Tomato Production Guide for Florida: Varieties

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Material Information

Title:
Tomato Production Guide for Florida: Varieties
Physical Description:
Fact sheet
Creator:
Maynard, Donald N.
Publisher:
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

Acquisition:
Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status:
Published
General Note:
"Publication date: August 1997."
General Note:
"SP 214"

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID:
IR00004672:00001


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1.This document is a chapter of SP 214, last printed in 1990 as Circular 98 C. SP 214, Tomato Production Guide for Florida, last printed in 1990 as Circular 98 C, is a publication of the Commercial Vegetable Guide Series, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and A gricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Publication date: August 1997. For more information about how to order the complete print document, SP 2 14, call UF/IFAS Distribution at (352) 392-1764. Please visit the FAIRS Website at http://hammock.ifas.ufl.edu The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer authorized to provide resea rch, educati onal information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Servi ce office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida / Christine Taylor Waddill, Dean 2.D.N. Maynard, professor, Horticultural Sciences Department, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS), University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611. The Tomato Production Guide for Florida is edited by G.J. Hochmuth, professor, Horticultural Sciences Department, IFAS. SP-214Tomato Production Guide for Florida: Varieties1D.N. Maynard2Variety selection, often made several months before planting, is one of the most important management decisions made by the grower. Failure to select the most suitable variety or varieties may lead to loss of yield or market acceptability. The following characteristics should be considered in selection of tomato varieties for use in Florida:CharacteristicsYield. The variety selected should have the potential to produce crops at least equivalent to varieties already grown. The average yield in Florida is currently about twelve hundred 25-pound-cartons per acre. The potential yield of varieties in use should be much higher than average.Disease Resistance. Varieties selected for use in Florida must have resistance to Fusarium wilt, race 1 and race 2; Verticillium wilt (race 1); gray leaf spot; and some tolerance to bacterial soft rot. Available resistance to other diseases may be important in certain situations.Horticultural Quality. Plant habit, stem type and fruit size, shape, color, smoothness and resistance to defects should all be considered in variety selection.Adaptability. Successful tomato varieties must perform well under the range of environmental conditions usually encountered in the district or on the individual farm.Market Acceptability. The tomato produced must have characteristics acceptable to the packer, shipper, wholesaler, retailer and consumer. Included among these qualities are pack out, fruit shape, ripening ability, firmness and flavor.Lar g e Fruited VarietiesAgriset 761. An early midseason, determinate, jointed hybrid. Fruit are deep globe and green shouldered. Resistant: Verticillium wilt (race 1), Fusarium wilt (race 1 and 2), Alternaria stem canker, gray leaf spot.Bonita. A midseason, jointless hybrid. Fruit are globe-shaped and green shouldered. Resistant: Verticillium wilt (race 1), Fusarium wilt (race 1 and 2), gray leaf spot.Merced. Early, deep-globe-shaped, greenshouldered fruit are produced on determinate vines. Jointed hybrid. Resistant: Verticillium wilt (race 1), Fusarium wilt (race 1 and 2), gray leaf spot, tobacco mosaic virus.

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Tomato Production Guide for Florida: Varieties Page 2 February 1998 Figure 1. Large-fruit slicing tomato. Figure 2. Cherry tomato.Olympic. A mid-season determinate, jointed hybrid. Fruit are deep oblate with green shoulders. Resistant: Verticillium wilt (race 1), Fusarium wilt (race 1 and 2), Alternaria stem canker, and gray leaf spot.Solar Set. An early, green-shouldered, largefruited, jointed hybrid. Determinate. Fruit set under high temperatures (92 (F day/72 (F night) is superior to most other commercial cultivars. Resistant: Fusarium wilt (race 1 and 2), Verticillium wilt (race 1) and gray leaf spot.Sunbeam. Early mid-season, deep-globe-shaped fruit are produced on determinate vines. Resistant: Verticillium wilt (race 1), Fusarium wilt (race 1 and race 2), gray leaf spot, Alternaria.Sunny. A midseason, jointed, determinate, hybrid. Fruit are large, flat-globular in shape, and are greenshouldered. Resistant: Verticillium wilt (race 1), Fusarium wilt (race 1 and 2), Alternaria stem canker, gray leaf spot (Figure 1).Plum Type VarietySpectrum 882. Blocky-pear shape, uniform-greenshouldered fruit are produced on medium-large determinate plants. Resistant: Verticillium wilt (race 1), Fusarium wilt (race 1 and 2), root-knot nematode, bacterial speck (race 0), Alternaria stem canker, and gray leaf spot.Cherry Type VarietyCherry Grande. Large, globe-shaped, cherry-type fruit are produced on medium-size determinate plants. Resistant: Verticillium wilt (race 1), Fusarium wilt (race 1), Alternaria stem blight, and gray leaf spot (Figure 2).