Digital Curation presentation to Digital Humanities Library Group

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Material Information

Title:
Digital Curation presentation to Digital Humanities Library Group
Series Title:
“Developing Librarian” Digital Humanities Pilot Training Project
Alternate Title:
Digital Curation presentation to Digital Humanities Library Group (DHLG)
Physical Description:
Handout for presentation
Creator:
Reboussin, Daniel
Publisher:
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Digital Humanities Library Group
Digital Humanities Library Group (DHLG)
Genre:
Spatial Coverage:

Notes

Summary:
Notes for a local presentation. What curatorial activities support scholarly access once a trusted repository or cultural heritage collection is online? Merely uploading materials to an open access site doesn’t mean they’ll be easily discoverable online. Effective digital curation supports researchers in discovering relevant collections they weren’t aware of prior to conducting a successful online search. While digital, these actions aren’t unlike analog or live liaison and routine interactions during reference consultation, library instruction, etc. Some examples of digital curation activities (all of which extend established library and archival practices) are outlined. These may enhance access, presentation, context, or support scholarly interpretation. References and further readings are provided to interested readers.
Acquisition:
Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Daniel Reboussin.
Publication Status:
Unpublished

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
UF
Rights Management:

This item is licensed with the Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License. This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon this work even for commercial reasons, as long as they credit the author and license their new creations under the identical terms.
System ID:
IR00004352:00001


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Digital Curation presented by Dan Reboussin Sept 17, 2014 1 3 PM. Library West 212 Digital Humanities Library G roup ( Developing Librarian project ) Digital curation (see Lee and Tibbo 2007; JISC 2003) can be defined a s the active management of digital resources over the life cycle of scho Curation is cultural caretaking (begins before selection includes preservation may also extend to deselection or weeding ). W hat happens after the digital grab and scan (or born digital share) ? Ibrar Bhatt adapt s (1990) theory of human information with this list of active words describ ing online social curation : Select, edit, single out, structure, highlight, group, pair, merge, harmonize, synthesize, focus, organize, condense, reduce, boil down, choose, categorize, catalog, classify, list, abstract, scan, look into, idealize, isolate, discriminate, distinguish, screen, pigeonh ole, pick over, sort, integrate, blend, inspect, filter, lump, skip, smooth, chunk, average, approximate, cluster, aggregate, outline, summarize, itemize, review, dip into, flip through, browse, glance into, leaf through, skim, refine, enumerate, glean, sy nopsize, winnow the wheat from the chaff, and separate the sheep from the goats Wh at curatorial a ctivities support scholarly access once a trusted repository or cultural heritage collection is online ? Mere ly uploading materials to an open access site ll be eas il y discover able online. Effective digital curation supports researcher s in discover ing relevant collections they weren t aware of prior t o conducting a successful online search (while digital, or live liaison and routine interactions during reference consultation, library instruction, etc.) Some e xamples of digital curation activities (all of which extend established library or archival practices) These may enhance access, presentation context, or support scholarly interpretation : Creat ing a social interface, monitor ing usage, observ ing and support ing user behaviors. Wh ich items get frequent heavy use? Make the m eas ier to find: P ave Enhancing available metadata Mak ing existing resources available (bibliographic records or archival finding aids) or enhanc ing traditional library resources with additional detail (see SobekCM Adding useful sub collection division s in Sobek/CM to highlight contents E dit in g landing page s ( in Sobek ) to build a scholarly context for collection s C ontribut ing to appropriate online sites in ways that support discoverability M ight include: the Institutional Repository ( including online exhibits ), Wikipedia official or private Continuing to engage in traditional forms of liaison, facilitation, promotion, outreach, and reference (attending scholarly meetings, presenting, publishing). Rich content, dense contextual information within a site, and links to the material from other highly ranked sites are key factors in how a site will appear in search results. Best practices

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Digital Curation presented by Dan Reboussin Sept 17, 2014 1 3 PM. Library West 212 Digital Humanities Library G roup ( Developing Librarian project ) include providing public metadata for curated materials and, for manuscripts and archives, collection context (find extent, contents, arrangement and also point to related works). There are important s ocial a s well as technical aspects to the way sites are in dexed by search engines such as Google Sobek and UFDC deal with the technical side of this equation (compliant code, support for efficient crawling, digital preservation measures, etc.) S ocial support includ es all of the above digital curation activities Search engines us e crawling and indexing to gather metadata and to determine what a w eb page is about (dynamic results, Page ranking) The site itself influences how Google assesses its value: technical features such as complia nt code and domains (such as .edu and .org ) support legitimacy, value, and relevance (www.wikipedia.org is an excellent example, as it is also among the most visited w eb sites). See: Contributing to Wikipedia References Curation as Digital Literacy Practice (blog entry, May 21). Available: http://ibrarspace.net/2014/05/21/curation as a digital literacy practice/ Hill Nicola Mark Sullivan and Laurie Taylor Technical Aspects: Metadata Sobek CM (support documentation). Available: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/help/metadata Accessed: Sept. 17, 2014. Joint Information Systems Committee. Establish a New Digital Curation Centre for Research into and Support of the Curation UK: JISC. http://www.dcc.ac.uk/docs/6 03Circular.pdf Attempted access: Sept. 17, 2014 Journal of Digital Information 8 :2 ( Sep. 2007 ) Available: https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/article/view/229/183 Accessed: Sept. 17, 2014. Tufte, Edward R. 1990. Envisioning information Cheshire, Conn.: Graphic s Press. Contributing to Wikipedia Wikipedia (online support page, last updated Aug. 23, 2014). Available: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Contributing_to_Wikipedia Accessed: Sept. 17, 2014.