Engaging Volunteers through ISOTURES: Recognition of Volunteer Success

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ ( Publisher's URL )

Material Information

Title:
Engaging Volunteers through ISOTURES: Recognition of Volunteer Success
Physical Description:
Fact Sheet
Creator:
Terry, Bryan D.
Publisher:
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

Acquisition:
Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status:
Published
General Note:
"First published October 2010"
General Note:
"4-H 6.9"

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID:
IR00003711:00001


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Full Text

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Bryan D. Terry, Rick Godke, Bill Heltemes, and Lori Wiggins2 The longer a volunteer is involved in the 4-H program, the more likely they are to notice when the elements of good volunteer management are not in place. Dynamics of effective volunteer program management Why is recognition and behavior related? What is a recognition system? What is informal recognition? What is formal recognition? Do I need both informal and formal recognition for volunteers? Are there any rules that would guide recognition strategies?

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Engaging Volunteers through ISOTURES: Recognition of Volunteer Success 2

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Engaging Volunteers through ISOTURES: Recognition of Volunteer Success 3 Give it or else! Give it frequently Give it in a variety of methods From 4-H Youth receiving services From 4-H and county office staff for being a part of the Extension organization From 4-H and the county extension office for services provided From 4-H for being part of the team Give it honestly. Give it to the person not the work. Give it appropriately to the achievement. Give it consistently. Give it on a timely basis. Give it in an individualized fashion. Give it to encourage more participation.

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Engaging Volunteers through ISOTURES: Recognition of Volunteer Success 4 Voluntary Action, 5 Volunteer Management The New Breed: Understanding and Equipping the 21st Century Volunteer Recruiting, Retaining, and Rewarding Volunteers: What Volunteers Have to Say Motivational theories about "what" motivates individuals Harvard Business Review Exploration in Personality. Motivation and Personality. Motivational theories about "how" people are motivated Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, Work and Motivation