Implementing Empathetic Strategies Into Healthcare Interior Design

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Material Information

Title:
Implementing Empathetic Strategies Into Healthcare Interior Design
Physical Description:
Book
Creator:
Mathis, Rachel
Publication Date:

Notes

Abstract:
"Seeing with the eyes of another, listening with the ears of another, and feeling with the heart of another." This quote by Alfred Adler was the basis of a sixteen week project focusing on healthcare interior design. The project posed the question, "How would you design spaces differently if you were empathizing with the patients, caregivers, and family members in an Outpatient Cancer Facility?" Collaboration with the Herman Miller inc. research and design team: began with a project kick-off and continued throughout the semester and included a trip to their Michigan-based headquarters and Chicago healthcare showroom. Narrative inquiry framed the project, and emphasized the stories of patients and caregivers. The process married narrative inquiry with evidence-based design research, which involved primary research, site analysis, patient interviews, and second research from journals. My contributions to this team project were the concept and design of the entrance, waiting, and healing and welloess areas of the facility. Overall the original design solution centered access to natural light and views to nature; prevention of hospital acquired infection and alternative healing; and humanizing the treatment experience. The result was a state-of-the art facility that empathized with the needs of the patients, family members and caregivers.
Acquisition:
Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Holly Hofer.
General Note:
Undergraduate Honors Thesis

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Rachel Mathis. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
System ID:
IR00003898:00001


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Full Text

PAGE 1

RACHEL MATHIS HONORS THESIS UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA COLLEGE OF DESIGN CONSTRUCTION AND PLANNING DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR DESIGNINTERIOR DESIGN

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RACHEL MATHISEMPATHYSeeing with the eyes of another, listening with the ears of another, and feeling with the heart of another. Alfred Adler

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HEALTHCARE DESIGNHOPE OUTPATIENT CANCER CENTER HOPE OUTPATIENT CANCER CENTERGROUP PROJECT: SABRYNA LYN, DANIEL FRAGATA, THERESA KELLNER, BRIANE SHANE SR. STUDIO FALL 2013 LOCATION: GAINESVILLE, FL DURATION: 16 WEEKSENTRANCE/RECEPTION AREA

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A PATIENTS JOURNEYThe design project presented in the Fall of 2013 encompassed the creation of a prototype outpatient cancer facility. The design process brought together the research of Herman Millers design development team individual research, and empathy. The facility given was a twostory building with approximately 23,000 square feet on each floor. The design team was asked to provide innovative design solutions that emphasized empathetic strategies supported by evidence-based design. By addressing the emotional, physical, and spiritual needs of the patients, staff, and family members, the design could be truly impactful. An initial empathy charette was followed by weeks of research interviews, precedent studies, and a narrative component. This process led the team to the concept of a patients journey The journey through cancer treatment can be a long difficult process that should not be experienced alone. The resulting drivers: support, connect, and restore were created to be the guiding principles throughout the design process. SUPPORT-BALANCE CONNECT-INTERLOCK RESTORE-ORGANIC CONCEPTUAL MODEL RECEPTION MID-POINT

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FIRST FLOOR ADJACENCY DIAGRAM FIRST FLOOR MASTER PLAN SECOND FLOOR MASTER PLAN RECEPTION/WAITING CAFE GARDEN INFUSION ENTRY SEQUENCE RADIATION STAFF SUPPORT RECEPTION/WAITING HEALING AND WELLNESS CAFE GARDEN RETAIL EDUCATION/BUSINESS FUTURE EXPANSIONFIRST FLOOR BLOCK DIAGRAM SECOND FLOOR BLOCK DIAGRAM SECOND FLOOR ADJACENCY DIAGRAM

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FIRST FLOOR PLAN

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WAITING/EDUCATION CENTER CAFE GARDEN CAFE GARDEN MID-POINT CAFE GARDEN MOOD BOARD RECEPTION/WAITING MOOD BOARDKey elements that were incorporated in the entrance based on E.B.D principles were access to natural lighting clear and visible pathways vertical integration and a welcoming hospitality style. The cafe garden was a unique area that incorporated active and passive engagement opportunities such as horticultural therapy and gentle yoga.

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TRANSVERSE SECTION SHOWCASING VERTICAL CONNECTION BETWEEN INFUSION AND HEALING AND WELLNESS HEALING AND WELLNESS LOUNGE HOPE LANE RETAIL CENTER HEALING AND WELLNESS MOOD BOARDThe healing and wellness area, Azure, incorporated alternative healing methods such as yoga, mindfulness meditation, massage, aroma and light therapies The retail center, Hope Lane features a salon/wig shop, pharmacy, bank, and nutrition center .

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SECOND FLOOR WAITING

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SECOND FLOOR PLAN

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SEMI-PUBLIC INFUSION NURSE STATION MID-POINT INFUSION MOOD BOARD PUBLIC INFUSION PRIVATE INFUSIONWithin the treatment areas, gradations of spaces from private to public were incorporated. Access to natural light, family support zones, centralized and decentralized nursing stations, and standardized location of equipment were all design decisions based on the initial research. Cleanability and prevention of hospital inquired infections were also considered in the design.

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LONGITUDINAL SECTION THROUGH INFUSION, SUB-WAIT, EXAM, AND RADIATION STAFF SUPPORT SPACE STAFF LOUNGE SKETCH SECOND FLOOR MOOD BOARDA staff support space was provided on the second floor. This allowed the staff a respite space and additional work areas that were separated from the patient zones. Key factors in the staff area were access to natural light, separate staff entrance and a variety of work spaces based on Herman Millers Living Office.