloped resources, and our farmers and our plan-
ters learned many things that will add greatly in mak-
ing their crops more profitable. I felt much gratified at
the position Florida took at the Exposition, and I am
confident that the State is feeling the good effects of the
advertisement she got there. Although only a few of
our enterprising citizens, with very limited means, un-
dertook the work of making an exhibit for Florida, and
although no presentation of many of our productions
was made, still our agricultural display surpassed that
of any other Southern State, and was only second to
that of Kansas. We took the first premium for Sea
Island cotton, for rice, hemp, sugar cane, and, of course,
for all tropical fruits.
ORANGE CULTURE.
(4. Governor, is not the cultivation of oranges attract-


ing more attention at present than any other industry
of your State?
A. It is certainly attracting a great deal of attention-
as much, perhaps, outside of the State as in it.
Q. Has not the industry attained very considerable
proportions ?
A. It has, and, apparently, very suddenly. Oranges
have been grown in a desultory sort of way in Florida
ever since the first settlements. At the close of the war,
however, the business of growing oranges amounted to
little or nothing in a commercial sense. Orange culture
is now one of the leading industries of the State.
Qs. At what do you estimate the value of the crop last
year ?
A. I would not like to make an estimate because I
have no reliable information. In 1879 it was estimated
that the number of oranges produced was 45,000,000, and
it is calculated that fully that number was exported in
1880. It is also estimated that the crop of 1880 was fully
25 per cent. larger than that of 1879. The value of the or-
ange business in 1880 was placed at $1,000,000.
Q. How much do you think is invested in orange
groves in the State?
A. Between $10,000,000 and $12,000,000. I am inclined to
think that this estimate is below rather than above the
truth.
Q. There are some very large groves in the State, are
there not?
A. Yes; the groves range from 10 to 10,000 trees.
Q. About how many trees are cultivated on an acre ?
A. The number varies. Some growers think that 20 feet
is the proper distance to place trees from each other;
others recommend 25, and still others 30. When trees
are 20 feet apart there are 100 to the acre, when 25 feet
apart 72 trees, and when 30 feet apart 56 trees.
Q(. Are the orchards, as a rule, near railways?
A. The greater portion of them are now. Narrow
gauge roads are being rapidly built all through the or-
ange region. Three or four such roads have been built
in the last year or two.
Q. Can you give me an estimate of the cost of a small
orange grove from the time of purchasing the land until
the trees are in good bearing condition ?
A. I am not sufficiently familiar with the business of
growing oranges to give you an estimate that would be
correct. I will, however, give you a statement of facts
made by an extensive orange grower of Putuam county,
who kept, from the beginning of his grove to the close of
the thirteenth year, an account of his expenditures and
receipts. This statement was published a year or so ago
by our Commissioner of Immigration. The grove was
commenced in 1866, and the account closed in 1879. The
number of trees was 300, and they yielded 442,000 oranges,
which were sold for $7,590. The expenditures, omitting
cost of land, first cost of trees and interest on money,
were $1,950. The receipts over expenditures were $5,640. Of
course it was quite a number of years before the trees
commenced to bear. The orchard is now attended with
very little expense, and is growing more valuable every
year.
Q. At what age do trees attain their perfection?
A. Orange trees hardly reach their prime before they
are 20 years old, and they continue to increase in value
for at least 20 years more. It is estimated that they will
yield productively for 100 years. There is a tree in a fa-
mous grove in the northern part of the State which is 80
years old, and it still yields enormously.
Q4. About what is the average yield of a tree?
A. The yield, of course, depends greatly on the size of
the tree and the season. A fair average, perhaps, would
be from 500 to 1,000 oranges. Of course these figures are
often greatly exceeded. For instance, Judge Wilson, of
Polk county, says that he has obtained from one tree
6,800 oranges. I have been told that a tree in Calhoun
county produced over that.
Q. Are all kinds of lands suitable for oranges?
A. No. Orange trees will grow in a variety of soils-
in clayey, sandy, shelly or loamy soils, in black or gray
hammocks, and on pine lands or blackjack ridges. The
Rev. T. W. Moore, however, who is an authority on or-
ange culture in Florida says that perhaps, the best soil
is found in dark-gray hammock land With deep soil, un-
derlaid with yellow clay or yellow sand subsoil.
(. What can land, suitable for orange orchards, be ob-
tained for?
A. From the government for $1.25, from the State for
from $1 to $7 per acre. Such lands in private hands, how-
ever, when its character is understood, sometimes com-
mands as much as $125 per acre.
Q. About What does an orchard, in good bearing, com-
mand per acre ?
A. I cannot answer that question because almost fabu-
lous prices are asked. It not unfrequently happens that
an orchard nets the owner as much as $1,000 an acre every
year.
Q(. About what is the average price of oranges on the
trees ?
A. Fifteen dollars a thousand.
(Q What are the methods of planting orange groves ?
A. There are several. As Mr. Moore, to whom I have
already referred, gives them, they are as follows: First,
the budding of the wild sour trees without moving them;
second, budding them first and planting afterwards in
some suitable location; third, planting the sour stumps
and budding afterward; fourth, growing the trees from -
the sweet seed without budding; fifth, planting the
sweet seedling and budding either before or after remov-
al from nursery; sixth, budding on sour seedling either
before or after removal from nursery; and seventh, a


grove of sweet seedlings.
Q. How soon after planting will the trees begin to bear
fruit?
A. That depends upon the method you adopt in plant-
ing. A sour tree budded where it stands with proper
management will bear fruit in four years. Sour stumps
planted in a suitable location, budded properly, and
treated with care, will bear in four years. Sweet seed-
ings budded will begin to bear in from four to six years.
The trees, however, which attain the largest size and
yield most abundantly are the sweet seedlings unbud-
ded. If very carefully treated they will commence to
yield in eight or ten years, and in a year or two after
that they will furnish a fair quality of fruit.
Q. About how many different varieties of oranges are
grown in Florida ?
A. Authorities differ. In some publications as many
as 60 varieties are mentioned. Growers, however, claim
that there are a good many more. In fact, almost every
large grower has two or three varieties of his own.
Q. Are orange trees subject to any kind of disease ?
A. They are less liable to disease than most other kinds
of fruit trees. The most formidable disease which at-
tacks them is the "die-back." The symptom is the dy-
ing back of the new wood to the old. The cause of the
disease may come from the sting of an insect, or may
originate near the roots.
Q. Are the trees liable to attacks from insects?
A. But very few insects trouble our orange trees. The-


I






52 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


insect which at one time was considered the most trouble-
some, and which threatened to destroy our groves, is
called Aspidiotus Gloverii. It is very dimunutive and un-
der a powerful glass has the appearance of a white louse.
It develops into a diminutive fly, and, sucking the vi-
tality out of the leaf or branch to which it clings, kills
it. There is another insect which plays on the bark of
trees from one to four years old. The wood-louse, or
white ant, frequently does serious damage to young
trees. An insect that is apt to attack trees starting
young shoots at times of the year when the grove is not
generally making new wood is the Euthoctha Galeator.
This insect inflicts a speedy injury. There are simple
remedies, however, for the destruction of all these in-
sects.
Q. Is there what is called an "orange belt?".
A. The expression is frequently used, but oranges can
be grown in any part of Florida with suitable cultiva-
tion and proper protection from frost. The frost line is
placed usually at the 28th or 29th degree of latitude; but
that has nothing to do with the "orange belt," as some
of the finest groves in the State are north of that line.
The severe winter of 1880-"1 did not injure groves south
of this line, while it inflicted some damage to groves in
the extreme northern portion of the State.
Q. Do orange groves require much cultivation ?
A. They do-both careful and intelligent cultivation.
Q. Can the land be sown in crops while the groves are
coming to maturity ?
A. Garden crops of all kinds may be cultivated, and
the groves may be used for sheep pastures. Orange trees
are greatly benefited by certain kinds of fertilizers, and
the droppings of sheep are very advantageous to them.
Q. Is there any danger of overdoing the orange, busi-
ness ?
A. No. The business offers greater inducements now
than ever before. The field is illimitable. We produce
an orange that is eagerly sought after in the market, and
should our production ever exceed the demands of our
own market, we can find a market in Europe. In fact,
we have already made the experiment of shipping or-
anges to Europe, and with encouraging results. There
is no immediate danger, however, of glutfing our mar-
ket. It is estimated that in 1879, in addition to our Flor-
ida crop, 771,000,000 oranges were consumed in this coun-
try. When it is remembered that our crop was only
about 45,000,000, it will be seen that it will be a good many
years, if ever, before we shall be able to supply the de-
mand. The annual increase in the consumption of or-
anges will perhaps equal our annual increase in produc-
tion.
Kind Words.
The Alachua Advocate of April 5th, says :
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH comes to our sanc-
tum in an entirely new form and picturesque
make-up. Under the new management it will
fill an important place in the development of
Florida. Price, $1 a year; Ashmead Brothers,
publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.
THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, under its new
management, is the prettiest paper in the State.
It is published by Ashmead Bro.'s, Jackson-
ville, Florida, at 81 a year. Send for it.-Key
West Democrat.
Mutton.
We have often wondered at the strange and
unaccountable indifference toward, not to say
actual dislike for mutton, among our Southern-
born people. In the whole range of meats,
there is scarcely one equal to good, well-fed
mutton, in delicacy and nutritious quality; and
we are not surprised that our English neigh-
bors should have always made mutton a stand-
ing dish. The American Cultivator says:
"Great Britain consumes an enormous quan-
tity of mutton. Choice mutton commands two
or three cents per pound more than beef in
London market. New England and New
York farmers should bestir themselves to secure
part of this vast trade; they should devote
more attention to the rearing and feeding of
mutton sheep, permitting the wool to be a
secondary consideration. Good results in wool


are quite certain to follow good breeding for
mutton, yet our Eastern farmers can make
more money in raising fine mutton than in com-
peting with Western ranchmen in producing
wool. The farmers of other countries have
their eyes on the English market for mutton.
It is reported that France and Germany, as
well as some other Continental countries, are
bestirring themselves to secure the English
market for fine mutton by improving the
quality of their mutton sheep. The French are
resorting more generally to English Southdown
rams to cross on their Merino ewes for this pur-
pose, while the Germans are favoring the Cots-
wold and Lincoln."
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


"COUNCIL OAK," at VILLA ALEXANDRIA."--[See description.] _
VILLA ALEXANDRIA, the grounds by the "River Road" or the "up-
The winter home of Mrs. Alexander Mitchell, per path," a long wood-fringed bluff, the flour-
of Milwaukee, lies in a beautiful curve of the fishing and extensive orange groves, and the
St. John's River, about two miles-south of this great variety of rare and lovely flowering plants,
city. vines and shrubs-roses, azaleas, camellias, ac-
Our engraving shows the front, or river ap- acias, palms, cape jasmines, etc., claim admiring
proach to the grounds, with the Villa seen attention and regard. Then the great Live
through a natural arched opening in the trees. Oak looms into view, and dwarfs by compari-
The first glimpse of "Alexandria," as the vis- son all neighboring "tenants of the wood."
itor lands at the boat-house, is very lovely and This truly magnificent specimen of Quer6us
attractive-indeed, quite unique, as a beautiful, sempervirens-(to which our engraving does
half-revealed rural picture; and this pleasura- very scanty justice)-is known as the Council
ble impression is in no degree lessened by a Oak," and tradition avers that, in the long-past
nearer and closer inspection of the Villa and its times, the Indians were wont to assemble neathh
surroundings. the shade of its branches, and hold their' coun-
Passing from the landing toward the entrance, cils of war and peace; plan friendly hunting
the clear and shining beach of shells first attracts parties or hostile forays, and decide 'all ques-
attention. Then, the Cherokee Rose hedge, tions of moment and importance. Ilowe"er
rolling its masses of "greenery" like a huge this be," we know not; but this antique legend
emerald wave, along the shelly shore; reaching and tradition throws a poetical glamour around
out its long slender, swaying wands in all di- the grand old forest monarch which increases
reactions, or climbing, vine-like, into the tops its interest and charm.
of the tall cypress and pine trees-this lovely The general tone of "Alexandria is refined,
evergreen, thorny, border-attractive and repel- quiet and reposeful. The natural beauties of
lant-is charming at all times; but especially the place have been carefully preserved, and the
when it is covered with the myriads of large, "improvements have always been directed by
showy blossoms which literally overload it for that fine taste, judgment and skill which are the
a few weeks in the early spring, it may 'be re- natural results of intuitive artistic perception
garded as a thing of beauty," to be long re- aided and developed by large culture and ex-
membered. tensive travel.
Upon entering the massive iron gates, swing- To the "lady of the manor" may justly be
ing from tall brick pillars crowned with vases of ascribed the credit and honor of creating from
tropical plants, cool, shady and alluring walks very crude materials this. delightful and most
branch off in different directions, and one espe- attractive Florida home-a visit to which has
cially, known as the "River Road," leads south- afforded pleasure to thousands, who will join
ward along the curving shore, under the shad- with us in the sincere wish that the generous
ows of huge, towering trees, draped and fes- and hospitable owner may live long to enjoy it!
tooned with that most graceful of Florida plants, -The Palatka Herald says: "Our visitors
the gray "Spanish Moss," (2 ilandsiausneoides,) are returning to their Northern homes. It
-affording at every step a new view of the seems difficult for them to understand that our
broad, silvery river ; the heavily wooded banks; April month is the most pleasant and delight-
ful of the season. Many, however, who are
the dense jungles of cane-brakes, bamboo-brier, troubled withthhroat and lung diseases go away
smilax, etc., on the water's edge; and in many too soon. They should by all means remain until
places strikingly reminding the visitor of the late in the month of May, and take easy jour-
sylvan gothic arches and weird moss drapery in neys home, stopping at different points so as not
the long, converging aisles of "Bonaventure to reach home until warm weather sets in. Ad-
t t t o /T vice on all subjects of this kind from newspa-
-that loveliest gate-way to the "Land of.the prs, is looked upon as selfish. But it is the
Hereafter." truth, nevertheless, that it is injurious for them
Returning from the southern boundary of to go back too soon."


I ,, ~ I .


-1






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. E


Sheep and Bees.
Columbus Drew, Esq., the indefatigable and
very able State Agent of Immigration, has elic-
ited many important facts from the sheep-rais-
ers and bee-keepers of Florida. We have al-
ready published a number of replies sent him,
and printed in the Union, and we now copy a
very interesting batch of letters from the daily
Times:
ALACHUA COUNTY.
MICANOPY, February 9, 1882.-C. Drew,
Esq.: Dear Sir-Your circular, making inqui-
ries about sheep-raising and bee-keeping in
Florida, is at hand. In reply, I can say that I
do not know of any section of the country bet-
ter adapted to these two interests than Alachua
County. There are not many sheep in this im-
mediate neighborhood, as most persons are now
turning their attention to small farms, raising
oranges and vegetables.
Bees do well, and can make a living the year
round. I have a few hives, and from two the
past summer got over a bushel of honey and
comb, which was very rich and fine. Most of
my neighbors have bees, but I know of no im-
ported Italian queens.
I saw a flock of sheep a few days ago, very
fat, on the range. Yours truly, etc.,
B. W. POWELL.
COLUMBIA COUNTY.
LAKE CITY, January 30, 1882.-Hon. C.
Drew, Dear Sir-I have thought that figures
may be unnecessary in reply to your circular
enclosed. Bee-culture is said to be very profit-
able in this county. Mr. John C. Bates, in
Lake City, has both Italian and common black
bees. He says bee-raising is a nice business,
and will pay very well.
Sheep do well, particularly in the south and
southwestern parts of Columbia County. Ex-
perienced men from other States believe sheep-
raising to be very profitable. No very large
flocks are kept, and not much attention has
been paid to the business. Those who have
sheep say they pay well. Dogs are numerous
and often destructive. If owners had sufficient
flocks to pay to watch them the business would
be better and more profitable.
There is an immense territory, embracing
part of Bradford, Alachua, Columbia and Su-
wannee Counties, in which the flocks could be
profitably kept. Very respectfully,
W. M. IVES, JR.
LEVY COUNTY. .
BRONsON, January 29, 1882.-Hon.C. Drew,
Jacksonville: Dear Sir-In answer to your cir-
cular, I would say that sheep-raising, as far as
I: can learn, has been and is profitable; but few
of our farmers have turned their attention in
that direction, and I learn from those who are
at present engaged in that industry that they
are well paid for their investment. The sheep
require but little feeding during the winter, and


the yield of wool is good. All complain that
they lose by worthless dogs, but~ a little legisla-
tion on this subject would soon correct the evil.
I am of the opinion that no industry will pay
better in Levy County than sheep-raising.
:Bee-keeping is a sure thing with us. Some
of our old farmers tell us that they have no
trouble in keeping bees, and while they cannot
tell me the yield per year from each hive, they
.all agree that it is good, and the quality of the
honey is fine. I am also informed that they
pay no attention to feeding the bee, but that
they are left to get their own support. Noth-
ing .is sowed that will yield blossoms for the
bees to feed upon. From my own observation,
I am sure that bee-keeping can be made of very
great profit in Levy County. I am surprised
that some person has not engaged in it largely.
We would be very glad to welcome those to
our county who would engage in any new en-


terprise. Our county is healthy and our lands
good. Very truly,
W. H. SEBRING.
Cor. Sec. Levy Co. Imm'n Society.
PUTNAM COUNTY.
CoMO, January 30, 1882.-C. Drew, Agent
Bureau of Immigration: Dear Sir-In re-
sponse to your circular respecting bees and bee-
keeping, I have the following observations to
make:-
1. Bees here lose very few days the year
round. They only depend upon the stores in
their hives during the months of December and
January.,
2. Our surplus honey-producing months are
not less than four, from the first of March ex-
tending sometimes to the last of July. Bees at
times, and on some plantations, store much
later than this.
3. We never experience on this peninsula,
"Fruitland Peninsula, .such drouths as occur
in the Western States and in California.
There often the bees die in countless numbers
from starvation. Here such casualty has no
occasion.
4. Our bottom lands and hammocks are all
great producers of honey-producing trees,
shrubs and flowers, and the supply of food is
so ample that overstocking can never occur.
5. In consequence of these bountiful supplies
of natural food, bees keep breeding nearly all
the year round.
Bee-keeping can be profitably engaged in by
women and others who, for profit or occupa-
tion, desire employment for otherwise vacant
hours.
As regards sheep raising, the writer has no
personal experience, and too little knowledge
to justify opinions. Very respectfully,
C. V. HUTCHINS.
DADE COUNTY.
MIAMI, March 1, 1882.-Hon. C. Drew:
Dear Sir-In answer to your circular of in-
quiry-bees have been successfully kept in
Dade County, and perpetual flowering plants,
in connection with an extremely even climate,
make it very probable they could be made
profitable, there being no possibility of a
famine. The honey made mostly from the pal-
metto bloom is quite like buckwheat honey;
the wax we obtain is good. The Indians in
this vicinity frequently obtain honey and wax
of good quality; and this leads me to think
that in the Glade Islands bees abound.
oI would suggest to any one coming to Dade
County, with a view to bee culture, to bring
all possible modern appliances amd improve-
mentg, I think if the enemies of the bees, in
the way of insects, such as ants, &c., could be
overcome by science, the interest would be ex-
tremely profitable here. There being plenty
of fresh water streams, small and large, in our
county, hives could readily be protected by
making stands for them in the water.


Sheep raising is not engaged in here at all.
My theory is, however, that sheep would thrive
as well as they do in the Bahamas, living
mostly from Bermuda, Guinea, and other
grasses. Then there is considerable natural
forage for them, and facilities for watering are
excellent. Altogether, the facility is fine for
raising sheep.
Very truly yours,
J. WM. EWAN.
-The following from the Pathfinder is.so
true that we reprint it in our columns: The
many thriving localities in the State are contin-
ually extending rare opportunities to capitalists,
which should not be passed unnoticed by those
especially at the North whose health demands
a change of climate, Florida is just the place
to combine health, business and pleasure."


FRUIT PUDDING.-To make a plain fruit
pudding, take one cup of sugar, one half cup
butter and two eggs, and beat together, then
add a cup of sour milk and one teaspoonful of
soda, three cups of flour and one cup of chop-
ped raisins; spices to taste. Put in a mold and
steam two hours. Another way which is very
nice: Take one and a half cups of flour, one
cup of bread crumbs, one cup of raisins, half a
cup of currants, two nutmegs, one cup of suet
chopped fine, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, four
eggs, a wineglass of brandy, a wineglass of
syrup and a little milk if necessary. Mix very
thoroughly; tie it in a clean cloth as tight as
possible, and boil fast five or six hours. Serve
with sauce.
RICH BROWN BREAD.-Four cups corn
meal, two cups rye, graham or other flour,
three cups sweet milk, two cups sour milk, one
cup molasses, one teaspoonful salt, two heaped
up teaspoonfuls of soda. Pour into three quart
basin and steam steadily for two hours and a
half, then place the loaf in the oven about
three-quarters of an hour, and if the oven is not
too hot you yvill have a loaf of brown bread fit
for a premium.
A BEEF PIE.-Cold roast beef, one onion,
one tomato, pepper and salt, one dozen'boiled
potatoes. Cut the cold beef in thin slices and
put a layer on the bottom of your dish. Shake
in a little flour, pepper and salt, cut up and add
a tomato (if in season) or onion, finely chopped,
then another layer of beef and seasoning until
your dish is full; if you have any gravy put it
in; have ready a dozen potatoes, boiled and
mashed, with butter and salt, spread over the
pie an inch thick; bake twenty-five minutes or
a little more.-
IRISH CABBAGE.-Chop a fine medium-sized
head of cabbage, and season with butter, pep-
per and salt; add water enough to cook until
very tender; then, when almost dry, add a cup
of thick, sweet cream, and simmer a few min-
utes longer. A good way is to use half cream
and half vinegar for those who prefer cabbage
with vinegar, or those who have no cream can
use milk thickened with a little flour.
FRIED POTATOEs.-Pare, wash, and slice
thin, raw potatoes, lay in ice-cold water an hour
or two, dry in a napkin; have a pan of hot
lard, put in a few at a time, and fry a light
brown; sprinkle with salt, turn with a fork,
take out with a wire spoon, and put in a dish
and set in the oven until all are cooked. To
be eaten either hot or cold.
Domestic Love.
Dr. Holmnes says: "I never saw a garment
too fine for a man or maid; there never was a
chair too fine for a cobbler or a cooper or a
king to sit in; never a house too fine to shelter
the human head. These elements about us,


the glorious sun, the imperial sun, are not too
good for the human race. Elegance fits man.
But do we not value tools a little more than
they are worth, and sometimes mortgage a
house for the mahogany we bring into it ? I
had rather eat my dinner off the head of a bar-
rel, or dress after the fashion of John the Bap-
tist in the wilderness or sit on a block all my
life, than to consume all myself before I got to
a home, and take so much pains with the out-
side that the inside was hollow as an empty
nut. Beauty is a great thing; but beauty of
house garment and furniture are tawdry orna-
ments compared with domestic love. All the
elegance in the world will not make a home
and I would give more for a spoonful of real
hearty love than for whole shiploads of furni-
ture and all the gorgeoisness all the upholsters
in the world can gathA."


I ,, -- ~ ; -I _






N5- THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


EXTREM10U SOUTl7iRBN FLOBIDA.

MONROE COUNTY-ITS POSITION-INDUS-
TRIES-PRODUCTIONS, ETC., ETC. -
From the Key West Democrat.
(Continued from last issue.)
COCOANUT PLANTING LAST YEAR.
*To commence, our Lieutenant-Governor, L.
W. Bethel, and United States District-Attor-
ney, C. B. Patterson, bought 100 acres last fall,
planted 1,070 cocoanuts; Messrs. Sam Filer
and Jeremiah Fogerty bought 100 acres and
planted 8,700 cocoanuts; Dr. J. V. Harris at
Shark's River, owns 300 acres and planted
6,000 cocoanuts; Mr. E. 0. Locke bought 120
acres and planted 4,000 cocoanuts, making in
all 19,740 cocoanuts for one fall. This year,
fully as many more will'be put in the ground.
Mr. Charles Maloney was the first to plaht a
cocoanut grove ; this was about five years since,
and to-day he has a grove of about 2,700 trees
that exceed in beauty, and worth also, any
grove of orange trees ever planted, and they
have not cost one-fifth what an orange grove
would cost.
If you wish further information, any one
of these gentlemen will cheerfully furnish you
if a stamp is inclosed for reply.
PROFITS OF A COCOANUT GROVE.
"In answer to numerous letters and several
little squibs which we have noticed in our ex-
changes, we will print this little item upon co-
coanuts. Mr. Charles Maloney was the first
that started a grove of this fruit upon this coast.
About three years since he planted twenty-six
hundred and forty cocoanuts and every one of
them lived and are doing well. Some of them
are now twelve feet high and are a sight of un-
paralleled beauty. When planted only a few
of them were sprouted. A cocoanut tree at
twelve years of age will produce from three to
four hundred nuts; and on an average they
seldom exceed this, be they 12 or 20 years old.
Say this lesser amount, 300 nuts at three cents
apiece at the grove, which is an exceedingly
low price, and his grove of 2,640 trees, will be
the handsome sum of $23,760. At one cent
apiece, which would be $3 per tree, they would
pay him yearly $7,920, while the cost of culti-
vating the grove is comparatively nothing.
"The cost of bringing a cocoanut grove into
bearing is nothing compared to bringing the
same number of orange trees into bearing; and
none of the danger from insects or cold, which
6ftimes is in the way of orange groves, is found
in the cultivation of cocoanut groves. The fore-
sight of.Mr. Maloney has proved not only of


incalculable benefit to him, but his success has
been the means of inducing others to buy lands
and improve the thousands of acres lying dor-
mant in the only tropical portion of Florida.
Very 'many are the inducements and advanta-
ges of our sunny clime; four years ago few
dreamed that hundreds of thousands of pine-
apples wotld be shipped from Monroe County;
that acres upon.acres of land that were regarded
as sterile should be planted in cocoanut and
lime groves; that plaihtation after plantat-i
should be opened up and plfited. in vegetables
and proving a lucky 4anza tod ic vfew, w1o
saw their chance and niade the best ) it. A
railroad now, and Monroe County will be the


banner county of this far Southern State."
PINE-APPLES.
The growing of this delicious and salable
fruit has engaged the attention of planters on
the Florida Keys for several years past; and
now annually 30,000 dozen are shipped from
Key Largo to New York direct. This county
is the only place within this country where the
growth of this fruit in sufficient quantities for
shipment has ever been made it is true that
with proper care they may be raised as far
North as the head waters of the St. Johns. The
wonderful fertility of the soil of Key Largo, and,
the fact that there is no frost, are the primal
reasons for their success in raising this fruit.
Instead of the thirty thousand now raised there,
a million dozen could be raised, for nearly
every Key from Biscayne Bay to Key West is
susceptible of cultivation; and the rapidity
with which they have been settled up within
the last two years are proof positive of this.
BANANAS
are also raised in great abundance, and are as
fine as those imported from Cuba;, in fact all
the fruits raised here are strictly tropical and
as a general rule altogether different from any
raised in other counties of the State, much less
of the Union; read for instance their names:
Pine-apples, plantains, bananas, guavas,
sugar apples, sappadilloes, sour sops, Jamaica
apples (custard), Mammee apples, mangoes,
alligator pears (Avacado), limes, lemons, grape
fruit, oranges, citron, grapes, sea grapes, cocoa
plums, paw-paws, tamarinds, pomegranates,
Spanish limes, cocoanuts, almonds, pond ap-
ples, dates, figs, hog plums, opuntia and prickly
pear fruit.
WOODS.

As we have before said the vegetation of the
island portion of this county, like its fruits, is
entirely different from that of the Mainland,
even that part South of the Caloosahatchee
which forms a portion of Monroe. The timber
found on the Keys is very hard and valuable,
admitting of a high polish, and used extensively
for ingraining and other fancy and costly work,
the famed lignum rite (the hardest wood),
prince, satin, the most delicate, crab wool, dog
wood, red mangrove, krale, torch, poison wood
(seasoned), royal palm, wild tamarind, button
wood, beef wood, iron wood, white wood, wild
lime, gumbolimbo (Gumaliba), Mastic, bay
cedar, stopper, sea grape, tamarind, Joe wood,
pigeon plum, red cedar, ash, pine, cypress, Aus-
tralian fir, spice wood, horse-flesh, cinnamon


wood and bark.
Just above Cape Sable, there is a body of
royal palm; and seeing it, well might it be asked
if the better land
"Is where the feathery palm tree rise
And the date gi'Wg ripe under sunny skies ?"
This most graceful tree rivaling, if not sur-
passing, the Cedars of Lebanon, here lift their
proud and graceful head full a hundred feet.
In this one grove, the only one over which the
flag of Uncle Sam holds dominion, contains
fully a thousand trees. This body of timber is
now the property of the general government,
havWig fiever been entered or homesteaded, but
fis will nomianch longer be the case.


FISHING INTEREST.
It is a well-known fact that the waters of the
Gulf of Mexico afford a greater variety of val-
uable fish than any other waters of North Amer-
ica, and at Key West we not only have the
waters of the Gulf with their infinite number,
but the Atlantic contributes some of her choic-
est specimens to the fishermen. Our coral rocks
and low, flat reefs seem to be the especial
camping ground," and we believe we can
truly say that scarcely a place of earth that
has better fish or more endless variety. A
dozen schooners, aggregating a tonnage of 750,
besides fully a hundred smackees who fish in
the shallow waters around the harbor; and be-
sides supplying the home market sell to the
larger schooners, for export to Havana. This
Business pays a good profit and affords a liveli-
hood to hundreds of men. In the last fiscal
year over orie hundred thousand dollars" of live
and salted fish were sent to Cuba alone. Be-
sides this, in the spring of each year several ex-
tensive fisheries are run at different places in
Charlotte Harbor, where the catch sometimes
to ten ,thousand barrels of mullets.
SPONGING.
Some 150 boats, from ten tons to fifty in size,
are engaged in sponge fishing on this coast. -As
a"matter of course, it gives employment to hun-
dreds. The actual value of the sponge shipped
from this port last year was over two hundred
and fifty thousand dollars. It is a hard life
and requiring much exposure, but proves a
school for the making of excellent and daring
seamen.
CIGAR MAKING.
There are at present eighty-one licensed cigar
factories in the Island of Key West alone; they
consumed for the year ending December 31,
1881, 700,945 pounds of imported Havana to-
bacco, on which an Internal Revenue Tax of
$18,956.25 was collected. The entire number
of cigars manufactured last year vere 26,732,-

460. This present year, so Mr. G. W; Allen,
Internal Revenue Collector: for this district,
says, will "exceed 35,000,000.
PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM.
The public schools of the county are admirably
arranged, and the tax is sufficient to run them
for ten months in the year. The buildings for
this purpose are good; the one in Key West for
whites will comfortably seat on its different
floors two thousand children: The building is
neatly furnished, and its whole management is
good. Schools are also provided for the color-


ed youth for the same time. On the.Mainland
of Monroe the school board owri valuablebuild-
ings at Myers, McKinley's, Twelve-Mile Creek
and one or two other places. The schools are
sufficient to give to the settler assurance of a
common education for his children. There is not
a settlement in the county of a dozen families
but where church of some denomination reg-
ularly holds services, In this respect Florida
is far ahead of any frontier State.

PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


I -J.
.4~,..
,~1 *~VY


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THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 5


Bee Moths.
I have been over the country considerably
in the last three days, and have not failed to
pay my respects to the blessed bee. I have not
found a dead colony, but few moths, and plenty
of honey. This has been a remarkable winter
for the preservation of the bee. The ignorance
that is prevalent concerning the natural history
of the bee is distressingly conspicuous, and no
amount of argument can induce them to sub-
scribe for a bee paper or make any move to en-
lighten themselves. Every intelligent person
that keeps bees for profit will have to make the
business a study, and the beginner will find
many mysteries, and will be under the neces-
sity of asking many questions, and as I am a
very recent beginner, I will ask a few ques-
tions: 1. What is the technical name for the
moth ? 2. How long in the year may we ex-
pect to find it ? 3. What time in the day may
we expect to see it ? 4. How does it get in the
hive? 5. What is the remedy ?
WM. T. STURGILL.
Pickering, Mo., March 6, 1882.
[1. Galleriac ereana.
2. From early in spring till late in the fall,
if colonies are not strong.
3. You will frequently in summer, especially
toward evening of a warm day, see white or
cream-colored moths, sometimes called millers,
nearly an inch long, suspiciously numerous
around the hives.
4. They frequently enter the hives at night,
or in the morning or evening. They sometimes
deposit their eggs in cracks around the hives,
from whence the larvae enter the hives, and
take up their quarters in the combs. These
attain nearly an inch in length.
5. Keep your colonies strong. They can be
exterminated from the combs, by placing the
latter in a small, close room, and sulphuring
thoroughly three times at intervals of six days.
-[rEd. American Bee Journal..

-Quinby, the well-known writer on bee
culture, says of catnip for bees : "If there is
any article that I would cultivate especially for
honey it would be catnip. I find nothing to
surpass it." This is high authority, and ought
to entitle this common but little utilized pro-
duct of nature to a place among the valuable
things of the farm. It is but another instance
that goes to show that our people fail to utilize
the native resources of- their farms as they


should. They have not learned the value of
the things they tread upon and often ruthlessly
destroy.

The Vegetable Crop.
There is apparently only about one-fifth of
the acreage in vegetables this season that there
was last, also that on account of a drouth there
will only be about one-fifth of a crop. We have
within the last few days had several good show-
ers that have broken the dry spell, and we can
now confidently expect a good season. It is
too late for cucumbers and tomatoes, but will
materially benefit the cabbages, Irish potato
and corn crop. The above will embrace an
area within Sanford, Tampa, Jacksonville and
Live Oak.


Farmers and Protection.
Without taking any sides on the question of
tariff or free trade, we print the following from
the Macon (Ga.) Telegraph:
Says the Boston Post: Surely farmers
ought to have an equal chance, but we believe
those who have been most influential in the
protection cause have not looked out quite as
closely for the farmers as they have for those
interests in which they were more directly con-
cerned. As a, consequence, what do we see?
Why, the 'pauper labor' of Europe sending its
results into our markets at a profit-butter
from Germany, cabbages from Germany, and
potatoes from Scotland and Ireland. Isn't it
about time for the granger in homespun to turn
lobbyist and plead for some little encourage-
ment of our infant industry of agriculture ?"
The Savannah News seizes upon the above
paragraph and adds to it a few idiotic utteran-
ces in the same strain. The reply called is fur-
nished by Heyle's United States Import Du-
ties." Farmers are protected upon the follow-
ing products:
Beef and pork, per pound, 1 cent.
Hams and bacon, per pound, 2 cents.
Cheese and butter, per pound, 4 cents.
Rice, per pound, 21 cents.
Lard, per pound, 2 cents.
Oatmeal, per pound, I cent.
Hops, per pound, 8 cents.
Figs, per pound, 21 cents.
Tobacco, not stemmed, per pound, 35 cents;
manufactured, do., 50 cents ; tobacco snuff, per
pound, 50 cents.
Cigars and cigarettes, per thousand, $250.
Wheat, per bushel, 20 cents.
Corn and oats, per bushel, 10 cents.
Potatoes, per bushel, 15 cents.
Flax seed, per bushel, 20 cents.
Prepared vegetables, 35 per cent.
Canned fruits, 25 per cent.
Oranges and lemons, 20 per cent.
Jellies, 50 per cent.
Bulbous roots, 30 per cent.
Brooms, 35 per cent.
Hats and bonnets of straw, chip or leaf, 40
per cent.
. Live animals, 20 per cent.
Spirits turpentine, per gallon, 30 cents.
Wool (duties for unwashed, if washed duties
are double,) 32 cents or less, per pound, 10
cents; exceeding 32 cents, per pound, 12 cents;
costing 12 cents or less, per pound, 3 cents;
costing 12 cents or more, per pound, 6 cents.
In addition, from 10 to 12 per cent. ad valorem.
Sugars, assessed per pound, according to
grade and quality, 1I, 21, 2#, 31 and 3 cents
per pound.
Hemp, per ton, $25.
Flax, per ton, $20.
Jute, per ton, $15.
Timber, hewed or sawed, 20 per cent.;
squared, per foot, 1 per cent.; sawed to boards,
planks, etc., per 1,000 feet, $1; other varie-
ties, $2.


Lumber, if planed, 50 cents per 1,000 feet
extra; pickets, 20 per cent.; laths, 15 cents per
1,000; shingles, 35 cents per 1,000; clapboards,
$2; cabinet ware and house furniture, 35 per
cent.
If the pauper labor of Europe can realize a
profit, after paying the freight and import
duties upon any article named in the list, what
profit could the American farmer make if he
had to contend with this "pauper labor" re-
lieved of the duties? We still contend that
the able economist of the News labors like the
homely Sisyphus seen so often in the country
roads.

The Dispatch has the largest circulation of any
paper in Florida; it is therefore the best adver-
tising medium in the State.


Importance of Health to the Laboring Classes.
In an interesting paper on the practical elements
of the labor question, contained in the January num-
ber of the International Review, Mr. Carroll D.
Wright indicates the important place which sanitary
science must hold in the labor question in the fu-
ture. He says that, "statesmen in their endeavors
to secure political advantages to their country, too
often fail to discover that the governments they ad-
minister can secure through sanitary regulations the
highest order of supporters. Agitators do not find
in this question so much matter for popular demon-
stration among the operative masses as they do in
the more superficial topics which give them occupa-
tion. The value of an hour a day taken from the
working time of men and women surrounded with
bad sanitary conditions, is nothing whatever in com-
parison with good sanitary conditions without the
added hour of leisure. Bad drainage, bad ventila-
tion, unclean streets, constitute topics for the most
earnest discussion, and are attracting the attention of
legislators; and when working people themselves be-
come aroused to the importance of demanding purer
conditions, the necessary laws will follow, if, indeed,
they are needed. No corporation has fairly realized
the essentials to industrial prosperity whose man-
agement cannot, or does not appreciate the positive
necessity of the healthiest surroundings. Social sci-
entists, indeed, are doing much to promote reform in
the direction indicated; but education in sanitary
matters is needed among the workers themselves. It
has become one of the vital elements of the labor
question, yet the labor reform platforms are rare, if
not absolutely unknown, until recently, that have
embodied a plank calling for sanitary regulation.
The State can, and should, open the door of every
home, whether private residence or crowded tene-
ment, and insist upon the purification of every
poisonous influence.
There can be no question as to the constitutional
right of the people to enact all requisite sanitary
laws, and of such a character that the object sought
to be reached can be reached effectually. It is too
late after the State has said that no man shall estab-
lish a nuisance to the injury of his neighbors, that
all children shall attend school, or that this person
may vot e, and that one shall not, or has said the
many things in form of law which regulate private
business and protect public convenience; it is
too late, after these things, to say the State cannot
step in and relieve any portion of its people, especially
its children, or enact laws to improve them mentally,
morally, socially and physically, and improvement
in this direction may be secured more largely through
their sanitary education than any other means. If it
is not the plain duty of a State to see to it most earn-
estly that the young have an opportunity to grow up
under such conditions of cleanliness as to secure bet-
ter mental and moral responsibility, there can be no
reason why we should be much concerned for them
after they have arrived at maturity. Economy de-
mands, and surely the best interest of the workers of
society demands, that the cheapest methods be
adopted, and that means that the early age is the
most favorable in which to lay the foundation for
strong bodies and sound minds. The proper care in
this direction would render unnecessary the costly
edifices we now build as homes for the insane, the


criminal, and the defective of all grades. Under a
code of efficient sanitary laws, which can only come
as the result of education in the elements of sanitary
science, intemperance will lose half its terrors and
relieve society of half its terrible results. Bad air
and the poison which comes from filth of any kind,
as surely leads to a desire for alcohol as absence of
food leads a man to eat.
Society has no right to place any obstacles in the
way of free beer or free rum, so long as it criminally
allows individuals to breathe in the very ingredients
which stimulate their want. As well might the sur-
geon complain of the .flow of blood from the severed
artery while he persistently-held it open. Such a
surgeon is a fool, and any legislature which attempts
to stop rum drinking, and yet allows the rum drinker
to constantly feed himself on the most voracious ap-
petizers for rum, is a body of such surgeons. With
the appetizer for rum removed, or to a great degree
checked by wholesome sanitary regulations and prac-
tices, the employers of labor have it in their hands to
kill rum drinking at short notice, by refusing to em-
ploy men given to it.


I


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STHE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


GOVERNOR BLOXHAM.-Dr. N. B. Wolf, of
Cincinnati, proprietor of the Windsor Hotel in
this city, has been on a little tour to Wakulla
Spring, Tallahassee, etc. While in the Capitol,
he had a pleasant interview with Governor
Bloxham, of whom he says : "The young Gov-
ernor is a most courtly gentleman in manners,
and a pleasant talker. His information is varied
and extensive, and I should think, in all mat-
ters appertaining to the political, financial and
educational interests of Florida, he is so well
informed as to make his opinion accepted as an
authority. He is a most interesting conversa-
tionalist, and one of the most graceful parlor
orators it has been my privilege to listen to."


She fo'rida jasslth.
JACKSONVILLE, APRIL 17, 1882.
EDITORS:
D. REDMOND, D. H. ELLIOTT, W. H. ASHMEAD.
Subscription $1.00 per annwmn, in advance.
RATES OF ADVERTISING.
SQUARES. 1 TIME. 1 MO. 3 MO. 6 MO. 1 YEAR
One................ ....... $ 1 00 $ 2 50 $ 5 50 $10 00 $ 18 50
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Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the best ad-
vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.

The Dispatch has the largest circulation of any
paper in Florida; it is therefore the best adver-
tising medium in the State.
5,000 TO 8,000 COPIES ISSUED EVERY WEEK.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.

OLD SUBSCRIBERS and readers of THE DIS-
PATCH are respectfully reminded that this is
the fourth number of the new series-that suffi-
cient opportunity has thus been offered for an
examination of our paper and a decision
upon its claims to their support; and that a re-
newal of their subscriptions and a remittance to
the publishers of $1 for the new volume will be
acceptable, and is now "in order."
THE price now paid colored laborers by rail-
roads and timber cutters in the counties along
the line of the Transit Railroad is so much in
excess of that paid by farmers for help that
they decline to hire them on their farms. From
$1 to $1.30 per day is about the price obtained.
OUR AMERICAN ITALY-Information for the
Settler and Tourist.-A neat pamphlet of fifty-
six pages, compiled and edited by Rev. John
F. Richmond, setting forth the situation,
climate, soil, productions, people, &c, of Sumter
County, Fla., and full of interesting and valua-
ble matter. We are indebted to C. F. Adams,
Esq., of Leesburg, for the copy before us.
MANY THANKS! to E. L. Roche, Esq., Sec-
retary of the Agricultural Society of South Car-
olina, for a complimentary invitation to a Flo-
ral Exhibition of the Society to be held at
Charleston, from the 18th to the 21st of the
present month. The well-known taste and cul-
ture of our Charleston neighbors insures an at-
tractive and interesting exhibition.


the laborer in consequence of halted produc-
tion was seen in the multitude of tramps during
the period of hard times recently passed away."
To which the N. 0. Advance replies : We
do not know that we exactly understand what
the writer of the above means. If he intends
to say that as a country increases in wealth,
and from year to year the aggregate capital be-
comes greater, money more plentiful,. and im-
provements of all kinds more general, causing
demand, and remunerative demand for skilled
and other labor, thus giving employment to
and ameliorating the condition of the working
classes, we can understand how capital may
become "the great leveler" or rather the great
elevator-elevating the laboring classes to a
position equal to that enjoyed by those having


Prayer in Action.
All readers of poetry are familiar with that
tender and beautiful sermon with which
Coleridge's "Ancient Mariner" closes his weird
and wondrous story-that grand utterance of
the gospel of love and the higher humanities
which has never been surpassed in concise ex-
pression:
He prayeth well who loveth well,
Both man and bird and beast.
He prayeth best who loveth best
All things both great and small;
For the dear God who loveth us,
He made and loveth all !"
These beautiful lines rose up in our memory
the other day upon reading an account of a re-
cent occurrence on the St. John's River, refer-
ing to an action of a well-known and popular
steamboat Captain, who, if he sometimes gets
his prayers a little "mixed," always carries a
cool head and his heart in the right place. We
quote from a Union writer, who is describing a
trip with Capt. James Fitzgerald, of the steamer
"H. B. Plant.:"
On our return, a very touching and pretty
incident occurred, which served to show that
beneath his bluff exterior, Captain Jim carries
a heart in which the truest and tenderest
emotions find a responsive throb. While the
steamer was cleaving her way through the nar-
row waters of the upper St. Johns, a wild duck,
having about her a brood of little ducklings,
was observed.but a few rods ahead and directly
in our path. She, poor thing, well enough
realized her danger, and tried in her dumb way,
to get her brood away by quacking to them,
fluttering on the water back and forth, but
never leaving them; and with a mother's devo-
tion, strong alike in all of God's animal creation,
seemed determined to stay and perish with
them. But the kind-hearted Captain had wit-
nessed the devoted act with others on his boat,
and like the gallant gentleman he is, called to
the pilot to stop the boat!" And she was
stopped! amid the applause of the passengers,
until Mrs. Duck and her little ones were safe
amid the sheltering grasses of the banks.
Capital and Labor.
The Chicago Herald says: "History demon-
strates that augmenting capital is the great
leveler. It is the laborer's untiring co-worker
and friend, and will ultimately redeem him from
every species of thraldom. The more plentiful
and the more active it can be made, the sooner
will arrive that grand day of universal emanci-
pation. The chief mischief of strikes is that
they temporarily arrest the operation of this
principle in its onward force by diminishing
production. What serious evils may fall upon


SOUND DOCTRINE.-At a late meeting of the
Michigan State Agricultural College, Dr. A.
D. Healy read a paper on Horticultural Edu-
cation, which was also ably discussed. Dr.
Owen introduced Horticulture in the Home,"
and urged the duty of providing books and
papers on the subject, and the duty of horticul-
tural societies to have libraries and schools for
the education of the young. The best works
on fruits, flowers and gardening should be
within their reach.

-Mr. S. M. Love, of this city, has sold his
young orange grove, containing six acres, to
Dr. W. B. Cornwell, of Mississippi, for $4,500
cash, and the Doctor is now boarding with Mr.
Love. He will remove with his family next
fall. The trees are in a thrifty condition, of a
very choice variety, and nearly of bearing age.
-Apopka Citizen.


---. ---- -- I


more of this world's goods than the masses.
The judicious employment of accumulated
capital is the laborer's untiring co-worker
and friend;" but how often is it otherwise
used? Far from being used to redeem him
from every species of thraldom," it is too often
employed to degrade him, and to reduce him to
a condition but little above the brute. Then,
indeed, it becomes a great leveler." Level-
ing the honest toiler to the dust-reducing his
family to poverty-and entailing upon his
children the curse of ignorance.
"Let capital and labor work together-let
them go hand in hand and increased prosperity
will follow wherever they tread ;" but let an
"irrepressible conflict" spring up between
them, and ruin to both will surely result.
Strikes but seldom occur when the capitalist is
just to the employed, when a fair day's labor
brings the necessaries and some of the luxuries
of life to homes of the honest and faithful
working men; but when the worker is called
upon to do more and get less, and work is cut
down to three days in the week; when large
numbers of skilled men are thrown out of em-
ployment and their places supplied with
cheaper labor, it is not to be wondered at that
strikes from time to time should occur, though
the strikers suffer pecuniary loss, and though
trouble should be entailed upon them and their
families.
Let the capitalist be just, and the work-
men faithful; let a fair day's work command
a fair price; let wages be paid when earned;
let proper sympathy exist between employer
and employed, and we shall hear but little of
strikes and of the evils which result from them."
The latest important strike with the cause
producing it we append:
The strike of the operatives of the Pacific
mills in Lawrence has produced more excite-
ment than that New England town of
40,000 inhabitants ever did before. The Pacific
mills corporation is a big concern, which can
command almost unlimited capital and employs
5,500 persons. It has never before had any
trouble with labor, and passed quietly through
all the crises and panics. When the manage-
ment lately cut down wages twenty-five per
cent., it caused astonishment. Some said it was
mismanagement that made the reduction neces-
sary. The cut was starvatioin to operatives,
who could just live on ninety cents a day, and
would thus be reduced to sixty-eight cents.





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 5-
: : .


a seventeen-inch apple 20 cents. These are the
prices at which I sold mine the past season.
Crowding 2x2 feet, and want of cultivation
gives small fruit, while wide planting 3x3, and
frequent cultivation will give large fruit. The
first method[ might give an average of 5,000
thirteen-inch apples per. acre worth $500. The
last would be likely to give-
2,000 fifteen-inch apples worth...................................... $800
1,000 sixteen-inch apples worth..................................... 175
1,000 seventeen-inch apples worth...........:................ 200
M making a total of............................ .............,........... $675
We do not yet know with any degree of cer-
tainty the distance apart that will give the best
results, either the kind and amount of cultiva-
tion, nor the best fertilizer. My impression is
that there are possibilities in the direction of


The Pine-Apple.
J. H. White, Esq., writing to the Florida
Agriculturist, from his home on Indian River,
says:
I use the full name "pine-apple" instead of
"pines," because we are surrounded with pines
of another sort.
The word tropical is used not in its diction-,
ary sense of "pertaining to the tropics" or
"within the tropics," but in its more sensible
sense of exempt from frost, or not capable of
enduring any degree of frost without injury, as
a tropical region, a tropical plant.
I use the words planter and plantation, not
in their local sense, as relating to a cotton or
sugar farm and its proprietor, but in the broader
and general sense; as a planter is one who
plants, and a plantation is the place planted.
I have a notion that somebody is in error in
regard to some pine-apple items that appeared
in the Agriculturist some time ago. Your Rock
Ledge correspondent told us that Capt. Baker,
of Key Largo, "realized 18 cents for his .crop,
paying $2,000 per acre," also, "that Indian
River is raising larger and finer apples than
either Key Largo or Lake Worth." The last
statement is probably true, but the first is not
believable by one who knows anything of the
facts. If others believe it and make it the ba-
sis of calculation for a fortune in pine-apple cul-
ture they are doomed to disappointment. The
writer evidently did,not believe it himself as he
subsequently estimated Indian River pine-ap-
plesat 8 cents each and the produce per acre at
$800. Even this is a large estimate for fruit
alone, but for both fruit and plants it is not far,
out of the way. Ten thousand apples to the
acre is too heavy, for most people set only that
number of plants per acre and if two-thirds of
them fruit it is more than an average. They
can be made to do much better than this, but
I speak of what they are made to do. When
we came here the fashion was to mulch anld not:
cultivate. If you hoed them they would die, and'
if you didn't mulch them they would die. But I
did the first and left the second undone, and with
this double deadly dose they didn't die. Now
the impression seems to be general that mulch-
ing is not necessary and hoeing is beneficial.
The industry here is yet in its infancy, and I
think the next five years will see a great change,
both in' methods and results. There is a grow-
ing demand for large fruit, and large apples
bring fancy prices. A thirteen-inch apple
brings 10 cents, a fifteen-inch-one 15 cents, and


the production of large fruit, and he who first
attains it will be the first to open the richest.
mine in Florida. I believe the possibilities are
at least 50 per cent. greater than the above esti-
mate.
Many people do not yet understand that the
pine-apple is tropical. While this is true and
the expense of protection so great that in re-
gions where frost occurs with much frequency
they cannot be profitably raised for the general
market. It is also true that in regions of fre-
quent frosts, if not too severe, a few can be suc-
cessfuilly raised for home use. If I lived as far
north as Jacksonville, I should try to raise them
for home use, even though the cost. might be
more than to buy them in the market. If any
of the readers of the Agriculturist wish to make
a trial of a few, I can furnisha few hundred at
$2 per hundred, packed ready .for shipment.
These plants are yet growing upon the stocks
that produced them; are fresh anil vigorous,
and. for planting are really worth iore-if as;
large-than the rooted plants that were .for-
merly sold at 25 cents each.
The Cow-Pea.
-Most Florida farmers know the great value of
the Cow-pea, though few cultivate it as exten-
sively as they should. Some Northern ex-
change paper-the American Agriculturist, we
think-took the matter up some timnie since, and
discoursed as follows:
The value of this pea, if its advantages
were known, would be great; but as it has
been principally grown in the South, it is only
very recently that it has been brought to the
attention of Northern farmers. Even in the
South it.has not received the notice due to a
plant so important to agriculture in that sec-
tion as it deserves,- for it has really been lhe
means of rescuing some of the Southern planta-
tions from total exhaustionon. Tlh Cow-pea,
though called a pea, is properly a bean.,.It will
grow orr.soil that scarcely produces anything,
bot: i, h6weiv'er sensible t6 the effectss 6f good
ianuring, and rewards; the farmer for such
treatment with bountifu ..yields It is indige-
nous to the MAiddle State. and.,the.o.uth,-pre-
ferring a warm season and dry soil. here
are a great many varieties of it, the most pro-
lifit being the Crowder, but the "Black-eyed" iss
preferred for the table. ;
As a renovator of the soil, next to clover, it
has no equal. Growing with a heavy, dense
foliage, ploughed under just at the period of
blossoming, if makes a splendid greeh maniiure,
rotting quickly and producing lasting effihets.
It can he grown for this purpose on land that
will not produce clover, and that is a very im-
portant item. On inferior land that has had a


or at the marvelous rate of six, seven and eight
papers in one second. These papers, too, it
must.., be remembered, are divided by it uni-
formly and accurately into pages, put in book
form, the backs glued, the edges cut, and last
of all are folded in the nicest possible manner,
ready.for delivery.:

The Largest Cities.
According to the last edition of Rand & Mc-
Nally's Atlas of the World, the following are the
largest cities in the world, with the population
as shown by the latest census:
Cities.. .Population.
London..................................................................... 4,000,000
Paris........................................ ... ................ .... 1,988,80(
Soo-choo................................................................... 1,500,000
Canton..................................................................... 1,300,000
Pekin.................................. 1,300,000
N ew Y ork............................................................. 1,200,000
B erlin :.............:................................................... 1,411,620'
K ink-te-ching........................................................... 1,000,00
Philadelphia..... ....... ................. ............... 864,000
W o-chang .... .......... .................. .......... 800,000


judice against it on the part of those not famil-
iar with it on account of the dark color it takes
when cooked'; but if the nutritious qualities of
the pea were fully known no difficulty would
be experienced in making it a staple article of
food.
.The Cow-pea is worthy of being introduced
to .every farmer. Its value as an article of food
for man and beast, the large crops of fodder (or
bushy vine) it produces, its adaptation to the
lightest and poorest soils and its usefulness as a
green manurial crop place it far above many
other plants that are grown to its exclusion. It
has no enemies among the insects, and is in that
particular free from damage. A heavy crop of
it will so completely cover the ground that not
even a ray of sunshine can enter, and it is often
necessary to pass over the vines a heavy roller
in order to get them ploughed under. From
twenty to forty bushels of the peas are usually
produced to an acre, and if they have been well
manured previous to seeding, the crop of hay
will be very large. One of the most important
advantages the pea confers on land is the shad-
ing it gives, some.experienced farmer contend-
ing that by this method it rather improves the
soil than injures it. A small outlay will enable
any one to try the Cow-pea, and those who have
not grown it should do so.
REMARKS.-In curing the Cow-pea for hay,
care must be taken to give the vines as little sun
as possible, consistent with proper drying. Our
method has been to commence cutting in the
morning as soon as the dew is off-let the vines
lie, in the swath until 10 or 11 o'clock-turn
over carefully en masse, without shaking up-
let the forage lie thus until 3 p. m., then cart
under cover and stack away loosely on a rack
of poles or rails ; so arranged that the air can
pass through. A long, open shed, with tiers of
slats nailed around the sides to sustain rails or
poles, answers the purpose admirably, and as
such a drying-shed can be very cheaply con-
structed in. this "wooden country," all thrifty
farmers should erect one or more for the purpose
indicated.
IJf the Cow-pea, in curing,is too much exposed
to the:sun, it dries up so rapidly that the leaves
drop off, in handling, and the fodder is compar-
atively valueless, By rapid wilting and partly
drying, in the manner above described, with
due care in: stowing away, this plant produces
hay much relished by stock, and of very great
value.. We shall have much to say ofthe Cow
pea as a fertilizer, hereafter.
THE GIEAT PRESs! Hoes new "lightning"
printing press is a. wonderful machine. It turns
off in first-class shape 24,000 papers, sometime 8
27,000, and has done as high as 30,000 an hour,


crop of Cow-peas turned under, if a light
sprinkling of lime is added; a venture may
safely be made -with clover the. following year.
It is planted about, the' same time with corn. It
can be sown for hay, but care must be taken: in
harvesting it properly. If allowed to get too
ripe the leaves will 'rumble off after it is stowed
away in the loft; but if cut when in full blos-
som, or just as the young, pods, begin to form,
and then cuted like ordinary hay, it will keep
well all the winter. 'Cows- eat it with relish,
and for sheep nothing is equal to: it-they, eat.
it up clean, being very .fond; of it. The, seeds
are more nutritious than our ordinary white
bean, stock prefedrfing it' when cooked' t'oc'oirn
or meal; while calves are raised on them With
ease where it is desirable to wean early. For
the table they are, cooked not only when dry,
but also when green, being a favorite dish on-
Virginia and Carolina tables. There is a pre-


I I ,. I I






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Railroading in Florida.
In writing upon such a subject the day and
age would suggest a boom not only of words
and ideas but plans perfected and on paper,
but to be practical one should confine himself
to present construction which will cover a suffi-
cient field for a vivid prospective. The only
constructed line from the without to the within
that is of any material advantage to the de-
velopment of the State's interests is the Savan-
nah, Florida and Western or Waycross Short
Line. It has contributed to so great an extent
to Florida's popularity this season, enabling as
it has, so many to make an enjoyable trip
to our many resorts of pleasure and com-
fort as to be a matter of congratulation, and
the requirements of this travel, a matter for
consideration. The salient points seem to be
economy, speed and comfort to Jacksonville as a
common point for distribution.
There appears to be an abiding faith in
modern American railway construction. You
never hear a party say he rode too fast. The
only criticism is upon the vehicles and accomo-
dation en route. The cars of the Savannah,
Florida and Western Railway Company have
pleased the most fastidious. Their dining cars
and restaurant at Waycross are said to be the
best south of Boston-hence no one has had
cause to complain, unless it is some native who,
accustomed to the ways of old, never gets ready
to alight from the cars until at destination, and
theti expect the conductor to be at his elbow
ready to assist in gathering up the bundles of
flesh and matter, and bodily carrying them into
the depot. To such we would like to say, will
you never learn to travel by rail, in a manner
at peace with yourself and the balance of man-
kind ? We may be enabled to give you a few
suggestions that may conduce to you pleasure
and others comfort. The conductor is in
charge of the train from "pilot to red light."
The pilot is called by some the cow-catcher, and
is the foremost part of the engine. The red
light is a signal of danger, as is carried at the
rear of the last car; hence from pilot to red
light is a railway term, used to express the
whole train. The engineer has charge of the
engine; the baggage master the baggage car.
The flagmen, who remains at the rear of the
train, and trainmen generally-two, one rear
and the other forward. This crew mentioned
in the order of their rank.
ETIQUETTE OF THE BAGGAGE CAR.
This car is specially devoted to the carrying


of baggage, and also furnishes desk room and
office for the conductor. If you have business
therein, make it brief as practicable. Do not
go searching among the baggage for yours un-
less by permission of the baggage master, and
then do not handle the checks. If an ac-
quaintance of the conductor, do not occupy his
or the baggage man's chair and time, as both
are in this apartment, which is exclusively
theirs for rest and records.
CAR FOR NEGROES.
This is first-class in every respect, and is for
their exclusive use. No white person will in-
trude, or occupy the car except upon invitation
of its occupants. We regret to say that some


think because it is the negro's car it is second-
class and they have the privilege of smoking,
etc., but such is not the case. They have co-
equal regulations with the whites, and are ac-
cordingly protected and respected in their
respective apartments.
THE SMOKING CAR.
This is considered the free and easy part of
the train, and especially adapted and designed
for the wants of gentlemen. If you should put
in an appearance in this car, with a cigar, and
minus a match, would you ever stop to think
who you would ask for a light; and if for a
light, whether it would be the smoker with a
short stub or a full-length cigar ? And did it
ever occur to you that if you were asked for a
light and your cigar was half or two-thirds
smoked, that it was to be manipulated over by
the party, and that he was not particularly
cleanly ? How do you like the idea of putting
back in your mouth a stub that has been fin-
gered over by a stranger ?
MORAL.-Never ask for a cigar to light
yours. Carry matches, or ask for them. You
impair the comfort of a smoker who is cleanly,
particularly a stranger, by lighting yours from
his cigar. The par excellence of style in
which it may be accomplished is no justifica-
tion for such a familiarity.
THE PASSENGER CARS.
These are for the accommodation of ladies
and gentlemen. If on entering you find the
door closed, close it after you. The placing of
any article in an unoccupied seat reserves it for
its owner. If the window of your seit is closed
and you desire to open it, courtesy would sug-
gest that you apprise the party in the seat in the
rear of you that you wish to open it, otherwise
the occupants may be greatly annoyed by
the draught of air and usual accompaniments.
The seats are to sit upon, not for your feet,
neither the polished arms thereof for foot rests.
The expensive finish demanded by the traveling
public would seem to suggest the propriety of con-
sidering the car the furniture of the company
and tobetreated by you as you would expect a
guest to treat yours. It is not always convenient to
clean cars between stations. Endeavor to leave
the premises you occupy in a condition to be
occupied by others on your retirement. In a
public conveyance never leave the piggish sign
behind you. A village, town, city or country
is judged by its people. If you are filthy in
your habits, a sign of relief from your fellow-
passengers will follow your exit, and remain in
remembrance of your habitation. One's home


habits and character can be judged by his ac-
tion in a public conveyance, or association
among that public in a public way.
THE PARLOR AND SLEEPING CAR.
These are in charge of sub-conductors or por-
ters, whose duties are to look after the wants
and comfort of their occupants. Special seats
and berths are secured in them, which gives
you the exclusive right thereto for the time and
destination paid for, subject to such regulations
as govern such cars, which are so familiar to
the class of travel occupying them as to need no
special suggestions from us; but to one idea we
would like to call attention, i. e., expectorating


in the wash-bowls. We trust that it is not gen-
erally practiced.
It would not conduce to your pleasure or
comfort to imagine that the party preceding
you in the use of the lavatory had cleaned his
teeth and expectorated in the wash-basin, there-
fore, in your ablutions make no effort in this
direction as a comforting assurance to your
predecessor.
As a continuation of this theme in this strain
may bring us into the sphere of a chronic
grumbler, we will forbear and hope for a better
opportunity to continue the subject as to its in-
fluence upon the State's development.

Read and Think; or, more Thought and
less Muscle between the Domestic
Exporters and Importers
of Florida.
We have thought that it might be attended
with some good to direct the attention of consum-
ers to the cost of production and transportation of
supplies brought from the West and North into
Florida, not only that they might learn the cost
and know the value, but that the producers and
consumers may form a correct idea of the rela-
tions between production, manufacture, trans-
portation to consumption-the prime agencies
employed.
Producers and consumers are frequently led
astray by the influence of speculation and at-
tribute its evils to manufacturing and traspor-
tation, and to that extent that by hearty and
ill-advised action injure these industries. We
propose to take up in order all the necessities
of food for man or beast that -is manufactured
in the North and West, and consumed in
Florida. For the first illustration we will take
A BARREL OF FLOUR.
It will not be necessary to enter into the de-
tails of the cost of the production of a bushel of
wheat on the farm, or the cost of transporta-
tion to the mill. The price of wheat that may
be run up or down by speculation does not
alter the cost of the farmers operations or pro-
duction, neither does the transportation so
regulate their rates by the market price of
wheat or its product. Therefore to ascertain
the cost of a barrel of flour we must base our
figures upon the market price of wheat. -The
grades of wheat corresponding with the grades
of flour. The very best article of wheat in
market or at the mill is, say, $1.30 per bushel.


It takes 5Y bushels of wheat to make one barrel of
flour-wheat costs................................................$7.15
M killing costs.................................................................... .75
Vhich is the cost and only profit of manufacturing.
The barrel costs.............................................................. .10
Cartage......................................................................... .03
$8.03
From which is to be deducted the amount realized
by the mill for the bran or middlings.................... 10
Making the cost of the barrel of flour at the mill free
on board for transportation .............. ............$7.93
The cost of transportation per barrel, in car load lots,
from St. Louis or Chicago to Jacksonville, Fla., is
about................................................................... .... 80
Making the total cost of barrel of the very best flour
laid down in Jacksonville........................................$8.73
The wholesale price of the best patent brands in
Jacksonville on April 7th, was................................ 75
The above will show you the margin for the
wholesale merchant. Manufacturing and trans-
portation rates are steady; the tendency is
downward, hence the above will answer for
basis of calculation. By being a judge of flour
and knowing the market price of wheat, you


3 - ,rr ~


I


I


I







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


can know whether or not you are paying more
than a reasonable price for your flour. Learn
to do your own thinking and not be persuaded
by speculators and allies that it is the manu-
facturers and transportation companies that
make provisions high.
Is not 75 cents a low enough rate at which
to manufacture five and a half bushels of wheat
into a barrel of flour ? And is not 80 cents a
low rate for over one thousand miles of railroad
transportation ?
In a future article we will take up the food
product from corn and the hog.


ON account of the drouth the cisterns at
many points in Florida have been exhausted
for several weeks. This has compelled the use
of surface and well water, and been attended
with the usual disorders of the human system.
We trust that there is now a sufficient water
supply, but in case of another failure, would
call attention to our suggestions of last year:
That is, to boil the water used for drinking and
culinary purposes.

Atlantic Coast Line-Freight Schedule.
We call attention to the change in the freight
schedule of the Atlantic Coast Line, as follows:
Leave Charleston daily except Sunday...... 7:00 p. m.
Florence ...... 3:45 a. m.
Arrive Wilmington .....11:45 a. m.
Leave Wilmington ...... 3:00 p. m.
4 Goldsboro .....10:25 p. inm.
Arr. at Portsmouth ...... 11:45 a. m.
Leave Portsmouth ... 5:30 p. m.
Arrive Baltimore Monday ..... 5:00 a. m.
Leave Portsmouth Wednesday, Saturday
and M onday...........................a. m.
Arrive Philadelphia Thursday, Sunday
and Tuesday.,............................... p. m.
Leave Portsmouth Monday, Wednesday
and Saturday................................... 6.00 p. m .
Arrive New York, Wednesday, Friday
and M onday.................................... a. m .
Leave Portsmouth Tuesday and Friday... 3.00 p. m.
Arrive Boston Friday and Monday......... a. m.
This road offers safe and rapid transportation facili-
ities and should be well patronized by our merchants
in.Georgia and Florida.

Sheep.
The crying need of American agriculture to-
day is a more general incorporation of the sheep
into the farming economy. More prolific than
horses or cattle, as well as more tractable, sub
sisting on scantier herbage and requiring less
supervision, it claims in additional advantage
of "paying for its raising" in annual installments
of marketable fleece pending its growth to ma-
turity. It is more readily transferred from one
inclosure to another, and is easily restrained
by fences which would prove no barrier against
the encroachment of other farm stock. It's light


tread and love of repose warrant its access
to fields and pastures where the tramping of
cattle and the tearing of hogs would not be tol-
erated. It wastes less food in proportion to the
quality consumed, and will hunt and utilize
much that would otherwise be lost to the far-
mer. Yielding a return in both fleece and flesh,
it furnishes its owner with the double advant-
age of catching a good market for his product,
requiring less water and disposed to work for
its food.
It is without a peer when summer's drouth
taxes the farmer's resources for enabling his
live stock to maintain an average of thirst and
flesh. All that can be said in behalf of feed-
ing live stock on the farm, as distinguished from


the soil-impoverishing policy of placing the raw
grain and grass upon the market, will be found
to apply with double emphasis to the farm that
carries as a part of its outfit one or more sheep
per acre. No, the animal returns more fer-
tility to soil in proportion to the amount ex-
acted for its support, while none equals it in the
evenness with which the droppings are dis-
tributed. Notwithstanding the evident advan-
tages the increase in sheep culture brings, the
agriculture of a country is generally and espe-
cially inuring to the benefit of such farmers as
incorporate it into their system, the fact is ap-
parent that sheep are not so numerous or so
evenly distributed as they should be.-Breed-
or s Gazette.

The Insect Population.
In 1849 Alexander von Humboldt estimated
that the number of species of insects preserved
in collections at between 150,000 and 170,000;
Europe alone being represented by more than
three times as many species of insects as of
phanerogamous plants. Ten years ago Dr,
Gerstacker estimated the number of species of
insects to be 225,000, five times as many as the
known species of all other animals together. If
we assume that there exists in the whole world
only three times as many insects as there are
phanerogamous plants-the latest estimation of
which approaches 225,000-we arrive at a start-
ling sum of about 750,000. Bewildering as this
estimate appears, it is probably too low. The
oak alone gives shelter and support to 450 spe-
cies of insects, and the pine to more than 200,
and one moth alone has thirty-five different
species of parasites! Without going further in
our calculation, we may safely assert that if the
number of species of all other classes of animals
should be doubled by new discoveries (which is
rather improbable for some classes, and impos-
sible for the vertebrates,) the number of species
of insects would be more than five times that of
all other animals taken together.


Celluloid is made from the cellulore obtained
in cotton cloth or raw cotton. The cotton is
treated to a weak solution of nitric acid. This
has the effect of making pulp of cotton very
much like paper pulp. After the acid has acted
the pulp is treated to a copious water-bath that
in a large measure washes out the acid. Then
it goes through a partial drying process, and a
large quantity of camphor gum is mixed with
it, and it is rolled into sheets ready for the dry-
ing-room, when it is dried on hot cylinders, the
same as paper is dried. It can be softened by
steam, but hardens again when it is dry. Cel-
luloid, when ready for the market, burns readily


as ordinary sealing-wax.

KILL YOUR FISH.-Dutch fishermen, accord-
ing to an exchange, kill their fish as soon as
they take them from the water, preventing
them from dying slowly and having their tissues
softened. The superiority of the flavor of the
fish killed by Dutchmen, when compared with
those which die slowly in French markets, is,
so it is said, very great.


It required one thousand cars to carry the
exhibits to the Atlanta Exhibition, but two
hundred were sufficient to take away those
which remained unsold.


Agricultural, Horticultural and Pornological
Associations.
Florida Fruit-Growers' Association-Office at Jack-
sonville-D. Redmond, President _W. H. Sebring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Secretary; W. H. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Corresponding Sec-
retary; D. Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee-Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. J. J. Harris, 0. P. Rookes,
P. Houston. Official organ-THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.
OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA STATE GRANGE AND
THEIR POST-OFFICEs.-Master, Wm. H. Wilson, Lake
City, Florida; Overseer, Wm. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, B. F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Field-
ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. H. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, R. F. Rogers, Welborn, Florida; Gate
Keeper, Frasier, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Wm. H. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomona, Mrs.
T. W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. H.
Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Geo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Umstead, Hous-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville.-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vice-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary; J. C. Greeley, Treasurer.
Directors-J. H. McGinniss, G. C. Wilson, J. P. Talia-
ferro, P. McQuaid, J. W. Whitney. Annual meeting-
Last Friday in April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. D. Sabin, Vice-
President; 0. E. Campbell, Corresponding Secretary;
Rev. 0. Taylor, Secretary and Treasurer.
Lake George Fruit Growers' Association, Georgetown,
Florida.-President, A. B. Bartlett, Georgetown; Vice-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. Hawkins, Lake
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal; A. H. Manville, Sec-
retary, Lake George; George W. Thorn, Treasurer,
Georgetown; Corresponding Secretary, Rolla Ham-
mond, Fort Gates.
Picolata Agricultural and Horticultural Society.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, C. W. Hodges, Vice-
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Corresponding Secretary,
N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., Recording Secretary; J. F. Sowell,
Treasurer.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Associa-
tion.--G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. Mathers, Second Vice-President; B.
W. Powell, Corresponding Secretary; B. F. Jordan, Sec-
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical Fruit Growers' Association of Monroe County,
Florida.-Home office, Myers Florida; F. A. Hendry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson,
President; Thomas Tillis First Vice-President; J. B.
Sutton, Second Vice-President; W. H. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary; J. M. Barco, Recording Secretary;
L. WV. Hamlin, Assistant Recording Secretary.
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Association.-
John Bradford, President, Bradfordville, Florida; D. H.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida.
Pinellas, Florida, Fruit Growers' Association.-D. W.
Meeker, President; Wm. P. Neeld, Secretary.
Bronson Agricultural Union, Bronson, Florida.-Jo-
seph Hirst, President; L. W. Hamlin, Secretary; semi-
monthly meetings, first and third Saturdays.
Central Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Association, Ar-
redondo, Florida.-Eli Ramsey, President; Dr. B. P.


Decatur County Fair Association, Bainbridge, Geor-
gia.-Maston ONeil, President: I. Kwilecki, Secretary.
Lake Wier Agricultural and Pomological Society (of
Marion County, Florida).-Captain J. L. Cainy, Presi-
dent ; Dr. L. M. Ayer, Corresponding Secretary.
Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Higgins, Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Association, Albany,
Georgia.-L. E. Welch, President; T. M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
Sumter County Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation.-D. L. Hubbard, President, Leesburg W. C.
Dodd, Recording Secretary, Leesburg; A. P. Roberts,
Corresponding Secretary, Leesburg.
Florida Central Agricultural Society.-Thos. F. King,
President, Gainesville; Secretary,
WV; K. Cessna, Corresponding Secretary, Gaines-
ville.


Archer Agricultural Association.-J. W. Williams,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine, Secretary ; I. C. Neal,
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President; John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewis, Treasurer, Tallahassee.
Indian River Agricultural and Pomological Society.-
A. P. Cleveland, President; W. H. Sharp, Secretary,
Rockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
Association.-R. J. Mays, President; Frank W. Pope,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
Orange County Fair Association.-General Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred. L. Robertson, Corresponding
Secretary.
Albion Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Associa-
tion.-Joseph Hirst, President; S. Frei, Secretary. Semi-
monthly meetings first and third Mondays.
Gadsden County Fair Association.-Jesse Wood, Pres-
ident; W. H. Scott, First Vice-President; J. R. Harris,
Second Vice-President; J. W. Kendricks, Secretary; E.
C. Lou, Treasurer.
South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion, Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
which we may have fallen in the naming of officers, &c.,
and oblige THE DISPATCH?]


- C r -I


I







> THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


nioss, and thus by their joint labor they find no
difficulty in keeping the wolf from their doors.
-Alachua Advocate.
-We notice that the orange trees about the
city have very few blooms, an indication that
the crop this year will be rather short.-Alachua
Advocate.
LE CONTE PEARS.-The Wesleyan Christian
Advocate says: Messrs. Sanford & Blackshear,
Thomasville, Georgia, have a magnificent
nursery of these celebrated pear trees. They
have now on hand about two thousand young
trees for sale; after having disposed of many
at remunerative prices. To a man in Florida
they sold three hundred two year old trees for


Wonder-Land.
I wonder what makes the skies so blue;
I wonder what makes the moon so bright,
And whether the lovely stars are born,
Like brand-new babies, each summer night.
And why do they hide when daylight comes ?
I wonder where in the world they go!
Perhaps, when the great, hot sun gets up,
They dry like dew, or they melt like snow.
I wonder what makes the flowers so sweet:
And where do they get their splendid dyes?
And why should some be as red as blood,
And others blue as the summer skies?
I wonder too-but so much their is
To puzzle my little head !-and oh,
I doubt if ever I'll find out half
The wonderful things I want to know ?
-CAROLINE A. MASON,
-A Tennessee lady writes thus about our
State, in the Independent:
Fair Florida! by breezes fann'd
From mighty gulf and ocean;
The waves of progress smite thy land,
The world is in commotion.

And the great soutlihlnd opens wide
Her portals to the stranger;
And he in safety may abide,
Without the fear of danger.

Here history will find her theme:
The real Eldorado;
The poet realize his dream,
A substance-not a shadow.
Thy star is rising in the east,
The brightest and the latest;
And those who once esteemed thee least,
Will yet behold thee greatest.




THE PALMETTO-ITS VALUE.-The Bartow
Informant says: "Stop burning the palmetto
woods, for this despised plant is now selling,
when gathered and baled for shipment, at $8
per ton. By the tests that we witnessed in
Washington last year, we think it will soon su-
persede all other material for boxes, sacks,
trunk covers, pulleys, and all other articles
made of paper, and. requiring strength. It may
not be generally known that barrels, trunk cov-
ers and pulleys such as are used on machinery,
and formerly made of iron, are now made of
paper. Houses are also celled and weather-
boarded, floored and covered with paper. And
we saw samples of writing paper made from
palmetto, written on by General W. E. Smith,
of Georgia, and washed clean in a basin of
water, just like a linen rag, and made ready for
use again without a rent or blemish. And grain
and flour sacks, it is claimed, can be made of it
that would bear more than a cotton sack of the
best make now used."
"SPANISH Moss."-A boom has struck the
moss business. Large quantities of moss are
brought in by the colored people every Satur-
day. It affords quite a business for those who
are engaged in gathering it from the hammocks.
While the older heads are engaged at farm and
other work, the children, who are too small to
be of service on the farm, are put to gathering


sail-boats, carrying freight to and fro. In a
very short time these will be supplemented by
steamers, and then a new region will be opened
of surpassing fertility and beauty.
-There are 1,000 Indians yet in the Ever-
glades of Florida. They speak their own lan-
guage, but by frequent intercourse with the
white people at the trading posts, on Lake
Okeechobee, have become civilized. They are
friendly and honest in their dealings with the
whites.-Spring.
There are only 203 Seminole Indians. They
principally trade at Fort Myers; are rapidly
becoming civilized and learning to speak Eng-
lish. They are divided in four families. Tiger,
from which the chiefs are chosen, Snake, Eagle
and Wind.-Key West Democrat.


five hundred dollars, money in advance. A
gentleman who has watched this variety of
pears carefully, the tree, the fruit, and the sale
of both for five years, says: "I can discover
nothing but what may be said in their praise."
-The Le Conte Pear orchards in the neigh-
borhood of Monticello are doing finely. The
trees are growing rapidly and are in an exceed-
ingly healthy condition. We also understand
that next season a great many additional acres
will be devoted to this pear, and the reasona-
ble inference is that a few years hence the Le
Conte Pear will create for this section as great
a boom as now prevails in Marion, Sumter and
other southern counties over the cultivation of
the orange. The Le Conte Pear will accom-
plish for Middle Florida what the orange has
for the South.-Monticello Constitution.
THE PEACH CROP.-The Constitution also
says: We are informed that the peach crop
of this county, while not so promising as that
of last year, will be very fair. Some trees are
already full of well advanced fruit, some even
as large as four and a half inches in circum-
ference, while others are in young fruit, and
'others blooming. If good transportation facili-
ties are afforded we believe that old Jefferson
will do herself credit in this as in all other
things."
BANANAS IN JEFFERSON.-Some of our citi-
zens who are cultivating the banana, have a
very flattering prospect of realizing a bountiful
yield the present year. Many plants are in
bloom, and should no unforeseen accident be-
fall the crop, this delicious fruit will be more
abundant than ever before. One of our towns-
men thinks he will realize from twenty to
twenty-five bunches from only a few plants.-
Monticello Constitution.
EARLY TOMATOES.-Col. W. C. Bird
brought to this office on Monday a few full
grown and thoroughly ripe tomatoes. They
were perfect in every respect, and are evidence
of what can be raised in this section of Florida,
when experience and energy are applied. Mr.
Jacquot, the associate of Col. Bird in Nacoosa
Nursery, Fruit and Vegetable Farm, is clearly
demonstrating that this section of Florida can
raise and place upon the Northern markets all
kinds of vegetables equally as early as any
other portion of the State; and his experiments
will be worth many thousands of dollars to
Jefferson County.--Monticello Constitution, 14th
instant.
-The farmers in Jackson County are plant-
ing more corn and less cotton, are engaging in
sheep husbandry, and propose to raise their
own meat.
FLORIDA STEAMERs.-Eight years ago there
was on only $120,000 invested in steamers on
the St. Johns. Now there are twenty-eight
steamers plying on that river, one of which
cost $240,000, and to this fleet constant addi-
tions are making. The Indian River and South
Florida lakes and inlets are now dotted with


in the midst of Orange Groves, for wealthy Northern-
ers, is the main idea. For Pamphlets and Maps giving
particulars, address

CHAPMAN & CHASE,
WINTER PARK,

ORANGE COUNTY, FLA.
April 17-3m


Wholesale and Retail


Drug Store,


35 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
PURE DRUGS, RELIABLE MEDICINES FANCY
Goods, Proprietary Articles, at lowest market prices.
Specialties-Norton's Salt Rheum Ointment, Melen's
Infant Food, Burnett's Cod Liver Oil. A Trial solicited.
feb 21-6m


--


-Artificial incubation has been practiced
from the earliest times in the East, chiefly in
China, India and Egypt. In the latter coun-
try large mamals, or ovens, holding from 40,000
to 80,000 eggs, are still used for the purpose;
and the villagers bring their eggs in the ex-
pectation of receiving, after a lapse of twenty-
nine days, 200 chicks for every 300 eggs de-
posited.




Jacksoniville Wholesale Prices.
Corrected weekly, by JONES & Bo0WEN, Wholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.
SUGARS-Granulated ................................... 103
White Ex. C........................................ 9
G olden Cr ........................................... 81
Pow dered............................................. 101
Cut Loaf.............................. ............... 11
COFFEE, Rio-Fair................... ........................ 11
G ood........................................... 12
Choice ........... ......................... 13
Best ........................................... 15
Java 0. G .................... .................... 25
M ocha .......................... .................. 35
Peaberry........ ....................................... 18
M aracaibo l.... ................................. 18
Any of above grades roasted to order.
FLOUR-Snow Drop, best.............................. 925
Oreole, 2d best ... ......... ..................... 8 25
Pearl, 3d best............................... ..... 8 00
M EATS-Bacon..................................................... 10Y4@11
Hams (Merwin & Sons)l........................ 15
Shoulders.................. ........................... 9 @ 10
HOMINY-Pearl, per bbl..................................... 5 25@5 40
M EAL-per bbl.......................................... ......... 5 251 5 40
LARD-Refined in pails...................................... 13
BUTTER-Very best, kegs................................... 45
CHEESE-Full cream ......................................... 16
H alf cream ................................ ........ 1312
ToBAcco-Shell Road............ ............ 55@56
Florida Boys, 11 inch 5's.................. 40
Florida Girls, bright twist, 14 to lb.. 50
Smoking in packages, 8 to b.......... 45
SOAP AND STARCII-Colgate's 8 oz., per box... 3 65
Peerless, 8 oz., per box ....................... 3 50
Starch, lump, per lb....... .. 5 @6c
HoPS, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS-
Hops, per lb................. ........................... ... 15@22c
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz .......... 60c
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
doz. 1 lb.................................................. 2 25
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. 1 lb. 2 25
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. tb..... 2 70
Royal Baking Powder, per doz.1 lb...... 1 50
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl.................................... 3 60@3 75
CHICKENS, each..................... ............................. 25@45
EGGS- Per doz..... ........................................... 20@23
HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lb., first class 13
Country Dry Salted, per lb..................... 9@11
Butcher Dry Salted, per lb .................... 9@10
Damaged Hides..:.................R............... .. 6
Kip and Calf, 81bs. and under.. 10
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb......................... 35
Deer Skins Salted, per lbt...... ............... 26@30
FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter........................................................ 1 50@ 4 00
Raccoon, each........... ............. 5@15
W ild Cat, each...................................... 10@20
Fox, each............................................. .. 5@ 15
BEESWAX-per lb....................................... 20
WOOL-Free from burs, per lb....................... 17@22
Burry, per lb...... ................................ 11 15
Hominy and meal will go higher in price. Flour finds
ready sale at above prices.





WINTER PARK
is a new town in Orange County, Florida, eighteen
miles south of Sanford, on the South Florida Railroad,
with a frontage of two miles upon three beautiful Lakes.

WINTER HOMES








THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.

FRIENDS, in various parts of the country,
not already subscribers, to whom we send a
fv marked copy of this journal, are "respect-
fully invited" to add their names to the long
and increasing list already on our mailing-books.
Terms-$1 per year, in advance.



A FEW CHOICE LOTS OF TEN (10) OR MORE
acres, river fronts, affording attractive and lovely
building sites, and admirably suited to the growth of
oranges, figs and other Florida fruits, may still be ob-
tained on reasonable terms.
"HOLLYWOOD" is south of "1Point La Vista," on
the eastern shore of the St. Johns River, four miles from
Jacksonville. For circulars, terms, etc., address
D. REDMOND,
apr 3-tf Box 257, Jacksonville, Fla.


DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,
GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emery Papers, Sce.
AGENT FOR
PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIRE TEST.

Johnson's Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, Martinez and Longman's
Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel
mar 25-ly JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
THEE



DAILYTIMES.



THE TIMES is the official paper of the city and the
leading paper of the State. It has the largest circulation
in Florida, and reaches all parts of it. It is not merely
a local newspaper, but aims to advocate the interests
and promote the prosperity of Florida as a whole.
Its reputation outside the State is very high. It has
taken rank among those journals whose columns are
looked to for news, and whose comments are quoted
with respect throughout the country.
Its editors have had wide and varied experience in
journalism North as well as South; its advertising pa-
tronage is liberal and of the best character; and its re-
sources, financial and other, are ample. It will furnish
Florida with a live, progressive, outspoken, and reada-
ble newspaper, the peer of any.

ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.
THE TIMES has secured by special contract the full
despatches of the ASSOCIATED PRESS. Besides this,
its Editor is Agent of the Associated Press for the State
of Florida, which gives him great advantages in obtain-
ing the freshest and most important State news.

SPECIAL DESPATCHES.


With representatives in the leading news centres of
the country, THE TIMES is well served in addition to
the regular Press reports. During the past winter it has
received a very large number of telegraphic specials."

CORRESPONDENCE.
Its regular correspondence from Washington, New
York and Boston, is of noteworthy excellence; and its
State correspondence has attracted much attention.
This feature will be extended and improved; and to
this end correspondence containing news or items of
Information of any kind is solicited from all quarters.

"OLD SI. "
In addition to his editorial work, Mr. Small will write
regularly for THE TIMES, and in its Sunday issues the
famous "Old Si" will disseminate wisdom in chunks
to the Florida public.
TERM (strictly in advance): One year, $10; six
months, $5; three months, $2.50; one month, $1. Sent
one month on trial for 50 cents.
Remittance should be made by draft or post-office,
order, or in a registered letter. Address
JONES & SMALL,
mar 27-6m Jacksonville, Fla.


F. S. CONE, A. H. MANVILLE, E. A. MANVILLE,
President and Business Manager. Secretary and Superintendent. Treasurer

Lake George, Florida.
A FULL LINE OF FRUIT TREES adapted to this climate, including Japan Persimmons, Japan Plums,
Peaches, Figs, Grapes, LeConte Pears, and over one hundred varieties of the Citrus.
ORA2NGTE A-NI) IEMION TNI.3EE7S- a specialty.
Catalogue free. apr 17-1y.

COLONEY, TALBOTT & CO.,

I = Aw LE 5 IN REA&L EST1M\TE

AND GENERAL AGENTS FOR THE


improvement of Florida Lands.

Lands Purchased, Cleared, Fenced, Planted and Attended to for Non-Residents.

FLORIDA HOMES SOLD TO ALL APPLICANTS UPON THE INSTALLMENT PLAN, WITH ABSOLUTELY
NO FORFEITURES.
Large Tracts of Land Furnished to Colonies or co-operative Settlers, in any Part of the State, at Low Prices.
GOVERNMENT OR STATE LANDS PURCHASED FOR ALL WHO MAY DESIRE, TITLES SEARCHED,
ABSTRACTS FURNISHED, AND NOTARY BUSINESS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
Particular attention given to the Sale or Lease of City Property, Rents Collected and Repairs Attended to.

]Full Charge Taken of G-roves or Other Property or Non-
Resi del nt ".
ITo. 39 May Street: Moom 12.3 :a=l etto Bl1oolk,


FLORIDA.


JACKSONVILLE,
feb 21-tf


BUY THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

-0-

GOULD & CO.'S


FERTILIZER
-AND-
INTSEOT E2TEEI ArTOM.,

Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange Growers and Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, con-
tains potash, lime, phosphoric acid, ammonia and the other essential elements of Plant Food, making a com
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & Bro.'s, and other high-priced Fertilizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity, and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $4 per barrel, $32 per
ton.
All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.

MESSRS. GOULD & CO.:
Gentlemen-I used one-half ton of your Fertilizer, in connection with the same amount of Baker & Bro.'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gave as good results as the others, which are much higher priced fertilizers-costing
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $51.50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12, 1881.
LEESBURG, SUMTER Co., FLA., March 6, 1882.
GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed your
agents at this point (Messrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer,
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its fostering care, I having had the honor
to win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer better and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer "kills two birds with one stone," inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies,
at one and the same time. I bave been testing it in the field, garden and orange grove for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues, whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For my part, I ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. if I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork.
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOURT.


feb28-6m




Soluble Ground Bone,

THE BEST AND CHEAPEST

nETRTILIZER FOR ORANGE TREES,

Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.
Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTER & BEA&N,
Agents for the State of Florida.


1yAnalysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


mar 27-6m


GOULD & CO.,
NO. 6 W. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

D. G. AMBLER. J. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.
AMBLER, MARVIN& STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as

AMBLER'S BANK.
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
T Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf
PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.






T THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


BALTIMORE EXPRESS
0-

MERCHANTS & MINERS


TRANSPORTATION O1VPANY!







The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail semi-weekly, as follows:
FROM BALTIMORE:
Every Wednesday and Saturday, at 3 p. m.
FROM SAVANNAH :
Every Tuesday and Friday, as follows:
l'uesday, March 2, at 2 p. m.
Friday, March 31, at 4 p. m.
Tuesday, April 4th at, 8 a. in.
Friday, April 7th, at 10 a. m.
Tuesday, April 11th, at 1 p. m.in
Friday, April 14th, at 3 p. in.
Tuesday, April 18th, at 5 p. m.
Friday, April 21st, at 10 a. m.
Tuesday, April 25th, at 1 p. m.
Friday, April 28th, at 3 p. m.
The steamers are first-class in every respect, and every
attention will be given to passengers.
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $15,
Including Meals and Stateroom.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS,
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTH-WEST by rail from
Baltimore.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
column.
JAS. B. WEST & CO., Agents.
Savannah, January 8th, 1878. 30-tf

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA




WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1882,
Passenger Trains will run over the Waycross Short
Line as follows;
Fast Mail. Jack'lle Ex.
Daily. Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at............ 9:00 a. m. 5:40 p. m.
Arrive Jacksonville at.............. 5:40 p. nm. 8:15 a. m.
Leave Callahan at........... ......... 9:44 a. in. 6:45 p. in.
Arrive Waycross at.....................11:57 a. 9:15 p. m.
Arrive Jesup at.............................. 1:40 p. m. 11:25 p. m.
Arrive at Brunswick at........... 6:00 p. m. 5:30 a. m.
Arrive Savannah at.............3:40 p. m. 2:35 a. m.
ArriveCharleston at................... 9:10 p. m. 9:05 a. m.
Arrive at Augusta at........ ....... 5:20 a. m. 1:30 p. m.
Arrive Macon at............................. 7:50 p. m. 7:00 a. inm.
Arrive Atlanta at..................... 3:50 a. 12:50 p. m.
Arrive Louisville at........ ........................ 8:00 a. m .
Arrive Cininnati nat................................ 700 a m
Arrive Washington at................ 9:30 p. m. 9:10 a. m.
Arrive Baltimore at................ 12:25 p. m. 12:05 a. m.
Arrive New York (limited express).......... 3:50 p. m,
Arrive New York P.R. R............. 6:45 a. m. 5:20 p. m.
Arrive St. Louis at................................. 7:00 p. m.
Arrive Chicago at.................................... 7:00 p. m.
TIME.
To Savannah............................................. 6:40 hours.
To New York............................................ 45:45 hours.
To Washington..... ........................... 36:30 hours.
To Chicago...................................................... 49:00 hours.
To St. Louis.................................................. 49:00 hours.
THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
i1L.Jacksonville to Savannah.
W Jacksonville to Louisville.


45iJacksonville to Washington.
ViqLJacksonville to Cincinnati.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
Passengers taking Savannah sleeper can remain in the
car until o'clock a. m.
Parlor and Drawing-Room Car on morning train
from Jacesonville through to Savannah, connecting
daily with through Pullman sleeper for New York.
The Dining Car attached to the train between Savan-
nah and Charleston affords supper lo passengers going
North, and breakfast to those comining South. ar
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to Montgomery and New Orleans
take the evening train.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.
Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. m. and arriving at Savannah at 2:35 a. m., or train
at Jacksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vannah at 3:40 p. m.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, at Depot Ticket
Office. J. E. DRAYTON,
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*] Ticket Agent.


Through Tariff on Vegetables Only.

VIA THE


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE.

ALL-RAIL VIA ATLANTA OR MONTGOMERY.
IN EFFECT MARCH 15, 1882.


FROM
JACKSONVILLE, CALLAHAN JUNCTION, LIVE OAK AND STATIONS S., F. & W.
TO


R'Y.


M acon..............................................................................................................
A ugusta....................................................................................................... ....................................................
A tlanta...............................................................................................................................................................
Colum bus, Ga .................... ..........................................................................................................................
M ontgom ery, A la ...............................................................................................................................................
M obi le................................................................................................................................. ......................
Chattanooga, Ten n.................. .....................................................................................
K noxville, Tenn ...................................................................................... .................................................
N ew Orleansn.................................... ................... ......... ..... ..................... .................................
N ashville, Tenn........................................................................................... .......................................................
M em phis, Tenna............................................................. .............................................................................. ..
Louisville, K y...................................................................... ................ ................................ .....................
Cincinnati, Ohio........................... ............................. ......... ...... ................... ..................................................
H enderson, K y........................................................................ ............................................................................
Colum bus, K yI ............. .......................................................................................................................
H ickm an, K y....................................................................................... ........................................................................
M adison, Ind.......................................................................................................................................................... ............................
Jeffersonville, Ind ............. .................... ....................................................... ........................................
Evansville, Ind...................................................................................................................................................
Cairo, Ill... ............................ ................................... ....................................... ..........................................
Indianapolis................................ .......................................................... .............. .............................
Terre H aute.......................................................................................................................................................
Colum bus, Ohioh............................................................................................................................................
St. Louis..................................................................... ............................................... ...... .. ...... ...........
Chicago.................................................................................................................... .................. ..... ..........
Peoria, Ill..........................................................................................................................................................
Cleveland................................................................................................................................................ ..........
Toledo.............................................. ............................ ................................................ ................................
Detroit..............................................................................................................................................................


-41
; .




30 60 60 00
35 70 70 00

40 80 80 00
40 80'80 00
45 90 9000
45 90 9000
45 90.90 90
45 90 9000
55 1 00100 00
55 1 00 100 00
55 1 00 100 00
551 00170000
551 00 10000
60 110,110 00
60 1101110 00
601 10 110 00
601 10 110 00
60 1 10 110 00
65 1 15 115 00
65 1 15 115 00
65 1 15115 00
655 15 115 00
70 1 20 120 00
70 1 201120 00
70 1 20120 00


TO SAVANNAH. TO CHARLESTON.
FROM -
Per Box. Per Bbl. Per Box. Per Bbl.
Jacksonville.......... ........................................ ....... ......... 20 40 25 50
Landings on St. Johns River........... ............................ 30 50 35 70
Stationson Florida Transit R. R....................................... ........... 30 50 35 65
Tam pa and M anatee................................................................................. 45 75 50 90
Stations on the J. P. & M. R. R.............................................................. 30 50 35 65
Stations on S., F. & W Railway.......................................................... 25 50 35 75

The dimensions of the Standard Box for Vegetables are 8x14x22 inches, and the weight is estimated at 50
pounds.
The Standard Barrel is double the capacity of the Standard Box.
Excess of capacity over the above will be liable to pro rata excess of charges.
The Car-load is estimated at 20,000 pounds. Excess of this amount will be charged for pro rata. Car-load
shipments must be to one destination and to one consignee.
Prepayment of freight will not be required, but good order and condition of shipments will be an absolute
requirement. It is clearly understood between the shippers and the transportation companies that no respon-
sibility shall attach for loss or damage, however occasioned, unless it be from gross negligence, and that such loss
must attach solely to the company upon whose line such gross negligence may be located.
The above points are the only points to which rates are guaranteed, and to which Bills Lading will be issued.
The Bills Lading will be issued only by the Agents of this Company, guaranteeing rates from those points only.
The charges advanced by this Line in good faith to connections at those points will not be subject to correc-
tion by this Line.
Unless otherwise instructed by the shippers, the original Bill Lading will be mailed the oonsigee at desti-
nation, and all claims for overcharge or loss and damage must be presented at destination, accompanied by the
original Bill Lading.
Shipments of single packages charged double rates.
In every case the full name and address of consignee must be given for insertion in Bill Lading and on the
Way-bill.
Where the route by which shippers desire their packages forwarded is not marked on the packages them-
selves, the Florida Dispatch Line" will forward same by the route by which the best interest of the shipper
will be served.


RATES VIA FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE AND THE ATLANTIC COAST LINE.

From la n d- Fla. Transit & From Stations From Stations
I ings on St. Jacksonville. Peninsular on J., P. & on S., F. &
Johns River. Railroads. M. R. R. W. Railway.
DESTINATION.



Baltimore, Md................................. 64 $1 27 50 $1 06 63 $1 21 63 $1 21 53 $105
Philadelphia, Pa........................... 64 1 27 53 1 06 63 $1 21 63 1 21 53 1 05
Roston, Mass........ ......... ... 71 1 43 60 1 22 70 1 37 70 1 37 60 1 22
New York, N. Y................ ........... 61 1 23 50 1 02 60 1 17 60 1 17 50 1 02

To make through rates from Tampa and Manatee, add for boxes 15c., and for barrels 25c. to rates from
Florida Transit Rrailroad. Single packages will be charged $1 each.

To make through rates from points tributary to the St. Johns River and Florida Transit Railroad, add the
rates for transportation lines connecting to above rates.
Stencils, shipping receipts and information furnished on application to any of the agents of the Line.

Fruit and Vegetable Shipments Through in Ventilated Cars.

Between Jacksonville and Savannah daily. TRANSFER TO SHIPS' SIDE AT SAVANNAH WITHOUT
BREAKING BULK.
Rates always as LOW AS BY ANY OTHER LINE. Take out Bills Lading via Savannah, Florida and West-
ern Railway to insure ADVANTAGES OF THF ALL-RAIL ROUTE.
Days of sailing subject to change without previous notice. For further information, if needed, apply to
GEO. YONGE, Agent Central Railroad Steamships, 409 Broadway, New York. Gen. W. L, JAMES Agent,
25 South Third St., Philadelphia. A. L. HUGGINS, Agent Merchants' and Miners' Line Baltimore. WM. H.
RING, Agent Boston and Savannah Steamship Line, 18T Wharf, Boston. 0. G. PEARSON, Agent S., F. & W.
Railway, 219 Washington St., Boston. C. D OWENS, General Agent S., F. & W. Railway, 315 Broadway New
York. J. B. ANDREWS, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, 43 German St., Baltimore. J. M. CLEMENT, Agent S., F.
& W. Railway, Pier 41 South Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, or to either of the undersigned.
W. 0. AMES, General Freight Agent, Jacksonville.
F. B. PAPY, General Freight Agent, Fernandina Fla.
JAS. L. TAYLOR, General Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.
D. H. ELLIOTT, General Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent, Jacksonville, Fla.


-1





THE FLORIDA DISPATCH e


Continuation of Through Freight Tariff on Vegetables via Florida Dispatch Line, in connec-
tion with Steamers direct from Savannah. Transfers to Ship's side without breaking bulk.

IN CONNECTION WITH STEAMSHIPS DIRECT FROM SAVANNAH.

From Land-
From Jackson- ings on St. From Florida From Tampa' From J., P. &
ville. Johns River. Transit R. R. and Manatee. M. R. R.
TO

4 0 0

Boston............................. o .............. 40 $ 80 45 85 45 $ 85 60 $110 45 $ 85
Boston via New York..................... 60 120 65 1 25 65 1 25 80 150 65 125
New York......................................... 40 80 45 85 45 85 60 1 10 45 85
Philadelphia....... ....................... 40 80 45 85 45 85 60 1 10 45 85
Baltimore......................... ....... 40 80 45 85 45 _85 60 110 45 85
IN CONNECTION WITH STEAMSHIPS OF M. & M. T. CO. FROM SAVANNAH
VIA BALTIMORE.

From Land-
From ings on St. From Florida From Tampa From J., P. &
Jacksonville. Johns River. Transit R. R. and Manatee. 1 M. R. ItR.
TO -- --' -- --
.0 ,
II aW I a ) CA)
_____________ ______ _ l^ OI ; P- P-4
Philadelphia................................. 50 81 00 58 $1 10 58 $1 10 73 $1 3,5 58 10
Providence.................................... 55 1 05 60 1 10 60 1 10 75 1 35 60 110
W ashington.................................. 52 1 05 57 1 10 57 1 10 72 1 35 57 1 10
W ilmington, Del.......................... 50 100 55 105 55 1 05 70 130 55 1 0.3
York, Pa.............................................. 59 1 10 64 1 15 64 1 15 70 1 40 64 1 15
Harrisburg, Pa............................... 63 1 15 68 1 20 68 1 20 83 1 45 1 68 1 20
Pittsburgh, Pa..... ..................... 72 1 20 77 1 25 77 125 92 1 50 77 25
Erie, Pa..................................... ..... 72 1 20 77 1 25 77 I 125 92 150 77 1 25
Steamship connection from Savannah for New York every Wednesday aud Saturday. For Boston every
Thursday. For Philadelphia every Saturday. For Baltimore Tuesday and Friday.
STEAMSHIP DEPARTURES FROM SAVANNAH.
FOR NEW YORK. FOR PHILADELPHIA.
Wednesday, March 29th, 3:00 p. m. Saturday, April 8th, 10 a. in.
Saturday, April 1, 4:30 p. in. Saturday, April 15th, 4:30 p. m.
Wednesday, April 5, 7:30 a. m. Saturday, April 22d, 10 a. m.
Saturday, April 8, 9:30 a. m. Saturday, April 29th, 3:30 p. m.
Wednesday, April 12, 1:30 p. m.
Saturday, April 15, 4:30 p. im.
Wednesday, April 19, 7:30 a. m.
Saturday, April 22, 9:30 a. m.
Wednesday, April 26, 1:30 p. m.
Saturday, April 29, 3:30 p. nI.
FOR BALTIMORE.
Tuesday, March 28, 2 p. nm.
Friday, March 31, 4 p. m.
Tuesday, April 4, at 8 a. m.
Friday, April 7, at 10 a. m.
Tuesday, April 11, at 1 p. in. BOSTON AND PROVIDENCE.
Friday, April 14, at 3 p. m. Thursday, March 30, 4:00 p. m,
Tuesday, April 18, at 8 a. m. Thursday, April 6, at 9 a. m.
Friday, April 21, at 10 a. m. Thursday, April 13, at 3:15 p. m.
Tuesday, April 25, at 1 p. m. Thursday, April 20, at 8:30 a. m.
Friday, April 28, at 3 p. m. Thursday, April 27, at 3 p. m.
Shipments via New York will be charged at the current rates from that point, with cost of transfer added.
Single packages will be charged $1 each to Boston, New York Philadelphia and Baltimore. If shipped be-
yond, they will be charged in addition the single package rates of connecting lines and cost of transfer.


Ocean Steamship Company.

SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.


The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, March 29h, 3:00 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Saturday, April 1, 4:30 p. m.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, April 5, 7:30 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, April 8th, 9:30 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, April 12th, 1:30 p. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, April 15th, 4:30 p. m.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, April 19,7:30 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, April 22d, 9:30 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, April 26th, 1:30 p. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, April 29th, 3:30 p. m.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway.
These splendid new ships are 2,250 tons each, were built expressly for this trade, having great speed and
most elegant passenger accommodations.
For information at New York apply to
H. YONGE, C. D. OWENS
Acting Agent Ocean Steamship Co., 409 Broadway. Ag't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry., 315 Broadway.
12-12m G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.



Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah andlPhiladelphia.

A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
-0-
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers are appointed to sail:
JUNIATA, April 8th, 10 a. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, April 15th, 4:30 p. m.
JUNIATA, April 22d, 10 a. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, April29th, 3:30 p. m.
Days and hours subject to change, without notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, W1M. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agents at Savannah.


Bostoll aiI Savnl hStomshl Linu






ONLY DIRECT LINE BETWEEN
SAVANNAH AND BOSTON.
Transhipment and extra handling saved. No danger
of fruit being frozen. Cars are unloaded at the steam-
ship wharf in Savannah, avoiding drayage.
CABIN PASSAGE, $18.
SAILING FROM SAVANNAH.
Chas. W. Love, Thursday, April 6, at 9 a. nm.
Seminole, Thursday. April 13th, at 3:15 p. m.
Chas. W. Love, Thur5day, April 20, at 8:30 a. m.
Seminole, Thursday, April 27, at 3 p m.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
44-tf Savannah, Ga.

DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
The largest stock in the State. Country

buyers will consult their own interests
b)y corresponding with tme. All orders
promptly filled at prices to compete with
any house south of Blhtimore. Rellmeni-
ber my only Florida address.

GEO. HUGHES,
mar 18-3m. Cor. Bay and Ocean, Jacksonville, Fla.

PIANOS AND ORGANS

15 lEast ltay *Taeksonville.
SOLD ON INSTALLMENTS, AT LOWEST PRICES-
branch of Ludden & Bates, Savannah- EXACTLY
SAME PRICES AND TERMS, Sheet Music, Strings
and sr4all instruments of all kinds. Send for cata-
logues, prices and terms. TUNING AND REPAIRING
a specialty. My tuner will make regular tours through
the State, and my customers will thus have my repre-
sentative at their doors, a great advantage to purchasers
of instruments. mar 18-6m.

BELL & 4HALLIDAY,

MANUFACTURERS



FRHIT ANllD YLTABL DBOXESO,

CAIRO, ILLINOIS,

A-ZSend for Illustrated Price-Lists
mar 18-3m

German Potash Salts,
(Kainit)
GUARANTEED 23 TO 25 PER CENT. SULPHATE OF
Potash, in 200 lbs. sacks. $1.50 per sack, or $15 per ton,
f. o.b. For sale by
GOULD & CO.,
feb 28-4t 6 W. Bay St., Jacksonville.

O. L. KEENE,

MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,


Laces, Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF

XI GLSOVES-!
67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
feb 21-ly
M. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the
of the Marshall House. Screven House.
rTHE HARNETT HOUSE,
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARNETT & GEORGE, Proprietors.
RAThES, $2 PER DAY.
This favorite family Hotel, under its new manage-
ment, is recommended for the excellence of its cuisine.
homelike comforts, prompt attention and moderate
rates. 13-ly


SI .







: THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


THE JONES







ARE THE


AND

BEST IN THE WORLD.
For sale by )1 J. C. L'EIENGLiE,
Wholesale Druggist, Jacksonville, Fla.
O Send for Circular. mar 25-tf

W. H. PILLOW,

STRAWBERRY SHIPPING AGENCY
AND PROPRIETOR OF BOWEN BRO.'S PATENT
Refrigerators. Fruit and Vegetable Repacking and
Commission House, Astor Block, Jacksonville, Florida.
REFERENCES-Bank of Jacksonville, Florida Savings
Bank, Col. H. T. Baya, Jacksonville. (P. 0. Box 340.)
mar 25-ly
O N:? ,-E .A.pS.
All Full Count-480 Sheets to the Ream.
10x10 at 14c., 11x11 at 17c., 12x12 at 20c.
SPECIAL PRICES TO LARGE BUYERS.
Address
ASIMI-EAD BROS.,
Booksellers, Stationers, Printers and Binders,
Jacksonville, Fla.
IF YOU WANT TO BUY

Orange Groves
OF
OIRAN1WGE LANDS
Below the frost line, and where all semi-tropical fruits
succeed better than any other portion of Florida, and
where the health and society is unexcelled, address,
with stamp, M. R. MARKS,
Real Estate Agent, Orlando, Orange Co., Fla.
50-tf
VEGETABLES

Slii io to All Wotorll Markots
IN
R E F RIG E R AT O3R CARS.
GIBSON & ROCKWELL,
PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA,
AVE ARRANGED TO RUN A LINE OF REFRIG-
erator Cars to all Western cities during the entire
vegetable season.
Send your Vegetables to them and you will get them
into the Western markets in good condition.
feb 21-4t


NW BEAUTIFUL UUL U .
SoPLENDID COLLECTION-THE MOST MAGNIFI-
u cent Show Plants during our summer and autumn,
for only a little outlay, 50c. per dozen. VERBENAS,
all colors, same price.


Tliree Excellent Moses.
"Marechal Niel," bright golden yellow.
General Jacqueminot," brilliant crimson.
"Perle des Gardin," beautiful straw color.
Strong plants, from five inch pots, 50c. each.
A good assortment of ever-blooming Roses. The very
best Tea-scented, from five inch pots, 30c. each.
=13.luliei a1dzcl = uax pa. ,
The most effective and stately of all the Ornamental
Grasses, 25c. each.
IPot-Grow-1n. r'rt it Trees
IS NO RISK IN TRANSPLANTING.
Japan Plums, 30, 50 and 75c. each.
Japan Persimmon, 75c. each.
Satsuma Orange, $1 each.
Black Hamburg and White Sweetwater Grapes, 40c.
each; Figs, 25c. each.
Packing and boxing free. Address
rA-f Ia O nL ilD IPUETZ,.
mar 25-tf Jacksonville, Fla.


PUFT:TIE : FIn" o"T1wn Oo-T2 ),TD, s$3.50 per Ton,
(Guaranteed PuIre.)

COOTTON SEE" 1VTE-AL, $38 per Ton,
(100 Pound Bags.)

COTT701T SEED KITT-jILT ASI-, $27 per Ton,
(The Best Potash in Use.)

STOCKBRIDGE FERTILIZERS for Orange Trees and vegetables, for sale by
,J. E. ILAIIT,
31-1y Jaclsonville, 'la.




WHOLESALE GROCERS,
AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR

.A.ger's Dry -op 0"1east Cales, e6c. per coz.

rDale &D 1Verrill's IHops, 15c.. per po~cnd.

I-orsefordc's MBreac Preporatio, $6 2 5 pler oase.

Sliell-5oica T'oboaoo.

"'lorida o3ys," 11 in.., 5's, -O.. per poo-ind.

Florida Oirls," t-wist, 1 to 110b., 500. per po-a d,

No. 7' West Bay Street, - - Jacksonville, Florida.
mar 18-6m
ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]
J. A. BARNES & CO.,

FRUIT AND PRODUCE

COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Soi1tl.ern. 'rUlait and. Vegetables sa Speoialt- r-
a3"6 and 3a8 2 North Delaware Avenue, Philadelphia.
31-1y


ASHMEAD BRO OTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,


Publishers, Booksellers, Stationers,


PRINTERS AND BINDERS,
AND DEALERS IN


Toys and Fancy


Articles.


NEWSDEALERS.-We keep all the latest Daily and Weekly Papers from Boston, New York, Philadelphia
Baltimore, Chicago, St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, New Orleans, Charleston, Savannah and Jacksonville, and
take subscriptions to all publications at publication price. Orders by mail promptly attended to.
LIST OF BOOKS ON FLORIDA.
FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, INVALIDS AND SETTLERS (Barbour)......................................................Price $1 50
FLORIDA : ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE AND HISTORY (Lanier)............................................................. Price 1 50
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paper.......................................... .................................................. Price 10
G U ID E TO JA CK SO N V ILLE ...............................................................................................................................Price 25
SOUTH FLORIDA TH E ITALY OF AM ERICA .............................................................................................. Price 25
DAV IS' ORAN GE CULTURE (new edition)......................................................... ........................................ Price 50
M OORE'S ORAN GE CULTURE (new edition)..................................................................................................Price 1 00
ORA N GE IN SECTS- Illustrated (A shm ead).....................................................................................................PTice 1 00
A MANUAL OF GARDENING IN FLORIDA (Whitner).............................................................................. Price 50
COL TON 'S M A P O F F L OR ID A ....................... ................................................................................................... Price 75
COLTON 'S M A P OF FLORIDA (Sectional).................................................................. ... ........................Price 1 25
INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA...............................................Price 3 00
Any of the above books mailed on receipt of price.
O R A N G E A P S .................................... ........................................10xl0, 14c.; 11x11, 17c.; 12x12, 20c.
LAW BLANKS.
W A R R A N TY D EED S, per dozen...................................................................... .................................................Price 50
QU IT-CLA IM DEEDS, per dozen.................. ......... .................................................. ................ .....Price 50
M O R T G A G E S, per dozen ......................................................................................................................................P rice 50
N OTARIA L SEAL PRESSES, m ade to order................................................................................................Price $5 00
We publish a full line of Law Blanks for Lawyers and Justices of the Peace. Price-list mailed on application.
Special prices to large buyers. Adddress
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
feb 12-tf 21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


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