Forging a Collaborative Structure for Sustaining Scholarly Access to the Baldwin Library for Historical Children's Literature

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Forging a Collaborative Structure for Sustaining Scholarly Access to the Baldwin Library for Historical Children's Literature
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Mini-Grant Application
Creator:
Alteri, Suzan ( Author, Primary )
Minson, Val
Walker, Ben
Taylor, Laurie N.
Carey, Jane Anne
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George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
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Gainesville, FL
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Abstract:
Mini-Grant Proposal for establishing a Baldwin Library Scholar's Council. In partnership with the Department of English.
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Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Suzan Alteri.

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University of Florida Institutional Repository
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University of Florida
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02 Cove r s h ee t _20 1 3 20 1 4 -P os t e d d ocx. 05115/ 20 1 3 2013 2014 Smathers Libraries Mini Grant APPLICATION COVER SHEET Application due: Tuesday, October 15, 2013, 5:00PM l.check here if this is your first grant application where you will be serving as a principal investigator (Pl) Principal Investigator (Pl) Name : Suzan Alteri Department: SASC Email : salteri@ufl.edu Phone : 273-2870 Additional project applicants please give name email and brief role for each: Dr Kenneth Kidd kbkidd@ufl.edu Partner Dr Kidd is a partner on the mini-grant and will work closely with the Pl and the project team to provide oversight and planning of the two-day meeting Title of grant application project: Forging a Collaborative Structure for Sustaining Scholarly Access to the Baldwin Library of Historical Children s Literature Project abstract (no more than 100 words) : This mini-grant will bring representatives from both the scholarly and library community together for the Baldwin Library of Histor i cal Children s Literature in Gainesville for a two day meeting Through the meetings and discussions the group will develop a fully proposed plan for the Baldwin Scholarly Council for submiss i on to the Deans of the Libraries for their review discussion and eventual implementation. As well the group will be asked for scholarly and library viewpoints regarding a future project for external funding on early American and British Children s Literature and Religious Tracts Funds requested (Limit of $5,000) : _$4, 983 ____ Describe how the 10% mandatory cost share w ill be met (be specific) : The Pro j ect team will meet the cost share requirement: Laur i e Taylor will devote 1 % of her time ( $742 00) Val M i nson will devote 1 % of he r t i me ( $778.00 ) and Ben Walker i s devot ing 1 % of his t i me ( $958 00) for a total of $1,478.00) which exceeds the required 10% cost share Please l i st the library resources/departments to be used in this project and the name of the person authoriz ing the intended use and date authorized Each authorizing person must init ial their approval and ava i lability of resources for th i s project. If you need more room continue on a separate page Resou r ces Required for Project as applicable Authoriz ing Individual includin cost share contributions Diane Bruxvoort Ben Walker D i rector ILF D i ane Bruxvoort Approving Initials Date Authorized I confirm receipt of approvals from all project team members to participate in this project as described in the narrative and budget: Pl Signature I 0 I L-\ -lo\ 3 Date t o -tljZo/3 Date P age I of I

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Forging a Collaborative Structure for Sustaining Scholarly Access to the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature Project Description : The project, Forging a Collabora tive Structure for Sustaining Scholarly Access to the Bald win Library of Historical Children’s Literature (Baldwin Library), seeks to leverage relationships in the Department of English (Mini-Grant Partner), other humanities departments, and nationally recognized scholars in: 1. Establishing a scholars council with local and nationa l participation, and Smathers Libraries endorsement 2. Increasing multidisciplinary research by local, national, and international scholars and graduate students 3. Preparing for submission to external federal and private funding agencies, including planning for a collaborative digital collection of Early American an d British Juvenile Literature and Religious Tracts 4. Creating protocols and testing a distributed digiti zation process based on the successful dLOC model 5. Assisting and informing the Curator of the Baldwin Libr ary of scholarly trends in children’s literature and related fields for program development, digitization priorities, and other related activities 6. Formalizing guidelines for paid and volunteer positions that provide support to enhance scholarly access Scholars Council The Baldwin Library will host a two-day planning meeting w ith scholars from the University of Florida (UF) and established scholars and curators from the larger academic world in the fields of children’s literature, the humanities, and special collections. The two-day meeting will establis h the specific function, roles, and responsibilities for the Scholars Council, which will comprise faculty from mu ltiple departments on campus as well as scholars from outside the university (see attached list). The two-day planning meeting will have various agenda items, but major talking points through guided brainstorming and discussion will be: Establishing the role(s) of a schol ars council in the Baldwin Library Determining the roles for scholars involved in the council Formalizing library / scholar partnerships for future project development Once the participants have outlined the function, roles, and responsibilities of the Baldwin Library Scholars Council, discussion will plan for an externally funded digitization project for Early American and British Juvenile Literature and Religious Tracts. Attendees will test and evaluate a prototype site for the Early American and British Juvenile Literature and Religious Tracts, and potential discussion points will be: Identify potential partner institutions and historical societies to digitize holdings Design and usability of digital collection for faculty, students, and scholars Possibility of external funding for continuation of the digital project Once the meeting is completed, the project team will sy nthesize the notes and decisions and prepare a report for review by attendees for final feedback before the proposal for the scholars council is submitted to the Deans of the Libraries for review, discussion, and implementation. Preparation of a Multi-instit utional collaborative project Early American children’s literature is defined as any publ ication produced during the US colonial period through 1823 when the United States began developing its own significant publishing industry and market. After 1823 until around 1860, most children’s literature and learning ma terials were produced by religious societies for mass consumption. These materials were often printed on cheap paper in chapbook style format so the burgeoning working and lower middle classes could afford books for their children. The connection between Early American children’s literature, which borrowed much from Great Britai n, and the subsequent religious tracts illustrate the shift from the colonial period into nation building. This transitio n is crucial not only for the field of children’s literature, but also for cultural studies, gender studies, history, religion, education, and the history of the book. This project will prepare a prototype online site with mate rials from the Baldwin Library Digital Collection as well as new materials to be digitized by the Baldwin Student Assistant. The Curator and the Baldwin assistant will choose new materials from the physical collection. Af ter the materials are chosen, the Baldwin Assistant will digitize select materials on a flatbed scanner to test and determine a viable workflow for use by other institutions. Testing and creating these workflows are important for th e universal implementation of digitization in smaller libraries and historical societies who may have limited resources at their disposal. This prototype online site and the

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workflow will be presented during the two-day planning meeting so participants can discuss the possibility of applying for external funding to create the multi-institutiona l digital project. This future possible grant opportunity will support instructional needs by allowing professors at UF and other universities to use the Early American and British Juvenile Literature and Religious Tracts digital collection. Importance of Project The Baldwin Library is a nationally and internationally renowned collection of historical children’s literature. Every year, scholars from the United States and other countries vi sit the physical collection housed in the Department of Special and Area Studies Collections, and even more sc holars conduct research from the Baldwin Library’s extensive digital collection ( http://ufdc.ufl.edu/juv ). The Baldwin Library is the second largest collection of children’s literature books in the U. S., and has the most holdings of Early American and British children’s literature and religious tracts of any other academic institution in the U.S. The significance of these holdings can have a substantial impact on scholarship for historians, literary scholars, religious scholars, cultural studies specialists, Americanists, women’s studies specialists, and those studying the history of the book if properly presented to this diverse group of scholars. The holdings in the Baldwin Library go beyond their value as research materials within the field of children’s literature alone. Current Situation : The largest audience, and almost exclusive partner, is the Department of English due to its nationally-recognized Children’s Literature Program and the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture, which is led by Dr. John Cech. Since the inception of the Baldwin Library at UF in 1982, previous curators have served on the board of the Center and given instruction sessions and guidance to undergraduate and graduate students in English. It is important for the Baldwin Library to continue this connection while also expanding its vision to embrace work with other humanities departments on campus. Although the Baldwin Library works closely with the Ce nter for Children’s Literature and Culture and the Department of English, this Center is currently not a resource for scholarship and research. The Baldwin Library has no structure in place that allows for sc holarly input to meet the needs of the collection for researchers. Due to the Baldwin Library’s reputation and popularity on campus and with researchers from around the world, the curator functions as both the manager of the collection and program director. Currently, the Baldwin Library offers an annual Speaker Series that brings scholars and children’ s authors to campus, a regular program of physical and online exhibits as well as traveling exhibits to other institutions, pursuing digital publishing ventures with materials from the Baldwin Library, and working with the DLC to have materials digitized for online courses. As distance learning efforts continue to increase at UF, it is expected that the demand for digital materials also will continue to increase. Benefits to the Libraries, teaching, and scholarship The curator’s position has changed over the past five years. It has become one in which the curator, to increase use of the Baldwin Library, has added numerous outreach ac tivities to expand the audience and research base. This project seeks to address the “lone ranger” approach to th e Baldwin Library by incorpor ating a scholars council to offer input on scholarly tren ds and outreach activities. By establishing a scholars council that supports and guides certain initiatives, the Baldwin Library will be better equi pped for multidisciplinary research from scholars and graduate students at UF and those within the larger academic community. The scholars council will re-position the collection among pe er institutions while fostering historical research in multiple disciplines. Forming a scholars council for the Baldwin Library meets the mission and goals of the Libraries: convening scholars from the humanities areas assists the Baldwi n Library in providing access to all relevant forms of knowledge; it provides a sounding board for research and instructional needs of the Libraries; it informs on trends in the field of children’s literature; and, leverages the rich materials in the Baldwin Library for other humanities departments beyond English. The benefits of the prototype site incl ude: the ability of faculty and graduate t eaching assistants to be able to access these online materials for use in course s; the scanned materials will also allo w scholars and researchers to access the rich material only available at UF; and usage of site to attract partners from other academic institutions and historical societies for a future collaborative grant proposal.

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Project comparison Although no formal informatio n regarding the use of Scholarly Councils and the library at an y academic institution was found, information on scholarly councils or advisory boards from museums, the Library of Congress, and academic councils not affiliated with the library of an academic institution is availabl e online. A summary of the findings is below: All scholarly councils or advisory boards are set-up to provide support and advice to expand awareness of the institution and its goals, promote educational ef forts, and act as advocates for the institution. Some scholarly councils or advisory boards assist with the development of an intellectual agenda or identifying issues and trends, advice, and guidan ce for research (Smithsoni an Museum of African American History and Culture; University of North Carolina’s Tomorrow Scholars Council). One scholarly council asked of its members to provid e perspectives and heighten intellectual conversation (Theatre for a New Audience). Most scholarly councils stress that the roles of the memb ers are strictly advisory in nature, usually to assist with development and advancement of the program’s goals and mission. The council or board is used on an as needed basis. Of particular interest was the Library of Congress’s Scholars Council for the John W. Kluge Center. This council, “Through discussion and reflection, assists in implementing an American tradition of linking the activities of thinkers and doers, those who are engaged in the world of ideas with those engaged in the world of affairs,” ( http://www.loc.gov/loc/kluge/scholars/ ). This council is advisory in nature and related to matters on scholarship. The council also has a charter, which states the importance for strong links between the library and the scholarly world and thus needs a council to offer advice on scholarly issues of import to increase opp ortunities to interact with one another. Members of the council advise the librarian on trends and developments related to fields of inquiry in relation to the library’s collections, exhibitions, and other programmatic possibilities. The Scholars Council for the John W. Kluge Center most fits the model for the potential Baldwin Library Scholars Council due to its links to scholars and the library and its advisory nature. Although not all aspects of this council are pertinent for the Baldwin Library Scholars Council, this is a good starting point for discussion. The two peer children’s literature collections – the Cent er for Children’s Literature Research (CLRC) at the University of Minnesota and the de Grummond Collection at the University of Southern Mississippi – do not have any type of scholarly council or advisory board. The Kerlan Collection at the CLRC does have a “Friends of the Kerlan” group, which is expected to “advocate for the library and encourage appreciation for and the use and support of this unique and rare resource,” ( https://www.lib.umn.edu/clrc/kerlan-friends ). In addition, the “Friends of the Kerlan” are responsible for raising funds through the sa le of notecards and other items and sponsorship of two annual awards. The CLRC’s collections, ar e focused mostly on contemporary materials. They do not have the range of historical materials that are held in the Baldwin Library nor do they have an active digitization program, although the University Libraries of the Univ ersity of Minnesota is part of the Google Books Digitization Project. The De Grummond Collection located at the University of Southern Mississippi is also a leading children’s literature collection both nationally and internationally. Like the Baldwin Library, its main focus is on American and British children’s literature. They also have a large collect ion of original archival materials. The De Grummond Collection does have an active digitization program with about 1000 items digitized to date. Although the De Grummond does collect in the same area as the Baldwin Library, it does not have strengths in historical materials. According to their online catalog they have between 50-100 early materials and only 50 early American items. However, neither the CLRC nor the De Grummond Collection have a distributed model for digitizing materials with partner institutions, nor do either have an official scholars council that advises the curator on trends, setting guidelines for working with graduate or undergraduate student interns and volunteers, or creating workflows and protocols for other institutions to contribute to a multi-institutional project. Since no other academic instit ution with collections in children’s literatu re has the depth and comparative materials held in the Baldwin Library on early American and British children’s literature, the future digital collection opens a new vein of research and teaching opportunities, and allows for the discovery of new texts to a broad audience. The only institution that has more early American materials (but not British) than the Baldwin Library is the American Antiquarian Society, which is not an academic institution. All of the comparative academic institutions do not have the breadth of materials held in the Baldwin Library, however, some institutions and historical societies do own

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materials the Baldwin Library does not have, which is why forging collaborations as the foundation for future digital collection expansion projects is so important. Resources needed The Mini-Grant funding resources needed include: conven ing visiting scholars at UF and a student to digitize selected materials for the prototype s ite and develop workflows for digitizing. Other resources will include space for the meeting and cost-share for project team members suppo rting efforts to convene visiting scholars and assist during the two-day meeting. Please note the prototype site is currently dark, awaiting the digitization of materials The PI will provide effort for selecting materials and veri fying the catalog records for digitization, developing any materials related to the meeting, planning the meeting, overseeing the project as a whole, supervising the Baldwin Assistant during her work on the mini-grant. In addition, the PI will develop materials, including the proposal for a scholars council, a report on the feasibility of the Early American and British Juvenile Literature and Religious Tracts digital collection for possible future funding, and information which may be used in an article. Because the PI will verify the catalog records and the Baldwin Assistan t will provide digitization and workflows, use of the cataloging department and the DLC is not needed. Activity timeline Nov. – Dec., 2013 PI convenes project team to discuss creation of invitations to be sent out to selected scholars, finalize invitation January 2014 PI and Dr. Kenneth Kidd send out invitations January 2014 PI and Baldwin Asst. select and pull 100 books for digitization February 2014 PI and Kidd determine tiere d levels for potential visiting scholars March 2014 PI convenes project team for planning agenda for meeting March 2014 PI and Grants Manager prepare list of prospective funders and a sample checklist of application requirements April 2014 Project team meets to prepare logistics of meeting April 2014 Project team meets to re view prototype site and workflows April 2014 PI sends required documentation to visiting scholars for honoraria May 2014 PI and Kidd finalize attendees and agenda May 2014 Project team finalizes any final preparations May/June 2014 Two-day meeting is held at UF July 2014 Project team meets to review meeting survey results July 2014 PI prepares and submits report and recommendations of meeting September 2014 PI and Kidd meet with Deans of Libraries for feedback and revisions October 2014 PI prepares final reports on mini-grant Collection ownership and copyright There are no copyright issues for materials since all collection items fall within the public domain. Evaluation of project and final product Project success is determined by the de livery of: An ou tline level of satisfaction and productivity in meeting agenda goals, number of scholars agree to continue participation and the final product will be a proposal for the Baldwin Library Scholars Council submitted to the Deans of the Libraries for review, discussion, and implementation. Financial implications There are no long-term financial implications for this pr oject. The scholars council will not cost the George A. Smathers or the Baldwin Library any monies since the council’s members will serve vo luntarily. If the Baldwin Scholars Council is approved, the group will meet either vi rtually or in-person. Funding for in-person meetings is the responsibility of Council members.

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Budget Narrative Explanation of Expenses Honoraria ($4000) : This honoraria is for scholars and/or curators from outside UF who are unable to receive funding from their home ins titution. The $4000 allotm ent will allow for five scholars at $800 each to be able to attend the two-day planning meeting. The $800 is to be used to cover partial cost of travel expenses. Given the high interest of many children’s literature scholars in visiting the Baldwin for research, it is anticipated that some scholars will obtain fundin g from their home institution to visit UF. The PI and Kidd will develop a tiered list so that the five scholars or curators deemed most important to attend receive the opportunity of an honorarium first. If certain schol ars or curators are unable to attend others from the list will be selected. OPS funds for stud ent worker ($983) : This expense is calculated at $10/hour for 10 hours per week plus fringe for a total of 94 hours. The student will be requ ired to work on the digitization and preparation of workflows for other institutions. This will enable the cr eation of the mock site that will be evaluated and discussed during the two-day planning meeting. Justification of expenses Honoraria : Due to the Baldwin Library’s national and intern ational reputation, it is necessary for scholars and curators from outside UF to be able to attend the two-day planning meeting for a scholars council and future funding proposal. It is expected that the scholars council be comprised of not only scholars from UF, but also scholars from other academic institutions w ith strong children’s literature programs. Members of the Department of English believe that an honorarium for travel expenses be offered to ensure that at least five experts are able to attend the planning meeting. Although it is possible that scholars will be able to receive money from their own institu tions, this cannot be as sumed as a guarantee. Both the PI and the Partner (Kidd) believe that a tiered list is the best way to solicit scholar attendance. OPS funds : The student will work closely with the PI in digitizing a select number of early American and British titles for the mock site. In addition, the st udent will develop various workflow processes and refinement of these processes for smaller institutions that might want to be involved in the future proposal for external funding. The student will document all processes for use by other institutions and time test the workflows for institutions that have little resources (d esktop computer, flatbed scanner). The student also will look into free software for leveling and cropp ing and use SobekCM for uploading metadata and scanned files. Given the technological and bibliographi c skill set and knowledge required to complete this project a $10/hour rate is appropriate. The 94 hours are sufficient for successful completion of digitization, workflows, and mock site. Roles and Cost Share Role of the Principal Investigator : The PI is the primary coordinator, liaison, and convener for the twoday meeting, developing all meeting materials, planni ng the meeting, and directing meeting conversations productively. In addition, the PI is responsible for supervising the student worker to make sure project deadlines are met. Working with Kidd from the Departme nt of English, the PI also will invite scholars and curators and maintain the tiered list of scholars/cur ators who are attending or unable to attend. Upon completion of the two-day meeting, it is the PI’s responsibility to collect data and write a report on whether the two-day meeting goals were met as well as preparing a proposal for the Baldwin Library Scholars Council for the Deans of the University Libraries. Role of the Project Team : The project team will assist the PI in developing the invitations to participants, planning the agenda and logistics, and reviewing the mock site for the two-day meeting. The team will participate in the two-day session as facilitators, note ta kers, and logistical assistants. In addition, after the two-day meeting is completed, the project team will assist in compiling data and notes from the two-day meeting and reviewing the final report and proposal.

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04-Budget_Form_2012-2013-Posted.xlsx, 08/15/2012 Please add lines to table as needed. If you need help completing this form, please contact Bess de Farber, PH# 273-2519. 1. Salaries and Wages (no fringe benefits required) Name of PersonSalary times % of effortGrant FundsCost ShareTotal Alteri, Suzan60,480 X 5%$0.00$3,024.00$3,024.00 Taylor, Laurie74,167 X 1%$0.00$742.00$742.00 Minson, Val77,782 X 1%$0.00$778.00$778.00 Walker, Ben95,844 X 1%$0.00$958.00$958.00 Perlini, Claudia (OPS)$10 X 94 hours + fringe$983.00$0.00$983.00 SUBTOTAL $983.00$5,502.00$6,485.00 2. Equipment ItemQuantity times CostGrant FundsCost ShareTotal $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 SUBTOTAL $0.00$0.00$0.00 3. Supplies ItemQuantity times CostGrant FundsCost ShareTotal $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 SUBTOTAL $0.00$0.00$0.00 4. Travel From/To# of people/# of daysGrant FundsCost ShareTotal $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 SUBTOTAL $0.00$0.00$0.00 5. Other (Vendor costs, etc. Provide detail in Budget Narrative section.) ItemQuantity times costGrant FundsCost ShareTotal Honoraria5 visiting scholars X $800$4,000.00$0.00$4,000.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 SUBTOTAL $4,000.00$0.00$4,000.00 Grant FundsCost ShareTotal Total Direct Costs (add subtotals of items 1-5) $4,983.00$5,502.00$10,485.00 Mini Grant Budget Form 2013-2014 Page 1 of 1

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APPENDIX A: LETTERS OF SUPPORT 1. Dr. John Cech, Professor of English and Director of the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture 2. Dr. John Ingram, Interim Curator, Harold and Mary Jean Hanson Rare Book Collection

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October 9, 2013 Recommendation for: Forging a Collaborative Structure for Sustaining Scholarly Access to the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature It is with great pleasure that I write in support of Suzan Alteri’s proposal to convene an initial, multi-day Baldwin Library Scholar’s Council meeting to discuss and advance long-term plans fo r the scholarly uses of the Baldwin Library. Such a meeting is long over due and especially relevant to the development of strategies for establishing important goals for the resources of the Baldwin Library within the various communities of scholars here and on national and international levels that ha ve special interests in its remarkable holdings. One of the issues that has affected the Baldwin Library since its official opening in 1982 has been the lack of a coherent an d sustained approach to creating a high degree of visibility for the collection, which is perhaps the most unique and extensive assemblage of children’s books in English in the world today. The challenge of bringing about such visibili ty depends, in part, on the development of a core group of scholars who are ac tively engaged in a wide range of initiatives on the Baldwin’s behalf. Suzan Alteri is the perfect person to le ad such an important effort. In the relatively short time that she has been the curator of the Baldwin Library, she has become an active member of the scho larly community, a tireless spokesperson for the collection, and an especially fo rward-thinking director of the Baldwin’s functions. She has given the library a new expansive profile – through the lecture series that she has launched, the ongoing exhibitions that she has created, and the many lectures about the holdings of the library that she has generously given. Among the invigorating aspects of her tenure as curator are her spirit of openness to new ideas, and her willingne ss to move the collection in fresh, productive directions. I wholeheartedly endorse this initiative and urge its funding. Yours sincerely, John Cech Professor of English Director, Center for Children’s Literature & Culture

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UFFLORIDA George A. Smathers Libraries Depa rhnent of Specia I and Area Studies Collections October 12, 20 I 3 Letter of Support for the following GASL Mini-Grant proposal : 208 Smathers Library PO Box 117005 Gainesville, FL 32611-7005 352-273-2755 352-846-2746 Fax www.uflib.ufl.edu I spec/ Forging a Collaborative Structure for Sustaining Scholarly Access to the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature I am pleased to write this letter of support for Suzan Alteri 's proposal to convene a two-day planning session through which to create a Baldwin Library Scholars Council and to lay the foundations for the roles this group of scholars and curators can play in advancing the reputation and increased use of the Baldwin and its collections. The Baldwin Library and its curators have made admirable strides in the past two decades in increasing awareness of the collection's potential for multifaceted applications to many areas of humanistic research The numbers of researchers have consistently increased during this period as word of the collection s rich scholarly resources has spread Not only have external researchers mined the collection (including the Bechtel Fellows) but undergraduate and graduate student use of the Baldwin s holdings has also accelerated due principally to the former and current curatorial outreach to the University of Florida's humanities departments, almost exclusively the Department of E nglish It is now time to move forward in a more systematic and comprehensive manner to identify and advance both new and existing long-term plans for the scholarly uses of the Baldwin Library Hence the call to create the Scholars Council is very timely. Presuming success in creating thi s committed group of academics and curators among their objectives which are also the strongest components of the proposal are a) the call for collaboration among library curators and academic faculty within and beyond VF in setting prioritie s for digitization projects b) the proposal for increasing extramural accessibility and use of the Baldwin and c) the consideration for planning a future project for external funding on Early American and British Children s Literature and Religious Tracts Since Suzan Alteri s tenure began at UF she has demonstrated her ability to move existing programs forward (e.g., active acquisition by purchase and donation of individual and collective research resources ; increased activity in having UF classes use the Baldwin ; proactive willingness to participate in exhibitions and present lectures on the Baldwin etc ) as well as implement new programs (scholars lecture series) or integrate new approaches into existing initiatives such as conjoining materials from the Baldwin with other collections (e.g., Rare Books) to provide cross-over resources for both undergraduate and graduate courses and seminars as well as occasionally opening the eyes of some ofour veteran VF academics to the richness of our collections in support of their own research l have worked closely with Suzan the past eighteen months and I am confident that she bas the intellectual acumen and energy to make the outcomes of the Mini Grant she bas proposed likely realities. TI1e Scholars Council could become the paradigm by which other of UF' s specialized collections could model similar councils. It has become clear that the Baldwin Library is now well known and appreciated academically by the Department of English Now it is time for its resources to become better well known to other humanists both within and beyond UF The successful outcomes noted in this proposal would be a giant step in the right direction I endorse this initiative and urge its funding J er-l i,,v r ct-,I John E Ingram Interim Curator Harold and Mary Jean Hanson Rare Book Collection University of Florida The Foundation f o r The Gator Nation

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APPENDIX B: LETTERS OF COMMITMENT 1. Dr. Kenneth Kidd, Professor and Chair, Department of English 2. Dr. Judith Page, Professor of English and Chair of the Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research 3. Dr. Jodi Schorb, Assistant Professor, Department of English 4. Laurie Taylor, Digital Humanities Librarian, George A. Smathers Libraries

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College of Liberal Arts & Sciences 4008 Turlington Hall Department of English PO Box 117310 Gainesville, FL 32611 352-392-6650 352 392 0860 Fax October 10, 2013 Dear Colleagues, I am very pleased to write in support of Baldwin Cu rator Suzan Alteri's effort s to establish an advisory council of scholars for the Baldwin Library, and to be gin with a professional meeting of stakeholders and experts from UF and other institutions. I'm excite d by the possibility of developing further and formalizing the relationship of the Baldwin with the English Department and with the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the College of Education, and the Co llege of Fine Arts especially (perhaps also the UF School of Law, with whom we have worked on various projects). The Ba ldwin is one of the chief reasons I left my former job and joined UF in 1998. I worked closely with the previous Curator, Rita Smith, collaborating twice on a graduate seminar/workshop ca lled "Reading in the Baldwin," in which graduate students pursued individual as well as collaborative resear ch projects in the Baldwin. I've encouraged graduate and undergraduate students to use the Bald win, and have directed doctoral dissertations by students who made moderate to extensive use of its holdings: Megan Norcia, Catherine Tosenberger, Cathlena Martin, Aaron Talbot, Cari Keebaugh, Ramona Caponegr o, Lisa Dusenberry, and Marilisa Jimenez Garcia (all of whom finished the PhD and are now happily employed – all but one teaching children's literature at the college level). Several artic le publications and at least one book (Norcia's) had their origins in those seminars. I've also occasiona lly served as mentor for the Bechtel Fellows, although my colleague John Cech has been the principal advisor for the program. Beyond my own investment in the Baldwin as a ch ildren's literature scholar, I can offer the broader support of the English Department. We have a number of faculty who have already been very involved with the Baldwin (especially Cech and Terry Harpold, but also Marsha Bryant), and we have other faculty who are seeking out more involvement, such as Judith Pa ge and Jodi Schorb. I am also a partner on this grant with Suzan and have already assisted with the de velopment of this grant. In addition, I will serve on the project team and attend the professional meeti ng of stakeholders and experts from UF and other institutions. If asked, I would be happy to serve as an advisor on this board. Individually and as a faculty, we are excited about the possibility of establishing a scholar's council, and we hope that Suzan's initiative can be funded, as an initial exploratory and brainstorming meeting of experts in children's literature, archive studies/special collections, early American culture, and related areas would be extremely beneficial. Please let me know if I can be of further help, and thanks for the consideration. Sincerely, Kenneth Kidd Professor and Chair of English Associate Director, Center for Children's Literature and Culture

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College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research www.web.wst.ufl.edu/ 200 Ustler Hall P.O. Box 117352 Gainesville, FL 32611 352 392 3365 352 392 4873 Fax October 6, 2013 “Forging a Collaborative Structure for Sustaining Scholarly Acce ss to the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature” I am writing in enthusiastic suppo rt of a mini grant for an advi sory council of scholars for the Baldwin Library. I am personally very interested in promoting the use of the extensive collections at the Smathers Libraries, and the Baldwin Collection is one that my students have regularly consulted. As part of my project for the Academy of Disti nguished Teaching Scholars, I noted that I want to work more broadly for students to use various collect ions on campus, such as those at the library and also the art work at the Harn Mu seum of Art. I would be delighted to participate in this on-going effort, beginning with the conferen ce that is described in the propos al, and would also be willing to serve on the council, if invited. Please let me know if I can pr ovide additional information. Sincerely, Judith W. Page Professor of English & Dis tinguished Teaching Scholar Director, Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research page7@ufl.edu Direct line: 352.273.0387

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The Foundation for The Gator Nation An Equal Opportunity Institution College of Liberal Arts & Sciences 4008 Turlington Hall Department of English PO Box 117310 Gainesville, FL 32611 352 392 6650 352 392 0860 Fax October 8, 2013 Forging a Collaborative Structure for Sustaining Scholarly Access to the Baldwin Libra ry of Historical Children's Literature I write to express my support for a mini grant for the Baldwin Library Scholars Council; the grant will enable the library to form an advisory board to suggest future directions for digitizing holdings in early Amer ican and British literature. I currently teach a range of upper division and graduate level courses whose primary focus is colonial American and antebellum literature. The Baldwin Collection has been a tremendous asset to teaching and learning at UF; for example, I brought my AML 4170: Studies In Genre (Indian Captivity Narrative) class to special collections to research its rare collection of earlier American fiction depicting Indian captivity. I am interested in serving on this advisory board and furthe ring the development of digital archives for teaching and research. Dr. Jodi Schorb Assistant Professor Department of English Affiliate Faculty, Center for Women's Studies and Gender Research University of Florida jschorb@ufl.edu

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The Foundation for The Gator Nation An Equal Opportunity Institution George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida Scholarly Resources & Research Services P. O. Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 352.273.2902 October 8, 2013 Dear Members of the Grants Management Committee: I am pleased to write in support of Suzan Alteri’s mini grant project on “Forging a Collaborative Structure for Sustaining Scholarly Access to the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature” which will support creating a scholarly council in support of the activities of the Baldwin Library and best position the Baldwin for new opportunities with grants, digital publishing, and more. The Baldwin Library has benefitted from many grants for digitization and from rich and dynamic collaborations with faculty, students, and scholars at UF and around the world. To support immediate needs and current activities, the Baldwin Li brary needs a more formalized structure for gathering UF scholarly input and for crediting scholars for their work. For instance when academic publisher Anvil Academic contacted the Baldwin regarding a new, innovative digital scholarship project entitled Alice in Dataland, the Baldwin Curator consulted with UF scholars who are experts on th e Baldwin. There is currently not a structure in place that eases this work or the validation and crediting fo r the work for these sorts of inquiries. Another example comes with interns and volunteers, where the Baldwin Cu rator is approached by many dozens of students each semester. In order to support student internsh ips and volunteering opportunities that best benefit students, the Libraries, and academic activities on campus overall, a consultative and facilitative structure is needed. In addition to specific needs that would be supported, this mini grant supports developing exactly the type of structures that are needed for academic libraries in the digital age. Academic libraries continue to grow closer to and integrate more strongly with teaching and research, and new structures are needed to support immediate needs, ongoing changes for the most successful development possible, and new opportunities. This mini grant will develop new supports that will benefit the Baldwin Library and provide a model for others at UF and around the world. I am excited to confirm my commitment as a member of the project team who will be attending the meeting, and participating in various ways throughout the project. I enthusiastically support this mini grant for its alignment with the mini grant program goals and the goals of the Smathers Libraries, including developing, integrating, and enhancing support for the UF Libraries in line with and as part of the scholarly communications lifecycle. Sincerely, Laurie N. Taylor, Ph.D. Digital Humanities Librarian Laurien@ufl.edu 528 Library West 352.273.2902

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APPENDIX C: LIST OF INVITEES University of Florida : Sophia Krzys Acord, Associate Director, Center for the Humanities in the Public Sphere Juliana Barr, Associate Professor of History/Women’s Studies, emphasis on Early America John Cech, Professor of English and Director of the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture, emphasis of all aspects of children’s literature Jim Cusick, Interim Chair, Special and Area Studies Collections Rebekah Fitzsimmons, Graduate Student (English) David Hackett, Associate Professor of Religion, emphasis on religious history and sociology of religion Terry Harpold, Associate Professor of English and Director of Graduate Student Teaching (English), emphasis on new media and digital humanities Emily Murphy, Graduate Student (English) Barbara Pace, Associate Professor in Education, emphasis on English education and media literacy Judith Page, Director of Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research, Professor of English, emphasis on British women writers (18th & 19th centuries) Elizabeth Ross, Associate Professor of Art History, emphasis on early modern Europe Jodi Schorb, Assistant Professor of English, emphasis on early American children’s literature Jon Sensbach, Professor of History, emphasis on Early America Stephanie Smith, Professor of English, Associate Chair and Undergraduate Coordinator (English), emphasis on 19th century American Literature Jane Townsend, Associate Professor in Education, emphasis on language arts and literacy Mariko Turk, Graduate Student (English), Assistant, Center for Children’s Literature and Culture Anastasia Ulanowicz, Assistant Professor of English, emphasis on children’s literature, religion and literature Casey Wilson, Graduate Student (English) Other Institutions : Peter Berg, Head of Special Collections, Michigan State University Robin Bernstein, Professor of African and African American Studies and of Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality; faculty member American Studies Program, Harvard University, emphasis on cultural history of race, age, gender, and sexuality Ramona Caponegro, Assistant Professor of English, Eastern Michigan University, emphasis on children’s literature Marah Gubar, Associate Professor of English and Director of Children’s Literature Program, University of Pittsburgh, emphasis on children’s literature Emiko Hastings, Curator of Books, William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan, emphasis on history of the book Haven Hawley, former Director of the Immigration Research History Center, University of Minnesota and Rare Books School faculty, University of Virginia, emphasis on history of the book Andrea Immel, Curator, Cotsen Children’s Library, Princeton University Claudia Nelson, Professor of English, Texas A&M University, emphasis on children’s literature Megan Norcia, Associate Professor, State University of New York – Brockport, emphasis on children’s literature Lissa Paul, Professor of Education, Brock University, emphasis on children’s literature and 18th century studies

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Kimberly Reynolds, Professor of Children’s Literature, Newcastle University, emphasis on children’s literature Ellen Ruffin, Curator of the De Grummond Collection, University of Southern Mississippi, emphasis on librarianship and children’s literature Sarah Schwebel, Associate Professor of English Language and Literature, University of South Carolina, emphasis on children’s literature, American literature, American history Eric Tribunella, Associate Professor of English and Chair, University of Southern Mississippi, emphasis on children’s literature Lisa Von Drasek, Curator of the Center for Children’s Literature Research Collections, University of Minnesota, emphasis on librarianship and children’s literature Annette Wannamaker, Professor of English, Eastern Michigan University, emphasis on children’s literature Laura E. Wasowicz, Curator of Children’s Literature, American Antiquarian Society Courtney Weikle Mills, Assistant Professor of English, University of Pittsburgh, emphasis on children’s literature and early American Literature David Whitesell, Curator in the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library at the University of Virginia, emphasis on book history

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Suzan Alteri: 1) What is the plan to create descriptive metadata for the local items to be digitized in the project? The local items of early American and British juvenile literature that will be selected for this project currently have full catalog records with descriptive metadata that will be imported by the Baldwin Assistant, Claudia Perlini. Many of these records were created as part of the three funded NEH grants previously awarded to the Baldwin Library. Although Ms. Perlini has training in cataloging materials, no items for the mock site will need to be cataloged. In addition, the Baldwin Library Digital Collection contains 242 religious tracts from Great Britain and the United States. Ms. Perlini is currently migrating items into this subcollection. I have spoken with Jane Anne Carey, who is the Cataloging Liaison to the Special Collections department, and she has concluded that these records have been fully cataloged with appropriate metadata. 2) How will a metadata scheme and best practices be developed as part of the planning process for other institutions? The test project will utilize existing resources within the SobekCM open source tools that Ms. Perlini will use in the creation of workflows for digitization and loading items into the subcollection. As well, she will develop a workflow based on research and analysis of metadata schemes. Jane Anne Carey has agreed to read, comment, and advise on Ms. Perlini’s work regarding metadata schema. In addition, if other metadata support is needed, the Baldwin Curator will consult with internal UF experts from the Cataloging and Metadata Department to determine the best methods to support future partners for metadata creation for items outside of UF. It is anticipated that if the Scholars Council agrees the project should move forward for external funding, the metadata schemes already in place with UFDC will be sufficient. 3) Which participants in the planning meeting have expertise in cooperative/distributed metadata workflows and management? It is not known at this time if this will become an agenda item at the two day planning meeting. If it does become a future agenda item, representatives from both the Cataloging and Metadata Department and the Digital Library Center will be included as well as project team member Dr. Laurie Taylor, Digital Humanities Librarian, who has extensive experience with the dLOC model. Indeed if any agenda items that come up in planning require expertise from the Libraries or other UF departments, these experts will be included in the two day meeting. In addition, the following possible attendees also have experience with cooperative/distributed models:

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Peter Berg, Head of Special Collections, Michigan State University Mr. Berg successfully completed a grant between Michigan State University, Central Michigan University, and the Library of Congress on a collaborative project on religious tracts in the United States. Ramona Caponegro, Assistant Professor of English, Eastern Michigan University Dr. Caponegro received her PhD from the Children’s Literature program at the University of Florida. During that time she also worked with the Baldwin Library’s NEH initiatives and preliminary cataloging. Emiko Hastings, Curator of Books, William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan As part of her duties as Curator of Books, Ms. Hastings sets cataloging priorities and works closely with the cataloging department. Haven Hawley, Visiting Professor and former Head/Programming Director of the Immigration History Research Center, University of Minnesota Dr. Hawley is an invited candidate for the Chair position for the Special and Area Studies Collections Department. As well, she has extensive experience with writing and evaluating grants, working with collaborative partnerships in digital initiatives, and working with information technology departments on grants. Ellen Ruffin, Curator of the De Grummond Collection, University of Southern Mississippi Dr. Ruffin is the curator of the second largest children’s literature book collection in the nation (behind the Baldwin Library). She has experience with digitization and working with digital centers, cataloging, and the IT department. Laura E. Wasowicz, Curator of Children’s Literature, American Antiquarian Society Ms. Wasowicz is the Curator and Cataloger for the North American Imprints Program at AAS. 4) Can you describe the role played by the Bechtel scholar? The Bechtel Fellow has no role to play in this Mini Grant. Bechtel Fellows are chosen by the Association of Libraries and Services to Children, American Library Association, based on a particular research topic they wish to spend a month researching in the Baldwin Library. The Baldwin Curator facilitates their research while at the Baldwin and they are also given a faculty mentor to work with. Interaction with Bechtel Fellows depends on what the Fellow is researching and how much assistance they need, but is usually limited to answering reference questions, pulling materials, scanning materials

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for future use once they leave, and working with the faculty member to help them get the most out of their experience here. The Baldwin Curator has no control over when Bechtel Fellows come to UF.



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Suzan Alteri: 1) What is the plan to create descriptive metadata for the local items to be digitized in the project? The local items of early American and British juvenile literature that will be selected for this project currently have full catalog records with descriptive metadata that will be imported by the Baldwin Assistant, Claudia Perlini. Many of these records were created as part of the three funded NEH grants previously awarded to the Baldwin Library. Although Ms. Perlini has training in cataloging materials, no items for the mock site will need to be cataloged. In addition, the Baldwin Library Digital Collection contains 242 religious tracts from Great Britain and the United States. Ms. Perlini is currently migrating items into this subcollection. I have spoken with Jane Anne Carey, who is the Cataloging Liaison to the Special Collections department, and she has concluded that these records have been fully cataloged with appropriate metadata. 2) How will a metadata scheme and best practices be developed as part of the planning process for other institutions? The test project will utilize existing resources within the SobekCM open source tools that Ms. Perlini will use in the creation of workflows for digitization and loading items into the subcollection. As well, she will develop a workflow based on research and analysis of metadata schemes. Jane Anne Carey has agreed to read, comment, and advise on Ms. Perlini’s work regarding metadata schema. In addition, if other metadata support is needed, the Baldwin Curator will consult with internal UF experts from the Cataloging and Metadata Department to determine the best methods to support future partners for metadata creation for items outside of UF. It is anticipated that if the Scholars Council agrees the project should move forward for external funding, the metadata schemes already in place with UFDC will be sufficient. 3) Which participants in the planning meeting have expertise in cooperative/distributed metadata workflows and management? It is not known at this time if this will become an agenda item at the two day planning meeting. If it does become a future agenda item, representatives from both the Cataloging and Metadata Department and the Digital Library Center will be included as well as project team member Dr. Laurie Taylor, Digital Humanities Librarian, who has extensive experience with the dLOC model. Indeed if any agenda items that come up in planning require expertise from the Libraries or other UF departments, these experts will be included in the two day meeting. In addition, the following possible attendees also have experience with cooperative/distributed models:

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Peter Berg, Head of Special Collections, Michigan State University Mr. Berg successfully completed a grant between Michigan State University, Central Michigan University, and the Library of Congress on a collaborative project on religious tracts in the United States. Ramona Caponegro, Assistant Professor of English, Eastern Michigan University Dr. Caponegro received her PhD from the Children’s Literature program at the University of Florida. During that time she also worked with the Baldwin Library’s NEH initiatives and preliminary cataloging. Emiko Hastings, Curator of Books, William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan As part of her duties as Curator of Books, Ms. Hastings sets cataloging priorities and works closely with the cataloging department. Haven Hawley, Visiting Professor and former Head/Programming Director of the Immigration History Research Center, University of Minnesota Dr. Hawley is an invited candidate for the Chair position for the Special and Area Studies Collections Department. As well, she has extensive experience with writing and evaluating grants, working with collaborative partnerships in digital initiatives, and working with information technology departments on grants. Ellen Ruffin, Curator of the De Grummond Collection, University of Southern Mississippi Dr. Ruffin is the curator of the second largest children’s literature book collection in the nation (behind the Baldwin Library). She has experience with digitization and working with digital centers, cataloging, and the IT department. Laura E. Wasowicz, Curator of Children’s Literature, American Antiquarian Society Ms. Wasowicz is the Curator and Cataloger for the North American Imprints Program at AAS. 4) Can you describe the role played by the Bechtel scholar? The Bechtel Fellow has no role to play in this Mini Grant. Bechtel Fellows are chosen by the Association of Libraries and Services to Children, American Library Association, based on a particular research topic they wish to spend a month researching in the Baldwin Library. The Baldwin Curator facilitates their research while at the Baldwin and they are also given a faculty mentor to work with. Interaction with Bechtel Fellows depends on what the Fellow is researching and how much assistance they need, but is usually limited to answering reference questions, pulling materials, scanning materials

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for future use once they leave, and working with the faculty member to help them get the most out of their experience here. The Baldwin Curator has no control over when Bechtel Fellows come to UF.



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Forging a Collaborative Structure for Sustaining Scholarly Access to the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature Project Description : The project, Forging a Collabora tive Structure for Sustaining Scholarly Access to the Bald win Library of Historical Children’s Literature (Baldwin Library), seeks to leverage relationships in the Department of English (Mini-Grant Partner), other humanities departments, and nationally recognized scholars in: 1. Establishing a scholars council with local and nationa l participation, and Smathers Libraries endorsement 2. Increasing multidisciplinary research by local, national, and international scholars and graduate students 3. Preparing for submission to external federal and private funding agencies, including planning for a collaborative digital collection of Early American an d British Juvenile Literature and Religious Tracts 4. Creating protocols and testing a distributed digiti zation process based on the successful dLOC model 5. Assisting and informing the Curator of the Baldwin Libr ary of scholarly trends in children’s literature and related fields for program development, digitization priorities, and other related activities 6. Formalizing guidelines for paid and volunteer positions that provide support to enhance scholarly access Scholars Council The Baldwin Library will host a two-day planning meeting w ith scholars from the University of Florida (UF) and established scholars and curators from the larger academic world in the fields of children’s literature, the humanities, and special collections. The two-day meeting will establis h the specific function, roles, and responsibilities for the Scholars Council, which will comprise faculty from mu ltiple departments on campus as well as scholars from outside the university (see attached list). The two-day planning meeting will have various agenda items, but major talking points through guided brainstorming and discussion will be: Establishing the role(s) of a schol ars council in the Baldwin Library Determining the roles for scholars involved in the council Formalizing library / scholar partnerships for future project development Once the participants have outlined the function, roles, and responsibilities of the Baldwin Library Scholars Council, discussion will plan for an externally funded digitization project for Early American and British Juvenile Literature and Religious Tracts. Attendees will test and evaluate a prototype site for the Early American and British Juvenile Literature and Religious Tracts, and potential discussion points will be: Identify potential partner institutions and historical societies to digitize holdings Design and usability of digital collection for faculty, students, and scholars Possibility of external funding for continuation of the digital project Once the meeting is completed, the project team will sy nthesize the notes and decisions and prepare a report for review by attendees for final feedback before the proposal for the scholars council is submitted to the Deans of the Libraries for review, discussion, and implementation. Preparation of a Multi-instit utional collaborative project Early American children’s literature is defined as any publ ication produced during the US colonial period through 1823 when the United States began developing its own significant publishing industry and market. After 1823 until around 1860, most children’s literature and learning ma terials were produced by religious societies for mass consumption. These materials were often printed on cheap paper in chapbook style format so the burgeoning working and lower middle classes could afford books for their children. The connection between Early American children’s literature, which borrowed much from Great Britai n, and the subsequent religious tracts illustrate the shift from the colonial period into nation building. This transitio n is crucial not only for the field of children’s literature, but also for cultural studies, gender studies, history, religion, education, and the history of the book. This project will prepare a prototype online site with mate rials from the Baldwin Library Digital Collection as well as new materials to be digitized by the Baldwin Student Assistant. The Curator and the Baldwin assistant will choose new materials from the physical collection. Af ter the materials are chosen, the Baldwin Assistant will digitize select materials on a flatbed scanner to test and determine a viable workflow for use by other institutions. Testing and creating these workflows are important for th e universal implementation of digitization in smaller libraries and historical societies who may have limited resources at their disposal. This prototype online site and the

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workflow will be presented during the two-day planning meeting so participants can discuss the possibility of applying for external funding to create the multi-institutiona l digital project. This future possible grant opportunity will support instructional needs by allowing professors at UF and other universities to use the Early American and British Juvenile Literature and Religious Tracts digital collection. Importance of Project The Baldwin Library is a nationally and internationally renowned collection of historical children’s literature. Every year, scholars from the United States and other countries vi sit the physical collection housed in the Department of Special and Area Studies Collections, and even more sc holars conduct research from the Baldwin Library’s extensive digital collection ( http://ufdc.ufl.edu/juv ). The Baldwin Library is the second largest collection of children’s literature books in the U. S., and has the most holdings of Early American and British children’s literature and religious tracts of any other academic institution in the U.S. The significance of these holdings can have a substantial impact on scholarship for historians, literary scholars, religious scholars, cultural studies specialists, Americanists, women’s studies specialists, and those studying the history of the book if properly presented to this diverse group of scholars. The holdings in the Baldwin Library go beyond their value as research materials within the field of children’s literature alone. Current Situation : The largest audience, and almost exclusive partner, is the Department of English due to its nationally-recognized Children’s Literature Program and the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture, which is led by Dr. John Cech. Since the inception of the Baldwin Library at UF in 1982, previous curators have served on the board of the Center and given instruction sessions and guidance to undergraduate and graduate students in English. It is important for the Baldwin Library to continue this connection while also expanding its vision to embrace work with other humanities departments on campus. Although the Baldwin Library works closely with the Ce nter for Children’s Literature and Culture and the Department of English, this Center is currently not a resource for scholarship and research. The Baldwin Library has no structure in place that allows for sc holarly input to meet the needs of the collection for researchers. Due to the Baldwin Library’s reputation and popularity on campus and with researchers from around the world, the curator functions as both the manager of the collection and program director. Currently, the Baldwin Library offers an annual Speaker Series that brings scholars and children’ s authors to campus, a regular program of physical and online exhibits as well as traveling exhibits to other institutions, pursuing digital publishing ventures with materials from the Baldwin Library, and working with the DLC to have materials digitized for online courses. As distance learning efforts continue to increase at UF, it is expected that the demand for digital materials also will continue to increase. Benefits to the Libraries, teaching, and scholarship The curator’s position has changed over the past five years. It has become one in which the curator, to increase use of the Baldwin Library, has added numerous outreach ac tivities to expand the audience and research base. This project seeks to address the “lone ranger” approach to th e Baldwin Library by incorpor ating a scholars council to offer input on scholarly tren ds and outreach activities. By establishing a scholars council that supports and guides certain initiatives, the Baldwin Library will be better equi pped for multidisciplinary research from scholars and graduate students at UF and those within the larger academic community. The scholars council will re-position the collection among pe er institutions while fostering historical research in multiple disciplines. Forming a scholars council for the Baldwin Library meets the mission and goals of the Libraries: convening scholars from the humanities areas assists the Baldwi n Library in providing access to all relevant forms of knowledge; it provides a sounding board for research and instructional needs of the Libraries; it informs on trends in the field of children’s literature; and, leverages the rich materials in the Baldwin Library for other humanities departments beyond English. The benefits of the prototype site incl ude: the ability of faculty and graduate t eaching assistants to be able to access these online materials for use in course s; the scanned materials will also allo w scholars and researchers to access the rich material only available at UF; and usage of site to attract partners from other academic institutions and historical societies for a future collaborative grant proposal.

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Project comparison Although no formal informatio n regarding the use of Scholarly Councils and the library at an y academic institution was found, information on scholarly councils or advisory boards from museums, the Library of Congress, and academic councils not affiliated with the library of an academic institution is availabl e online. A summary of the findings is below: All scholarly councils or advisory boards are set-up to provide support and advice to expand awareness of the institution and its goals, promote educational ef forts, and act as advocates for the institution. Some scholarly councils or advisory boards assist with the development of an intellectual agenda or identifying issues and trends, advice, and guidan ce for research (Smithsoni an Museum of African American History and Culture; University of North Carolina’s Tomorrow Scholars Council). One scholarly council asked of its members to provid e perspectives and heighten intellectual conversation (Theatre for a New Audience). Most scholarly councils stress that the roles of the memb ers are strictly advisory in nature, usually to assist with development and advancement of the program’s goals and mission. The council or board is used on an as needed basis. Of particular interest was the Library of Congress’s Scholars Council for the John W. Kluge Center. This council, “Through discussion and reflection, assists in implementing an American tradition of linking the activities of thinkers and doers, those who are engaged in the world of ideas with those engaged in the world of affairs,” ( http://www.loc.gov/loc/kluge/scholars/ ). This council is advisory in nature and related to matters on scholarship. The council also has a charter, which states the importance for strong links between the library and the scholarly world and thus needs a council to offer advice on scholarly issues of import to increase opp ortunities to interact with one another. Members of the council advise the librarian on trends and developments related to fields of inquiry in relation to the library’s collections, exhibitions, and other programmatic possibilities. The Scholars Council for the John W. Kluge Center most fits the model for the potential Baldwin Library Scholars Council due to its links to scholars and the library and its advisory nature. Although not all aspects of this council are pertinent for the Baldwin Library Scholars Council, this is a good starting point for discussion. The two peer children’s literature collections – the Cent er for Children’s Literature Research (CLRC) at the University of Minnesota and the de Grummond Collection at the University of Southern Mississippi – do not have any type of scholarly council or advisory board. The Kerlan Collection at the CLRC does have a “Friends of the Kerlan” group, which is expected to “advocate for the library and encourage appreciation for and the use and support of this unique and rare resource,” ( https://www.lib.umn.edu/clrc/kerlan-friends ). In addition, the “Friends of the Kerlan” are responsible for raising funds through the sa le of notecards and other items and sponsorship of two annual awards. The CLRC’s collections, ar e focused mostly on contemporary materials. They do not have the range of historical materials that are held in the Baldwin Library nor do they have an active digitization program, although the University Libraries of the Univ ersity of Minnesota is part of the Google Books Digitization Project. The De Grummond Collection located at the University of Southern Mississippi is also a leading children’s literature collection both nationally and internationally. Like the Baldwin Library, its main focus is on American and British children’s literature. They also have a large collect ion of original archival materials. The De Grummond Collection does have an active digitization program with about 1000 items digitized to date. Although the De Grummond does collect in the same area as the Baldwin Library, it does not have strengths in historical materials. According to their online catalog they have between 50-100 early materials and only 50 early American items. However, neither the CLRC nor the De Grummond Collection have a distributed model for digitizing materials with partner institutions, nor do either have an official scholars council that advises the curator on trends, setting guidelines for working with graduate or undergraduate student interns and volunteers, or creating workflows and protocols for other institutions to contribute to a multi-institutional project. Since no other academic instit ution with collections in children’s literatu re has the depth and comparative materials held in the Baldwin Library on early American and British children’s literature, the future digital collection opens a new vein of research and teaching opportunities, and allows for the discovery of new texts to a broad audience. The only institution that has more early American materials (but not British) than the Baldwin Library is the American Antiquarian Society, which is not an academic institution. All of the comparative academic institutions do not have the breadth of materials held in the Baldwin Library, however, some institutions and historical societies do own

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materials the Baldwin Library does not have, which is why forging collaborations as the foundation for future digital collection expansion projects is so important. Resources needed The Mini-Grant funding resources needed include: conven ing visiting scholars at UF and a student to digitize selected materials for the prototype s ite and develop workflows for digitizing. Other resources will include space for the meeting and cost-share for project team members suppo rting efforts to convene visiting scholars and assist during the two-day meeting. Please note the prototype site is currently dark, awaiting the digitization of materials The PI will provide effort for selecting materials and veri fying the catalog records for digitization, developing any materials related to the meeting, planning the meeting, overseeing the project as a whole, supervising the Baldwin Assistant during her work on the mini-grant. In addition, the PI will develop materials, including the proposal for a scholars council, a report on the feasibility of the Early American and British Juvenile Literature and Religious Tracts digital collection for possible future funding, and information which may be used in an article. Because the PI will verify the catalog records and the Baldwin Assistan t will provide digitization and workflows, use of the cataloging department and the DLC is not needed. Activity timeline Nov. – Dec., 2013 PI convenes project team to discuss creation of invitations to be sent out to selected scholars, finalize invitation January 2014 PI and Dr. Kenneth Kidd send out invitations January 2014 PI and Baldwin Asst. select and pull 100 books for digitization February 2014 PI and Kidd determine tiere d levels for potential visiting scholars March 2014 PI convenes project team for planning agenda for meeting March 2014 PI and Grants Manager prepare list of prospective funders and a sample checklist of application requirements April 2014 Project team meets to prepare logistics of meeting April 2014 Project team meets to re view prototype site and workflows April 2014 PI sends required documentation to visiting scholars for honoraria May 2014 PI and Kidd finalize attendees and agenda May 2014 Project team finalizes any final preparations May/June 2014 Two-day meeting is held at UF July 2014 Project team meets to review meeting survey results July 2014 PI prepares and submits report and recommendations of meeting September 2014 PI and Kidd meet with Deans of Libraries for feedback and revisions October 2014 PI prepares final reports on mini-grant Collection ownership and copyright There are no copyright issues for materials since all collection items fall within the public domain. Evaluation of project and final product Project success is determined by the de livery of: An ou tline level of satisfaction and productivity in meeting agenda goals, number of scholars agree to continue participation and the final product will be a proposal for the Baldwin Library Scholars Council submitted to the Deans of the Libraries for review, discussion, and implementation. Financial implications There are no long-term financial implications for this pr oject. The scholars council will not cost the George A. Smathers or the Baldwin Library any monies since the council’s members will serve vo luntarily. If the Baldwin Scholars Council is approved, the group will meet either vi rtually or in-person. Funding for in-person meetings is the responsibility of Council members.

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Budget Narrative Explanation of Expenses Honoraria ($4000) : This honoraria is for scholars and/or curators from outside UF who are unable to receive funding from their home ins titution. The $4000 allotm ent will allow for five scholars at $800 each to be able to attend the two-day planning meeting. The $800 is to be used to cover partial cost of travel expenses. Given the high interest of many children’s literature scholars in visiting the Baldwin for research, it is anticipated that some scholars will obtain fundin g from their home institution to visit UF. The PI and Kidd will develop a tiered list so that the five scholars or curators deemed most important to attend receive the opportunity of an honorarium first. If certain schol ars or curators are unable to attend others from the list will be selected. OPS funds for stud ent worker ($983) : This expense is calculated at $10/hour for 10 hours per week plus fringe for a total of 94 hours. The student will be requ ired to work on the digitization and preparation of workflows for other institutions. This will enable the cr eation of the mock site that will be evaluated and discussed during the two-day planning meeting. Justification of expenses Honoraria : Due to the Baldwin Library’s national and intern ational reputation, it is necessary for scholars and curators from outside UF to be able to attend the two-day planning meeting for a scholars council and future funding proposal. It is expected that the scholars council be comprised of not only scholars from UF, but also scholars from other academic institutions w ith strong children’s literature programs. Members of the Department of English believe that an honorarium for travel expenses be offered to ensure that at least five experts are able to attend the planning meeting. Although it is possible that scholars will be able to receive money from their own institu tions, this cannot be as sumed as a guarantee. Both the PI and the Partner (Kidd) believe that a tiered list is the best way to solicit scholar attendance. OPS funds : The student will work closely with the PI in digitizing a select number of early American and British titles for the mock site. In addition, the st udent will develop various workflow processes and refinement of these processes for smaller institutions that might want to be involved in the future proposal for external funding. The student will document all processes for use by other institutions and time test the workflows for institutions that have little resources (d esktop computer, flatbed scanner). The student also will look into free software for leveling and cropp ing and use SobekCM for uploading metadata and scanned files. Given the technological and bibliographi c skill set and knowledge required to complete this project a $10/hour rate is appropriate. The 94 hours are sufficient for successful completion of digitization, workflows, and mock site. Roles and Cost Share Role of the Principal Investigator : The PI is the primary coordinator, liaison, and convener for the twoday meeting, developing all meeting materials, planni ng the meeting, and directing meeting conversations productively. In addition, the PI is responsible for supervising the student worker to make sure project deadlines are met. Working with Kidd from the Departme nt of English, the PI also will invite scholars and curators and maintain the tiered list of scholars/cur ators who are attending or unable to attend. Upon completion of the two-day meeting, it is the PI’s responsibility to collect data and write a report on whether the two-day meeting goals were met as well as preparing a proposal for the Baldwin Library Scholars Council for the Deans of the University Libraries. Role of the Project Team : The project team will assist the PI in developing the invitations to participants, planning the agenda and logistics, and reviewing the mock site for the two-day meeting. The team will participate in the two-day session as facilitators, note ta kers, and logistical assistants. In addition, after the two-day meeting is completed, the project team will assist in compiling data and notes from the two-day meeting and reviewing the final report and proposal.

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04-Budget_Form_2012-2013-Posted.xlsx, 08/15/2012 Please add lines to table as needed. If you need help completing this form, please contact Bess de Farber, PH# 273-2519. 1. Salaries and Wages (no fringe benefits required) Name of PersonSalary times % of effortGrant FundsCost ShareTotal Alteri, Suzan60,480 X 5%$0.00$3,024.00$3,024.00 Taylor, Laurie74,167 X 1%$0.00$742.00$742.00 Minson, Val77,782 X 1%$0.00$778.00$778.00 Walker, Ben95,844 X 1%$0.00$958.00$958.00 Perlini, Claudia (OPS)$10 X 94 hours + fringe$983.00$0.00$983.00 SUBTOTAL $983.00$5,502.00$6,485.00 2. Equipment ItemQuantity times CostGrant FundsCost ShareTotal $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 SUBTOTAL $0.00$0.00$0.00 3. Supplies ItemQuantity times CostGrant FundsCost ShareTotal $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 SUBTOTAL $0.00$0.00$0.00 4. Travel From/To# of people/# of daysGrant FundsCost ShareTotal $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 SUBTOTAL $0.00$0.00$0.00 5. Other (Vendor costs, etc. Provide detail in Budget Narrative section.) ItemQuantity times costGrant FundsCost ShareTotal Honoraria5 visiting scholars X $800$4,000.00$0.00$4,000.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00$0.00$0.00 SUBTOTAL $4,000.00$0.00$4,000.00 Grant FundsCost ShareTotal Total Direct Costs (add subtotals of items 1-5) $4,983.00$5,502.00$10,485.00 Mini Grant Budget Form 2013-2014 Page 1 of 1

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APPENDIX A: LETTERS OF SUPPORT 1. Dr. John Cech, Professor of English and Director of the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture 2. Dr. John Ingram, Interim Curator, Harold and Mary Jean Hanson Rare Book Collection

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October 9, 2013 Recommendation for: Forging a Collaborative Structure for Sustaining Scholarly Access to the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature It is with great pleasure that I write in support of Suzan Alteri’s proposal to convene an initial, multi-day Baldwin Library Scholar’s Council meeting to discuss and advance long-term plans fo r the scholarly uses of the Baldwin Library. Such a meeting is long over due and especially relevant to the development of strategies for establishing important goals for the resources of the Baldwin Library within the various communities of scholars here and on national and international levels that ha ve special interests in its remarkable holdings. One of the issues that has affected the Baldwin Library since its official opening in 1982 has been the lack of a coherent an d sustained approach to creating a high degree of visibility for the collection, which is perhaps the most unique and extensive assemblage of children’s books in English in the world today. The challenge of bringing about such visibili ty depends, in part, on the development of a core group of scholars who are ac tively engaged in a wide range of initiatives on the Baldwin’s behalf. Suzan Alteri is the perfect person to le ad such an important effort. In the relatively short time that she has been the curator of the Baldwin Library, she has become an active member of the scho larly community, a tireless spokesperson for the collection, and an especially fo rward-thinking director of the Baldwin’s functions. She has given the library a new expansive profile – through the lecture series that she has launched, the ongoing exhibitions that she has created, and the many lectures about the holdings of the library that she has generously given. Among the invigorating aspects of her tenure as curator are her spirit of openness to new ideas, and her willingne ss to move the collection in fresh, productive directions. I wholeheartedly endorse this initiative and urge its funding. Yours sincerely, John Cech Professor of English Director, Center for Children’s Literature & Culture

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APPENDIX B: LETTERS OF COMMITMENT 1. Dr. Kenneth Kidd, Professor and Chair, Department of English 2. Dr. Judith Page, Professor of English and Chair of the Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research 3. Dr. Jodi Schorb, Assistant Professor, Department of English 4. Laurie Taylor, Digital Humanities Librarian, George A. Smathers Libraries

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College of Liberal Arts & Sciences 4008 Turlington Hall Department of English PO Box 117310 Gainesville, FL 32611 352-392-6650 352 392 0860 Fax October 10, 2013 Dear Colleagues, I am very pleased to write in support of Baldwin Cu rator Suzan Alteri's effort s to establish an advisory council of scholars for the Baldwin Library, and to be gin with a professional meeting of stakeholders and experts from UF and other institutions. I'm excite d by the possibility of developing further and formalizing the relationship of the Baldwin with the English Department and with the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the College of Education, and the Co llege of Fine Arts especially (perhaps also the UF School of Law, with whom we have worked on various projects). The Ba ldwin is one of the chief reasons I left my former job and joined UF in 1998. I worked closely with the previous Curator, Rita Smith, collaborating twice on a graduate seminar/workshop ca lled "Reading in the Baldwin," in which graduate students pursued individual as well as collaborative resear ch projects in the Baldwin. I've encouraged graduate and undergraduate students to use the Bald win, and have directed doctoral dissertations by students who made moderate to extensive use of its holdings: Megan Norcia, Catherine Tosenberger, Cathlena Martin, Aaron Talbot, Cari Keebaugh, Ramona Caponegr o, Lisa Dusenberry, and Marilisa Jimenez Garcia (all of whom finished the PhD and are now happily employed – all but one teaching children's literature at the college level). Several artic le publications and at least one book (Norcia's) had their origins in those seminars. I've also occasiona lly served as mentor for the Bechtel Fellows, although my colleague John Cech has been the principal advisor for the program. Beyond my own investment in the Baldwin as a ch ildren's literature scholar, I can offer the broader support of the English Department. We have a number of faculty who have already been very involved with the Baldwin (especially Cech and Terry Harpold, but also Marsha Bryant), and we have other faculty who are seeking out more involvement, such as Judith Pa ge and Jodi Schorb. I am also a partner on this grant with Suzan and have already assisted with the de velopment of this grant. In addition, I will serve on the project team and attend the professional meeti ng of stakeholders and experts from UF and other institutions. If asked, I would be happy to serve as an advisor on this board. Individually and as a faculty, we are excited about the possibility of establishing a scholar's council, and we hope that Suzan's initiative can be funded, as an initial exploratory and brainstorming meeting of experts in children's literature, archive studies/special collections, early American culture, and related areas would be extremely beneficial. Please let me know if I can be of further help, and thanks for the consideration. Sincerely, Kenneth Kidd Professor and Chair of English Associate Director, Center for Children's Literature and Culture

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College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research www.web.wst.ufl.edu/ 200 Ustler Hall P.O. Box 117352 Gainesville, FL 32611 352 392 3365 352 392 4873 Fax October 6, 2013 “Forging a Collaborative Structure for Sustaining Scholarly Acce ss to the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature” I am writing in enthusiastic suppo rt of a mini grant for an advi sory council of scholars for the Baldwin Library. I am personally very interested in promoting the use of the extensive collections at the Smathers Libraries, and the Baldwin Collection is one that my students have regularly consulted. As part of my project for the Academy of Disti nguished Teaching Scholars, I noted that I want to work more broadly for students to use various collect ions on campus, such as those at the library and also the art work at the Harn Mu seum of Art. I would be delighted to participate in this on-going effort, beginning with the conferen ce that is described in the propos al, and would also be willing to serve on the council, if invited. Please let me know if I can pr ovide additional information. Sincerely, Judith W. Page Professor of English & Dis tinguished Teaching Scholar Director, Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research page7@ufl.edu Direct line: 352.273.0387

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The Foundation for The Gator Nation An Equal Opportunity Institution College of Liberal Arts & Sciences 4008 Turlington Hall Department of English PO Box 117310 Gainesville, FL 32611 352 392 6650 352 392 0860 Fax October 8, 2013 Forging a Collaborative Structure for Sustaining Scholarly Access to the Baldwin Libra ry of Historical Children's Literature I write to express my support for a mini grant for the Baldwin Library Scholars Council; the grant will enable the library to form an advisory board to suggest future directions for digitizing holdings in early Amer ican and British literature. I currently teach a range of upper division and graduate level courses whose primary focus is colonial American and antebellum literature. The Baldwin Collection has been a tremendous asset to teaching and learning at UF; for example, I brought my AML 4170: Studies In Genre (Indian Captivity Narrative) class to special collections to research its rare collection of earlier American fiction depicting Indian captivity. I am interested in serving on this advisory board and furthe ring the development of digital archives for teaching and research. Dr. Jodi Schorb Assistant Professor Department of English Affiliate Faculty, Center for Women's Studies and Gender Research University of Florida jschorb@ufl.edu

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The Foundation for The Gator Nation An Equal Opportunity Institution George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida Scholarly Resources & Research Services P. O. Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 352.273.2902 October 8, 2013 Dear Members of the Grants Management Committee: I am pleased to write in support of Suzan Alteri’s mini grant project on “Forging a Collaborative Structure for Sustaining Scholarly Access to the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature” which will support creating a scholarly council in support of the activities of the Baldwin Library and best position the Baldwin for new opportunities with grants, digital publishing, and more. The Baldwin Library has benefitted from many grants for digitization and from rich and dynamic collaborations with faculty, students, and scholars at UF and around the world. To support immediate needs and current activities, the Baldwin Li brary needs a more formalized structure for gathering UF scholarly input and for crediting scholars for their work. For instance when academic publisher Anvil Academic contacted the Baldwin regarding a new, innovative digital scholarship project entitled Alice in Dataland, the Baldwin Curator consulted with UF scholars who are experts on th e Baldwin. There is currently not a structure in place that eases this work or the validation and crediting fo r the work for these sorts of inquiries. Another example comes with interns and volunteers, where the Baldwin Cu rator is approached by many dozens of students each semester. In order to support student internsh ips and volunteering opportunities that best benefit students, the Libraries, and academic activities on campus overall, a consultative and facilitative structure is needed. In addition to specific needs that would be supported, this mini grant supports developing exactly the type of structures that are needed for academic libraries in the digital age. Academic libraries continue to grow closer to and integrate more strongly with teaching and research, and new structures are needed to support immediate needs, ongoing changes for the most successful development possible, and new opportunities. This mini grant will develop new supports that will benefit the Baldwin Library and provide a model for others at UF and around the world. I am excited to confirm my commitment as a member of the project team who will be attending the meeting, and participating in various ways throughout the project. I enthusiastically support this mini grant for its alignment with the mini grant program goals and the goals of the Smathers Libraries, including developing, integrating, and enhancing support for the UF Libraries in line with and as part of the scholarly communications lifecycle. Sincerely, Laurie N. Taylor, Ph.D. Digital Humanities Librarian Laurien@ufl.edu 528 Library West 352.273.2902

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APPENDIX C: LIST OF INVITEES University of Florida : Sophia Krzys Acord, Associate Director, Center for the Humanities in the Public Sphere Juliana Barr, Associate Professor of History/Women’s Studies, emphasis on Early America John Cech, Professor of English and Director of the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture, emphasis of all aspects of children’s literature Jim Cusick, Interim Chair, Special and Area Studies Collections Rebekah Fitzsimmons, Graduate Student (English) David Hackett, Associate Professor of Religion, emphasis on religious history and sociology of religion Terry Harpold, Associate Professor of English and Director of Graduate Student Teaching (English), emphasis on new media and digital humanities Emily Murphy, Graduate Student (English) Barbara Pace, Associate Professor in Education, emphasis on English education and media literacy Judith Page, Director of Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research, Professor of English, emphasis on British women writers (18th & 19th centuries) Elizabeth Ross, Associate Professor of Art History, emphasis on early modern Europe Jodi Schorb, Assistant Professor of English, emphasis on early American children’s literature Jon Sensbach, Professor of History, emphasis on Early America Stephanie Smith, Professor of English, Associate Chair and Undergraduate Coordinator (English), emphasis on 19th century American Literature Jane Townsend, Associate Professor in Education, emphasis on language arts and literacy Mariko Turk, Graduate Student (English), Assistant, Center for Children’s Literature and Culture Anastasia Ulanowicz, Assistant Professor of English, emphasis on children’s literature, religion and literature Casey Wilson, Graduate Student (English) Other Institutions : Peter Berg, Head of Special Collections, Michigan State University Robin Bernstein, Professor of African and African American Studies and of Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality; faculty member American Studies Program, Harvard University, emphasis on cultural history of race, age, gender, and sexuality Ramona Caponegro, Assistant Professor of English, Eastern Michigan University, emphasis on children’s literature Marah Gubar, Associate Professor of English and Director of Children’s Literature Program, University of Pittsburgh, emphasis on children’s literature Emiko Hastings, Curator of Books, William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan, emphasis on history of the book Haven Hawley, former Director of the Immigration Research History Center, University of Minnesota and Rare Books School faculty, University of Virginia, emphasis on history of the book Andrea Immel, Curator, Cotsen Children’s Library, Princeton University Claudia Nelson, Professor of English, Texas A&M University, emphasis on children’s literature Megan Norcia, Associate Professor, State University of New York – Brockport, emphasis on children’s literature Lissa Paul, Professor of Education, Brock University, emphasis on children’s literature and 18th century studies

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Kimberly Reynolds, Professor of Children’s Literature, Newcastle University, emphasis on children’s literature Ellen Ruffin, Curator of the De Grummond Collection, University of Southern Mississippi, emphasis on librarianship and children’s literature Sarah Schwebel, Associate Professor of English Language and Literature, University of South Carolina, emphasis on children’s literature, American literature, American history Eric Tribunella, Associate Professor of English and Chair, University of Southern Mississippi, emphasis on children’s literature Lisa Von Drasek, Curator of the Center for Children’s Literature Research Collections, University of Minnesota, emphasis on librarianship and children’s literature Annette Wannamaker, Professor of English, Eastern Michigan University, emphasis on children’s literature Laura E. Wasowicz, Curator of Children’s Literature, American Antiquarian Society Courtney Weikle Mills, Assistant Professor of English, University of Pittsburgh, emphasis on children’s literature and early American Literature David Whitesell, Curator in the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library at the University of Virginia, emphasis on book history