Plants and Youth: Making a Totem

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ ( Publisher's URL )
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Material Information

Title:
Plants and Youth: Making a Totem
Physical Description:
Fact sheet
Creator:
Black, Robert J.
Publisher:
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

Acquisition:
Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status:
Published
General Note:
"Original publication date June 1996. Reviewed September 2007 and November 2010."
General Note:
"ENH120"

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID:
IR00003835:00001


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Full Text

PAGE 1

Robert J. Black, Kathleen C. Ruppert and Sydney Park Brown2 1. This document is ENH120, one of a series of the Environmental Horticulture Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Original publication date June 1996. Reviewed September 2007 and November 2010. Visit the EDIS Web Site at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu. 2. Robert J. Black, retired professor emeritous; Kathleen C. Ruppert, former assistant professor, Sydney Park Brown, associate professor, Environmental Horticulture Department, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611. Vining foliage plants grown on slabs of tree fern or bark are called totems. Climbing types of foliage plants such as grape ivy, English ivy, wax plant, philodendrons and pothos are good choices for totems. Select a container that has drainage holes in the bottom and is large enough for the plant of your choice and the slab it will grow upon. Choose a slab that is 3 to 5 times taller than the container. Hold the slab upright in the container, and then pack 2 to 4 inches of potting mix firmly around it (Figure 1n). Set the plant in the pot and add more potting mix (Figure 2n ). Never set the plant in the soil deeper than it was growing originally. Fasten the stems to the slab with tape, twist ties or string until roots attach themselves (Figure 3n). Totems require the same amount of care as any other potted foliage plant. They should receive indirect light, enough water to keep the soil moist and occasional applications of diluted, soluble, houseplant fertilizer. In a few months, the entire totem should be covered by the foliage plant. Bark slab The outside piece of wood with attached bark cut from a log. Fern slab A section of the trunk of tree fern. Foliage plants Plants grown primarily for the beauty of their leaves and stems. Foliage plants are susceptible to cold injury, so they are usually grown indoors.

PAGE 2

Plants and Youth: Making a Totem 2 Potting mix A material developed by combining several substances (peat, perlite, pine bark, sand, etc.) for growing plants in pots.