Tomato Production Guide for Florida: Pest Management Introduction

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ ( Publisher's URL )
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Tomato Production Guide for Florida: Pest Management Introduction
Physical Description:
Fact sheet
Creator:
Hochmuth, George
Publisher:
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

Acquisition:
Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status:
Published
General Note:
"August 1997"
General Note:
"SP 214"

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID:
IR00004676:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

1.This document is a chapter of SP 214, last printed in 1990 as Circular 98 C. SP 214 ,Tomato Production Guide for Florida, lasted printed in 1990 as Circular 98 C, is a publication of the Commercial Vegetable Guide Series, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Publication date: August 1997. For more information about how to order the complete print document, SP 214, call UF/IFAS Distribution at (352) 392-1764. Please visit the FAIRS Website at http://hammock.ifas.ufl.edu The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer authorized to provide resea rch, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Servi ce office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida / Christine Taylor Waddill, Dean 2.G.J. Hochmuth, professor, Horticultural Sciences Department, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultura l Sciences (IFAS), University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611. The Tomato Production Guide for Florida is edited by G.J. Hochmuth, professor, Horticultural Sciences Department, IFAS. SP-214Tomato Production Guide for Florida: Pest Management Introduction1G.J. Hochmuth2Tomatoes are subject to damage from many insects, nematodes, and fungal, viral, and bacterial pathogens. In addition, weeds and several physiological disorders, such as nutrient deficiencies, can cause yield losses. Specific chemical control measures can be obtained from the Pest Management Guides or from Circular SP-170, Commercial Vegetable Production Guide. Chemical control of pests must be practiced only according to the pesticide label. Where several chemicals are available to control a pest, alternating the use of the materials may help reduce chances of developing pest resistance to a chemical. Misuse of chemicals can lead to possible worker contamination and environmental pollution in addition to exceeded tolerances for pesticide residues on fruit. Before using any chemical, read the product label and the information in the guides detailing precautions and suggestions for proper use. Pest control should consist of an integrated pest management (IPM) system which relies on efficient use of all appropriate control strategies. Action is taken to prevent problems and suppress damage levels without relying solely on chemicals. Effective IPM consists of four basic principles: exclusion of the pest from the field, suppression of pest levels below an economic threshold, eradication of certain pests where deemed absolutely necessary, and plant resistance in cultivars of crop plants. To carry out these principles, several steps are taken: identification of key pests and beneficial organisms, preventative cultural practices to minimize pest development, pest population monitoring by trained field scouts, prediction of loss and risk to determine when levels of yield and quality will be threatened, and action decision on which control measure is warranted. All sound IPM programs include an evaluation phase to assess the level of success.