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Florida dispatch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/NF00000068/00003
 Material Information
Title: Florida dispatch
Uniform Title: Florida dispatch
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Ashmead Bros.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 10, 1882
Publication Date: 1869-1889
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (1869)-n.s. v. 9, no. 4 (Jan. 21, 1889).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of North Florida
Holding Location: University of North Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0497
oclc - 08331006
System ID: NF00000068:00003
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida dispatch, farmer & fruit grower; farmers alliance

Full Text




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Devoted to the Aricultural, 1anufacturino and Industrial'Interests of Florida and the South.


Vol. 1.--No. 3.


New Series.--Published by ASHMEAD BROTHERS, Jacksonville, Fla.


Price 5 cents.


Monday, April 10, 1882.


$1.00 per Year, in advance; postage free.


THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR.
Dar's a gin'rul idee," said old Si last evening,
dat dis State am er kin' ob nashunal hosspittle, an'
hit's wah all de time twixt deth an' de dockters. In-
stead of dat dar's health down heah an' plenty ter spar.
Dey sells hit from de market house ter de kitchen-do',
and de only place whar yer kant fin' it is er allyga-
tor's mouf!" "Then your advice is that people
should come to Florida, but beware of the alligator ?"
Dat's hit!" "I ain't got no use fer er allygator-
hit's too much like er pollytishun-got mo' mouf dan
vittals an' mo' hide dan honesty!". And with this
epigram the old man bowed himself out of the sanc-
tum."'
Old Si is right; the alligator has more mouth and
hide than vitals-a fortunate thing for the curiosity
dealer but a very disastrous, state of affairs for itself,
and like other large mouthed animals," it has at
last gotten into trouble.
Like the Bison and North American Indian, the
alligator is destined in the near future to become ex-
tinct. They are vanishing at
the approach of the white man's
step and civilization, like the
.morning mist before the rays of'
the sun.
They are a relic of a bygone
age. Their haunts are already in-
vaded and they will soon sleep
their last sleep with their ances-
tors-the plesiosaurus, pterodac-
tyle and hydrosaurus' of the ante-
diluvian world.
The shores of the St. Johns,
Kissimmee and Ocklawaha Rivers
will no longer resound with their
cry, and we shall know them no
more, excepting by tradia n_
and by their bleached bones
and dried carcasses in our mu-
seums. Fifty, or sixty thousand
are annually killed for their slides
to use in the. manufacture of
satchels, pocket-books, boots,
shoes, &c., and to satisfy the cu-
pidity of curiosity dealers who
manufacture studs,sleeve buttons,
vignettes, &c., out of their teeth.
Out of this immense number a


few hundred are killed by the would-be sportsmen,
who visit Florida during the winter months. If,
however, we depended upon these for the extermina-
tion of this largest saurian of North America, we
are afraid they would soon become as abundant as
they were a hundred years ago; but as these miss
ninety-nine times out of a hundred, there is no prob-
ability of that happening. The alligator has little
to fear from this source, a fact of which the saga-
cious reptile is well aware.
On the Ocklawaha, where they are at present most
plentiful, it is not an unusual thing for one of
them to lie on a log and allow a whole volley from
pistols, rifles, shot-guns, howitzers and blunderbusses,
to be fired, before stirring-then slowly raising his
head, winking his eye, and apparently laughing at
the pseudo-marksmen, he elevates and shakes defi-
ance with his posterior extremity, plunges into the
depths below, and is seen no more. Our illustration
admirably depicts the haunt* of the alligator."


THE PALM TREE.
There are districts of Tinnevelly, in South-
ern India, where the soil is so dry and sandy
that it is surprising anything will grow. Yet
where this powdery red sand prevails for miles
we have walked through plantations of the
stately Palmyra palm, the great stems rising to
an immense height, and the trees in the most
vigorous health. Here, as elsewhere, the sap
flows most freely at the hottest time of the
year, and when the soil is without vegetation
and almost without substance, when the only
shade is that cast by these branchless trees from
their narrow crowns of leaves; when the only
clouds are clouds of dust, "when the streams are
dry and the wells are exhausted, and the largest
rivers are only a bed of glowing sand," there is
the singular spectacle of these stately trees flow-
ing continually with their fountains of sweet wa-
ter. How is it possible ? we often asked. Bishop
Caldwell, whose house lies close to such a des-
ert. tripd tq answer that question for himself.
NHe dug into the ground to ob-
serve the course ofthe roots,but
as deep as he dug "the thread-
like roots of the palm burrow-
ed deeper," until at last "when
forty feet below the surface, he
came upon water:"and here the
roots, drinking in the refresh-
ing moisture, penetrated even
further among gravel and
stones till he could follow them
no more. The riddle was
solved ? and any one may feel
what a new beauty it gives to
the comparison here. The
roots of the Christian life sink
down into the living waters.
They are fed from the peren-
nial fountains of the Spirit far
)ut of sight. And the surface
rnd freshness of that life, and
)f all the influences that flow
-om it, do not depend on what
we see, for the soil where such
-tlife grows is often spiritually
warren but they depend upon
ts roots striking down among
the living waters.- Good
------- Words.


I I








2 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


Raising Turkeys.
Twenty-five years ago almost every large
farmer living not too near to neighbors was
in the habit of keeping turkeys. They were
a great help in destroying grasshoppers,
crickets, and other injurious insects which
prey upon the crops of the garden and field.
They usually roosted on trees near the farm
buildings, and after the first few weeks from
hatching gave very little trouble to the
feeder, and afforded a good bunch of bank
notes for paying off debts which might be-
come due about Thanksgiving, Christmas, or
New Years. Of late years, however, the
profits from turkey raising have been much
diminished by a disease which attacks the
birds at all ages, from the time they are as
large as quails till they are fully grown.
The symptoms are dullness, pale skin on the
face and down the neck, inclination to sit
on the ground or lag behind when feeding
with the flock in the fields, and a yellowish,
watery discharge from the bowels. The
birds usually live but a few days after these
symptoms are observed. They lose their ap-
petites and grow rapidly weaker till they are
found dead on the ground, near their usual
haunts. If they are opened the liver will be
found very much enlarged with numerous
tubercles scattered over the surface. It
seems to be purely a disease of the liver, as
the other organs in most cases present a nor-
mal appearance.
We have lost three fine flocks in years
past by this disease, without knowing any
cure or preventive, and many others in va-
rious parts of New England have had a sim-
ilar experience, and have consequently
abandoned the raising of these choice birds.
Charcoal and sulphur, we believe, have been
recommended to be mixed with the food, but
by the time the disease shows itself it is not
an easy matter to administer medicines in
this way, as the birds have little or no appe-
tite.
While looking at some fine large, healthy-
looking turkeys, and discussing methods of
raising with a companion, he stated that he
had been very successful in treating this dis-
ease by giving red pepper, cinnamon and
rhubarb, in the form of pills, which can be
easily given to the fowls, whether they have
an appetite or not. The rhubarb is physick-
ing in its effect on the bowels, while the pep-
per and the cinnamon warm up the bird and
stimulate action in the digestive organs.
We have no experience with this treatment,
but give it wholly on the authority of Mr.
M. Since turkeys have become so scarce
upon our New England farms, grasshoppers
and crickets have increased to an alarming


extent in many localities. Whole fields of
grass are sometimes eaten by grasshoppers,
especially the second crop of clover, of
which they are particularly fond.-New Eng-
land Farmer.

-A gas-burner consuming four cubic feet of
gas per hour produces more carbonic acid in a
given time than is evolved from the respiration
of eight adult human beings. Bear this in
mind, you who suffer from nervousness, that
when you have shut yourselves in your rooms
and lighted an argand burner (which consumes
about twelve cubic feet of gas per hour) you
are to all intents and purposes immured with
twenty-three other persons, all taking oxygen
from the atmosphere.


GALVESTON.

A BUSY AND BEAUTIFUL CITY BY THE GULF
OF MEXICO.
There is a street in Galveston called Broad-
way, with a green-sodded boulevard down the
middle, on which stretch two miles of resi-
dences, many of them as spacious and pretty as
can be seen in Cleveland or Dayton, Ohio, all
of frame, some in the newest style of decorative
carpentry; others with classical porticos and
green sash-sided colonades covering the kitchen
extension, writes Gath to the Cincinnati
Enquirer. On second inspection the business
part of Galveston appeared more self-reliant
and active than any other part of the South.
The richest firm in the place, bankers named
Bald, were said to be worth $4,000,000. A re-
cent fire destroyed business property worth
$700,000, but, while the ruins were still smok-
ing, the facade of the new edifice of one firm
was going up in iron. The Brush electric light
was stretched through the streets. The wooden
street pavement of Galveston has been down
ten years, is set on gravel, not on a wood base,
and is said to be favored by the gulf air. Huge
freight yards surround the town; cotton-seed
mills, grist mills, ice factories, foundries and
cotton presses are features of the broad streets,
and one firm, the Blumer, keeps twenty drum-'
mers on the road. The drummers generally
feed at a French restaurant tavern, where I
have had some of the geese I saw sailing upon
the Galveston flats yesterday. The principal
hotel, the Tremont, covers nearly a block, and
is split for balconies from the office, or rotunda,
up to the roof. Oranges and roses grow in the
open air of Galveston ; the street cars keep the
streets musical. Order is said to be very good,
because the rogues cannot get off Galveston
island, which is two miles from the mainland.
Sugar plantations are close by Galveston. Cot-
ton is grown in sight of the island, and of a sea
island quality, and no phosphate or other
manure is said to be used to assist the cotton
crop of Texas, though the cotton of the At-
lantic States is chiefly produced on artificial
aids now. I asked a gentleman of Scotland,
who has resided here eleven years, if the heat
of Texas was not a drawback.
"It is not the summers, sir," he replied,
"which we suffer from, but the mild winters."
"How is that ?"-
There is not enough real winter to give our
systems the relief we expect from the steady,
strong summers. We really have nine months
of summer in Texas, and yet the nights in the
hottest part of summer are not as oppressive as
I have felt them in New York; but we are
worn out by the summer tarrying with us all
winter."
I e


Ozone Formed by Light.
An interesting discovery is announced from
Paris by M. J. Dessan, a French chemist, who
has been for years engaged in the study of oxy-
gen and ozone. He finds that oxygen can be
transformed directly into ozone by the rays of
light. The oxygen he used in his experiments
was prepared from chlorate of potash and very
pure. It was contained in a glass bell jar,
which, together with all the other vessels em-
ployed, was coated with blackened paper to
exclude the light and keep the oxygen dark.
While in this condition the oxygen had no ac-
tion in the ozone test with which it communi-
cated; but when the rays from an oxy-hydro-


gen lime-light were reflected upon the bell jar
so as to fall upon the gas within for twenty-five
minutes, the solution of iodide of potash and
amidou used as an ozone test became blue, and
indicated the presence of that substance. The
discovery, if it be sufficiently verified, will
throw considerable light on the physiological
action of solar radiation.-Eclectic Magazine.
Condensed Grape Juice.
In Italy, a new industry has arisen in the
production of condensed grape juice, after the
pattern of condensed milk. The juice is evapo-
rated in a vacuum pan until it assumes the ap-
pearance of toffee, and is reduced to one-tenth
of its former bulk. By careful attention to
temperature, it retains all its fruit-acid and
grape-sugar, and also those mineral components
which are believed to exercise great influence
in forming the qualities of wine. Where diffi-
culties of transport are found, this condensing
process will be of very great value, though
what the excise authorities may have to say in
the matter will remain 'to be seen.-Eclectic
Magazine.
The Oldest Flowering Plants.
Count de Saporta and M. A. F. Marion re-
cently brought before the French Academy of
Sciences a joint memoir on the genera William-
sonia and Goniolina, the most ancient forms of
flowering plants of the fructification of which.
anything definite is known. In Williamsonia
the trunk bears at its extremity the organs of
reproduction, which show two distinct forms,
apparently indicating that the plant was dioe-
cious, but in both there is a multifoliate en-
velope, which acquires a globular form by the
curvature of the bracts composing it.
The parts of the envelope of the male flower
seem all to stand at the same level; they are
elongated, narrowed, and bent toward each
other at the apex. Within the envelope rises
a conical axis, the base of which is surrounded
by a circular zone, with radiating stripe. The
outer margin of this zone, when exposed, is
found to be covered with a number of very
small irregularly hexagonal areas, which seem
to represent so many pollen-cells. This basil
zone would seem to represent a sterile and per-
sistent part of the androphore, in which at one
time the whole comical body was covered with
a felted layer, composed of the filaments and
their appendages, reminding one by its posi-
tion and arrangement of the male flowers of
the Reed-mace (Typha).
The female inflorescence of Williamsonia is
furnished with a globular envelope like that of
the male flowers, but its bracts are a little
shorter. The organ contained in this envelope,
and which is certainly deciduous when mature,
consisted of a convoluted (?) receptacle of more
or less globular form. The central leaves of
the envelope, which have remained in place,


testify by their thickness and leathery texture
to the primitive nature of this formation. In
their midst stands the globular conceptacle, the
upper parts of which are covered with carpel-
lary areas; and in the lower part of the re-
ceptaele we see the fibrous, woody tissues of
which the axis was composed.
The remains of the genus Goniolina, D'Or-
bigny, appear as ovate bodies, in the form of
cones rounded at the upper end, and borne
upon a cylindrical stalk. The surface is cov-
ered with very regular hexagonal areas, ar-
ranged in spiral lines. The areas are smaller
toward the point of insertion of the stalk.
These fossils were formerly regarded as Echi-
noderms, and described as Crinoids under the
name of Goniolina geometrica.-Eclectic Maga-
zine.


(Scientific Dept. continued on fourth page.)


__ __


2


THEFLOIDADISPATCC:H.


I








THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 3


Florida as a Permanent Home.
While the swelling current of foreign immi-
gration sets westward with all the force which
similarity of climate aided by organized specula-
tion and transportation can give it, it is a well-
recognized and gratifying fact that in all the
Northern and Western States there is an in-
creasing appreciation, among the more intelli-
gent resident classes, of the superior advantages
of a milder and more agreeable climate, and
ever verdant vegetation of the South. The frosts
and storms of winter, the heat and droughts of
summer, and the intervening floods and violent
changes, the periodical devastation of insects-
all conspire to induce the agriculturist and pro-
ducer to seek homes where the exactions are less
severe and the demands less imperative. And
from every quarter the questions are coming:
Is the climate of Florida beneficial? Can a
Northerner come to Florida in summer without
danger ? Can subsistence be had from the pro-
ducts of the soil while planting and maturing
an orange grove? What is the price of lands
cleared and uncleared? Can homesteads on
government lands be secured ?
To these questions, which come in all kinds
of shapes, we reply: .
1. No climate in this or any other country
possesses more of the constitutional elements of
health, and none is more exempt throughout
the year from prevailing disease or epidemics,
Scientific analysis and long-continued experi-
ence and observation corroborate this position,
and careful comparison with the most favored
climatic resorts affirm the assertion.
2. Immigrants can come to Florida safely at
any season of the year by a proper observance
of the common physical laws which govern in a
radical or partial change of climate. It is much
safer for the Northerner to come South in sum-
mer than for the Southerner to go North in
winter. Both have to observe new rules and
fortify themselves against new elements. If the
habits of life are regular and proper regard is
had to cleanliness, avoiding bad water, bad
whisky, and unnecessary exposure to the ele-
ments, there is no reason why one coming here
in summer should not remain perfectly healthy.
We are satisfied from over twenty years of
personal observation that the most prolific
causes of difficulty is the too frequent drinking
of water in too large portions, the too free use
of ice, and the habit too commonly indulged in
of using stimulants. The experience of the
Northern soldiers during the war fully vindi-
cates the assertion that health and vigor may
be preserved by a proper regard to the change
of circumstances and influences. There exist


no special malarial influences to combat, and
the character of our soils is wisely adapted by
Providence to our uniform and long-continued
warm season. We commend to our readers
the various publications on the climatology of
Florida for a full and reliable basis of judg-
men tof the constituent elements of our climate.
3. Our soil and climate both conspire to
speedy and successful production of vegetables,
small fruits and field crops for immediate reli-
ance. Some crop may be successfully planted
at all seasons of the year and the new comer
has not to wait more than three months before
he can begin to subsist from his own produc-
tions. Had we space we could exhibit this in
detail to the satisfaction of the most sceptical.
While he plants his orange grove, which re-
quires no more expense, knowledge or care than
an apple, pear, or peach orchard at the North,


he may raise his subsistence-his corn, sugar,
rice, sweet and Irish potatoes and garden vege.
tables, strawberries and small fruits upon the
same land until the trees come into bearing.
An orange grove costs no more than an apple
orchard, and when once in bearing it is a sure
and profitable reliance for generations.
4. The price of land is lower in proportion
to productive value, advantages of market and
facilities for transportation than in any North-
ern State. Good agricultural lands on old im-
proved estates and contiguous to railroads and
thoroughfares, can be had from $5 to $25 per
acre; wild lands from 70 cents to $10; choice
hammock lands on the St. Johns River, con-
tiguous to steamboat landings, can be had in
small or large tracts at about $20, while the
contiguous pine lands, eligible located, are to
be had at from $5 to $10.
5. Homesteads can be secured on govern-
ment lands; State lands can be purchased at
from $1 to 82 per acre, and the railroad lands
of the Transit Road, and lands on the Disston
purchase in South Florida, can be had at $50
for a forty-acre lot. Some are held higher, but
this is the ordinary price.- Union.

Winter Park.
Recently we paid a visit to Messrs. Chapman
& Chase's new town of Winter Park, located
on the S. F. R. R., about two niiles south of
Maitland. A beautiful depot building has
been constructed there by the enterprising pro-
prietors. Mr. 0. E. Chapman met us, and in
a spring wagon showed us around over the site
of the proposed town. Their hotel at that time
was about lathed for the plastering, and Mr.
Rodgers, builder, said it would be ready for
occupancy, he thought, within three or four
weeks. We then drove to the two other hotel
sites. One is on the eminence between Lakes
Osceola and Virginia, and the other is on a
high point more directly overlooking Virginia.
From either site a grand view is obtained over
a number of lakes, and the various improved
places surrounding. Hotels built on either of
these sites could not fail to furnish extensive
views of unexcelled interest to all visitors or
guests. The lay of the lots around the lakes
was there pointed out by Mr. Chapman, and
the planning has been a master-piece of good
judgment. On our return to the hotel, Mrs.
Chapman joined our party and through their
urgent invitation we consented to dine with
them at Maitland. On our drive thither we
passed through the fine place of our friend J.
G. Stovin, on the south side of Lake Maitland,
whom we had the good fortune to find at home,
although our time was limited, we took a rapid
run with him over his grove. It is truly won-
derful what this gentleman has affected. Seven


years ago he located on that side of the lake,
then a wilderness of pine trees and dense un-
dergrowth. Now, by his indomitable will and
energy he has one of the finest groves around
Lake Maitland. His first trees numbering
several hundred, are now a little over six years
old, and many of these in bearing. They are
fine, large and perfectly healthy. They are re-
freshing to look at, and we are not surprised
that Mr. Stovin takes pride in showing them.
Including these older trees, he had enlarged his
grove to 2,300 trees and had land ready for
planting 700 more, making a grove of 3,000
trees. How's that? no want of confidence
there. Mr. Stovins returns for his time, labor,
and money are just as sure as the interest on
U. S. bonds, only his return is better.-South
Florida Journal.


Will the Orange Business be Overdone?
The Iowa farmer, toiling in a great belt of
rich lands where millions and billions of
wheat and corn are garnered, does not cease
his efforts fearing over production; the
Texan with his myriad flock does not aban-
don the range to ease the market. We have
stood at New York in August and Septem-
ber, when the long drawn trains rolled in
loaded with peaches. Many hands worked
lively unloading until peach carts and bas-
kets piled one upon the other seemed to cover
acres, and still the trains came thundering
in, until we turned away saying : "Who can
ever eat all these peaches ?" Yet the peach
business has not been overdone. Now there
are a hundred acres in these States that will
raise peaches to one acre that will
raise oranges. The peach is a perishable
fruit. It must be picked when it ripens and
hastened to market, while the orange, the
queen of fruits, hangs blushing in ripened
beauty from October to March without in-
jury, awaiting a customer and a market.
We need not fear overproduction as long
as one hundred and seventy millions an-
nually of the Mediterranean crop find buy-
ers in our markets, and thirty or forty mil-
lions more are imported from the West In-
dies and its vicinity. Florida has not been
able to give more than one in fourtern of the
annual supply of the country. The increase
in population and wealth will greatly out-
strip the increase in orange production so
that no plethoria is possible. If we could
fill our own markets, we have still the whole
outside world as a customer. If Europeans
can afford to ship poor oranges to us, can
we not afford to ship good ones to them ?
Florida finds market for much of her crop on
her own territory. All Florida will soon be a
vast winter boarding house, and visitors
come to Florida to eat oranges just as they
go to Saratoga to drink mineral water.
Many millions are to be consumed in our
own State annually, so that considering the
quality of our fruit, and our close proximity
to the great American markets, all fears of
overproduction must quickly vanish. The
Florida orange, with all the increase in pro-
duction, brings a better price than it did ten
years ago, and at half its present price can
be grown with vastly better profits than
crown the toil of the New Hampshire farmer.
Volusia County News.

IMPROVED GRASSES.-In many respects
grass culture has not kept pace with im-
provements in other branches. We are con-
tinually getting new plants, trees, new fruits,


new vegetables, new grains, but a new grass
is never thought of. We have the same
orchard grass, the same red-top, the same
timothy that we had over a hundred years
ago, and, so far as the drift of thought goes,
we shall have the same grasses for a hundred
years to come. And yet there is no reason
that we can see why there should not be im-
proved grasses as well as improvements in
any other thing, and there doubtless would be
if public attention was drawn to the matter
as it should be.- Germantown Telegraph.

PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


I


THE LRIADSPTH


3







4 H LOIADIPTH


Animal Retribution.
The Boston papers tell a curious story of the
retribution which recently came upon a buck,
which, by virtue of his superior strength, and
sagacity, had exercised a tyrannous lordship
over the herd of deer on the Common, and had
thereby excited the hatred of the younger bucks.
The time came when he had to shed his horns.
The other bucks gained knowledge of the fact
with a marvelous quickness, gathered around
him, made a concerted attack upon him and
speedily disabled him, despite the gallant re-
sistance he tried to make. He was knocked
down, butted and kicked till his head and sides
streamed with blood, shoved this way and that,
with all the fury accompanying each action
that the pent-up spite of years could render it-
self capable of, and, finally, was reluctantly
compelled to give up the ghost. Several of the
men employed on the Common and public
grounds witnessed the affray, and attempts
were made to drive off the old fellow's assail-
ants, but it was of no use. Each attempt was
resented by the infuriated deer, and every man
who entered the inclosure with pacific inten-
tions was obliged to flee for his life. The mur-
der having been consummated, the fury of the
animals became appeased, and the dead carcass
was removed from the arena.




Sewer Gas; is it a Cause of Disease ?
From the Sanitary Engineer.]
At a meeting of the Academy of Medicine,
New York, in March, 1882, Dr. Frank H.
Hamilton read a paper on the subject of sewer
gas, in which he said that by means of sewer
gases it was certain that typhoid fever and
diphtheria were propagated, and it was his own
conviction that many other zymotic diseases, as
Asiatic cholera, might be and sometimes were
propagated by them. It was thought by many,
that it was enough for safety to have water
traps, but it was well known, he said, that
water was no protection against it. There was
no remedy, he said, against sewer gas except
the proper use of chemicals, supplied to traps
daily. He believed that to secure the best pro-
tection, all plumbing fixtures should be placed
in an "annex to the dwelling. Not a few of
our lately constructed and most elegant man-
sions had not an inch of plumbing in those por-
tions usually occupied by the family, he said.
Another concession that civilization must
make was that we return to the open fire-place,
the best ventilator ever invented," as a means


of warming our dwellings. Sanitary engineers,
he said, were no doubt performing a much
needed and very useful service, but there was
no evidence that, up to the present day, they
had done anything more than investigate the
evils they had been asked to remove.
At the close of the paper, Prof. Doremus
showed the Academy the results of experiments
to prove that sewer gases-as ammonia and
sulpuretted hydrogen-easily pass through
water traps. He had before them several glass
traps prepared beforehand, in which the differ-
ent gases were stated to have passed through
the water, and shown the proper reaction on
paper in the other side of the tube. He also
believed that the only means of protection was
by the use of chemicals in the traps. He recom-


mended manganate of soda and sulphate of
magnesia, which, when mixed, gave off ozone,
the great purifier. These should be supplied
to water-closet traps every time they were used
by a mechanical contrivance.
Doctor John S. Billings, U. S. A., upon be-
ing called on by the President, spoke at some
length upon the subject of house sanitation in
large cities. He said that he took a more
cheerful view of the situation and of the power
of sanitary engineering to prevent danger than
was done by the author of the paper (Doctor
Hamilton). Referring to Prof. Doremus's ex-
periments, he said that they did not prove any-
thing as regards the passage of sewer gases
through traps of water-closets connected with
properly arranged soil pipe. The gas in Prof.
Doremus's flasks is almost pure, and the amount
of water in the half inch glass tube is very
small and soon saturated. In the soil pipe the
offensive gases are greatly diluted with air, and
the very careful experiments of Dr. Carmichael,
of Glasgow, made with an ordinary water-closet
and soil pipe which had been used for a long
time, and showed conclusively that the amount
of gases which pass through a water trap from
a ventilated soil pipe is so extremely minute
that it can only be detected by the most deli-
cate test, and is so diluted with air that it is
not dangerous to health. The difference in the
effect of dilution upon gases, and upon germs
was pointed out. There is no such thing as a
sewer gas of peculiar and definite composition.
Sewers contain various kinds of gases, in con-
stantly varying proportions. These gases do
not produce specific contagious diseases, such
as diphtheria, scarlet or typhoid fever.
It is not, however, correct to say that they
produce no disease, and are never dangerous.
.When not diluted, they tend to produce debil-
ity, loss of appetite, headache, nervous prostra-
tion, etc., and to dispose the system to be affect-
ed by the true immediate or specific causes of dis-
ease. But when sufficiently diluted, they are
not dangerous, and this dilution can be secured,
so far as the house is concerned, by thorough
ventilation of the soil pipe, provided that the
communication between the sewer and the soil
pipe be cut off by a trap and fresh air inlet. Un-
der such conditions the proportion of offensive
and dangerous gasses in the soil pipe are very
small, and the amount absorbed by the water in
closet traps, is almost inappreciable.
The case is somewhat different as regards the
minute particles or germs contained in sewer


air, at least under certain circumstances. It
is true that, as yet, we are not able to speak
positively as to these supposed germis. We can
only act upon probabilities, but in speaking to an
audience of physicians, I feel sure they will ap-
preciate this, for they have to act on probabili-
ties only in every case they treat. Now it is
highly probable that what are known as the
specific contagious diseases are not produced
by gasses arising from the decomposition of
vegetable or animal matters, or of excreta, but
from minute living particles or organisms.
If diphtheria, scarlet fever, or typhoid fever,
could be produced by combinations of filth,
moisture and temperature, it is impossible to
explain why these diseases do not constantly


prevail in some cities in India, China, etc.;
nor upon this theory is it possible to explain
why they are more prevalent now than they
were fifty years ago. Now the danger to health
from these germs cannot be entirely removed
by dilution.
If the virus of sheep-pox, or of vaccine be di-
luted until not more than one inoculation out
of fifty takes effect, it will still be found that
when it does take, the effect is the same as if
pure virus had been used.
Does the water trap prevent the passage of
these germs ? The experiments of Dr. Car-
michael show that it does, and that an organic
putrescrible fluid will remain unchanged when
exposed only to the air immediately above such
trap. A pin hole in the soil pipe is more dan-
gerous than a trap.
From these experiments, as well as from
those of Weinich, Pumpelly and others, I think
that the estimate of the danger of house drain-
age has been placed much to high. The real
difficulty seems to me, to be, not that the re-
sources of sanitary science and engineering are
not sufficient to secure safe plumbing; but the
people at large who are willing and able to pay
for good work do not know to whom to apply
to get it. In this matter physicians are the nat-
ural advisers and leaders, and it is very satis-
factory to find that they are investigating the
subject. I would only urge upon them to go
.cautiously, and not to rush into extremes. There
are few competent advisers, and some skillfull
and honest plumbers; and the physicians should
know who these'are and where they are to be
found.
At the conclusion of Dr. Billing's remarks,
Dr. E. G. Janeway said that specific disease
germs should not pass through a water trap;
so far as scarlet fever was concerned, he had
never seen a case that he thought could possi-
bly have come from the sewer, and he chal-
lenged any one present to tell him of a case.

DEFENSIVE HABITS OF ANIMALS.-The fol-
lowing notes have been taken on the offensive
and defensive habits of animals A serpent's
first instinctive impulse of self-preservation,
like that of every other animal, lies in escape.
If surprised suddenly, or brought to bay at
close quarters, it may be too terror-stricken to
attempt flight; then it bites, following a curi-
ous general rule which seems to obtain through-
out nearly the whole animal world, from a


passionate child downward, no matter what the
natural methods of offense may be. Young
Felidoe will keep their talons sheathed until
they have exerted all possible force with their
soft milk-teeth, and a lizard will seize the hand
which restrains it with its insignificant little
jaws when its tail or claws might inflict far
more injury. The Boidie never use their con-
strictive powers in self-defense (unless they are
gripped,) and it seems. probable that if a
venomous snake's fangs lay in its tail it would
use its teeth first when attacked before bring-
ing them into play. Indeed, it must be remem-
bered that very few animals are provided with
exclusively defensive weapons, and that the
python's enormous strength in constriction, the
viper's poison apparatus and t-he electric dis-
charge of the gymnotus are given them prima-
rily for the purpose of securing their food.


- 1


I


Is


THEFLOIDADI SPATCHO







Florida Notes-Continued from third page.
-The Bainbridge (Ga.) Democrat says: "That
spirit of whole-souled hospitality, refinement and cul-
ture that in other days made Quincy the garden spot
of Florida, is still fostered by the place and people."
-The Osceola correspondent of the South Florida
Journal remarks that Osceola is still booming, and
I am glad to say it is not the kind of boom we often
see and hear of in new countries, where settlements
spring up phantom-like, to-day, and are gone to-mor-
row. No, sir! Osceola has been for the past six or
seven years steadily plodding her road towards pros-
perity, and to-day we find her in the same happy state ;
land is selling like ripe cherries, or, perhaps I should
say, oranges. Young groves are being marked out in
every quarter, new buildings springing into existence,
old ones painted and renovated, and indeed everything
tends to make glad the hearts of old settlers, and
make them feel satisfied that this settlement has a
bright prospect ahead."
-Recently the successful cultivation of semi-tropi-
cal fruits and vegetables, not to mention the staple
crops of corn, rice and cane, has turned the eyes of
many seeking southern homes in our direction. The
severely cold weather of last winter, which proved so
disastrous to the vegetable crops and orange and lemon
groves in the northern and eastern parts of the State,
has also induced many who before considered this
locality sufficiently exempt from frost to change their
minds and seek with us a milder and more unvarying
climate.-Manatee Co. News.
-" We observe with pleasure," says the Alachua
Advocate, "That the Florida obelisk, transported
from Atlanta to the State Fair at Jacksonville, was
regarded as peculiarly representing the State at large,
and noticed as one of the chief attractions at Jackson-
ville as it was at the Atlanta Exposition. As the
handiwork of the lamented Place and Mr. Voyle, of
Alachua county, we are proud of it. None the less so
are we when we remember the personal effort it cost
Mr. Place to collect most of the materials of which it
is formed, from this county. He scoured the county
for miles around this place, and when he could not
get the quantities of rice, rye, hay, tobacco, oats, mil-
,lets, corn, cane, pumpkins, etc., for love, he pur-
chased them for the purpose of constructing that pe-
culiar and ever-to-be-remembered exhibition of the farm
products of Alachua county which at the same time
represented those of the State. We shall not soon
forget the earnestness with which he expressed his re-
solve, the last moment we saw him, to have such an
, exhibition, if he had to pay for it out of his own
purse. While tlie 'Florida Obelisk' will be a monu-
ment to his memory, the remembrance of it will be
indissolubly linked with the extraordinary wealth of
fertility and varied productions which lie within the
county he adopted and loved as his home."
-Superintendent Hugh Dempsey, of the Southern
Express Company of Augusta, has returned after an
absence of more than a month on a business trip
through Florida. Mr. Dempsey speaks in glowing
teams of the progress and growth of Florida, and
says it is the busiest State in the Union. He tells us
that hotels are still overcrowded, and it is all the


fashion to go to Florida as much for pleasure and ele-
gant life as for health. He returns to his home the
picture of health and happiness, and is welcomed by
all his friends.-Augusta Chronicle.

ASHES AS A FERTILIZER.-Chas. A. Green,
of New York, holds that ashes are a fertilizer
of unquestioned value. Most constituents of
the soil are found in the ashes of vegetation.
Ashes having been once used in the growth of
vegetation may be largely used again to nourish
renewed productions. The farmer is indiffer-
ent, careless, and wasteful of this great ally,
though if a supply chances to be lying about in
the way, he will, from necessity apply itto the
fields, often inconsiderately, and breathe freer
for the riddance. A large part of the most
valuable ingredients of ashes is lost to the
farmer through exposure to the rain, as ashes
are often out in boxes and barrels six or eight
months.


NEW PUBLICATIONS.
Orange Culture in California, by Thomas A.
Garey, with an appendix on grape culture, by
L. J. Rose, San Francisco, Cal., 1882.
Progressive orange-growers in Florida and
elsewhere, who desire to become familiar with
the advanced ideas and the best practice of our
California neighbors, should send for Mr.
Garey's book. It is a neat, closely-printed vol-
ume of 227 pages, written in a clear, forcible
style-full of practical sense, and rich in sug-
gestion. Beginning with introductory remarks
on orange raising, it passes through all the
stages of selecting the seed; raising the plants;
culture of the young plants in nursery; selec-
tion of site for the orchard or grove; purchase
of trees ; plan of the grove; transplanting;
cultivation; irrigation; crops in grove; fer-
tilizers; pruning; diseases of orange trees;
destructive insects and enemies; profits of
orange growing; cost of planting an orange
grove or orchard, in California; where the
orange can be most successfully grown in Cali-
fornia; varieties; seedling vs. budded trees;
how to propagate by budding, grafting, layer-
ing, cuttings, &c.; stocks for budding and
grafting; lemon culture; limes ; citrons; or-
ange wine and brandy; recipes of much value;
appendix, &c. Price, in stiff cloth, $1.25.
Ashmead Bros., Jacksonville, or Dewey & Co.,
San Francisco, Cal.
Santa Barbara County, Cal.-A business
man's estimate of its climate, soils and products,
by Joseph J. Perkins, 1881. We are indebted
to the author's kindness for a copy of this spark-
ling and interesting little pamphlet of 35 pages,
which tells, in a clear and very pleasant way,
all that is really most worth knowing in regard
to an attractive and interesting country. We
commend the whole style, manner and animus
of this pamphlet to all who are getting up simi-
lar publications in Florida-a few of whom do
not seem to have discovered this author's fac-
ulty of "putting on the brakes" at the right
moment. We presume the little work can be
obtained from the author, Joseph J. Perkins,
Esq., Santa Barbara, Cal., and it is worth send-
ing after.
Catalogue, illustrated and descriptive, of
plants, seeds and bulbs, cultivated and for sale
by Nanz & Neuner, Louisville, Kentucky. An
excellent and attractive catalogue, describing
an extensive and valuable stock. Sent free per
mail.
New Southern Poultry Book.-Col. Jno. M.


Claiborne, of Galveston, Texas, is about to
issue a new Southern poultry book, which can-
not fail to be of much value and interest; as
the Colonel is an ardent lover of fine and thor-
oughbred poultry; an experienced breeder, and
one who wields the pen of a ready writer."
We shall announce the character and price of
the book more fully, as soon as a copy comes to
hand.

-The Alta Californian says: "Samuel
Purdy in his grave is a standing rebuke to of-
ficial venality," and winds up the article with
an epitaph, "Here lies an honest man." Those
figures re a good deal mixed.-Lowell Courier.


How TO COOK ONIONs.-The odor of onions
is so objectionable that in many households
they are a forbidden dish; yet as a toothsome
accompaniment to roast meat they excel all
other vegetables, and this method of preparing
them will obviate their disagreeable odor both
in the house and the breath : Cut the onions,
after removing their skins, into quarters and
boil them in salted boiling water, putting a
wine-glass of vinegar into the water while boil-
ing and before the onions are added, and boil
half an hour. Then turn off all the water and
add enough boiling water and cold milk, equal
parts, to cover the onions. Boil another half
hour, letting the milk and water nearly boil
away, then sprinkle flour from the dredging
box over them and add a large piece of butter
to them and stew ten minutes and serve in a
thickened mass. If the odor of the onion is
perceived in the house, put some vinegar in a
little tin or iron skillet and boil it rapidly and
its fumes will destroy those of the onions.
AN IMPROVEMENT IN ROASTING BEEF.-A
roast of beef can be be greatly improved in
flavor and made more tender if the juice of a
large lemon is squeezed all over it after it is
placed in the dripping pan. Cut the lemon in
halves and squeeze out all the juice, removing
the pips. Then peel off the rind as you pare
an apple with a sharp knife and put it under
the ribs or sirloin of the beef. Let the beef
roast for half an hour without any water in the
dripping pan, as the lemon juice will be suffi-
cient to keep it from burning. Then add the
usual amount of boiling water and baste it very
frequently. Pepper the roast when put into
the oven, but do not sprinkle salt over it until
it is taken from the pan, as it extracts the
juices of the meat. Flour the roast with the
dredging-box half an hour before it is taken
from the oven.
A PASTE THAT WILL KEEP.-Wheat flour, one
ounce, powdered alum, one-half drachm, water suf-
ficient, or eight ounces oil of cloves, or winter green,
three or four drops. Rub the flour and the alum with
the water to the consistence of milk; place this over a
moderate fire and stir constantly until the paste drops
from the wooden paddle in jelly-like flakes and has
the appearance of starch While the mass is still hot,
add the essential oil and pour the paste into an earth-
enware pot or open jar. In the course of about an
hour a crust forms on the top; pour gently on this an
inch of water, more or less. When some paste is
wanted, decant the water, take out the quantity
needed and put some water again on the remainder,
repeating the operation each time. Paste may be
kept in this way for months, and will never be troubled
with flies.
ORANGE CUISTARDS. -Soak two cups of stale bread
in a pint of cold milk; when it is soft beat it smooth,


add the grated rind and juice of three oranges, the
yolks of three raw eggs, and sugar sufficient to make
the mixture palatable. The quantity will, of course,
depend upon the flavor of thf oranges. Have ready
six buttered cups set in a dripping pan half full of
hot water; then beat the whites of three eggs to a
stiff froth, mix them lightly with the other ingre-
dients, put the mixture into the cups and bake the
custards about twenty minutes in a moderate oven.
They will be done as soon as the egg is firm.
IMITATION GROUND GLASS.-Cut from tissue paper,
or thin white muslin, fancy figures, and then with
transparent gum, fasten them upon the glass. These
are good for hall doors. The same end may be ob-
tained by applying to the windows, with a brush, a
hot solution of sal-ammoniac, Glauber's salts, or Ep-
som salts. The crystalizations in the first will be in
straight lines; the Epsom salts will produce four-
sided prisms, and the Glauber's salts six-sided ones.
A perfect and beautiful screen can be formed in this
way.


IFLO~bA ISPA 011





6 TH FLOIDADISPTCH


EXTREME SOUTHERN FLORIDA.

MONROE COUNTY-ITS POSITION-INDUS-
TRIES-PRODUCTIONS, ETC., ETC.
From the Key West Democrat.
Monroe county embraces not only the most
southern part of Florida, but is the most south-
ern land belonging to the United States. It in-
cludes all the country lying on both sides of the
Caloosahatchee River; all the islands or keys of
Charlotte Harbor; extends east to Lake Okee-
chobee, and the county line of Dade, thence
south, including within its route, all the Flor-
ida Keys, from near Biscayne Bay to, and in-
cluding, the Dry Tortugas.
The main land of the county, outside of the
islands, embraces land enough to form two such
States as Rhode Island.
ENORMOUS CATTLE HERDS.
But in this vast territory, only a few people
live, and these are principally stock men, whose
vast herds of cattle find grazing from the Caloo-
sahatchee River to the Indian hunting grounds,
near Cape Sable, numbering no less than 100,-
000 head valued, as they roam, for $700,000.
Ten years ago there were not a thousand cattle
where this vast herd now feed. The Caloosa-
hatchee was then the southern boundary of civ-
ilization, and beyond was an unknown wilder-
ness, explored only by the intrepid soldier dur-
ing the Indian war and since by the last rem-
nant of that powerful tribe of braves, the Semi-
noles.
FORT MYERS.
The increase of stock has been no more rapid
than that of other property. The flourishing
and picturesque border village of Myers was a
deserted frontier fort. The old barracks had
been torn down and in their places a few huts
had been erected by fishermen and hunters.
The cocoanut trees planted by the officers dur-
ing the Indian war of 1856 were alone flourish-
ing amid the general wreck; the orange trees
were hung with moss, and the streets had grown
up with lime, lemon and guava trees, a tropi-
cal forest only could be seen. About this time,
Captain Hendry and others drove their stocks
of cattle far to the southward, and with their
families, founded a settlement here; houses
were built, streets again were cleared, orange
groves trimmed and in a short time the deserted
fort assumed the appearance of a prosperous
little town. Shortly before this, the Interna-
tional Ocean Telegraph Company erected their
line near Myers, on their way to Punta Rassa,
where it took water for Key West and Ha-


vana.
PUNTA RASSA.
Punta Rassa, twenty miles from Myers, at
the mouth of the Caloosahatchee, was chosen as
the shipping point. Telegraphic communication
with the markets of Key West and Havana
soon made itself felt, and within a short time
nearly all of the beef-cattle dealers from Mana-
tee, Brevard, Polk, Marion, Sumter, and even
far away as Alachua county, drove their cattle
here for sale or shipment; so Punta Rassa, a
city of two houses, yearly ships over 20,000
head of cattle valued at $300,000. All the busi-
ness except shipping is done at Fort Myers,
where the cattle buyers have large pastures and
other conveniences for keeping them. This ex-


tensive trade has made Myers a lively and pro-
gressive village; a number of stores do a good
business. The citizens have built large and
comfortable private residences, and we know,
'from personal observation, that there is not a
town in Florida of five times its population
that has as handsome churches, school-houses,
and Masonic Hall as this frontier town.
FARMING AND FRUIT-RAISING.
At first the citizens confined their attention
in this direction to a small garden and a grove
of oranges, bananas, guavas, etc., for their fam-
ily alone; but others than stockmen soon found
the advantages that this section offered, and
they either bought State land or homesteaded
government land and went to farming and fruit-
raising in earnest, and they readily found a sale
at home for all they produced. The number of
cow-boys coming from the upper counties make
a good market; money was made as the busi-
ness and the farms extended. A large number
of orange groves are now just coming into bear-
ing. On the Caloosahatchee and its tributaries,
were immense tracts of rich hammock land and
hundreds of acres have been cleared and
planted in cane. Two or three steam sugar
mills have recently been put in operation, and
the old-fashioned "boiler" and the cranky
wooden rollers have been thrown aside for the
centrifugal and evaporator. Strictly tropical
fruits are raised. Some of the largest and most
flourishing alligator pear trees and sappadilloes
that I have ever seen, grow upon this river.
THE CALOOSAHATCHEE AND OKEECHOBEE
DRAINAGE COMPANY.
This company, incorporated by the Legisla-
ture in 1880, are now at work on the headwaters
of the Caloosahatchee. A powerful dredge boat
is daily cutting her way to the Okeechobee from
Lake Hickpochee, and not many months will
elapse before the long pent up waters of that
great lake will flow down the Caloosahatchee,
and the million acres of overflowed lands on the
border of Okeechobee and the Everglades will
be redeemed. The canal, now cutting, is to be
widened and deepened, as well as the river into
which it flows, for that great ship canal which
has been the dream of engineers and enthusiasts
for so many years. The greater part of these
lands, so soon to be reclaimed, lay in Monroe
county; the major portion of the work is to be
done there, and the progress of the surrounding
country, and of its people, show the merit of the
work, and the faith of all in its early comple-
tion.
THE CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER.


The St. Johns is noted, and right worthily,
too, I confess, for its beauty, its broad waters,
the picturesque foliage on its banks, the charm-
ing villages which dot its shores, and last, but
not least, the growing city of Jacksonville, the
entrepot of Florida; but way down in the Pen-
insula, full four hundred miles further south,
there is a river that rivals it in all but length.
Its banks are covered with a more dense and
tropical foliage, high, picturesque bluffs add
charms to the scenery and variety to the eye,
islands here and there, covered with a dense
growth of trees, make even more interesting a
river in which lavish nature has spared nothing
in making it grand and beautiful.


No town, not even villages, with one excep-
tion (Myers), adorns its shores. We have a
wilderness of forest and stream, with only an
occasional house to remind us of the encroaching
settler upon the domains of nature; but only a
year or so more, at the furtherest, and every
available sight upon this grand river will be
covered with houses, and orange groves will
take the place of the primeval forest. Enough
to-day of the mainland, let us go to the island.
We will first speak of
KEY WEST.
This place bears the inevitable reputation of
being the largest city in the State, and the ex-
treme southern point of land of the Union. Here
the waters of the Atlantic and Gulf kiss each
other for the first time; by us that silent, swift,
mysterious river-the Gulf stream-sweeps on
its northward course, its warm waters lave our
shores; the pleasant breezes, laden with the
perfume of the tropics, temper our clime, and
give us the same equitable mild, but invigorat-
ing weather that Havana, the Capital of the
Queen of the Antilles, has. The flower gardens
as we now write (February 8th), are decked in
the most gorgeous dress of the year ; the Afri-
can date tree is laden with its bloom ;rare trop-
ical flowers, found nowhere else in Florida, add
their beauty and fragrance; full a thousand
cocoanut trees raise their graceful and symmet-
rical heads high above the surrounding shrub-
bery, giving the city a strictly tropical appear-
ance. The houses are mostly of one, a few only
of two stories, not one that is higher, all painted
white. The number of Cubans and Spaniards
seen, the queer and incessant jargon of foreign
tongues add much toward its tropical and non-
American appearance. One had about as well
visit Italy and not see Rome as to go to Florida
and not see Key West. We sometimes hear it
said that Key West and the neighboring keys,
are barren coral rocks." No greater mistake is
ever made. It is true that all of them are
rocky, but there is plenty of soil for any agri-
cultural purposes. Look at the dense foliage
of Key West already described, and you find a
disclaimer more eloquent than words.
Key West lays in the track of all steamers
passing to and from Mexico, Central America,
and the Gulf coast cities of the United States.
Several of these lines touch regularly at this
post, the most of them occasionally. Mallory's
great Texas line of fast and powerful steamers,
some of them of 3,000 tons burthen, none less
than 2,500, all new and splendidly equipped,
represented here by Mr. A. F.:Tift, touchat this


place every Thursday from New York and
every Saturday from Galveston. This line gives
us rapid and sure transportation to Northern
and extreme Western places. By it we are en-
abled to put all our tropical fruits and vegeta-
bles in the best market of the world (New
York), within four days. The next regular
line is Morgan's Havana and New Orleans',
which also, makes regular trips, touching weekly
both ways. These ships will land you in Ha-
vana in eight hours from the time you leave the
dock at Key West, offering thereby to tourists,
a safe, pleasant and agreeable trip to the most
interesting city in either North or South Amer-
ica for a small outlay. These steamers also


_ i. II ~ III I II


6


THEFLRD DIPTH





THE FLOID DISPATCH.7


touch at Cedar Key, thereby giving you an op-
portunity of visiting other towns and places in
Florida, if you feel so inclined. Then comes
the regular line of mail steamers making direct
semi-weekly trips between this city and Cedar
Key. This is purely a local line and the one
on which we principally depend. It has only
one stopping place between these routes, this is
Punta Rassa, and is, therefore, their sole de-
pendence, outside of sail boats, for passenger
and freight transportation; it also leaves the
mail. This line is represented in Key West by
Mr. Wm. Curry. Cheap rates to Punta Rassa,
Key West and return will be given to parties
prospecting with a view to settle. Another
very important. line is the Pensacola and Ha-
vana. This line is owned and controlled by the
Louisville and Nashville Railroad. This past
fall and winter the steamers were not run, it
being impossible for the company to have had
them furnished in time, but about the first of
October, of this year, (1882), this line of new
and elegant steamers will begin their semi-
weekly trips and continue them as they did in
the fall and winter of'80 and '81. The steam-
ers they run that year were chartered, but they
preferred building ships of their own, but the
contractors failed to furnish them in time for
the past season's trade. This is the best of the
much valuable and direct routes, and is of great
benefit to the Island City. To our fruit and
vegetable growers it opens the great markets of
the Northwest, Cincinnati, Louisville, St. Louis,
Chicago and other cities are brought within a
few days' travel of the tropics. In exchange
for our oranges, cocoanuts, guavas, we can eas-
ily and cheaply have their meal, flour and grits.
This line is represented at this place by John
J. Philbrick. Besides the above named routes,
we have frequent communications with Havana
through the Spanish steamers which visit this
coast for cattle; also with the mainland by
fast-sailing schooners. Take all in all there is
no place in Florida that has more opportunities
of travel than our own far-away town. The iron
horse, it is true, has not reached us, but never-
theless, it is coming. It has only narrow passes
and shallow channels to cross between the Keys
that so thickly dot the water between this city
and Cape Sable; the engineers of the United
States have declared it practicable, and one of
the wealthiest syndicates in the Union own the
charter and the franchises of the route, and ere
many years this sea-girt isle will be bound by
an indissoluble link to the rest of the Conti-


nent, no longer will we be isolated, but the
quickening breath of energy, and the pulsation
of a more rapid and untiring people added to
our more quiet but still progressive population,
will make Key West one of the great cities of
the South with nothing but its own talent ad-
vantages, and that of our large and fertile coun-
ty ; but when it is taken into consideration that
a railroad here and then all the trade and traf-
fic of Mexico, Central and South America and
the other West India Isles, will come here for
embarkation ; that the number of great steamship
lines that will be the out-growth of this, men
may well ponder out the promises that our fair
isles and Monroe County offers.
In order to give some idea of the fruitful


productions of our Key, we append the follow-
ing.
TOMATO SHIPPING.
Three years ago, who would have supposed
that during one season we would have shipped
10,000 crates of tomatoes, much less the same
amount within six weeks; but nevertheless,
there has been carried to New York, Galves-
ton, and New Orleans, already this season,
7,849 crates, and to-day 3,000 more are packed
and ready for shipment, making 10,849 crates
of tomatoes raised on this and the neighboring
islands ; and it is roughly computed that by the
first day of April 100,000 crates will go for-
ward. What an industry in the second year of
its development; and what promises for the fu-
ture of our county!
Next year, doubtless, many other vegetables
will be tried and found equally as profitable.
Competition is not to be feared, since it is im-
possible to find any other climate in the United
States as tropical as ours. It is only the Keys
that never have frost; it is true that it but
rarely occurs south of the Caloosahatchee, but
never south of Cape Sable. In view of these
facts, what a prosperous and successful future
awaits the live and energetic man who buys
land and begins the work of improving these
Keys.
(Concluded in our next.)

Rural Improvemeant.
Remarkable progress has recently been made
in rural improvement. Here and there, a
single association to promote village improve-
ment was long since formed. But systematic
efforts to multiply these associations are of re-
cent origin. Such efforts have been most per-
sistently made in Connecticut. A dozen years
ago, the Superintendent of Schools in Connecti-
cut offered to "lecture on this subject, without
charge either for services or expenses, in any
town in the State." For a time, the offer met
no response, and even for three years few invi-
tations were received.' The project was chi-
merical"' and "sentimental." That it would
encounter misapprehension and ridicule, I pre-
dicted. Though always confident that results
would ultimately reverse such first impressions,
the change came sooner than I expected, and
now this work commands the sympathy and co-
operation of the wisest and best men of the
State. Governor Bigelow, in his message to
the Legislature in January last, expressed his
high appreciation of what had been done in this
direction, and strongly commended this move-


ment as worthy of all support." A promi-
nent New York paper then said, in reference
to this advocacy of rural improvement in his
inaugural address, "Governor Bigelow has
taken the lead of other States in this matter,
and has set a noble example to them all."
Though no part of my official duties, but
only a by-play, or rather a volunteer avoca-
tion, in addition to my proper vocation, my in-
terest in this work grows with years and re-
sults. Over fifty associations for Rural Im-
provement have been organized in Connecticut.
I have also aided in forming over one hundred
such associations in the other New England,
Middle, and Western States. This movement
has worked its way across the continent.
Thriving associations are doing their beneficent
work in Minnesota, Kansas, California, and in-
deed in almost every Northern State. The as-


sociations in Berkley and Santa Barbara, in
California, are now initiating a movement
which in five years will be likely to attract the
attention of the entire State; for this work is
contagious. One example makes another. The
grand example of Berkley cannot fail. to make
many others. With our returning prosperity
there is already a growing and wide-spread
movement to adorn and improve our country
towns. Far more has been accomplished the
last season than in any former year. The mat-
ter can no longer be treated as a fine theory or
mere experiment. The man who asks for the
practical tests can be pointed to many towns
where these associations have manifestly done
great good in cultivating public spirit, quick-
ening social and intellectual life, fraternizing
the people, improving the sanitary conditions,
enhancing the value of real estate; and increas-
ing the charm and attractions of domestic life.
Gratifying as are the results already achieved,
they are a mere beginning compared with what
ought to be and will surely be when the sub-
ject is fully appreciated. While grateful that
something, however humble, has lately been
accomplished in all the towns of Connecticut,
especially around the homes and grounds of
our citizens, this effort should not be slackened
till an efficient association is formed in every
township. It has long been my aim to improve
the homes and home life of our people, and to
help them realize that the highest privilege and
central duty of life is the creation of happy
homes. The best product of Christian culture
is a refined and happy home.
Every influence should be combined to foster
home attachments. Patriotism itself hinges on
domestic sentiments. When one's home-like
that now hallowed ground at Mentor-becomes
the Eden of taste and interest and joy and love,
those healthful local ties are formed which
bind him first and most to the spot he has em-
bellished, and then to his town, county, State,
and country. Whatever adorns one's home
and ennobles his domestic life strengthens his
love of country and nurtures all the better ele-
ments of his nature. On the other hand, the
nomad, with no local attachments, can have no
patriotism. As content in one place as in an-
other, and truly happy nowhere, he is like a
tree planted in a tub, portable indeed, but at
the expense of growth and strength. To
Adam, Paradise was home; .to the good among
his descendants, home is Paradise," is.an old
saw fit to be ever new in its realization, like
Goethe's saying, "He is happiest, be he king
or peasant, who finds his happiness at home."
-B. G. Northrop, in Our Continent."

-Here is something that may stir up the
boys who think that because they have not rich
parents they can accomplish nothing. The
great men of the world have often arisen from
the humblest beginnings:
Virgil was the son of a potter.
Milton was the son of a scrivenor.
Demosthenes was the son of a cutler.


Shakespeare was the son of a wool-stapler.
Robert Burns was a plowman in Ayreshire.
Cardinal Wolsey was the son of a pork
butcher. s
Oliver Cromwell was the son of a London
brewer.
Whitefield was the son of an inn-keeper at
Gloucester.
Columbus was the son of a weaver and a
weaver himself.
Benjamin Franklin was a printer.
Roger Sherman was a watchmaker.
William Carey was a shoemaker.
Horace Greeley was a printer.
Andrew Johnson was a tailor.
Abraham Lincoln was a flat boatman.
Daniel Webster was the son of a farmer, and
worked on the farm till he was seventeen.
The list might be continued indefinitely.


- -? --Age*


I


I


THEFLRD DIPTH


7




Tilt PILO 1RIfA *PIS1ATC;H..


JACKSONVILLE, APRIL 10, 1882.
EDITORS:
D. REDMOND, D. H. ELLIOTT, W. H. ASHMEAD.
Subscription $1.00 per annum, in advance.
RATES OF ADVERTISING.
SQUARES. 1 TIME. 1 MO. 3 MO. 6 MO. 1 YEAR
One .................$1 00 $250 $550 $1000 $1850
Two....................... 200 500 1000 18 00 3400
Three........... ..... 3 00 7 00 1400 2500 4600
Four...................... 4 00 900 17 50 30 00 5800
Eight ..................... 8 00 16 50 30 00 50 00 100 00
Sixteen............... 16 00 30 00 50 00 80 00 15000
Ten lines solid nonpareil type make a square.
The FLORIDA DISPATCH has a very large circulation
in Florida and South Georgia, and is by far the best ad-
vertising medium for reaching the merchants and fruit
and vegetable growers of those sections. All business
correspondence should be addressed to
ASHMEAD BROS., Publishers, Jacksonville, Fla.

The Dispatch has the largest circulation of any
paper in Florida; it is therefore the best adver-
tising medium in the State.
5,000 TO 8,000 COPIES ISSUED EVERY WEEK.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE FLORIDA FRUIT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.

MANY articles of interest, unavoidably
crowded out of this number, shall appear in
our next.
FARM NOTES-Crop News-Agricultural
and Horticultural items, of all kind, from all
parts of this and the adjoining States, earnestly
solicited.
WE call the attention of our readers to
our "Sanitary Column," which appeared
for the first time in our last issue. This
is conducted by Dr. A. S. Baldwin, a gentle-
man too well known for his scientific attain-
ments to require comment at our hands.
WE desire to draw the attention of our num-
erous readers to the advertisement of Messrs.
Ambler, Marvin & Stockton, bankers, which
appears in this issue. This is a reliable house
in every way, and those of our readers who de-
sire to open a bank account cannot find a safer
or more courteous house to deal with.
-- * --- *
AN EDITOR'S WORK.-Some jaded "knight
of the quill," the scissors and the paste-pot, says
that the duties of the genuine, died-in-the-wool,
simon-pure editor are multifarious and multi-
tudinous! His work is not only to "do a lit-
tle writing, as is sometimes supposed, but to
cull, to glean, to select, to discriminate, to de-
cide, to foresee, to observe, to grasp, to explain,
to elucidate, to inflate, to boil down, "to be, to
do and to suffer," and several hundred other
verbs, with a large number of" back counties"


yet to hear from.
PLUCKING POULTRY.-The following is
given as an excellent method of plucking poul-
try: Hang the fowl by the feet with a light
cord; then with a small knife give one cut
across the upper jaw opposite the corners of the
mouth; after the blood has stopped running a
stream, place the point of a knife in the upper
part of the mouth, run the blade on into the
back part of the head, which will cause a
twiching of the muscles. Immediately follow-
ing this operation is the proper time for pluck-
ing the fowl, as every feather yields as if by
magic, and there is no 'danger of tearing the
most tender chick.


City Officers of Jacksonville, for the Ensuing Year.
Mayor-M. A. Dzialynski.
Marshal-John F. Tyler.
Clerk-J. C. Andreu.
Assessor-Thomas Lancaster.
Collector-*M. L. Hartridge.
Treasurer-J. Huff.
Aldermen-C. B. Smith, Dr. W. McL. Dan-
cy, B. Thebeaut, Geo. A. DeCottes, P. E. Mc-
Murray, Chas. Benedict, J. A. Huau, P. P.
Crolly, Wm. Hurter.

Fences-Hedges--Barbed Wire, Etc.
The coming fence "-the farm and garden
barrier of the future-is exciting no little at-
tention everywhere throughout this country,
and, as one of our exchanges remarks, farm
fencing has been discussed year after year with
increased interest ever since fencing was used
to divide fields and farms, and to keep out of
fields and crops the roving cattle which formerly
filled the highways and did immense damage
to the honest, hard-working farmer. The orig-
inal "worm fence is still in existence, and so
is the stump fence" in the wilder parts of the
State where fences are used at all. Then came
the post-and-rail," which, in the most im-
proved sections, continues to be the most popu-
lar and we may say the most efficient fence;
but lumber is getting scarce, and some other
material than wood must be substituted. The
"hedge fence" in the Western States has,
within the last ten years, been most extensively
introduced, and many believe that is the fence.
Next came the iron fence, the common wire
fence, followed by the barbed wire fence,"
which just now seems to claim the most popu-
larity. But there is still another just tried in
the West, which is coming in for a full share of
popular favor. This is simply a wire fence
without barbs, woven together similar to a fish-
ing seine, with a large heavy top and bottom
wire. This fence, it is said, will completely
withstand all kinds of cattle, with no possibility
of injury, while it is "no more expensive than
ordinary board fence." As to the real truth of
this statement we cannot say, but we should
fear that from the lightness of the wire, unless
well galvanized, it would succumb to the effects
of the weather. One thing, however, seems to
be well established, that iron, in some form,
must eventually be the "coming fence" to stay.
Wood has become too expensive, but we can-
not bring our mind to believe that the live
fence, however it may be esteemed by some,
will ever be a fixture in this country."
We do not dissent from much of the fore-


going; but we think a combination of the rose-
hedge and barbed wire (which we shall explain
and describe in a future DISPATCH,) combines
both defensiveness and beauty, in a high de-
gree, and will be found worthy of wide adop-
tion.-AG. ED.

Le Conte Pear.
In reply to the inquiries of our subscriber,
"H. J. P.," we would say that the largest orchards
of the Le Conte Pear are, probably, in the
vicinity of Thomasville, Ga. We do not know
that it has been fruited in Florida, to any great
extent, yet; but the tree makes a fine growth
here, and we have strong hopes that it will bear


well and prove of great value. As to the
origin of this variety, we can only remark that
it is clouded in obscurity. The original tree
was sent by Major Le Conte, of Philadelphia,
to his niece, Mrs. Harden, of Liberty County,
Georgia, some forty years ago. Charles Down-
ing, the venerable and distinguished Pomolo-
gist of Newburg, New York, writes under the
date of August 20th, 1880, that: he has been
able to trace the particular tree sent South by
Major Le Conte to the nursery of Wm. R.
Prince, of Flushing, New York, and that Mr.
Prince sold it as a Chinese Pear. The tree is
evidently a hybrid from either the Chinese
Pear or Snow Pear, both of which were at the
date given, growing on Mr. Prince's grounds.
The growth and foliage of the Le Conte more
nearly :resemble the. Snow Pear than the
Chinese Pear, and it is quite distinct from any
other Chinese Pear hybrid. The tree grows
nearly as upright and rapidly as a Lombardy
Poplar, with large, light-green, glossy leaves,
and green shoots. This pear grows readily
from cuttings, the same as grape vines and
quince trees, and among the thousands of trees
in cultivation in the South from Georgia to
Florida and Texas, it is stated there never has
been any appearance of blight, or any other
disease on tree or fruit.
The parent tree, now forty years old, is the
greatest bearing pear tree known, having
yielded thirty-nine bushels of fine pears in a
single season. It has no off years," but con-
tinues to produce the same heavy crops every
year, and comes into bearing the third year
from the cutting. The fruit of the Le Conte is
large, bell-shaped, of a rich creamy yellow
color, with a handsome blush on the sunny
side. It ripens in July and August, and is
one of the best shipping pears known.
The fruit brought $5 to $7 in the New York
market, the past season.

Sorghum Sugar-Canes.
The "Orange" and the "Amber" varieties
of Sorghum are favorably spoken of at the
West; and they are even making their way
into the cane fields of Louisiana. The Agricul-
tural Editor of the New Orleauis Price Current,
speaking of the "Orange" variety, writes :
It is quite probable that this comparatively
new variety of Sorghum is destined to work a
revolution in the sugar interests of the South,
where it grows to perfection.
From experiments made during the past
season, it has been shown that the or-
ange cane may be grown profitably in
connection with the ribbon variety. It
should be planted as soon as the ground is
thoroughly warmed in the spring. Cultivated
thetsame as corn. It matures in about one
hundred days. After the first crop is cut and


sent to mill, the stubble will, if given proper
cultivation, make a second one, the latter, if not
wanted for sugar making may be used as fod-
der; in this case it should not be allowed to
grow too large, as it is apt to become hard and
woody; the seed of the Sorghum is utilized for
feeding purposes and it is an excellent food for
either cattle, mules or poultry. We hope that
the "members of the Sugar Planters' Associa-
tion will give this plant an impartial and ex-
tended trialrduring the present year, as a crop
of newv sugar and molasses arriving on the mar-
ket in August or September, at a time when
the old stocks are almost exhausted, would be
hailed as a boon by our merchants, who have
been obliged in these seasons of scarcity to im-
port the impure New York sugars to fill their
country orders.


I






THE P-VtOkRltl)A D1PAT'C


Under-Ground Cisterns.
A subscriber at Palatka, (H. E.) writes
EDITORS FLORIDA DISPATCH : The people
'in this section are now talking of building un-
der-ground cisterns; and there is a great diver-
sity of opiniQn, as to the best mode of construct-
ing them; I wish to make a couple on my farm,
as soon as possible.
Brick are not made in this section, and come
very expensive. We have no shell to use in
making concrete. Do you think it practicable
to cement directly on to the sand ?
Please give us your views on cistern building,
in light, sandy soil, in your next issue, and
oblige a new subscriber. H. E.
REPLY.-We do not think it safe or prac-
ticable to cement directly on the sand. Line
your excavation with good, sound, hard brick,
laid close and true, and cement on this lining of
brick. Portland cement is the strongest and
most durable; but the Rosendale hydraulic lime,
with clean sharp sand, will make a good and
durable cement, if properly mixed, and ap-
plied by a good workman.-[ED.

Ensilage and Silos.
A Palatka subscriber says: ,
"I am 'delighted with Vol. 1, No. 1, New
Series, of THE DISPATCH.
"I am building on my farm, at Halidon, a
couple of large "silos'," and would like to try
the sorghum for ensilagee."
I think I will have the first silo ever built
in Florida, and hope that my experiments with
ensilage will benefit my neighbors, as well as
myself. Very respectfully, H. E."
REPLY.-The "Branching Sorghum" (mailed
to our friend,)-as well as other varieties of
Sorghum; Cat-Tail, or "Pearl" Millet; common
corn, sown thickly in the drill, Hungarian
grass, etc., all seem adapted to the purpose.
Our correspondent certainly deserves praise
for making the first plunge into the ensilagee"
business in Florida, and we wish him the most
abundant success. Since the inception of this
" silo and ensilage excitement, however, we
have regarded it as a matter of doubtful utility
for the more Southern States, where an abund-
ance of green forage can be grown twelve
months in the year, and where the Northern
system of housing and feeding stock is not, we
fear, likely to find many advocates. That our
cattle, sheep,; horses, mules, etc., would be
greatly benefited by more regular and abund-
ant feeding-especially in the winter months-
no observing or sensible man can deny; but
that such stock can be as easily and economi-
cally fed by ensilagee" cured in an expensive
"silo" as they could be served directly from


the field, we do not at all believe.
The "silo" and the making of ensilagee,"
sprang from the necessities of large dairymen
and cattle raisers in colder and more rigorous
climes than Florida, but we are in favor of pro-
gress in all things, and shall watch the result of
the courageous experiment of E. H." with a
great deal of interest.-[AG. ED.

-"The incongruities of nature are well illus-
trated when a man, whose life from the cradle
has been one stupendous error, points out a
small mistake in a newspaper and then asks the
editor why he can't get things straight in his
paper ?"


St. Luke's Hospital. Mrs. Goodhue, Mrs. J. D. Bucky, Mr. Mead,
This well-known Jacksonville institution M. W. Drew, Win. M. Davidson, Maj. Mc-
comes under the head of charities made nec- Laughlin, Henry Clark, Wm. Wightman.
essarjy by circumstances." It may well be The gentlemen named as the incorporators
ranked with the caravansary "hospice" of the were chosen as an advisory committee.
early Christians-" the home of the stranger, TOUtrST,'S s RIBBLIN(GS.
no less than the home of the sick." To many OLD PLANTATIONS (?) ON THE LOWEI ST.
who are seeking renovated health and strength JOHNS-" DEVIL TREE !" COACH WHIP
in our genial climate, the life in the hotel is SNAKE, ETC.
wholly unsuitable to promote these ends. To A wandering scribe, who has "done" at
many, quiet is the true panacea for pain; an least a small part of Florida, writes thus of the
many, quiet is the true panacea for pain ; andwonders he has seen, to the Doylesville (Pa.)
the necessary repose that recuperates exhausted Democrat :
vitality is best secured in the retirement of Some of our invalids left at Charleston for
hospital life, where at the same time they can Aiken, some at Savannah, and from thence to
receive the competent care and kindly atten- St. Augustine. Our turn came at length, amid
e and k l live oaks and the perfume of roses and orange
tions of intelligent physicians and nurses, essen- blossoms. The vivid sunshine of July, the
tial to their recovery. If recovery is not possi- warmth of June, month of our summer's glory
ble, then assuredly these attentions will smooth here, in March. Yesterday we went down the
the way to death, assuage the pains of disease St. Johns to the ocean. Saw old plantations
and.pangs of parting with life, far from home with their negro quarters, and orange groves,
fiend by the way, and at Mayport, white sand banks
and friends, dazzingly beautiful.
St. Luke's was instituted some years since in The floor is of sand like the mountain drift,
this city, by three directresses, acting members And pearl shells spangle the flinty shores."
this city, by three directresses, acting members Got off at Fort George, took a forest ride to
of the Relief Association; and the commodious the foot of the hill, which we ascended on foot,
structure pictured above is the result of the and then to the top of the observatory, one of
generosity and activity of the citizens of Jack- the life-preserving stations, and on the highest
sonville, largely aided by Mrs. Alex. Mitchell, ground on our coast below New Jersey. We
of Milwaukee, and other ladies and gentlemen were awayabove the top ofthe forest, and we
of took a bird's eye view of the vast expanse of
of means and liberaliy, forest, river and ocean. O! what a picture.
The recent reorganization of the Hospital The drive through this forest is beyond my
Associations gives cheering promise of increased power of description ; it would have to be illus-
activity and usefulness, and opens a wider field treated by pictures to be understood, so unlike is
for the exercise of "divine charity" We re- it to ours. A part of it was a palmetto grove,
for the exercise of "divine charity;" We pre- a p o1 t r t t e grew;
) P ia part of the crookedest trees that ever grew;
sent the names of the present officers, directresses long, crooked, naked branches, growing in
and incorporators, and trust the public may, at every direction. Our driver said it was the
all times be ready to second their noble and devil tree; then water and live oaks, hanging
praiseworthy efforts for the amelioration of suf- mosses, vines, and flowers, everywhere. Tihe
fearing and sorrow: palm, from which fans are made, is an under-
feng andgrowth, so is the huckleberry tribe. A snake
Mrs. Alex. Mitchell, President. was killed, six feet five inches long, very slen-
Mrs. H. Reed, 1st Vice-President. der, called the coach-whip snake, from the re-
Mrs. Young, 2d Vice-President. semblance to a coach whip, also, in cracking
Mrs. Win. Wightman, 3d Vice-President. their tails like a whip, their warning in defense.
Mrs. Wmi. Root, Secretary. They conveyed it to the hold of the boat, sus-
Mrs. J. M. Schumacher, Treasurer. pended it from the ceiling over a cargo of fresh
Directresses-Mrs. McGinnis, Mrs. Dr. shad, its long, slender tail sweeping over them.
Spence, Mrs. D. G. Ambler, Mrs. McConihe, We do not eat shad now," etc., etc.
Mrs. D. Eagan, Mrs. E. M. Randall, Mrs. J. [" Devil tree" seems a little sensational for
T fo g a w ade d t im the stunted live-oaks of the coast, and that
The following names were added to the in-
corporators: Mrs. J. M. Schumacher, Mrs. cracking of the snake's tail, as a "warning of
Bishop Young, Mrs. J. H. Durkee, Mrs. C. C. defence," will scarcely hold water "-but
McLean, Mrs. O. L. Keene, Mrs. Dr. Stout, n'importe !-0. K!]


I I 1 I I II I II I I






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THE DIS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.

FRIENDS, in various parts of the country,
not already subscribers, to whom we send a
marked copy of this journal, are "respect-
fully invited to add their names to the long
and increasing list already on our mailing-books.
Terms-$1 per year, in advance.



A FEW CHOICE LOTS OF TEN (10) OR MORE
acres, river fronts, affording attractive and lovely
building sites, and admirably suited to the growth of
oranges, figs and other Florida fruits, may still be ob-
tained on reasonable terms.
"HOLLYWOOD" is south of "Point La Vista," on
the eastern shore of the St. Johns River, four miles from
Jacksonville. For circulars, terms, etc., address
D. REDMOND
apr 3-tf Box 257, Jacksonville, Fla.

,I:STS= S BO.'S


FLORIDA.


Soluble Ground Bone, BUY THE BEST AND CHEAPEST


THE BEST AND CHEAPEST


FERTILIZER FOR ORANGE TREES.
Will PERMANENTLY ENRICH THE SOIL and
PROMOTE a HEALTHY and VIGOROUS GROWTH.
Combined with POTASH and MULCHING will PRE-
VENT RUST ON THE ORANGES.
For sale by
FOSTER & BE&AEiN,
Agents for the State of Florida.


jAGPAnalysis Guaranteed.
Send for Circulars and Price-List.
Jacksonville, March 25, 1882.


mar 27-6m


THE



DAILY TIMES.




THE TIMES is the official paper of the city and the
leading paper of the State. It has the largest circulation
in Florida, and reaches all parts of it. It is not merely
a local newspaper, but aims to advocate the interests
and promote the prosperity of Florida as a whole.
Its reputation outside the State is very high. It has
taken rank among those journals whose columns are
looked to for news, and whose comments are quoted
with respect throughout the country.
Its editors have had wide and varied experience in
journalism North as well as South; its advertising pa-
tronage is liberal and of the best character; and its re-
sources, financial and other, are ample. It will furnish
Florida with a live, progressive, outspoken, and reada-
ble newspaper, the peer of any.

ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.
THE TIMES has secured by special contract the full
despatches of the ASSOCIATED PRESS. Besides this,
its Editor is Agent of the Associated Press for the State
of Florida, which gives him great advantages in obtain-
ing the freshest and most important State news.

SPECIAL DESPATCHES.
With representatives in the leading news centres of
the country THE TIMES is well served in addition to
the regular Press reports. During the past winter it has
received a very large number of telegraphic specials."


CORRESPONDENCE.
Its regular correspondence from Washington, New
York and Boston, is of noteworthy excellence; and its
State correspondence has attracted much attention.
This feature will be extended and improved; and to
this end correspondence containing news or items of
information of any kind is solicited from all quarters.

"OLD SI."
In addition to his editorial work, Mr. Small will write
regularly for THE TIMES, and in its Sunday issues the
famous "Old Si" will disseminate wisdom in chunks
to the Florida public.
TERM (strictly in advance): One year, $10; six
months ,$5" three months, $2.50; one month, $1. Sent
one month on trial for 50 cents.
Remittance should be made by draft or post-office
order, or in a registered letter. Address
JONES & SMALL,
mar 27-6m Jacksonville, Fla.


0-

GOULD & CO.'S


F E R TIL I Z ER
-AND-


Has been during the past season thoroughly tested by many of the first Orange Growers and Gardeners of the
State, and received their endorsement and approval. The material which forms the base of this Fertilizer, con-
tains potash, lime, phosphoric acid, ammonia and the other essential elements of Plant Food, making a corn
plete Fertilizer. Many who have tried it with Stockbridge, Baker & Bro.'s, and other high-priced Fertilizers,
say it is equal to them in the same quantity, and has the advantage of being an Insecticide.
This Fertilizer is put up in barrels containing 250 pounds, or 8 barrels to the ton. Price $4 per barrel, $32 per
ton.
ton.All orders with remittance promptly filled and delivered free on board cars or boats.

MESSRS. GOULD & CO.:
Gentlemen-I used one-half ton of your Fertilizer, in connection with the same amount of Baker & Bro.'s,
New York, and Bradley's, of Boston, last February, using the same quantity of each on alternate rows through-
out my grove. I find yours gave as good results as the others, which are much higher priced fertilizers-costing
$50.50 per ton for B. & Bro.'s and $51.50 for Bradley's, delivered here. I consider yours equal to either of the
others, and a great saving to the growers. Very respectfully, T. J. TUCKER.
WILCOX, ORANGE COUNTY, FLA., September 12, 1881.
LEESBURG, SUMTER Co., FLA., March 6, 1882.
GOULD & Co.:
Gentlemen-Allow me to express my thanks for the promptitude with which you have directed your
agents at this point (Messrs Spier & Co.,) to deliver to me the premium of one ton of your valuable fertilizer,
so generously offered for the best display of vegetables grown under its. fostering care, I having had the honor
to win the said premium.
It was with very small hope of so substantial a reward, that I placed my vegetables among the exhibits
of our first county fair last month; but I wanted our people to know that we have at our own doors, as it
were, a fertilizer and insect destroyer better and cheaper than any of the celebrated Northern brands,
Gould's Fertilizer "kills two birds with one stone," inasmuch as it feeds the plant, and destroys its enemies
at one and the same time. I bave been testing it in the field, garden and orange grove for nearly two years, and
the result has been such that I feel independent of scale, leaf rollers, borers, and the other insect plagues whose
name is legion, while my plants are well fed and vigorous, and exhibit the dark, glossy green of health and
thrift.
For my part, I ask nothing better than Gould's Fertilizer, and at our next county fair. If I live to see it, I
mean to show yet more of its handiwork.
Yours truly, HELEN HARCOURT.
GOULD & CO.,
feb28-6m NO. 6 W. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


DEALER IN

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,

GLUES, BRUSHES,
Window, Picture and Carriage Glass.
GOLD AND METAL LEAF,
BRONZE, COPPERAS, ALUM, PUMICE STONE, KEROSENE,
Sand and Emery Papers, &e.
AGENT FOR
PRATT'S MINERAL COLZA OIL,
3000, FIRE TEST.

Johnson's Prepared Kalsomine. Wads-
worth, iMartinez and Longman's
Prepared Paints.
WHALE OIL SOAP AND PARAFINE OIL
FOR ORANGE TREES.
No. 40 West Bay St., Sign of Big Barrel,
mar 25-ly JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
ALBERT FRIES, ST. NICHOLAS, OPPO-
site Jacksonville, keeps twenty varieties of
pure-bred fowls. Eggs for Hatching, $2 per
dozen. mar 25-3t


NEW BIlAUTIFUL aCOLEUS.
SPLENDID COLLECTION-THE MOST MAGNIFI-
cent Show Plants during our summer and autumn,
for only a little outlay, 50c. per dozen. VERBENAS,
all colors, same price.
Tbxree Exceller.t :Esoes,
"Marechal Niel," bright golden yellow.
"General Jacqueminot," brilliant crimson.
"Perle des Gardin," beautiful straw color.
Strong plants, from five inch pots, 50c. each.
A good assortment of ever-blooming Roses. The very
best Tea-scented, from five inch pots, 30c. each.
uEhala.lie and. Measmpas,
The most effective and stately of all the Ornamental
Grasses, 25c. each.
Pot-Grown." zr'Lit Trees
IS NO RISK IN TRANSPLANTING.
Japan Plums, 30, 50 and 75c. each.
Japan Persimmon, 75c. each.
Satsuma Orange, $1 each.
Black Hamburg and White Sweetwater Grapes, 40c.
each; Figs, 25c. each.
Packing and boxing free. Address
ARNOLD PUETZ,
mar,25-tf Jacksonville, Fla.


10


_


---


nj
~r~ms~ Ilrr C11 r-~ -~-- --- L : -TT---C;~~ .I~ii -----. m a~r;--~~--r~n r-.r;?---;ia-~ar.r -7~V1~-r;rljr-- ------ --- ---


II


COLONEY, TALBOTT & CO.,


DEALERS IN REAL ESTATE
AND GENERAL AGENTS FOR THE


Improvement of Florida Lands.

Lands Purchased, Cleared, Fenced, Planted and Attended to for Non-Residents.

FLORIDA HOMES SOLD TO ALL APPLICANTS UPON THE INSTALLMENT PLAN, WITH ABSOLUTELY
NO FORFEITURES.
Large Tracts of Land Furnished to Colonies or co-operative Settlers, in any Part of the State, at Low Prices.
GOVERNMENT OR' STATE LANDS PURCHASED FOR ALL WHO MAY DESIRE, TITLES SEARCHED,
ABSTRACTS FURNISHED, 'AND NOTARY BUSINESS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
Particular attention given to the Sale or Lease of City Property, Rents Collected and Repairs Attended to.

Full Charge Taken of Groves or Other Property for Non-
ResideS1nts.
2 To- 3 aB r. Street: 3=5oom 13 Pa:Llmetto Block,


m


JACKSONVILLE,
feb 21-tf






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH. 31


$w--

LIFE.
The following verses were contributed to the
San Francisco Times by Mrs. H. A. Deming.
Each line is a quotation from a standard au-
thor, while the lines rhyme with each other
and the sense is continuous :
Why all this toil for triumphs of an hour? [Young.
Life's a short summer, man a flower. [Dr. Johnson.
By turns we catch the vital breath and die-
The cradle and the tomb, alas! so nigh. [Prior.
To be Is better than not to be, [Sewell.
Though all man's Ilfe may seem a tragedy; [Spencer.
But light cares speak when mighty grlet are dumb.
[Daniel.
The bottom is but shallow whence they come.
Raleigh.
Your fate is but the common fate of all; Longfellow.
Unmingled Joys here to no man befall. South well.
Nature to each allots his proper sphere; Congreve.
Fortune make folly her peculiar care; Churchill.
Custom does often reason overrule. Rochester.
And throw a cruel sunshine on a fool. Armstrong.
Live well; how long or short, permit to heaven;
[Milton.
They who forgive most shall be most forgiven.
Sin may be clasped so close we cannot seeits face.
(Trench.
Vile Intercourse where virtue has no place.
[Somervllle,
Then keep each passion down however dear.
[Thomson.
Thou pendulum betwixt a smile and tear. [Baron.
Her sensual snares let faithless Pleasure lay,
Smollet.
With craft and skill to ruin and betray. Crabbe.
Soar not too high to fall but stoop to rise; Masslnger.
We masters grow of all that we despise. ('rowley.
Then I renounce that impious self-esteem; [Beattle.
Riches have wings, and grandeur is a dream.
[Cowper.
Think not ambition wise because 'tis brave;
Davenant.
The paths of glory lead but to the grave. Gray.
What is ambition? 'Ts a glorious cheat! Will is.
Only destructive to the brave and great. Addison.
What's all the gaudy glitter of a crown. [Dryden.
The way to bliss lies not on beds of down. Quarles.
How long we live, not years but actions te 11
That man lives twice that lives the first life well.
[Herrick.
Make, then, while yet we may, your God your friend,
[Mason.
Whom Christians worship, yet not comprehend.
[Hill.
The trust that's given guard, and to yourself be Just,
For, live we how we can, yet die we must. iShakespeare.




Silk Cltmfre.
L. S. Crozier, of Corinth, Miss., in writing to
the New York World, speaks of silk culture as
an important addition to general farming, and
adds:
One of the peculiarities of silk culture is that
it can be divided and subdivided indefinitely ;
that the poor can reach to it as easily as the rich.
Every year, in a few weeks, in the smallest cot-
tage, with a few acres of young mulberry trees,
the farmer putting into usefulness the old and
soung members of his family can make the
ret year after planting $50 or $100, the sec-
ond year, $150 to $300, from a mulberry grove
of two to five acres of his upland soil; in the
bottom of course, it will increase faster. At
Silkville, Kan., in 1876, I have got 3,000
pounds of cocoons out of six and one-half to


seven acres of mulberry trees four years old,
after planting only five from the seed. The
dried cocoons were selling at $3 per pound, or
about eighty cents green, making altogether
$2,400 for our cocoons. Not quite ten pounds
of green cocoons made one pound of reeled
silk ; out of 3,000 pounds of cocoons we got
330 pounds of reeled silk, as beautiful and
stout as the best French silks, and though a
Yankee girl, having hardly three months' prac-
tice, reeled it, got a high price in French mar-
kets that ear, say $12 per pound. Out of the
litters and wastes we paid one-third of the ex-
penses, which were:
First moult, at 75 cents per day, six days (one
lady)............................................. $ 4 50
Sixty cents from the first to the second moult,
four days (four girls)....... .......................... 4 80
Sixty cents from second to third moult, four
days (six rls)................ ............... .......... .....o
Sixty cents from third to fourth moult, six days
(eight girls).......................................21 60


Sixty cents from fourth moult to spinning
cocoons, eight days (eight girls)........................... 38 40
Picking cocoons, at 1 cent per pound.................... 0 00
Picking leaves, at 80 cents per 100 pounds (30,000
pounds).................................................................. 90 00
Rent of two stables (fifteen days) for use of co-
coonery ..................................... 30 00
Rent of capital used for shelves, trees and land-
400 at 10 per cent................................................. 4000
Overseer and other little expenses......................... 100 00
Total expenses............................................... ......... 90
Net profit on cocoons only..... ................... 2,2 00
This is a large profit, and I must explain
that we had first-rate breeds of silk-worm eggs
that made number-one cocoons, first-rate mul-
berry trees and a high price paid for silk. To
doubting Thomases, let me emphasize the fact
that I do not raise inferior breeds of worms; I
do not feed my worms on osage orange, black
or red mulberry trees, neither on the pest called
here white mulberry, which is simply the
broussonetia; not even on the far-famed multi-
caulis, whose immense failure in France, as
well as the United States, killed the silk cul-
ture, already important in several of our South-
eastern States. We use only the best kinds of
the Morus Alba, the Rose and Moretti's best
varieties; then also a new kind called Lou
and Lou-Sang.
Silk culture has two limits-one climate-too
far South, or too far North; both forbid it.
Another limit is the economical one. It hap-
pens when this culture meets with another of
same importance at the same time. Here this
is not the case. In early spring, while the men
are ploughing for cotton, the lady of the house
with her children for three weeks, has little
trouble to feed the young silk worms. The
last week, when work needs hurrying, there are
plenty of colored boys to pick the leaves while
the lady and children of the house are attend-
ing the larvae. All this will be done in April;
then will come the cash money from the silk
factory in exchange for the cocoons, and this
will help a good deal to enlarge the cotton and
other crops, for we insist on this point: Silk
culture is only an important addition to gen-
eral farming.

A Cow Pasture Under Water.
The St. Johns River is not a river at all. It
is a great bay like the Chesapeake. It is from
two to five miles wide, salt and subject to tides
for seventy-five miles. It is very shallow-boats
not being able in many instances, to get within
half a mile of the banks. The landings are
long, narrow wooden piers running out like jet-
ties.
When I asked Captain Larkin, of Palatka,
whether the thing was a pond, a bay, or a river,
he said:
"Tain't neither, Mr. Perkins. It's a cow pas-
ture. It's a subterranean cow pasture. Don't
you see droves of cattle standing in the water
and grazing all the way from Jacksonville ?"
Capt. Larkin was right. The St. Johns is real-
Ily a great State cow pasture. All the cattle in
Florida stay in it all winter. There they stand


all day long with their heads in the water eat-
ing the grass which grows in the bottom of the
river, This grass does not grow up through
the water, but lay on the bottom ; and the cows
put their heads clear under the water to get it.
I've seen cows with their heads, ears and horns
all under the water. The head will go entirely
under water for at least a minute, and then it
will come up dripping with water and the
mouth full of grass. It is a very funny sight
to see a cow with her head apparently severed
from her body, while the tail isswitching at the
flies. So thousands of cattle live on the St.
Johns all winter long.-Eli Perkins in Chicago
Tribune.

THE DISPATCH has the largest circulation
of any paper in Florida; it is therefore the
)I best advertising medium in the State.


- -----


President, (alnesville; .Secretary,
.; W'. K. Cessna, Corresponding Secretary, Gaines-
Archer Agricultural Association.-J. W. Williams,
President, Archer; J. A. Pine, Secretary ; I. C. Neal,
Corresponding Secretary, Archer.
Middle Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion.-P. Houston, President; John A. Craig, Secretary;
Edward Lewls, Treasurer, Tallahassee.
Indian River Agricultural and Pomologciali ociety.-
A. P. Cleveland, Prlesident; W I. Sharp, Secretary,
Iltockledge, Florida. Meets second Saturday in each
month.
Madison County Agricultural and Mechanical Fair
Association.- It. J. Mays President; Frank W. Pope,
Secretary, Madison, Florida.
(range County Fair Association.-'Gmeneral Joseph
Finnegan, President; Fred. I. Rlobertson, Corresponding
Secretary.
Albion Agricultural and Fruit growerss' Associa-
tlon.-Joseph Hirst, President; S. Frei. Secretary. Semni-
monthly meetings first and third Mondays.
Gadsden (County Fair Assoelation.--Jesse WN(ood, Pres-
ident; W. H. Scott, First Vice-lresident; J. It. liarris,
Second Vice-President; J. W. Kendricks, Secretary; E.
C. Lou Treasurer.
South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical Associa-
tion Thomasville, Georgia.-H. M. Sapp, President; K.
T. McLean, Secretary.
[Will our friends in the different associations above
enumerated, be kind enough to correct any errors into
which we may have fallen in the naming ol officers, &c.,
and oblige TlHE DISPATCH ?]


Agffrteulftural, lortlefltu*al awland Pnolofleal
Assoelations.
Florida Fruit-Orowers' Association-Offlce at Jack-
sonville-1). Redmond, President ; W. II. bring, Vice-
President; D. H. Elliott, Se(retary; W. H. Ashmead,
Assistant Secretary; C. A. Choate, Ctorresponding see-
retary; 1). Greenleaf, Treasurer. Executive Commit-
tee-Dr. C. J. Kenworthy, Dr. .. .. Hlarris, o. P. ltookes,
P. Houston. Oflcihal organ-Tme FLO.mDA I)SPATCii.
OFFICERIS OF TIK FLORID)A STATE iGRAN.E AND '
THEIR PO.ST-OFFICES.-Master, Win. II. Wilson, Iake '
(ity, Florida: Overseer, Winm. Hicks, Houston, Florida;
Lecturer, I. F. Wardlaw, Madison, Florida; Steward,
Daniel Lynn, Lake Butler, Florida; A. S., T. W. Field-
Ing, Wilson, Florida; Chaplain, A. M. Clontz, Live Oak,
Florida; Treasurer, J. HI. Lee, White Springs, Florida;
Secretary, It. F. Iogers, Welborn, Florida; Oate
Keeper, Frasler, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Ceres,
Mrs. Win. II. Wilson, Wilson, Florida; Pomnona, Mrs.
T. W. Fielding, Wilson, Florida; L. A. S., Mrs. J. II.
Lee, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Executive (Committee,
J. C. Waldron, White Springs, Florida; Oeo. W. Wal-
dron, Suwannee Shoals, Florida; Geo. Uminstead, Ilouis-
ton, Florida.
State Park Association, located at Jacksonville.-
Damon Greenleaf, President; A. J. Bidwell, Vic(-Presi-
dent; A. J. Russell, Secretary: J. C. Greeley, Treasurer. |
Directors-J. II. Mc(linniss, 0. C. Wilson, J. P. Talla-
ferro, P. McQuald, J. W. Whitney. Annual meeting-
fast Friday In April each year.
Orange Park Fruit and Vegetable (Growers' Asso tion.-Orlando Knapp, President; E. !). abin, V'ice-,
President; 0. E. Campbell, Corresponding erecreury;
Rev. 0. Taylor, Secretary and treasurer.
Lake George Fruit (Growers' Asswination, Georgetown,
Florida.-President, A. 11. Bartlett, Georgewown : Vice-
Presidents, E. A. Manville, N. W. Hlawkins, Imak-
George, and E. Kirby, Mt. Royal: A. II. Manville, sec-
retary, Lake George: Georgo W. Thorn. reasurer,
Georgetown; Corresponding secretary, Rolla iHam-
mond, Fort Gates.
Picolata Agricultural and Inorticultural so'lety.-R.
B. Canova, President; J. J. Lee, C. W. Hodges, Vice.
Presidents; N. R. Fitz-Hugh, Corresponding -tecretary,
N. It. Fitz-Hugh, Jr., ItRecording secretary; J. F. So well,
Treasurer.
Micanopy Fruit and Vegetable Growers' Assocla-
tion.-G. W. Means, President; J. J. Barr, First Vice
President; A. H. Mathers. Second Vice-President; B.
W. Powell, Corresponding Secretary; B. F. Jordan, Seo-
retary and Treasurer.
Tropical Fruitlrowers' Association of Monroe County,
Florlda.-Home office, Myers, Florida; F. A. Ihlendry,
President; T. M. Parks, Secretary. Meets once a week.
Levy County Immigration Society.-J. M. Jackson,
President; Thomas Tillis, First Vice-President; ItB.
Sutton, Second Vice-Presldent; W. II. Sebring, Corres-
ponding Secretary' J. M. Barco, Recording Secretary;
. W. Hamlln Assistant Recording Secretary.
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Assmolation.-
John Bradford, President, Bradfordville, Florida; D. II.
Elliott, Secretary, Jacksonville, Florida.
Pinellas, Florida, Fruit growerss' Association.--). W.
Meeker, President; Wm. P. Neeld, secretary.
Bronson Agricultural n ton Bronson, Florida.-Jo-
seph Hlllrst, President; LI. W. Hlamlln, S(eretary; semi-
monthly meetings first and third Saturdays.
Central Fruit ani Vegetable Growers' Assoclation, Ar-
redondo, Florida.-El Ramsey, President; IDr. B. P.
Richards, Secretary.
Evergreen Horticultural Soclety, D)unedin, Florida.-
J. W. Matchett, President; W. Tate, VIce-President;
Gee. L. Jones, Secretary.
Decatur County Fair Association, llainbrldge, Geor-
gia.-Maston O'Neil, President; I. Kwilckl, Stecretary.
Lake Wier Agrneultural antd Pomnologrcal rSocietr (of
Marion County., Florida).-Captain J. L. ('say,. resi-
dent )r ID M. Ayer, 'orresponding Secretary.
Welaka Horticultural Society (Welaka, Florida).-J.
S. North, President; C. M. Iiggins. Secretary.
Southwest Georgia Industrial Associatin, Albany,
Georgia.-I. E. Welch, President; T. M. Carter, Secre-
tary.
Sumter County Agricultural and Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation.-l). IL. Hubbard, President, l~eesburg- W. C.
Dodd, Rlecording Secretary, leesburg; A. 1'. Roberts,
CorrespondlIng Secretary, leesburg.
Florida Central Agricultural Soclety.-Thos. F. King,


I











-As some lady visitors were going
through a penitentiary, under the escort of a
superintendent, they came to a room in which
three women were sewing. Dear me," one of
the women whispered, what vicious looking
creatures! Pray, what are they here for?"
Be" l(cause they have 1no other home; this is our
sitting-rooml, and( the are lmy wife and two
dI daughters blandly answeredI the superinten-
(lient.
-" )Dos any (one believe that if the African
people inl the Southerin States were not sur-
rounll(ded andtl upheld by the whites there, they
could maintain tree government there ? I do
not believe it."-Senitor Jones, of Nevada.
-New Jersey is trying to claim Noah, be-
caulse lie was a New ark man. Yes, but you
know lie looked out of his Arkansaw land.
(ive the Southi a fair show in this thing.- tn-
identified.
-" Jir one chord, the hart) Is sieis it
\Mo ve. o nt stoe, the arch i Is shattered
()loe hill clarion cry of sorrow b)ids an armed tistm
()ne sliali cloud can hide the sunlight;
S I i. 1s onIe string, the I pearls ari scaltered4';
'I hi ini lii thought a tsoul may prish ; ay me word, a
heart maiy break."
I A lady on being asked why she called her
two rcuries W heeler aind Wilson, replied,
because neither was a Singer."
---Postihumous rIegard:
If yhoa have g('iltll words and looks, Il friends,
'1 n' sliare ir me-if vyo4) liiavet'a lr l i shied,
T i tI la i ves, ittred-!ti t hem not, t I)ray,
I ntil 1 hear noi, see noti, being dead.
"' For loving looks, though friutght with tenderness,
And kindly tears, though they lhll thick und fhst,
And words o)r prise'; alas1! can naught avail
lo lift Iihe shladows o 1a lie Ithatl 's Imst."
-The first ingredient ill conversation is
trutlt, the next good sense, the third good
humor, and the fourth wit.
-It is said that women now lecture on
every sulbjec(('t but washing, darning and the
economyV of the household.
-If you would always Ie discreet,
Five things observe' witllh uro-
0)1 whiom 3"yo speak, to whoin you six'ak,
.\nd how, ad \when, and where..
-One of the latest theories a(ldv'anced(l is that
a{p)lcs are more nutritious than l)tatoes, 3and(
in ('Cornwall, lEngland, workmen say they can
work better on the fri'uit tlian on the vegetable.
-The Swiss pastor, Oberlin, wlose life was
a worthy example of this precept, nobly ex-
lnrt'sc'd thle thought when lie says :-
"" I sh'le, and dreamed that life was bIeaty;
I woke, 1and o1und1 that lile was Duly.
'Was iheln 11y di'ream a shadowy lie?
Toll ion, sadl heart, couragueously
And thou shalt lind thy dreamn to be
.A nloonday light andl truth to tlhee."


-()fall the musical instruments the violin is
the ost endlurinlg. Pianos wear ut, wind instru-
(menlts get battered and old-fashioned, the pipes
of organs become scattered and the original
construction is lost .sight of. All kinds of nov-
elties are introduced into flutest,'but the sturdy
violin stands on its own merits. Age and use
only improve it, and instead of new ones com-
manlding tile highest prices, as is the case with
other instruments, it is the violins of' the few
Italian makers of' the last three centuries that
colnmandI fabulous prices. It is impossible to
handle an old violin without a feeling of venera-
tion, when oin( reflects on the number of' people
w ho have probably played on it, the weary
hours it has beguiled, the source of enjoyment
it has been andi how well it hias been loved.


South floridta.
BAY ST'. .IJOSKE1, Fl., March 31, 1882.
EITOS FI.OuIlDA DiSlATCii: This place, often
called Yellow ilutl, is situated ()on tie western border
(f Hlillslb.roulgh county, aliout one lihundred miles
south (of Cedar Keys. Thle lands are high, dry and
liealthy, e vered with pine, willow and oak timber;
water very good and pure. Several places here have
been settled altout thirty years, others have just been
located, with all grades and dates between. There are
some very fine bearing orange groves in this vicinity,
the largest of which, that of Mr. W. Whitehurst, has
It'en'i ill bearing over twenty years. The trees a3re
usually sweet seedlings, s1ome are grafted trees, how-
ever, tilhe rulgh leon, sour ornllge, sweet seedling
and granpe fruit stocks being preferred for grafting
purposes in the order linamed. Oiln our lands, which
usually have ia sanldy slub-soil, the rough lemon is get-
ting to bie prized by many for a grafting stock from
its tendellcy to put its roots well, and thereby keep all
fresh and crisp alove through any drought.
Several varieties of lemons are grown here with
greater or less success. Some gentlemen, few years
since, procured a box of iniported lemons, planted
thi( seed, and li)oped to get something good from the
lot, lut as I see one o)f tit(e party is having his lemon
trees grnfted with sweet oranges, I presume the result
was not encouraging. The people here have not, as a
rule, invested much in the named varieties of the
orange' as found in tihe nursery (ctalloguttes, but when
(ldeirous of)l graftinIg would usually select from the
largest old bhearinlg groves such ci0olls as set'elied to
represent a good quality o( fruit as to form, size, color,
tflnuvr, and so) on.
We have no jl'rfiectly reliable statistics as t) oranllge
sliiments for the pivast winter, but imagine that un-
olher 'year 1or s4 will sholiw more thai lialf a million
from Bay St. Jo.seph neighborhood.
The vegetable business is beginning t4 attrnets o(me
attention, and we trust byi next saso ln I(uiit(a vege.ta-
ble 1)1boom may be expected here. WVe have had n11
frost whatever during lite past winter tol injure the
tenderest vegetation.
Trnilspoirtation facilities are yet rather primitive,
lbing confined to some half-dozen s11111all schooners
iiand sloops plying between here' aind Cedar Keys.
These usually answer pretty well for tihe transfer ()of
l',eights and passengers, but we' howpe and1( strive for a1
r'egu.lr coast steallnslit.
(tuit a number of settlers have recently found
pleasant locations among usi atnd we presume others
will follow, for with tle present gradual advance ill
real estate w'e doubt if lands can ever again be pur-
lchased .-o c.heaplly as now.
We to rntullato' ylou onI tlhe present appearanclihi('e (of
TI'i.. DI)S'ATC'l ali(nd trust that (every family in Flor-
ida will take ,one or more copies o (f this, tlhe cheapest
aundl best fruit-growers' p)ape(r )published in thIe State.
lies|.e.ttfully, .J. C. CKAy'K.

-Potash soft soap for lubricatinlg lpurposes
may be very easily made in this way : Dissolve
twellty pounds of pure caustic potash within two
gallons of soft water in any iroln o(r earthenware


vessel. Add to this strong caustic lye nine gal-
lols of any animal or vegetable oil heated to
about 40" Fahrenheit ; pouring the oil into the
lye in a small stream, and keeping up a contin-
ual stirring until the two are thoroughly com-
bineld and the mass is (quite smooth. Ten min-
utes will suffice fir the operation. Cover the
vessel with blankets to) keep in the heat, andi
leave the mixture in a warm room for three
(lays. The result will be one hundred and
twenty pounds of thie finest concentrated potash
soft soap, pure and free from adulteration. Be-
sides being useful fbr lubricating machinery,
this soal) serves well for washing flannels and
greasy and stained articles in cold water.

PERSONS ORDERING GOODS FROM AD-
VERTISERS APPEARING IN THIE 1)IS-
PATCH WILL CONFER A FAVOR BY NO-
TIFYING THEM TO THAT EFFECT.


Saddle, or 6Ridlng." Horses.
H. P. Speer thus discourses of saddle horses in the
Iowa Homestead:
"The most desirable points in saddle horses are
what are known as saddle gaits, the most useful, and
therefore the important of which is the walk. This
gait, although common to all horses, is one at which
there is as wide a range of excellence as at the faster
gaits of*trotting and running. The average rate of
speed at which horses walk in harness or under the
saddle, is probably no more than three miles an hour,
while a really good walker can cover five, and in rare
cases six miles under the saddle. Being the easiest
gait on both horse and rider, such horses will make
wonderful journeys without distress. What is known
as the fox trot is also a very desirable gait, and is
easily taught to most horses by urging them slightly
beyond a walk, and when they strike the right gait
hold them to it; it is a trifle faster than a walk and a
near approach to the single foot. Nearly all saddle
horses will take a few steps at this gait when changing
from a walk to a trot, but will not keep it unless
trained to it. The speed differs from four to seven or
eight miles per hour; horses will learn tolike the gait,
and it is an easy one for the rider, and next to the
walk, the best long distance gait. Single footing is
nearly the same as the fox trot, and is an exact inter-
mediate between the walk and the trot, each foot ap-
pearing to move in a sort of go-as-you-please' man-
ner, and considering that it is an exceptionally easy
gait for the rider, and that an average single footer
will cover nine or ten miles per hour, it is worthy of
cultivation. The rack and pace are nearly alike, the
only difference being that in the former the hind foot
reaches the ground a trifle in advance of the forefoot
on the same side, while at the latter gait the feet on
each side move exactly together; a pure lateral mo-
tion. Either the rack or the pace is much more de-
sirable than the trot under the saddle, and the pace is
at least as fast, if not a faster gait than the trot. In
addition to possessing all the above saddle gaits the
model saddle horse should be level-headed, cour-
ageous and kind; and should be active, an easy mover i
at any gait, have a sensitive mouth, respond readily to I
the touch on the bridle rein, be sure footed, able and
willing to trot, gallop or run as required, and above
all sound upon his legs and perfect in the wind.

KEEPING FRFiTs--COOL STORAGE.-We learn from
the Boston Herald, that within a year or two the in-
vention of "cool storage for fruits," etc., has proved
a very great saving in the more perishable kinds of
fruit. There are two methods by which the requisite
low temperature is produced-by means of ice, and by
the use of chemicals, the latter method being consid-
ered the best for fruit, since no moisture is evolved.
The principle involved is the lowering of the temper-
ature to such a degree that the process of fermenta-
tion, the first stage of decay, is stopped. In the ordi-
nary cold storage for fruit the temperature is lowered
to 40', but 80 above the freezing point. By this
method Bartlett pears, fit for the market, have been
kept sound and good thirty days. Practically, how-
ever, they are not kept more than half or two-thirds of
that time. But the system saves a great amount of
fruit. Last season, at the North, winter pears were
carried to the middle of March in good order.

LII'.E ON THE FARM--In the best of the
olden countries, the tradesman, the teacher, the


mechanic-not to say the commercial traveler-
would congratulate himself on the good fortune
that promoted him to the standing of a free-
hold firmer, even though his acres should be
few enough to be counted on his fingers. The
notion that a man stands a little higher who
wears linen and bends over a desk or a coun-
ter, than the man who wears cotton and holds
a plow-handle, is a backwoods notion. If it
has any influence-as it doubtless has had-in
beguiling young men from the farm to the of-
fice, it will not have it much longer. Asa new
country sentiment it will go the way of the log-
cabins and corduroy roads.

THE DISPATCH, $1.00 per year.


THE FLO III I)A Dl,'SPATCfl.


I I








T F D


S ''.eXAS.
In 1880 the United States produced 2,718,-
000,000 bushels of grain on 120,000,000 acres
of land, and 6,000,000 bales of cotton on 15,-
000,000 acres--the total value of the two crops
being $1,600,000,000. According to the last
Census the State of Texas has an area of 170,-
000,000 acres, or 35,000,000 more than the en-
tire grain and cotton acreage of the United
States combined; and as the soil of Texas is
excellently adapted for grain and cotton, that
State might produce as much of these as the
whole yield of both for the entire country in
1880, and then have 35,000,000 acres of land
left which would probably more than cover
all the land in the State that is not tillable.
Texas is just about twenty-four times as large
as Maryland ; and if settled at the samerate per
square mile as Massachusetts, its population
would be about 50,000,000, or nearly as great
as the present population of the United States.
The agricultural productions of the State in-
clude almost everything that can be raised
either in the temperate or the torrid zone, and
the yield per acre of all products is said to be
unusually large; and for 1880, according to
the Agricultural Department, the average value
of all farm products per acre was $16.15 in
Texas, $13.82 in Indiana, $11.64 in Illinois,
$12.46 in Wisconsin, $11.54 in Minnesota, $9.-
34 in Iowa, $10.85 in Missouri, and $7.98 in
Kansas, showing that the average value per
acre of farm products is much greater in Texas
than in the leading Western States. As a stock-
raising country Texas is probably unsurpassed
-the number of cattle, sheep, etc., in the State
in 1880 being:
Number. Value.
H orses................................................ 1,002,456 $ 26,865,821
Mules ................................... 202,460 9,041,864
M ilch cows....................................... 566,300 8,013,338
Oxen and other cattle..................... 4,270,240 41,333,236
Sheep.............. ........................... 6,023,628 12,348,4,37
Hogs...................... 2,035,900 6,327,367
Total...............................................13,902,984 $103,975,063
These figures show the vast extent of stock-
raising in Texas, which leads all other States in
that line.-Baltimore Journal of Commerce.

The San Francisco Occident gives us this short
chapter on
THE ORANGE IN THE BIBLE.
Rev. James Neil, incumbent of Christ Church in
Jerusalem, has a chapter in his Palestine Explored,"
upon the orange. He contends that the word tap-
pooah, which is translated in King James' version
"apple," ought to be translated orange. We cannot
repeat all the arguments he presents; some of them
are curious and some are cogent. He quotes the line
in Canticles, (ii. 5) where the bride is represented as
saying: "Comfort me with apples." He would
translate it: Strew me with orange;" that is, cover
me with orange blossoms. This is done at bridals
in all parts of the civilized world. Whoever heard of
wreathing a bride with apple blossoms or handing ap-


ples to her to smell during the marriage ceremony ?
But wherever orange blossoms can be obtained, they
are worn upon the person or carried in the hand of
the bride. If apple blossoms were the proper per-
fume at a wedding, people could be marrind only in
the spring, But where the orange flourishes there are
some trees in blossom the year round; and the leaves
are fragrant as well as the blossom. That orange is
the true translation, being established exegetically,
it is interesting to see how the custom referred to in
this oriental marriage song is repeated, in the bridal
wreath or bouquet, the world over. This is one of
the incidental proofs that the Bible is for all ages.
Whenever a bride says: "Adorn me with orange
flowers," we are reminded of the mutual love of
Christ and his Church. The orange being an ever-
green, bearing blossoms and maturing fruit at all sea-
sons ; being more productive the older it grows; liv-


ing for a century; being fragrant in leaf, blossom and
fruit, and its fruit being the least perishable known,
so that it will hang on the tree for a year after it is
ripe without rotting. What tree, in forest or orchard,
is so fitting an emblem of Christ? Hence the bride
says: (Cadt. ii. 3) "As the orange trae among the
trees, so is my beloved among the sons." It is now
mid-winter, yet our own orange trees are covered
with foliage. The golden fruit is on them ripe and
luscious, but not decaying; while, beside the ripe
oranges, are pearly blossoms that fill the air with per-
fume. Such is our Saviour. At all seasons we can
" sit under His shadow with great delight, and find
His fruit sweet to our taste." (Cant. ii. 3.) I hope
that the revisers of the Old Testament may give us
the orange instead of the apple in the Song of Songs.

PROFIT IN BLACK WALNUTS.-The smartest
Texan, and, in fact, the smartest farmer, I have
ever met, is old Sim Graves. After Mr. Graves
had shown me his cattle and cotton, he took
me over to see his woods.
Well, what of it ?" I said, as he pointed to
a ten-acre forest.
"What of it? Why, them's black walnuts,
sir. Ten acres of 'em. Planted 'em myself ten
years ago. See they're nine inches through.
Good trees, eh ?"
And sure enough there were ten acres of
hand-planted black walnut trees. They stood
about feet apart, 200 to the acre-in all,
2,000 trees.
Well, how did you get your money back ?"
I asked.
Black walnuts are worth $2.50 a bushel,
ain't they ? I'll get 400 bushels this year.
That $1,000. A hundred dollars an acre is.
good rent for land worth $15 an acre, ain't it ?"
"Well, what else ?" I inquired, growing in-
terested.
The trees," continued Mr. Graves, are
growing an inch a year. When they are twenty
years old they will be nineteen inches through.
A black walnut tree nineteen inches through is
worth $25. My 2,000 trees ten years from
now will be worth $50,000. If I don't want to
cut them all, I can cut half of them, and then
raise a bushel of walnuts to the tree-that is,
get $2,500 a year for the crop. Two hundred
and fifty dollars an acre is a fair rent for $15
land, ain't it ?"

ORANGE SALAD.-Slice half a dozen sour oranges;
remove the seeds without breaking the slices; arrange
them neatly on a salad dish or in a salad bowl; dust
them lightly with cayenne pepper; pour over them
three tablespoonfuls of salad oil and serve the salad
with game or poultry.




Vegetable Markets.

TELEGRAPHIC REPORTS OF PRICES FROM
EASTERN AND WESTERN MARKETS.


The Times is indebted to Messrs. Gibson &
Rockwell, shippers and dealers in Florida; fruits
and vegetables, No. 6. West Bay street, for the
following special telegraphic price lists of North-
ern and Western vegetable markets, received
by them daily:
CINCINNATI, April 7.-Tomatoes in good de-
mand at $4 per bushel crate; cukes, $7@8 per
crate ; peas, $1.75@2; beans, $3 ; cabbage, $5
@5.50 per crate; of 40 to 50 heads; potatoes,
$6@7.50 per barrel; strawberries, 40 cents per
quart. Market strong and steady.
CHICAGO, April 7.-Peas, $1.75@2.25; beans,
$3@3.50; tomatoes, $4@4.25; cabbage, $5.50
@6 per barrel; cukes, $7@8 per crate ; pota-
toes, $7 per barrel.
PHILADELPHIA, April 7.-Tomatoes, $1.75


@2.50; beans, $1.75@2.50; peas, 75c.@$1.50;
cabbage, $4.50@5; cukes, $4.50@5; potatoes,
$5@5.75. Market dull.
NEW YORK, April 7.-The vegetable mar-
ket has been quiet and slow for several days,
and outside prices obtained only for the best
stocks. Poor lots almost unsalable. Tomatoes,
$1.50@2.50; beans, $1.52@2.25 ; peas; 75c.@
$1.50; cabbages, $4@4.50; potatoes, $4.50@
5.50 per barrel; cukes, $4@5 per crate.
JACKSONVILLE, April 7.-Market fully sup-
plied with all vegetables. Sales made. for beans
at 81.50@2.50; peas, $1.25@1.75; tomatoes,
$1.25@2.50 per crate; Early Rose potatoes,
new, $5@6 per barrel; Western shipments pay-
ing well.

,Jacksonville Wholesale Prices.
Corrected weekly, by JONES & BO WEN, Wholesale and
Retail Grocers, Jacksonville, Fla.
SUGARS-Granulated........................... 10%
W white Ex. C........ ...... ................. 9P
G olden C.............................................. 8
Pow dered............................................. 10%
Cut Loaf............................................... 11
COFFEE, Rio-Fair........................................ 11
G ood ............................................ 12
Choice .......................................... 13
B est .............................................. 15
Java G .... ......................... .............. 25
M ocha ................................ .................. 35
Peaberry................................................ 18
Maracaibo...... ........................... 18
Any of above grades roasted to order.
FLOUR-Snow Drop, best ..... 9 25
Oreole, 2d best...................................... 8 50
Pearl, 3d best....................................... 8 25
MEATS-Bacon................................................... 10%4@11
Hams (Merwin & Sons).... ............ 15
Shoulders.................. ........................... 9 2@ 10
HoMINY-Pearl, per bbl..................................... $5 25
M EAL-per bbl................................... 5 25
LARD-Refined in pails ......................... 13
BUTTER-Very best, kegs................................. 45
CHEESE-Full cream.......................................... 16
Half cream...................................... .. 13Y
TOBACCO-Shell Road......................................... 55@56
Florida Boys, 11 inch 5's.................. 40
Florida Girls, bright twist, 14 to lb.. 50
Smoking in packages, 8 to lb .......... 45
SOAP AND STARCH-Colgate's 8 oz., per box... 3 65
Peerless, 8 oz., per box............................ 3 50
Starch, lump, per lb.......... .......... 52@6c
Hops, YEAST CAKES, BAKING POWDERS- .
Hops, per lb.... ....................... 15@22c
Ager's Fresh Yeast Cakes, per doz. 1 lb. 60c
Grant's 3-Dime Baking Powder, per
doz. 1 lb .................................................. 2 25
Town Talk Baking Powder, per doz. 1 b. 2 25
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. 1/2 l.... 2 70
Royal Baking Powder, per doz. V lb...... 1 50
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Florida Sugar and syrups ruling high
for first grades.
POTATOES-Irish, per bbl............................. 3 60@3 75
CHICK EN S, each..................... ............................. 25@45
EGGS- Per doz... ............................................ 20( 23
HIDES-Dry Flint Cow Hides, per lb., first class 13
Country Dry Salted, per tlb.................... 9(11
Butcher Dry Salted, per tlb.................... 9@10
Damaged Hides...................................... 6
Kip and Calf, 8lbs. and under................ 10
SKINS-Raw Deer Skins, per lb......................... .35
Deer Skins Salted, per lb...... ............... 26@30
FURS -Otter, each, (Summer no value) Win-
ter..................................................... 1 50@.4 00
Raccoon, each.................................. 5@15
W ild Cat, each.................................... 10@20
Fox, each........................................... 5@15
BEESWAX-per lb. ............................... 20
WOOL-Free from burs, per lb....................... 17-'""
Burry, per lb...................................... (a 15
GOAT SKINS-Each per It............................... l0
Since our last report sugars, bacon, hams and lard
have advanced, while Irish potatoes have declined in
price. Bacon and lard are strong at above quotations.

t, -.-. --.


D. G. AMBLER, J. L. MARVIN. J. N. C. STOCKTON.

AMBLER, MARVIN & STOCKTON


Oldest Established Bank in East Florida.
Organized in 1870 by Mr. D. G. Ambler, and
Generally Known as

AMBLER'S BANK.
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
Deposits received, Discounts made and Exchange
Bought and Sold on MOST FAVORABLE TERMS.
Collections made and Proceeds promptly remitted.
Correspondents-Importers & Traders National Bank,
New York; Merchants National Bank, Savannah, Ga.
Resident correspondents of Brown Bros. & Co., Drexel,
Morgan & Co., Jas. G. King's Sons, Kountze Bros., New
York, and other prominent Bankers issuing Letters of
Credit. apr 10-tf


Siblscrih for Thoe Floriuda Bisatcl.


I


I -


T EFLORIDA -DISPATCH.


13






THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


BALTIMORE EXPRESS Through Tariff on Vegetables Only.


0-

MERCHANTS & MINERS


TRANSPORTATION COMPANY!


The steamships of this company are appointed to
sail semi-weekly, as follows:
FROM BALTIMORE:
Every Wednesday and Saturday, at 3 p. m.
FROM SAVANNAH:
Every Tuesday and Friday, as follows:
Tuesday, March 25, at 2 p. m.
'riday, March 31, at 4 p. inm.
Tuesday, April 4th at 8 a. m.
Friday, April 7th, at 10 a. inm.
Tuesday, April 11th, at 1 p. in.
Friday, April 14th, at 3 p. ni.
Tuesday, April 18th, at 8 a. m.
Friday, April 21st, at 10 a. m.
Tuesday, April 25th, at I p. m.
Friday, April 28th, at 3 p. m.
The steamers are first-class in every respect, and every
attention will be given to passengers.
CABIN FARE from Savannah to Baltimore, $15,
Including Meals and Stateroom.
For the accommodation of the Georgia and Florida
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPPERS,
this company has arranged a special schedule, thereby
perishable freight is transported to the principal
points in the WEST and SOUTHWEST by rail from
Baltimore.
By this route shippers are assured that their goods
will receive careful handling and quick dispatch.
Rates of freight by this route will be found in another
column.
JAS. B. WEST & CO., Agents.
Savannah, January 8th, 1878. 30-tf

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
VIA




WAYCROSS SHORT LINE.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1882,
Passenger Trains will run over the Waycross Short
Line as follows;
Fast Mail. Jack'lle Ex.
Daily. Daily.
Leave Jacksonville at................ 9:00 a. m. 5:40 p. m.
Arrive Jacksonville at............... 5:40 p. m. 8:15 a. m.
Leave Callahan at.......................... 9:44 a. m. 6:45 p. m.
Arrive Waycross at......................11:57 a. m. 9:15 p. m.
Arrive Jesup at............................ 1:40 p. m. 11:25 p. m.
Arrive at Brunswick at................. 6:00 p. m. 5:30 a. m.
Arrive Savannah at.................... 3:40 p. m. 2:35 a. m.
Arrive Charleston at.................... 9:10 p. m. 9:03 a. m.
Arrive at Augusta at..................... 5:20 a. m. 1:30 p. m.
Arrive Macon at........................... 7:50 p. m. 7:00 a. m.
Arrive Atlanta at.......................... 3:50 a. m. 12:50 p. m.
Arrive Louisville at..................................... 8:00 a. m .
Arrive Cincinnati at...................................... 7:00 a. m .
Arrive Washington at................... 9:30 p. m. 9:10 a. m.
Arrive Baltimore at....................12:25 p. m. 12:05 a. m.
Arrive New York (limited express)........ ... 3:50 p. mn,
Arrive New York P. R. R............ 6:45 a. m. 5:20 p. m.
Arrive St. Louis at....................................... 7:00 p. m .
Arrive Chicago at.......................................... 7:00 p. in.
TIME.
To Savannah................................................... 6:40 hours.
To New York.................................................. 45:45 hours.
To W ashington.............................................. 36:30 hours.
To Chicago...................................................... 49:00 hours.
To St. Louis..................................................... 49:00 hours.
THROUGH SLEEPERS ON EVENING TRAIN.
"-Jacksonville to Savannah.
j@4Jacksonville to Louisville.
g- Jacksonville to Washington.
*.,Jacksonville to Cincinnati.
A Restaurant and Lunch Counter has been estab-
lished at Waycross, where passengers will be bounti-
fully furnished at moderate rates.
Passenge s taking Savannah sleeper can remain in the
car until 7 o'clock a. m.
Parlor and Drawing-Room Car on morning train
from JacKsonville through to Savannah, connecting
daily with through Pullman sleeper for New York.
The Dining Car attached to the train between Savan-
nah and Charleston affords supper to passengers going
North, and breakfast to those coming South.
Only one change of cars to New York.
Passengers going to Montgomery and New Orleans
take the evening train.
Passengers from line of Transit Railroad take the
train at Callahan.

Passengers from line of Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad either take train at Live Oak, leaving
2 p. m. and arriving at Savannah at 2:35 a. m., or train


at Jacksonville, leaving at 9 a. m. and arriving at Sa-
vannah at 3:40 p. m.
Connecting at Savannah with steamers for New York,
Philadelphia, Boston and Baltimore.
Connecting at Charleston with steamers for New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Through Tickets sold to all points by Rail and Steam-
ship connections, and Baggage checked through. Also
Sleeping Car berths and sections secured at Company's
Office in Astor's Building, 84 Bay street, at Depot Ticket
Office. J. E. DRAYTON,
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent. [*] Ticket Agent.


VIA THE


FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE.

ALL-RAIL VIA ATLANTA OR MONTGOMERY.
IN EFFECT MARCH 15, 1882.


FROM
JACKSONVILLE, CALLAHAN JUNCTION, LIVE OAK AND STA
TO


tTIONS S., F. & W. R'Y.
Sq 0
e| , e


M acon.............................. .............................................................................................................................
A ugusta................................................... ..................................................... ......... ............................................
A tlanta ................................................................................................................... .........................................
Colum bus, Ga ................................................................................................................ ...........................
Montgom ery, A la................................................................................ ............................................. .. ....
M obile............................................ ................................................................................................................
Chattanooga, Tenn ............................. ................................... ..... .................... ....
K noxville, Tenn................................................................................................ .................................. ...........
New Orleans.............................................. ............................................... .................
Nashville, Tenn.. ... ........... ....... ................................ .. ........................ ..........................
M em phis, Tenn ....................... .................................................................. ....... ....... .........
Louisville, K y....... ...................... ............................................................................................ ..... ..................
Cincinnati, Ohio............................ ...................................... ..... ........................................ ................ .........
H enderson, K y.... ................................................ ....................................................
Colum bus, Ky........................................................................................................................ ........ .............
H ickman, K yl ............................................................................ ................................................ ..... ....
M adison, Ind.................... ....... ............................ .......... ............................. ........ .............................................
Jeffersonville, Ind................... .............................. ............................................
Evansville, Ind........ .........................................................................................................................................
Cairo, Ill...............................................................................................................................................................
Indianapolis..................................... ......................... ................................................................................
Terre Haute...... ...............................................................................................................e ; ..................... .......
Colum bus, Ohio.............................. .................................................................................................................
St. Louis........................................................................................................................................... .... ............
Chicago..........................................................................................................................................................
Peoria, Ill..................................................................................................................................... .......................
Cleveland............................................................................ ..................................................... . .........
Toledo......................................... ........................ .................................... ................. ............. .........
Detroit...... ...................... 0 ............................. 00 .. ................. .............................. ...........


25 50 &50 00
30 60 6000
35 70 70 00
35 70 70 00
35 70 7000
40 8 80 000
40 80 8000
45 90 9000
43 1 90 00
451 90 90 90
45 90; 90 00
5510010000
55 1 0010000
551 0010000
551 00:100 00
551 00 10000
60 1 10110 00o
60 10 110 00
601 10110 00
601 10110 00
60 1 10110 00
651 151115 00
65 115115
651 15,11500
701120120 00
70 1 20 120 00
7011 20|l20 00


TO SAVANNAH. TO CHARLESTON.
FROM --- --
O___ Per Box. Per Bbl. Per Box. Per Bbl.
Jacksonville..... ............... ...... ....................... ............... 20 40 25 50
Landings on St. Johns R iver ................................................................................ 30 50 35 70
Stationson Florida Transit R. R............................. ............................... 30 50 35 65
Tam pa and M anatee............................ ................................................ 45 75 50 90
Stations on the J. P. & M. R. R............... ........................ ........... 30 50 35 65
Stations on S., F. & W Railway........................................................... 25 50 35 7

The dimensions of the Standard Box for Vegetables are 8x14x22 inches, and the weight is estimated at 50
pounds.
The Standard Barrel is double the capacity of the Standard Box.
Excess of capacity over the above will be liable to pro rata excess of charges.
The Car-load is estimated at 20,000 pounds. Excess of this amount will be charged for pro rata. Car-load
shipments must be to one destination and to one consignee.
Prepayment of freight will not be required, but good order and condition of shipments will be an absolute
requirement. It is clearly understood between the shippers and the transportation companies that no respon-
sibility shall attach for loss or damage, however occasioned, unless it be from gross negligence, and that such loss
must attach solely to the company upon whose line such gross negligence may be located.
The above points are the only points to which rates are guaranteed, and to which Bills Lading will be issued.
The Bills Lading will be issued only by the Agents of this Company, guaranteeing rates from those points only.
The charges advanced by this Line in good faith to connections at those points will not be subject to correc-
tion by this Line.
Unless otherwise instructed by the shippers, the original Bill Lading will be mailed the oonsigee at desti-
nation, and all claims for overcharge or loss and damage must be presented at destination, accompanied by the
original Bill Lading.
Shipments of single packages charged double rates.
In every case the full name and address of consignee must be given for insertion In Bill Lading and on the
Way-bill.
Where the route by which shippers desire their packages forwarded is not marked on the packages them-
selves, the Florida Dispatch Line" will forward same by the route by which the best interest of the shipper
will be served.


RATES VIA FLORIDA DISPATCH LINE AND THE ATLANTIC COAST LINE.

F rom lan d- Fla. Transit &| From Stations From Stations
i ings on St. Jacksonville. Peninsular on J., P. & on S., F. &
Johns River. Railroads. M. R. R. W. Railway.
DESTINATION. 14 A .


_____________ _ .__ a a. 0
Baltimore, Md..... ................... 64 $1 27 50 $1 06 63 $1 21 63 $1 21 53 $1 05
Philadelphia, Pa.......................... 64 1 27 53 1 06 63 $1 21 63 1 21 53 1 05
Roston, Mass................................. 71 1 43 60 1 22 70 1 37 70 1 37 60 1 22
New York, N. Y..... ......... 61 1 23 50 1 02 60 1 17 60 117 50 1 02

To make through rates from Tampa and Manatee, add for boxes 15c., and for barrels 25c. to rates from
Florida Transit Rrailroad. Single packages will be charged $1 each.

To make through rates from points tributary to the St. Johns River and Florida Transit Railroad, add the
rates for transportation lines connecting to above rates.
Stencils, shipping receipts and information furnished on application to any of the agents of the Line.

Fruit and Vegetable Shipments Through in Ventilated Cars.

Between Jacksonville and Savannah daily. TRANSFER TO SHIPS' SIDE AT SAVANNAH WITHOUT
BREAKING BULK.
Rates always as LOW AS BY ANY OTHER LINE. Take out Bills Lading via Savannah, Florida and West-
ern Railway to insure ADVANTAGES OF THF ALL-RAIL ROUTE.
Days of sailing subject to change without previous notice. For further information, if needed, apply to
GEO. YONGE, Agent Central Railroad Steamships, 409 Broadway, New York. Gen. W. L, JAMES, Agent,
.25 South Third St., Philadelphia. A. L. HUGGINS, Agent Merchants' and Miners' Line Baltimore. WM. H.
RING, Agent Boston and Savannah Steamship Line, 18T Wharf, Boston. 0. G. PEARSON, Agent S., F. & W.
Railway, 219 Washington St., Boston. C. D OWENS, General Agent S., F. & W. Railway, 315 Broadway, New
York. J. B. ANDREWS, Agent S., F. & W. Railway, 43 German St., Baltimore. J. M. CLEMENT, Agent S., F.
& W. Railway, Pier 41 South Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, or to either of the undersigned.
W. 0. AMES, General Freight Agent, Jacksonville.
F. B. PAPY, General Freight Agent, Fernandina Fla.
JAS. L. TAYLOR, General Freight Agent, Savannah, Ga.
D. H. ELLIOTT, General Agent Florida Dispatch Line, Jacksonville, Fla.
GEO. W. HAINES, Agent, Jacksonville, Fla.


I







THE FLORIDA DISPATCH 1I


Continuation of Through Freight Tariff on Vegetables via Florida Dispatch Line, in connec-I nan Oniulnobh (tonmrhin Tinn
tion with Steamers direct from Savannah. Transfers to Ship's side without breaking bulk.

IN CONNECTION WITH STEAMSHIPS DIRECT FROM SAVANNAH.

Fro ni Land- I' -


TO


Boston...............................................
Boston via New York........ .........
New York......... ............
Philadelphia ....................................
Baltimore.........................................


From Jackson- ings on St. From Florida From Tampa From J., P. &
ville. Johns River. Transit R. R. and Manatee. M. R. R.





40 $ 80 45 85 45 $ 85 60 $1 10 I 45 85
60 1 20 65 1 25 65 1 25 80 150 65 1 2.5
40 80 45 85 45 85 60 110 45 8.5
40 s80 45 85 45 5 M 60 1 10 45 85
40 80 45 85 45 85 60 1 10 4I 45 85


IN CONNECTION WITH STEAMSHIPS OF M. & M. T. CO. FROM SAVANNAH
VIA BALTIMORE.


I-I
0


Philadelphia.................................. 50 81 00
Providence...................................... 55 1 05
Washington............................... 52 1 05
Wilmington, Del ............................. 50 1 00
York, Pa ................... ...... 59 10
Harrisburg, Pa ..................... 63: 15
Pittsburgh, Pa................ ................... 72 1 20
Erie, Pa...................................... ..... 72 1 20


From Land-
ings on St. From Florida From Tampa From J., P. &
Johns River. Transit R. R. and Manatee. M. R. R.

-2


58 $1 10 58 $1 10 73 $1 35 58 $ 1t10
60 110 60 110 75 135 60 1 10
57 110 7 10 1 72 135 57 1 10
55 105 a 55 105 70 130 IV55 1 0'
64 1 15 64 115 70 1 40 64 1 15
68 20 68 20 83 45 68 1 20
17 2 88 1 83
77 1225 77 1 25 92 150 77 1 25
77 1 25 77 i1 25! 92 150 I 77 1 25


Steamship connection from Savannah for New York every Wednesday aud Saturday. For Boston every
Thursday. For Philadelphia every Saturday. For Baltimore Tuesday and Friday.
STEAMSHIP DEPARTURES FROM SAVANNAH.
FOR NEW YORK. FOR PHILADELPHIA.
Wednesday, March 29th, 3:00 p. m. Saturday, April 8th, 10 a. in.
Saturday, April 1, 4:30 p. m. Saturday, April 15th, 4:30 p. m.
Wednesday, April 5, 7:30 a. in. Saturday, April 22d, 10 a. m.
Saturday, April 8, 9:30 a. m. Saturday, April 29th, 3:30 p. m.
Wednesday, April 12, 1:30 p. m.
Saturday, April 15, 4:30 p. m.
Wednesday, April 19, 7:30 a. inm.
Saturday, April 22, 9:30 a. m.
Wednesday, April 26, 1:30 p. inm.
Saturday, April 29,3:30 p. m.
FOR BALTIMORE.
Tuesday, March 28, 2 p. m.
Friday, March 31, 4 p. m.
Tuesday, April 4, at 8 a. m.
Friday, April 7, at 10 a. inm.
Tuesday, April 11, at 1 p. m. BOSTON AND PROVIDENCE.
Friday, April 14, at 3 p. m. Thursday, March 30, 4:00 p. m,
Tuesday, April 18,at 8 a. in. Thursday, April 6, at 9 a. m.
Friday, April 21, at 10 a. m. Thursday, April 13, at 3:15 p. m.
Tuesday, April 25, at 1 p. m. Thursday, April 20, at 8:30 a. m.
Friday, April 28, at 3 p. in. Thursday, April 27, at 3 p. m.
Shipments via New York will be charged at the current rates from that point, with cost of transfer added.
Single packages will be charged $1 each to Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore. If shipped be-
yond, they will be charged in addition the single package rates of connecting lines and cost of transfer.


Ocean Steamship Company.


SAVANNAH AND NEW YORK.


The Magnificent New Iron Steamships sail from Savannah on following dates:
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, March 29h, 3:00 p. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH, Saturday, April 1, 4:30 p. m.
GATE CITY. Wednesday, April 5, 7:30 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, April 8th, 9:30 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS, Wednesday, April 12th, 1:30 p. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, April 15th, 4:30 p. m.
GATE CITY, Wednesday, April 19,7:30 a. m.
CITY OF MACON, Saturday, April 22d, 9:30 a. m.
CITY OF COLUMBUS. Wednesday, April 26th, 1:30 p. m.
CITY OF AUGUSTA, Saturday, April 29th, 3:30 p. m.
Through Bills of Lading and Tickets over Central Railroad of Georgia, Savannah, Florida & Western
Railway.
These splendid new ships are 2,250 tons each, were built expressly for this trade, having great speed and
most elegant passenger accommodations.
For information at New York apply to
H. YONGE, C. D. OWENS
Acting Agent Ocean Steamship Co., 409 Broadway. Ag't Sav'h, Florida & Western Ry., 315 Broad way.
12-12mn G. M. SORREL, Agent, Savannah, Ga.



Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.

Savannah and Philadelphia.
-0
----O'-----
A STEAMSHIP OF THIS LINE SAILS FROM EACH PORT EVERY SATURDAY.
-0
EXCURSION TICKETS ISSUED BY THE OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO.'S PHILADELPHIA LINE WILL
be received for passage by the Company's Ships to New York. Tickets sold by all Agents to New York via Phil-
adelphia at SAME PRICE as DIRECT TO NEW YORK.
Philadelphia steamers are appointed to sail:
JUNIATA, April 8th, 10 a. m.
(ITY OF SAVANNAH, April 15th, 4:30 p. m.
JUNIATA, April 22d, 10 a. m.
CITY OF SAVANNAH. April 29th, 3:30 p. nm.
Days and hours subject to change, without notice. Both ships have elegant passenger accommodations.
WM. L. JAMES, WM. HUNTER & SON,
44-tf Agent, 13 S. Third St., Philadelphia. Agen ts at Savanna l.


ONLY DIRECT LINE BETWEEN
SAVANNAH AND BOSTON.
Transhipment and extra handling saved. No danger
of fruit being frozen. Cars are unloaded at the steam-
ship wharf in Savannah, avoiding drayage.
CABIN PASSAGE, $18.
SAILING FROVI SAVANNAH.
Chas. W. Love, Thursday, April 6, at 9 a. in.
Seminole, Thursday. April 13th, at 3:15 i). m.
Chas. W. Love, Thur5day, April 20, at 8:30 a. m.
Seminole, Thursday, April 27, at 3 p m.
RICHARDSON & BARNARD, Agents,
44-tf Savannah, Ga.

DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

The largest stock in the State. Country

buyers will consult their own interests
)y corresponding with lme., All orders

promptly filled at prices to compete with

any house south of Baltimore. Remem-

ber my only Florida address.

GEO. HUGHES,
mar 18-3m. Cor. Pay and Ocean, Jacksonville, Fla.

PIANOS AN D ORGANS
Z &_.MB. C. -_1e2','

15 ETIast Ihy ,Tacksonville.
SOLD ON INSTALLMENTS, AT LOWEST PRICES-
U branch of Ludden & Bates, Savannah-EXACTLY
SAME PRICES AND TERMS, Sheet Music, Strings
and small instruments of all kinds. Send for cata-
logues, prices and terms. TUNING AND REPAIRING
a specialty. My tuner will make regular tours through
the State, and my customers will thus have my repre-
sentative at their doors, a great advantage to purchasers
of instruments, mar 18-4m.

BELL & HALLIDAY,

MANUFACTURERS


FRUIT AND VEYFTABLE BOXFS,,


CAIRO, ILLINOIS,

4--Send for Illustrated Price-List;
mar 18-3mn

German Potash Salts,
(Kainit)
r(UARANTEED 23 TO 25 PER CENT. SULPHATE OF
Potash, in 209 lbs. sacks. $1.50 per sack, or $15 per ton,


f. o. b. For sale by
feb 28-It


GOULD & CO.,
6 W. Bay St., Jacksonville.


O. L. KEENE,

MILLINERY, FANCY, DRESS GOODS,
NOTIONS,

Laces, Worsteds,
AND A FINE LINE OF


67 West Bay Street, Corner Laura,


JACKSONVILLE, -
feb 21-ly


- - FLORIDA.


M. L. HARNETT, formerly BEN GEORGE, late of the
of the Marshall House. Screven House.
THlE HIARNETT HOUSE,
SAVANNAH, GA,
HARNETT & GEORGE, Proprietors.
RATS, $2 PER DAY.
This favorite family Hotel, under its new manage-
ment, is recommended for the excellence of its cuisine.
homelike comforts, prompt attention and moderate
ra tes. 13-ly


TO


Front
Jacksonville.






e THE FLORIDA DISPATCH.


S THE JONES
PATENT VENTILATED m
Snoltiltleol Trusses

AND

S "-PPO &TE -SO,
ARE THE


AND

BEST IN THE WORLD.
For sale by 1)R. J. C. L'ENGIE,
Wholesale Druggist, Jacksonville, Fla.
A-Send for Circular. mar 25-tf

W. H. PILLOW,

STRAWBERRY SHIPPING AGENCY
AND PROPRIETOR OF BOWEN BRO.'S PATENT
Refrigerators. Fruit and Vegetable Repacking and
Commission House, Astor Block, Jacksonville, Florida.
REFERENCES-Bank of Jacksonville, Florida Savings
Bank, Col. H. T. Baya, Jacksonville. (P. 0. Box 340.)
mar 25-ly
VEGETABLES

ShIDifl to All wostorl Morkots
IN
RE FR IG ER AT OR CARS.
GIBSON & ROCKWELL,

PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA,
HAVE ARRANGED TO RUN A LINE OF REFRIG-
erator Cars to all Western cities during the entire
vegetable season.
Send your Vegetables to them and you will get them
into the Western markets in good condition.
feb 21-4t


Florida Curiosity Bazar.

FLORIDA NOVELTIES,
Manufactured and for Sale by
J. I. MACKEY,
No. 37 East Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
JEWELRY, CHARMS, ORNAMENTS, AND NOVEL-
TIES OF ALLIGATOR TEETH,
Sea Beans, Rare Shells, Coral Beans, Fish Scales, Etc.
Rare Florlda Grasses, Florida Stuffed Birds, and
Plumage. feb 21-4t

All Full Count-480 Sheets to the Ream.
10x10 at 14c., 11xl at 17c., 12x12 at 20c.
SPECIAL PRICES TO LARGE BUYERS.
Address
ASHIMEAD BROS.,
Booksellers, Stationers, Printers and Binders,
Jacksonville, Fla.
IF YOU WANT TO BUY


Orange Groves
OF
OR ANGE LANDS
Below the frost line, and where all semi-tropical fruits
succeed better than any other portion of Florida, and
where the health and society is unexcelled, address,
with stamp, M. R. MARKS,
Real Estate Agent, Orlando, Orange Co., Fla.
50-tf


Wholesale and Retail Drug Store,
35 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
pURE DRUGS, RELIABLE MEDICINES, FANCY
Goods, Proprietary Articles, at lowest market prices.
Specialties-Norton's Salt Rheum Ointment, Melen's
Infant Food, Burnett's Cod Liver Oil. A Trial solicited.
feb 21-6m


P :E :I3>TE Ca-ov0UTD B0o3TE, $3.50so per Ton,
(Guaranteed Pure.)


(100 Pound Bags.)

COTTO SEED I LL t aS, $27 per Ton.,
(The 3est Potash in Use.)


STOCKBRIDGE FERTILIZERS for Orange Trees and vegetables, for sale by
31-ly


J. E. ITART,
Jaceksonville, Fla.


JONTES. dS OWE10


WHOLESALE GROCERS,
AGENTS FOR THE STATE FOR

A ger's Dry :E-op eastat calkes, 60c. per d1oz.

Dale Sz 2:V.errill's Hops,15c. per poolrnd..

IHorseford.'s read preparation, $6 25 lper case.

Slbe1l-BoadL Tobacco.

"-lorida Boys," 11 in.., 5's, -40c. per poLanid.

F" loridac Girls," t7rist, I to lb., 500c. per pou n.d,

No. 7 West Bay Street, - - Jacksonville, Florida.
mar 18-6m
ESTABLISHEDD 1871.]
J. A. BARNES & CO.,

FRUIT AND PRODUCE

COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
SoutlberT3 1rMXLit asC.d. Vegetables a Speoiialtyr.
30" and 38 North JDelaware Avenue, Philadelphia.
31-ly

ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,


Publishers, Booksellers, Stationers,


PRINTERS .AND BINDERS,
AND DEALERS IN


Toys and Fancy


Articles.


NEWSDEALERS.-We keep all the latest Daily and Weekly Papers from Boston, New York, Philadelphia,
Baltimore, Chicago, St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, New Orleans, Charleston, Savannah and Jacksonville, and
take subscriptions to all publications at publication price. Orders by mail promptly attended to.
LIST OF BOOKS ON FLORIDA.
FLORIDA: FOR TOURISTS, INVALIDS AND SETTLERS (Barbour)................................................... Price $1 50
FLORIDA: ITS SCENERY, CLIMATE AND HISTORY (Lanier)...............................................................Price 1 50
GUIDE TO EAST FLORIDA (Edwards), paper............................................................................................Price 10
G U ID E TO JA CK SON V ILLE ............................................................................................................................Price 25
SOUTH FLORIDA, THE ITALY OF AMERICA.........................................................................................Price 25
DAVIS' ORAN GE CULTURE (new edition)........ ...........................................................................................Price 50
MOORE'S ORANGE CULTURE (new edition)............................. ............ ....................... ......................Price 1 00
ORANGE INSECTS-Illustrated (Ashmead).. ................................. ..... ....:..........:....................... PTice 1 00
A MANUAL OF GARDENING IN FLORIDA (Whitner)............................................................................... Price 50
COLTON 'S M A P OF FLOR IDA ,.. .................................................................: ... ........ .............................Price 75
COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA............. ... .....-Price 75
COLTON'S MAP OF FLORIDA (Sectional)................................................. ..........................................Price 1 25
INDEX TO THE DECISIONS OF THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA ..................... ......................Price 3 00
Any of the above books mailed on receipt of price.
ORANGE W RAPS...................................................................................10x0, 14c.; x1x11, 17c.; 12x12, 20c.
LAW BLANKS.
W ARR ANTY DEEDS, per dozen .................................................................................................... .....Price 50
QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS, per dozen............................................................. ......................................... ...........Price 50
M O R T G A G E S, per dozen ....................................................................................................................................P rice 50
NOTARIAL SEAL PRESSES, made to order..... ....................................................... .............Price $5 00
We publish a full line of Law Blanks for Lawyers and Justices of the Peace. Price-list mailed on application.
Special prices to large buyers. Adddress
ASHMEAD BROTHERS,
feb 21-tf 21 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


-- - I --