Energy For Florida Foliage Plants

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ ( Publisher's URL )
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Energy For Florida Foliage Plants
Physical Description:
Fact sheet
Creator:
Fluck, Richard C.
Publisher:
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

Acquisition:
Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status:
Published
General Note:
"Publication date: October 1992."
General Note:
"EES-80"

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID:
IR00004823:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

FactSheetEES-80 October1992 EnergyforFloridaFoliagePlants1 RichardC.Fluck2Foliageplantsrankedsecondin1990(onlybehind EnergyFacts FloridaFoliagePlants 3,900acres,0.2%ofthecroppedland. Statewide,uses 11.8trillionBtu ofenergy, 9.5%ofallenergyused inFloridaagriculture. Peracreofcoveredfoliage,uses 4.09billion Btu ofenergy,andperacreofopenfield foliage,uses 0.7billionBtu. $43returnper millionBtu ofenergyused. oranges)amongallFloridaagriculturalcommodities inbothdirectandtotalprimaryenergyrequirements. Foliageplantsrequireaverylargeportionofthe energy(9.4%ofthedirectenergyand9.5%ofthe totalprimaryenergy)requiredforallFlorida productionagriculture.Thislargeamountofenergy consumptionoccurreddespitethefactthatin1990 foliagewasgrownononlyabout3900acresin Florida.Whethergrownundercoverorinopen fields,foliageplantsareamongthemostenergyintensiveofallagriculturalcommodities.Statewide, foliageproductionaccountsfor3.65trillionBtuof directenergyand11.8trillionBtuoftotalprimary energy. Theamountofdirectenergyforcoveredfoliage productioninFAECMis1.24billionBtu/acreandthe totalprimaryenergyis4.09billionBtu/acre.Open fieldfoliageproductionrequiresconsiderablyless energyinFAECM:0.16billionBtu/acredirectenergy and0.74billionBtu/acretotalprimaryenergy.The majorenergyinputsforfoliageproductionare"other costs"(35%undercoverand49%uncovered),labor (17%foreach),dieselfuel(22%undercoverand 17%uncovered),electricity(5%and13% respectively)andLPgas(8%and3%respectively). "Othercosts"includessuchinputsasdepreciable capitalcosts,soilmedia,pots,andseed(Figure1, Table2). Comparisonofthevalueoffoliageproduction withitsenergyrequirementsshowsthatthevalueper milliondirectBtuof$144isslightlyabovetheaverage forallFloridaagricultureproductionof$136. FoliagevaluepermilliontotalprimaryBtuof$43is approximatelythesameasthestate'saverageof$44. 1.ThisdocumentisFactSheetEES-80,aseriesoftheFloridaEnergyExtensionService,FloridaCooperativeExtensionService,InstituteofFood andAgriculturalSciences,UniversityofFlorida.Publicationdate:October1992. 2.RichardC.Fluck,Professor,AgriculturalEngineeringDept.,CooperativeExtensionService,InstituteofFoodandAgriculturalSciences, UniversityofFlorida,GainesvilleFL32611. TheFloridaEnergyExtensionServicereceivesfundingfromtheFloridaEnergyOffice,DepartmentofCommunityAffairsandisoperated bytheUniversityofFlorida'sInstituteofFoodandAgriculturalSciencesthroughtheCooperativeExtensionService.Theinformation containedhereinistheproductoftheFloridaEnergyExtensionServiceanddoesnotnecessarilyreflecttheviewsoftheFloridaEnergyOffice. TheInstituteofFoodandAgriculturalSciencesisanequalopportunity/affirmativeactionemployerauthorizedtoprovideresearch,educational informationandotherservicesonlytoindividualsandinstitutionsthatfunctionwithoutregardtorace,color,sex,age,handicap,ornational origin.Forinformationonobtainingotherextensionpublications,contactyourcountyCooperativeExtensionServiceoffice. FloridaCooperativeExtensionService/InstituteofFoodandAgriculturalSciences/UniversityofFlorida/ChristineTaylorStephens,Dean

PAGE 2

EnergyforFloridaFoliagePlants Page2 Figure1.PrimaryenergyinputsforFloridafoliageproduction. TableTable2.2.Primaryenergyinputsfor Floridafoliageproduction. EnergyInputs % Othercosts 36.0 Dieselfornon-irrigation 21.4 Labor 17.0 Electricityfornon-irrigation 12.4 LPgas 7.9 Gasoline 2.1 Nitrogen 0.9 Lubricants 0.5 Herbicides 0.5 Dieselforirrigation 0.4 Insecticides 0.4 Electricityforirrigation 0.1 Phosphorus 0.1 Potash 0.1 Fungicides 0.1 Otherpesticides 0.1FLORIDAAGRICULTUREPRODUCTION ENERGYThedatapresentedinthisfactsheetwere developedusingtheFloridaAgriculturalEnergy ConsumptionModel(FAECM),acomputermodel. FAECMusesacresofproductionorlivestock numbersandtheenergyusedtomaketheproduction inputsrequiredperacreorperheadtoquantifythe primary energyusedinFloridaforagricultural production.This primary energyconsumption includesfuels,lubricantsandelectricity,called direct energyinputs,aswellastheenergyusedinproviding allproductioninputs( indirect energyinputs). Ittakesenergytodrillanoilwell,pumpthe crudeoilout,refineitandtransportthedieselfuelto thegrower.Ittakestheenergyinthenaturalgas feedstockplustheenergyusedtoconstructthe productionplant,powertheproductionplantand drivethetrucktogetthenitrogenfertilizertothe grower.FAECMquantifiestheeightdirectenergy sources(dieselfuel,LPgas,etc.),theindirectenergy usedtomakethoseeightenergysourcesavailableand theindirectenergyusedtoprovidethirteenmajor agriculturalinputs(nitrogenfertilizer,pesticides,etc) todeterminetheenergyrequiredtoproduce agriculturalcommoditiesinFlorida. Intotal,FAECMisamodelthatpredictsallthe energyrequiredtoprovideallinputsnecessary,upto thefarmgate,forallofFlorida'sagricultural production,FAECMdoesnotaddressenergy requirementsforanytransportation,packing, processing,distributionorotherfunctionsprovided foragriculturalcommoditiesaftertheyleavethefarm gate. FAECMshowsthatdirectenergyinputsfor Floridaagriculturalproductionhaveremained relativelyconstantsince1974(Figure1).Variations areduemainlytochangesincommodityproduction levelsandachangingmixofcommoditiesproduced. Thereductionintotalprimaryenergyisdueprimarily toincreasesinenergyefficiencyofindustrial productionsystemsforagriculturalproductioninputs. Floridaconsumed66%moreenergyin1990than in1974,dueinlargemeasuretoitsincreasedhuman

PAGE 3

EnergyforFloridaFoliagePlants Page3population.Floridaagriculturalproductionenergy, expressedasapercentageoftherapidlyincreasing Floridatotalenergyconsumption,hasdecreased sharplyfrom7.8%in1974to3.9%in1990.