“Between Scarcity and Excess: Problems over Water in Santiago Tlatelolco during the Early Colonial Period”

Material Information

Title:
“Between Scarcity and Excess: Problems over Water in Santiago Tlatelolco during the Early Colonial Period”
Physical Description:
Conference Papers
Creator:
Vargas-Betancourt, Margarita
Conference:
2013 Annual Meeting of the American Society for Ethnohistory, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Notes

Abstract:
During the colonial period, like in the precontact era, the need of water to drink, irrigate, and obtain resources as well as the need to control flooding shaped the life of the people who lived in Santiago Tlatelolco, one of the two indigenous republics included in Mexico City. Adaptation to a lacustrine environment was the first dilemma that the Tlatelolca experienced when they founded their city. The arrival of the Spaniards and the establishment of a colonial system brought about different types of problems. In this paper, I will discuss some of the strategies that the Tlatelolca used to obtain and control water in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The purpose will be to elucidate to what degree these mechanisms reflect continuity or transformation of indigenous culture.
Acquisition:
Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Margarita Vargas-Betancourt.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID:
IR00004309:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads: