Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers

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Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers
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Fact Sheet
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Wellborn, Thomas L.
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University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
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Gainesville, Fla.
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"Reprinted 1993, Reviewed July 1997."
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"Cir-874"

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1.This document is Cir-874, one of a series of the Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Florida C ooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Reprinted 1993, Reviewed July 1997. Please visit the FAIRS Web site at http://hammock.ifas.ufl.edu .The Institute of Food and A g ricultural Sciences is an equal opportunit y /affirmative action emplo y er authorized to provide research, educational information and other services onl y to individuals and institutions that function without re g ard to race, color, sex, a g e, handicap, or national ori g in. For information on obtainin g other extension publications, contact y our count y Cooperative Extension Service office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and A g ricultural Sciences / Universit y of Florida / Christine Ta y lor Waddill, Dean2.Thomas L. Wellborn, Jr., Professor Emeritus and Charles E. Cichra, Assistant Professor, Department of Fisheries and Aquatic S ciences, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, 32611.Cir-874Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers1 Thomas L. Wellborn, Jr. and Charles E. Cichra2The DecisionCatfish farming is much more than just stocking fish in a pond, feeding, and then reaping the profits. It is a very expensive and risky form of agriculture. Intensive catfish culture requires almost 24-hour a day management, and unless you are willing to provide this type of management, you should look at another enterprise. To help you determine if intensive catfish farming is feasible for you in your particular situation, a checklist is provided below (see Table 1). It doesn't cover all of the possibilities, but it does list most of the important considerations. Answering "yes" to all or most of the questions does not guarantee success, just as answering "no" does not mean failure.The InvestmentThe amount of investment required for catfish farming varies and depends on many factors. The following is a list of costs common to most catfish farms (see Table 2 and Table 3). Determine the approximate costs for your situation:Site SelectionThe selection of the site is a critical decision. Look for these characteristics in a potential site. 1)Soil must hold water. 2)Flat land requires moving about 1,000-1,200 yards of dirt per acre. Rolling land requires more dirt be moved and is, therefore, more expensive. 3)Lands classed as "wetlands" cannot be cleared by law. Wetlands are defined as, "those areas that are inundated or saturated by surface or ground water at a frequency and duration sufficient to support, and that under normal circumstances do support, a prevalence of vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions. Wetlands generally include swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas. 4)Site must be suitable for draining. 5)Land is not subject to flooding. 6)Pesticide residues are not present in soil. 7)Run-off is not from agricultural fields. 8)Adequate water is available to fill p ond within 10 12 days. (See Table 4). 9)If surface water is used, the watershed should be adequate for filling p ond during normal rainfall.

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Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers Pa g e 2July 1997Table 1. Checklist to determine feasibilit y of intensive catfish farmin g YesNo Management Do y ou alread y have suitable ponds or a pond site? Do y ou have most of the e q uipment ( tractors, pumps, stora g e buildin g etc. ) needed ? Do y ou have the necessar y financial resources ( about $3000/acre investment and $2500/acre annual production cost ) needed? Have y ou made an estimate of investment costs and annual cost and return? Have y ou estimated the impact of chan g es in fish prices and feed costs on pro j ected income? Will current interest rates and interest costs on investment and operatin g capital permit a reasonable profit? Will the expected profit provide an ade q uate return for y our labor, mana g ement and risk? Is catfish farmin g the best alternative for the land y ou intend to use? Can y ou afford to fore g o income until y ou sell y our first crop ( usuall y 15-24 months after startin g) ? Have y ou looked at record s y stems available and picked one best suited to y our situation? Can y ou afford to absorb occasional losses? Are y ou willin g to devote the time and effort re q uired? Marketing Do y ou know of an established market for y our fish? Is there a market for y our fish at the time of y ear y ou plan to sell them? Will y ou have harvestin g and transport e q uipment, or do y ou have a suitable arran g ement for harvestin g y our fish? Will y ou be able to harvest fish y ear round? Do y ou have an alternative marketin g strate gy ? Physical Factors Will the soil hold water? Is the topo g raph y of the land suitable for pond construction? Is there ade q uate g round water close enou g h to the surface for catfish farmin g ? Is the water q ualit y suitable for fish farmin g ? Is the pond area protected from floodin g ? Are the drains in existin g ponds ade q uate for rapid drainin g ? Can y ou prevent wild fish from enterin g the pond? Is there dail y access to the ponds, re g ardless of weather, for feedin g treatin g and harvestin g ? Is the pond bottom suitable for harvestin g ( smooth and stump-free ) ? Will someone live close enou g h to the pond to allow fre q uent observation and necessar y mana g ement? Production Are g ood q ualit y feeds available at competitive prices? Is there a source of suppl y for dru g s and chemicals? Are fin g erlin g s available at competitive prices? Can y ou make or purchase needed aeration e q uipment?

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Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers Pa g e 3Table 1. Checklist to determine feasibilit y of intensive catfish farmin g YesNoJuly 1997Is dependable labor available? Is a dependable dia g nostic service available? Do y ou have ade q uate stora g e facilities for feed? Are y ou aware of the g overnment a g encies that can provide y ou with educational and technical assistance? Risks Are y ou prepared to handle these problems: Poor water q ualit y ? Diseases? Pesticide contamination? Poachers and vandals? Low fish prices and hi g h feed costs? Personal stress resultin g from financial loss? Table 2. List of costs of common to most catfish farms. # Amount Capital Costs 1land 2pond construction ( about 6.2 cubic y ds. per linear foot of levee for a 1 6 foot top ) g ravel, ve g etation 3drains ( pipe, valve, fittin g s ) 4water suppl y 5buildin g ( stora g e and service ) 6aeration e q uipment ( paddle wheel, relift pumps, etc. ) 7boat and motor 8trucks 9fish haulin g tanks and a g itators 10feedin g e q uipment, feed stora g e bins 11tractors 12mowers 13ox yg en testin g e q uipment 14other water q ualit y testin g e q uipment 15seines, stora g e reels, crane 16dip nets 17waders and boots 18miscellaneous e q uipment 19taxes and insurance 20interest

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Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers Pa g e 4Table 2. List of costs of common to most catfish farms. # AmountJuly 1997Operating Costs 1Feed ( see Table 3 ) 2fin g erlin g s 3electricit y 4fuel ( diesel and g asoline ) 5maintenance and repairs 6harvest labor 7transportation 8dail y labor 9chemicals and dru g s 10telephone 11miscellaneous 12 interest on operatin g capital For information on the economics of producin g catfish in Florida, order A q uaculture in Florida: g eneral economic considerations", Sea Grant Extension Bulletin SGEB-9, from the Sea Grant Advisor y Pro g ram, G022 McCart y Hall, Universit y of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. ( cost -$1.00 ) Table 3 Cost of feed in cents to produce a 1 lb catfish at different feed conversions and prices. Feed Conversion Cost per lb of feed ( cost per ton in parentheses ) $0.10$0.1125 $0.125$0.1375$0.15$0.1625 ( $200 ) ( $225 ) ( $250 ) ( $275 ) ( $300 ) ( $325 ) 1.5:1 15.016.918.820.622.524.4 1.6:1 16.018.020.022.024.026.0 1.7:1 17.019.121.323.425.527.6 1.8:1 18.020.322.524.827.029.3 1.9:1 19.021.423.426.128.530.9 2.0:1 20.022.525.027.530.032.5

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Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers Pa g e 5July 1997Table 4. Time in hours re q uired to pump different volumes of water in acre feet at four different pumpin g rates. Pumpin g Rate Volume in Acre Feet* 15 10 70** Hours 100 g pm54.3271.5 543.13802 ( 158 ) *** 500 g pm10.954.3 108.6760 ( 31.6 ) *** 1,000 g pm5.427.0 54.3380 ( 15.8 ) *** 2,000 g pm2.713.5 27.2190 ( 7.9 ) *** 3,000 g pm1.89.0 18.1127 ( 5.3 ) *** 1 acre foot = 325,850 g allons = 1 surface acre that is 1 foot deep. ** The number of acre feet of water in a pond with 17.5 surface acres with an avera g e depth of 4 feet. *** Number of da y s re q uired to pump that volume of water.Pond ConstructionProduction1.Size 17.5 water acres on 20 land acres; large ponds are more difficult to manage, and smaller ponds are more expensive to construct. 2. Slope bottom to drain by gravity flow (0.1-.2 ft. per 100 ft.) 3. The drain should be large enough so pond can be drained within 7-10 days. Drain outlet must be at least 2 feet above surface of water in drainage ditch to prevent wild fish from entering pond. 4.Levee top width should be at least 16 feet. Gravel may be required, so that the levee will be passable in rainy weather. 5. Slope should be 3:1 with proper compaction. 6. Freeboard (the height of the levee above the water level) should not ex ceed 2 feet nor be less than 1 foot. 7. Depth should be at least 3 feet at the toe of slope at shallow end and should not ex ceed 6 feet at toe of slope at the deep end. 8.Shape of pond is determined by topography. A square 20-acre pond requires 1 867 feet of levee. A rectangular 20-acre pond that is 660 x 1,320 feet requires 1,980 feet of levee, a difference of 113 feet. When you get into the production phase of raising catfish, there are many important things you will have to know and remember. In this section we cover the major ones on the intensive culture of catfish with ground water available.Stocking1)Do not exceed 3, 000 to 3,500 per acre first growing season. This will permit your gaining experience in management while minimizing potential problems with disease and water quality. 2)Stock 4,500 per acre thereafter. 3)Use 6-8 inch fish if available since they will reach a harvestable size of 1.25 pounds in about 180-210 days when water temperatures are above 70 ( F (21 ( C). 4)Before stocking the pond, weigh and sample-count the fish so you can determine the number actually being stocked. To determine number actually stocked, weigh out a sample of fish (1 to 10 lbs.) and count. Then calculate the total number of fish stocked with this formula (see equation 1):

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Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers Pa g e 6July 1997(1) (3) (2)To determine the weight of 1,000 fish, weigh and count sample of fish; then (see equation 2):Table 5. Avera g e wei g ht of channel catfish fin g erlin g s for various len g ths. These wei g hts will var y considerabl y dependin g on condition of fish and when the y were last fed. Len g th in inchesAvera g e wei g ht per 1,000 fish in pounds Number of fish per pound 1 1 1,000 2 3 333 3 7 143 41 95 3 53 42 9 66 01 7 79 41 1 8 140 7 9 190 5 10 280 45)Stock the pond as soon as water is in the pond and catfish are available 6)If you partially harvest the pond, restock as soon after harvest as possible with one 5-8 inch fish for each fish harvested. Count a weighed sample of harvested fish, then calculate number harvested using the following formula (see equation 3): Therefore, since 8,000 fish (weighing a total of 10,000 lb) were harvested, you need to restock 8,000 fingerlings. 7)When all fish are harvested from a pond, restock the pond as soon as it is 1/4 to 1/2 full and stocker-size catfish are available.Feeding R emember No Feed, No Gain1)Feed size Match feed size to fish size. 2)Quality of feed use complete feed with vitamins added. Above 65 ( F (18.3 ( C) use floating feed. Use sinking feed when water temperatures are lower. 3)Feeding rates Several factors that control the amount of food fish w ill eat are: temperature, water quality (oxygen, pH, ammonia, etc.), food size, palatability or taste of f ood, frequency of feeding, the way the fish are fed, location of feeding sites, and whether floating or sinking pellets are used.

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Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers Pa g e 7July 1997As a rule of thumb, feed 2 to 3 percent of the weightdevelop your own system or use the forms in the of the fish in the pond daily when water temperatures areappendix. 65 ( F (18.3 ( C) or higher. Feed 1 percent of the body weight every other day when water temperatures are lower than 60 ( F (15.5 ( C). When water temperature is above 90 ( F feed intake is usually reduced. Adjust amount fed every two weeks by obtaining a sample of fish from the pond, weighing the sample, and counting the number in the sample. Then use the following formula to calculate the weight of food to feed per acre daily for the next two weeks (see equation 4): Limit feeding to a maximum of 100 lb per acre per day. Exceeding this rate can result in severe water qua lity problems that can be difficult to manage. Table 6, Table 7, Table 8 and Table 9 are guides to show the amount to feed based on average expected gains at stocking rates of 1,000 5 or 7-inch fingerlings per acre. If you have stocked 2,000 catfish per acre, mu ltiply the amount to feed daily per acre by 2. If the pond was stocked with 3,500 per acre, mu ltiply the am ount to feed daily per acre by 3.5. Remember these tables are guides only and the amount you feed daily depends on your particular situation and all factors which influence daily feed consumption by catfish. Winter feeding as a management practice cannot be overstressed. Feed once daily in the morning as soon as water qua lity permits. According to recent research, after noon feeding results in excess fat rather than protein in the form of muscle tissue. Recordkeeping is a must for good management. You canWater Quality1)One key to successful catfish farming is an adequate supply of suitable water. Here are some water sources: Wells are most desirable because of year round availability and uniform quality; they are also free of fish that can transmit disease. Reservoirs or streams will work but can act as a source of wild fish, disease, and chemical contamination. Runoff is least desirable and not satisfactory for intensive culture since it is not available when needed. Can only refill p ond during rainy season, thus restricting harvest time. 2)Be prepared to check water for: Oxygen daily Ammonia every 7-10 days pH when ammonia is present Nitrites every 2-3 days Chlorides when nitrites are present Total Alkalinity before using copper sulfate See Management of water quality for fish Circular 715, for testing procedures; available from your county extension agent.Diseases and Treatment1)Observe fish daily to see the first sign of a disease. Signs that fish may be getting sick fall into two main categories: Behavior The way fish act, particularly a reduction in feeding activity, will often indicate the beginning of a disease. Physical appearance Check any abnormalities to see if a disease is starting. 2) Anything that prevents stress will reduce the chance of an infectious disease.

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Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers Pa g e 8July 1997IFAS Extension Veterinarian for Aquaculture, (904) Oxygen minimum of 4 ppm, maximum not to exceed 150 percent saturation for 4-6 hours. Temperature 33 ( F (0.6 ( C) to 120 ( F (48.9 ( C); don't ex ceed a rapid 10 ( F (5.6 ( C) increase or decrease. pH .4.5 to 10.5; best range is 6.5 to 9.0. Nutrients feed must contain all essential nutrients. Proper handling. Prevent toxins, natural or introduced, from entering pond. Maintain good water qua lity by preventing buildup of nitrite, ammonia, etc. 3)Before treating fish for disease there are several things you need to know: Prognosis. Feasibility of treating in facility where fish are located. Economics of treating. Does loss rate warrant treatment? 4)Before deciding on treatment to use, you must know these things: Water and how it will affect the treatment. Fish and how they will respond to the treatment. Chemical and its effectiveness in a particular situation. Disease and how it will respond to the treatment selected. 5)Calculation of Treatment Levels see Circular 716, "lntroduction to fish parasites and diseases and their treatment"; available from your county extension agent.What To Do If Fish Get Sick1.Sick fish can be submitted to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Service State Diagnostic Laboratories. Fish must be referred to these laboratories by a veterinarian. If you do not have a veterinarian who will see fish, you may contact Dr. Ruth Francis-Floyd, 392-9617. The two State Diagnostic Labs are located at Kissimmee and Live Oak, respectively: Mailing Address Kissimmee Diagnostic Lab P.O. Box 460 Kissimmee, FL 32741 Location 2700 N. Bermuda Avenue Kissimmee, FL 32741 (407)847-3185 Mailing Address Live Oak Diagnostic Lab P.O. Drawer 0 Live Oak, FL 32060 Location 912 Nobles Ferry Road Live Oak, FL 32060 (352)362-1216 2.Many fish disease problems are related to poor water quality. All commercial pr oducers should invest in a water quality test kit and learn how to use it and interpret the results. This assistance is available from IFAS Aquaculture Specialists in Gainesville, Seffner, and Blountstown. If you are unable to test your own water, assistance may be available from your county agent. If he/she does not have access to a water quality test kit you may ship a water sample to your closest Aquaculture Extension Specialist. These people are located at the locations listed below. Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture 7922 NW 71 Street Gainesville, FL 32606 (352)392-9617 Hillsbor ough County Extension Office 5339 State Road 579 Seffner, FL 33584 (813)621-5605 Northwest Florida Aquaculture Farm P.O. Box 754 Blountstown, FL 32424 (904) 674-3184

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Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers Pa g e 9July 19973. If you suspect a fish kill is caused by a pesticide, contact Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, (904) 487-2130.Off-Flavor The only way to correct flavor problems is to put affected fish into clean water for 3 to 10 days.Control of Undesirable FishThere are two ways to control undesirable fish: 1)Complete eradication of all fish either by: Drain and dry ponds. Rotenone Use 3 pounds of 5% rotenone powder or 6 pints of 2.5% emulsifiable rotenone per acre foot of water. Use only when water temperature is above 70 ( F (21.1 ( C). 2)Selective Removal of Scale Fish Fintrol (Antimycin A) Legal to use. Used at 1/5 the recommended rate is satisfactory and economical. Use early in the morning when pH is less than 8.5 to reduce cost of treating.Aquatic Weed ControlHave problem weed identified by county agent. Calculate pond area and volume to be treated. Choose most economical and effective control method. Follow label instructions. See "Weed control in aquaculture and farm ponds," Circular 707 for more information, available from your county extension agent.HARVESTINGYou must decide whether to do your own harvesting or hire a custom harvester. If you do your own harvesting, the equipment and labor required depend on the number, size, and shape of your ponds. Basic equipment required: hydraulic-powered seine reel mounted on a 2-wheel trailer; 3 feet of seine for every 2 feet of pond width; should be 10 feet deep and have floats and mud line; 14 foot john boat with seine bracket on front and powered with a 10-25 h.p.motor; boom truck with hoist; in-line scales, and fish basket; 2 tractors with hydraulic system for pulling seine; cutting seines or live cars; dip nets, waders, gloves, etc.; emergency aeration equipment. Stretch the seine across one end and pull it by the tractors toward the end with the inflow pipe. It is necessary for two men to get in the water and move with the seine, using a foot to keep the mud line on the bottom. After fish are concentrated at one end, load the fish in the basket, hoist it up to the live-haul truck, record weight, and then put in hauling tank containing water. If you decide to use custom harvesting, here are some things you need to know: Cost varies, but is usually 3-5 cents per pound. Contact custom harvester well ahead of anticipated harvest for scheduling purposes and to determine cost. Be sure you have a market and fish are on-flavor. Find out what equipment you are expected to provide.

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Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers Pa g e 10July 1997APPENDIX (These tables are based on temperatures that you would expect to find in north Florida during a normal year. For other areas of Florida, where higher temperatures are encountered, these tables would have to be adjusted.) Table 6. Table 7. Table 8. Table 9. Daily Feeding Record. Weekly Pond Record. Recap & Adjustment Calculations for Feed Fed. Pond Conversion Ratio Calculations.Table 6 Feedin g g uide based on avera g e expected g ains with a feed conversion of 1.75 at a stockin g rate of 1,000 5-inch fin g erlin g s per acre. DatesWaterCol. 1 Wt ofCol. 2 % ofCol. 3 Wt. ofCol. 4Col. 5Col. 6 No. Col. 7 Temp, ( F1,000 Fish atBod y WtFood Fed/Conver-Gain inof Feedin g Gain in lb. Be g innin g Fed Dail y Acre/Da y 1,000sionLb. PerDa y sPer Period FishDa y 3/15-3155-6034 1.0 0.3 1.750.2173.4 4/1-1560-6537.4 1.5 0.6 1.750.3154.5 4/16-3065-7041.9 2.0 0.8 1.750.5157.5 5/1-1570-7549.4 2.5 1.2 1.750.71510.5 5/16-3175-8059.9 3.0 1.8 1.751.01616.0 6/1-1580-8575.9 3.0 2.3 1.751.31519.5 6/16-3085-9095.4 3.0 2.9 1.751.71525.5 7/1-1590-95120.93.0 3.6 1.752.11530.9 7/16-3190-95151.83.0 4.6 1.752.61641.6 8/1-1590-100193.43.0 5.8 1.753.31549.5 8/16-3190-95242.93.0 7.3 1.754.21667.2 9/1-1585-90310.13.0 9.3 1.755.31579.5 9/16-3075-85389.63.0 11.71.756.715100.5 10/1-1565-75490.12.5 12.31.757.015105.0 10/16-3160-65595.12.0 11.91.756.816108.8 11/1-1555-60703.91.5 10.61.756.11591.5 Total Expected Wei g ht of Fish = 795.4 lb Total Wei g ht of Food Fed = 1331.2 lb Method of calculatin g pro j ected g rowth of fish durin g y ear: ( 1 ) Column 1 x Column 2 / 100 = Column 3 ( 2 ) Column 3 / Column 4 = Column 5 ( 3 ) Column 5 x Column 6 = Column 7 ( 4 ) Column 7 + Column 1 = Column 1 next time period

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Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers Pa g e 11July 1997Table 7 Feedin g g uide based on avera g e expected g ains with a feed conversion of 1.5 at a stockin g rate of 1 ,000 5-inch fin g erlin g s per acre. DatesWaterCol. 1 Wt ofCol. 2 % ofCol. 3 Wt. ofCol. 4Col. 5 GainCol. 6 No. Col. 7 Temp, ( F1,000 Fish atBod y WtFood Fed/Conversionin Lb. Perof Feedin g Gain in Be g innin g Fed Dail y Acre/Da y Da y Da y sLb. Per 1,000 FishPeriod 3/15-3155-6034.01.00.31.50.2173.4 4/1-1560-6537.41.50.61.50.4156.0 4/16-3065-7043.42.00.91.50.6159.0 5/1-1570-7552.42.51.31.50.91513.5 5/16-3175-8065.93.02.01.51.31620.8 6/1-1580-8586.73.02.61.51.71525.5 6/16-3085-90112.23.03.41.52.31534.5 7/1-1590-95146.73.04.41.52.91543.5 7/16-3190-95190.23.05.71.53.81660.8 8/1-1590-100251.03.07.51.55.01575.0 8/16-3190-95326.03.09.81.56.516104.0 9/1-1585-90430.03.012.91.58.615129.0 9/16-3075-85599.03.016.81.511.215168.0 10/1-1565-75727.02.518.21.512.115181.5 10/16-3160-65908.52.018.21.512.116193.6 11/1-1555-601102.11.516.51.511.015165.0 Total Expected Wei g ht of Fish = 1267.1 lb Total Wei g ht of Food Fed = 1852.8 lb Method of calculatin g pro j ected g rowth of fish durin g y ear: ( 1 ) Column 1 x Column 2 / 100 = Column 3 ( 2 ) Column 3 / Column 4 = Column 5 ( 3 ) Column 5 x Column 6 = Column 7 ( 4 ) Column 7 + Column 1 = Column 1 next time period

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Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers Pa g e 12July 1997Table 8 Feedin g g uide based on avera g e expected g ains with a feed conversion of 1.5 at a stockin g rate of 1,000 7-inch fin g erlin g s per acre. DatesWaterCol. 1 Wt ofCol. 2 % ofCol. 3 Wt. ofCol. 4Col. 5 GainCol. 6 No. of Col. 7 Gain Temp, ( F1,000 Fish atBod y WtFood Fed/Conversionin Lb. PerFeedin g in Lb Per Be g inin g Fed Dail y Acre/Da y 1,000 Da y Da y sPeriod Fish 3/15-3155-6094.01.00.91.50.61710.2 4/1-1560-65104.21.51.61.51.11516.5 4/16-3065-70120.72.02.41.51.61524.0 5/1-1570-75144.72.53.61.52.41536.0 5/16-3175-80180.73.05.41.53.61657.6 6/1-1580-85238.33.07.11.54.71570.5 6/16-3085-90308.83.09.31.56.21593.0 7/1-1590-95401.83.012.11.58.115121.5 7/16-3190-95523.33.015.71.510.516168.0 8/1-1590-100691.33.020.01.513.315199.5 8/16-3190-95890.82.520.01.513.316212.8 9/1-1585-901103.61.820.01.513.315199.5 9/16-3075-851303.11.520.01.513.315199.5 Total Expected Wei g ht of Fish = 1502.6 lb Total Wei g ht of Food Fed = 2114.4 lb Method of calculatin g pro j ected g rowth of fish durin g y ear: ( 1 ) Column 1 x Column 2 / 100 = Column 3 ( 2 ) Column 3 / Column 4 = Column 5 ( 3 ) Column 5 x Column 6 = Column 7 ( 4 ) Column 7 + Column 1 = Column 1 next time period

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Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers Pa g e 13July 1997Table 9 Feedin g g uide based on avera g e expected g ains with a feed conversion of 1.75 at a stockin g rate of 1,000 7-inch fin g erlin g s per acre. Dates WaterCol. 1 Wt ofCol. 2 % ofCol. 3 Wt. ofCol. 4Col. 5Col. 6 No. Col. 7 Temp, ( F1,000 Fish atBod y WtFood Fed/ConversionGain inof Feedin g Gain in Lb Be g inin g Fed Dail y Acre/Da y Lb. PerDa y sPer Period 1,000 FishDa y 3/15-3155-6094.01.0 0.9 1.750.5174.4 4/1-15 60-6598.41.5 1.5 1.750.91513.5 4/16-3065-70111.92.0 2.2 1.751.31519.5 5/1-15 70-75131.42.5 3.3 1.751.91528.5 5/16-3175-80159.93.0 4.8 1.752.71643.2 6/1-15 80-85203.13.0 6.1 1.753.51552.5 6/16-3085-90255.63.0 7.7 1.754.41566.0 7/1-15 90-95321.63.0 9.6 1.755.51582.5 7/16-3190-95404.13.0 12.11.756.916103.5 8/1-1590-100507.63.0 15.21.758.715130.5 8/16-3190-95638.13.0 19.11.7510.916174.4 9/1-15 85-90812.52.5 20.01.7511.415171.0 9/16-3075-85983.52.0 20.01.7511.415171.0 10/1-1565-751154.51.7 20.01.7511.415171.0 10/16-3160-651325.51.5 20.01.7511.416182.4 11/1-1555-601507.91.3 20.01.7511.415171.0 Total Expected Wei g ht of Fish = 1678.9 lb. Total Wei g ht of Food Fed = 2795.3 lb. Method of calculatin g pro j ected g rowth of fish durin g y ear: ( 1 ) Column 1 x Column 2 / 100 = Column 3 ( 2 ) Column 3 / Column 4 = Column 5 ( 3 ) Column 5 x Column 6 = Column 7 ( 4 ) Column 7 + Column 1 = Column 1 next time period

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Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers Pa g e 14July 1997

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Guide for Prospective Catfish Farmers Pa g e 15July 1997