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Validating Paul M. W. Linebarger’s Role in the History of the Chinese Republic

University of Florida Institutional Repository
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Material Information

Title:
Validating Paul M. W. Linebarger’s Role in the History of the Chinese Republic
Physical Description:
Grant Proposal
Creator:
David Hickey
Publisher:
George A Smathers Libraries
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Florida
Publication Date:

Notes

Abstract:
This proposal requests travel and subsistence funding for one month of research time in Taiwan to investigate Chinese sources related to Paul M. W. Linebarger’s influence on Dr. Sun Yat-sen and others during the Republican period. Linebarger was an American lawyer who served 18 years as main legal counsel to Sun Yat-sen, the founder of the Chinese Republic, and later in 1930 – 37 as an advisor to the Nationalist government. This research seeks to answer: 1) How Chinese peers viewed Judge Linebarger’s importance to Sun, and later to the Republic of China in the 1930-37 period, when he was invited to advise the Nationalist Government in legal matters; and, 2) What is the historical assessment from Chinese sources on Linebarger’s contributions after his death?
Acquisition:
Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Joseph Piazza.
General Note:
Sponsor: Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
IR00003542:00001

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Validating Paul M. W. Linebarger’s Role in the History of the Chinese Republic
Physical Description:
Grant Proposal
Creator:
David Hickey
Publisher:
George A Smathers Libraries
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Florida
Publication Date:

Notes

Abstract:
This proposal requests travel and subsistence funding for one month of research time in Taiwan to investigate Chinese sources related to Paul M. W. Linebarger’s influence on Dr. Sun Yat-sen and others during the Republican period. Linebarger was an American lawyer who served 18 years as main legal counsel to Sun Yat-sen, the founder of the Chinese Republic, and later in 1930 – 37 as an advisor to the Nationalist government. This research seeks to answer: 1) How Chinese peers viewed Judge Linebarger’s importance to Sun, and later to the Republic of China in the 1930-37 period, when he was invited to advise the Nationalist Government in legal matters; and, 2) What is the historical assessment from Chinese sources on Linebarger’s contributions after his death?
Acquisition:
Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Joseph Piazza.
General Note:
Sponsor: Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
IR00003542:00001


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Description of the Proposed Project for the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation – Research Grant: Validating Paul M. W. Linebarger’s Role in the History of the Chinese Republic This proposal requests travel and subsiste nce funding for one month of research time in Taiwan to investigate Chinese sources related to Paul M. W. Linebarger’s influence on Dr. Sun Yat-sen and others during the Republican peri od. Linebarger was an American lawyer who served 18 years as main legal counsel to Sun Yat-sen, the founder of th e Chinese Republic, and later in 1930 – 37 as an advisor to the Nationalist government. This research seeks to answer: 1) How Chinese peers viewed Judge Linebarger’s im portance to Sun, and later to the Republic of China in the 1930-37 period, when he was invited to advise the Nationalist Government in legal matters; and, 2) What is the historical asse ssment from Chinese sources on Linebarger’s contributions after his death? The investigator plans to coor dinate with these Taiwanese schol ars: Dr. Hengsyung Jen, professor emeritus, Department of Foreign Languages and Lite ratures, National Taiwan University; and Dr. HengHsiung Cheng, Associate Professor and former Direct or of University Libraries, Fu-Jen Catholic University. These scholars have agr eed to support the project in provi ding location of and information on important resources, including both archival and in-per son references. The invest igator is aware that appropriate Republic of China histor ical archives such as those in Academia Sinica and the National Central Library can be used to accomplish this res earch. Once the research data has been collected and analyzed, a more accurate and complete historical re presentation will emerge on how the Chinese viewed Linebarger and his supportive endeav ors during and after the time he worked in China and the United States on behalf of Sun, the Tongmenhui and the Kuomintang. The author of Sun Zhongshan’s first official biography in Eng lish as well as Chinese was recognized as the earliest one by People’s Daily in 2001. Paul Myron Wentworth Linebarger, according to his son Paul Myron Anthony Lineba rger in a footnote in the latter’s own 1937 publication “Political Doctrines of Sun Yat-se n,” wrote “Sun Yat-sen and the Chinese Republic” in 1924 as a propaganda work. Sun had collaborated with and fully authorized Linebarger in the creation of this account of his life; neither he nor Linebarger had any expecta tion that it would ever be regarded as an infallible source, and ce rtainly not as an academically rigorous document. Hsu Chih-jen ( ) translated this into Chinese as published 1926 in Shanghai. If Paul M. A. Linebarger (PMAL) is right for them to collaborate closely on such an enterprise designed to enhance Sun’s public image as well as th e cause, Linebarger must have had a special relationship with Sun which lasted from their first Manila meeting in 1906 during the time he served as a judge in the Philippines Seventh District, all the way to Sun’s death in 1925, comprising 18 or so years in which Judge Line barger acted as one of Sun’s associates and advisors. While their relationship was not as ostensibly close as th at of other foreigners to Sun, notably that of Homer Lea, Sun’ s military advisor from Los Angeles who died in 1912, or that of Australian journalist/confidante William H. Donald, Judge Linebarger worked fervently for Sun’s cause, talking with prospect ive donors in overseas Chinese co mmunities as well as to U. S. Congressmen on Sun’s behalf. Their rich conn ection based on mutual respect and admiration permeates all Judge Linebarger’s writings, includ ing the last chapters of his typewritten final autobiography, the sole copy of whic h is held in the George A. Smat hers Libraries, University of

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Florida manuscript collection (see Dec. 2011 Guide to the Manuscript of Paul Myron Wentworth Linebarger’s Autobiography http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/manus cript/guides/Linebarger.htm ). If one examines major English-language m onographs on Sun Yat-sen from the thirties to the present, one finds a relative dearth of a ny references to Judge Linebarger. While Lyon Sharman dropped his name five times in her ce lebrated 1934 “cult-corre ctive” work entitled “Sun Yat-sen, His Life and Meaning: A Critical Biography,” she seemed to favor only light anecdotes about the Judge becoming “in his own way, a Lafayette to Sun,” especially in fundraising and writing about Sun. One of two authors in 1984 monographs detailing American contributions to the Chinese 1911 Revolution dism issed Linebarger as a supporter who could do nothing for Sun, and characterized hi m as a footnote in the big pict ure of Sun’s U.S. associates (Key Ray Chong, “Americans and Chinese Refo rm and Revolution, 1989-1922: The Role of Private Citizens in Diplomacy,” p. 135). Another author hinte d, without using Judge Linebarger’s name, that people suspected “a lawyer who later became a judge” stole evidence that might have connected Linebarger with possi bly illegal activities (Eugene Anschel, “Homer Lea, Sun Yat-sen and the Chinese Revolution,” p. xiv). However a more serious omission occurs in the in-depth 1994 “La Chine au XXe sicle: D’une revolution a l’autre 1895-1949 [English: Sun Yat-sen].” The au thor, Marie-Claire Be rgere, never mentioned Judge Linebarger in her text and index, then wr ongly attributed PMAL’s work “T he Political Doctrines of Sun Yat-sen” to Judge Linebarger on p. 464 of her bibliography. In looking at Chinese sources in the Chinese Academic Journals (CAJ) and People’s Daily ( ) databases, since 1980 in the former and 1948 in the latter, very few journal and newspaper records contain any reference to A 2011 China Newsweek article on Huang Hsing ( ) paraphrased a 1961 American monograph by Chun-tu Hsueh titled “Hwang Hsing and the Chinese Revo lution.” Again, the passage involving Judge Linebarger was anecdotal in describing a s upposed 1914 encounter between Huang Hsing and the Judge: ‘s author refers to Judge Line barger receiving a bulky package from Huang containing an appeal to the American pub lic to support Chinese democracy in its struggle against the usurpation of Yuan Shih-k’ai. An account of this incident is attributed by Hsueh directly to “Sun Yat-sen and the Chinese Republ ic.” Hsueh further em phasizes that Judge Linebarger’s description is one of the few Western accounts honor ing Huang Hsing as a leader comparable to Sun Yat-sen. The other CAJ search result also is dated from 2011: in ( Culture and History Vision ). Judge Linebarger is described as Sun’s “ ” or secretary, which was not the case; but the sh ort article goes on to say that Sun trusted Linebarger and looks to him to help Sun make decisions. One can th us glean how important Judge Linebarger was to Sun through later critical writings such as this. The People’s Daily database search produced only th e previously mentioned 2001 article citing Judge Linebarger’s biography as the earl iest by anyone, and a 1949 two-part article on the “History of American Aggression” ( ) which characterized both Linebargers as American intruders who worked for the Kuomintang government. A 1982 book edited by Huang Jilu ( list ) and published in Taiwan was listed in an OCLC First Search compilation of books containing

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references to Judge Linebarger. The 1975 and 1982 print editions are only available in Taiwan. An electronic table of contents of this important work can be accessed, but the full-text of any of these chapters is inaccessible to the investigator. The print as well as electronic research limitation in this case reflects the investigator ’s challenges and barriers to accessing Chinese sources contemporary to Sun, as well as those late r critical sources for opinions or data about Judge Linebarger. Spending time in Taiwan libra ries and archives is required to research adequately the role Judge Linebarger played in his dealings with Sun Zhongshan and other key players in overthrowing the Manchus, establishi ng the Republic and working as a legal advisor. This research will fill a lacuna in scholarship on one of Sun’s American advisors who strongly supported Sun, and may have influenced Zhongshan in certain ways. It will provide the content and context necessary to promote widely the existence of the University of Florida’s typewritten and extensively annot ated manuscript, “Counsellor to Sun Yat-sen,” as an important resource for scholars researching Sun Yat-sen and U. S. – China relations. This manuscript is currently in the queue to be digitized and mounted in the Un iversity of Florida Digital Collections ( http://ufdc.ufl.edu/ ). The investigator will publish re search findings in a peer-revi ewed journal article. As a result of discussions with colleagues in Taiw an, subsequent scholarly output may include an article in an academic Chinese journal. These re search products also will contribute to greater knowledge of Paul M.W. Linebarger’s stat us as advisor and friend to Sun Zhongshan. Proposed Research Schedule Timeframe Activity July 1, 2014 Travel from Japan to Taiwan (I w ill have already spent f our months on the China mainland and in Japan researching another topic during my academic sabbatical July 2 Meet with scholar contacts 1) Dr. Hengsyung Jeng ( ), Professor Emeritus, Department of Foreign Langua ges and Literatures, National Taiwan University, 12 – 7F Lane 52, We nchou Street, Taipei, Taiwan 10660 hengsyung@gmail.com 2) Dr. Heng-Hsiung Cheng ( same characters as above), Associate Prof., Fu-Jen Catho lic University, Former Director of University Libraries (FJU), 5F-1, No.32, Sec. 1, An He Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan chenghh@blue.lins.fju.edu.tw July 3 – July 30 Conduct research and write at Academia Sinica Archives / National Central Library / other appropriat e libraries and archives July 31 Travel from Taiwan to San Francisco August 1 6 Conduct research and write at th e Hoover Institution Archives at Stanford University, contact person: Mr. Charles Fosselman, Access & Digital Information Services Libr arian, East As ia Library August 7 Travel from San Francisco to Baltimore August 8 12 Conduct research and write at the Eisenhower Library Special Collections Department, Johns Hopkins University, c ontact person: Mr. Yunshan Ye, East Asian Librarian, Eisenhower Library August 15 – June 1, 2015 Prepare, submit and publish articles in US and Chinese publications

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Itemized Budget Expense Category and Detail Cost Airline travel: ha lf the round trip cost from East coast to East Asia, per the CCKF guidelines $750 Subsistence costs: based on $120 / day fo r 31 days in Taiwan, per the CCKF guidelines $3,720 TOTAL $4,470 NOTE: The principal investigator, Davi d Hickey, does not plan to utilize a research assistant. He has been awar ded sabbatical leave during the travel period proposed here.

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1Curriculum Vita Date October 10, 2013 Vita of C. David Hickey Asian Studies Bibliographer Associate Librarian cdhickey@ufl.edu http://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/asian_studies / http://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/chinese_culture Work Experience: University of Florida George A. Sm athers Libraries, October 2000 to present, Asian Studies Bibliographer / Associate University Librarian: Responsible for the overall development and ma nagement of the Asian Studies collections, including selecting and evaluating CJK langua ge materials in both print and electronic media. Analyzes the university Asian Studies programs, determines needs and priorities, and plans to enhance the library research reso urce support of these programs. Collaborates with library and teaching faculty to establis h collection management policies; organizes and collaborates with library staff to deve lop public service and technical programs and policies on behalf of these programs. Partic ipates in the library’s publications and fundraising programs. Awarded tenure 2007. Specifically as Chinese Collection Manager an d Japanese/Korean Collections Coordinator, performs all aspects of native script and western language collection development and management, collaborates with academic faculty in building up holdings to support current and future programs, and provides on-demand subject reference serv ice and bibliographic instruction. University of Florida Smathers Li braries, July 1995 to October 2000, Chair, Access Services Department and Chinese Collection Manager: Provided leadership in the development, c oordination and provisi on of services that facilitate user access to information resources in the Smathers Libraries. Responsible for interlibrary loan/document delivery and stor age collection management for all Smathers Libraries, and for circulation, reserves and stack management services for the humanities and social sciences collections. Served as a member of the management team in establishing library programs and setting pol icies, especially those covering public services. Slippery Rock University of Penns ylvania Bailey Library, Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania, January 1992 to June 1995, Access Services Librarian/Coordinator of NOTIS Online Library System: Responsible for overall supervision of automate d systems, interlibrary loan and circulation, including reserves, stack contro l, library privileges and photod uplication services. Shared

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2 in providing evening/weekend general re ference service, and acted as Asian Studies/modern language collect ion development liaison. Georgetown University Lauinger Library, Washington D. C., September 1979 to July 1991, Head of the Circulation Department: Planned and implemented a GEAC circulation system. Responsible for ongoing automated operations, access privileges, Reserve section, ILL, stack control and exit security. Performed full-time research in Ph.D program July 1991 to January 1992. Northwestern University Library, Evanston, Illinois, March 1977 to September 1979, Assistant Head of Circulation Services: Supervised Library exit control, study space as signments, fines and billing, Library limited access and borrowing procedures, and com puterized circulation activities. Center for Research Libraries, Ch icago, Illinois, July 1976 to March 1977, Assistant Circulation Librarian: Performed bibliographic search ing and disseminated material s and holding information to interlibrary loan agencies around the country. United States Navy, 1969 – 1973, Commissioned Officer: Administrative Assistant in Manned Spacecraf t Recovery Section, Hawaii during Apollo 17 and early Skylab missions; Advisor to South Vietnamese Navy, Nha Trang; Administrative Assistant in Op erations Department, USS Oklahoma City (CLG-5), based in Yokosuka, Japan. Education: PhD coursework in Chinese Literature/Language, with minors in Applied Linguistics and East Asian Histor y, Georgetown University, 1982-2000— completed all requirements but dissertation. AMLS in Library Science, University of Michigan, 1976. MA in Chinese Studies, Un iversity of Michigan, 1975. AB in Russian Literature, University of Notre Dame, 1969. Honors: Granted two-semester sabbatical to be taken during Spring and Summer Semesters, 2014. Awarded a full travel scholarship to attend the Chinese Studies Electronic Resources Workshop at the University of Washington, Summer 2008. Participated as a fully funded foreign honoree in the invitati on-only “International Forum of Chinese Databases: Perspectives of Collection De velopment and Usage” at Renmin (People’s) University of China in Beijing during the fo llow-up tour of Beijing and Shanghai libraries and electronic/print vendors, October 2008.

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3 One of twenty Chinese Studies Li brarians nationwide to receive an invitation to participate in the Luce Summer Inst itute for East Asian Librarians held at the University of Pittsburgh during the summer of 2004. Attended the follow-up tour of Shanghai and Beijing book vendors and libraries, October 2004. As one of ten Chinese Collection Managers nationwide to receive an American Library Association/Hong Kong Book Fair stipend, attended the Hong Kong Book Fair July 17 – 23, 2001. Languages: Spoken Mandarin Chinese and written m odern standard Chinese (working knowledge), written Japanese (rudimentary knowledge). Publications: Refereed: 1. Hickey, C. David. “Area Studies Libraries in the Global Studies Milieu: Implications for N on-Roman Script Print Resource Management, and University Li brary Budgets and Staffing.” Library Collections, Acquisitions and Technical Services 30, nos. 1-2 (2006): pp. 77 84. 2. Hickey, C. David and Jade Yurong Yang Atwill. “Area Studies Librarians and International B ook Fairs: The Hong Kong Book Fair Experience.” Library Collections, Acquisitions and Technical Services 27, no.1 (2003): pp. 97 105. 3. Hickey, C. David and Shelley Arle n. “Falling Through the Cracks: Just How Much ‘History’ is History?” Library Collections, Acquisitions and Technical Services 26, no. 2 (2002): pp. 97 – 106. 4. Hickey, C. David. “Serials ‘Derel egation’ from Remote Storage.” Collection Building 18, no. 4 (1999): pp. 153 – 160. Non-refereed: 1. Hickey, C. David. “Development of the Asian Studies Collection.” Howe Society Newsletter, Chapter One: For Friends of the George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida (2003): pages 1, 6. 2. Hickey, C. David. “Building the Ch inese Collection: A Library Case Study.” Chinese Studies Forum 2001 : Proceedings of the Sixth Annual Conference on Chinese St udies 2 (2001): pp. 141 – 148: Paper originally was presented to scholars in Chinese Studies from

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4 around the state and southeast region at The Sixth Annual Conference on Chinese Studies, spon sored by Florida-China Linkage Institute and the University of South Florida, Tampa, April 7, 2000. Papers, Speeches, Presentations: Invited: 1. Resources for College Libraries (RCL) peer referee report for the Asian History, Languages and Literatures S ection. Involved extensive subject taxonomy analysis, subject resources recommendations and collection management area assignment review Anne Doherty, Project Editor for RCL commented “You provided us with invaluable advice on how best to refine this area…your contribu tions have been central to the credibility of the RCL content and its value to academic librarians, faculty and students.” January 8, 2013. 2. “Books on China You Should Read.” Two-hour PowerPoint talk and follow-up Q&A presented at University of Florida’s Oak Hammock facility. Part of an Institute for Learning in Retirement (ILR) four-part faculty seminar series jointly sponsored by the UF Asian Studies Program, October 15, 2009. 3. With Robin Kear of Nova Southeaste rn University and Arif Jamal of University of Pittsburgh, “Exchanging Skills and Cultures: Benefiting from the International Exchanges Committee of IRRT.” Poster Session presented at American Library A ssociation (ALA) Annual Conference, New Orleans, June 25, 2006. 4. “Serving Sinologists and Chinese-Americans at the Local University Library.” Keynote speaker for the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA) Annual Conf erence Program, Orlando, June 27, 2004. 5. “Building an Academic Library’s Chinese Collection from Next-toNothing to Something: A Case Study.” Poster Session presented at Association for Asian Studies Annua l Conference, Washington, D. C., April 6, 2002. 6. “Serials in Remote Storage: Get Some Runs Home or Strike ‘Em Out.” Poster Session presented at Amer ican Library Association Annual Conference, Chicago, July 8, 2000. 7. “Riding the Chinese Dragon: Cu lture, Nature and Technology” Workshop. Panel respondent at sy mposium sponsored by the East-West

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5 Center’s Asian Studies Developmen t Program (University of Hawaii) and Florida Institute of Tec hnology, Melbourne, November 5, 1999. Not Invited: 1. Introduced general and specialized libr ary resources and services to UF students taking such courses as As ian Religion and Asian History 2000 2013. 2. “Select Materials from the UF Smat hers Libraries General Collections on Western Interactions with China.” University of Florida Smathers Libraries People Awareness “Bag-Lunch” Program, co-presentation with Jeffrey Barr, Smathers Libraries Rare Books Curator, January 16, 2002. Creative Works: 1. 2012 – present, creator and maintain er of the University of Florida Smathers Libraries Chinese Culture Libguide: http://libguides.uflib.uf l.edu/chinese_culture 2. 2009 – present, creator and maintain er of the University of Florida Smathers Libraries Asian Studies Libgui de, the official library site for Asian Studies: http://libguides.uflib .ufl.edu/asian_studies 3. 2005 – 2009, creator and web-master of Council on East Asian Libraries’ former Committee on Public Service site, now accessed via the dedicated CEAL server http://www.eastasianlib.org/cpu/index.htm and author of “East Asian Library Service Flexibility in the Progressively More Globally-Focus ed Academic Context” working policy/procedure paper in its form er “Focus on Issues” Section. 4. January 2005, as a member of the ALA International Relations Round Table (IRRT), compiled the online International Job Exchange Bibliography: http://www.ala.org/ala/irrt/irrtcommi ttees/irrtintlexc/in ternationaljob.ht m updated January 2006 and now handled by the current Committee members. 5. 2000 – 2004, Smathers Libraries Co ordinator for gathering and submitting “UF News from the Field,” Florida Chapter of the Association of College and Re search Libraries Newsletter : http://www.unf.edu/library/facrl/uf5.html

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6 Grants: (funded only) 1. 2010 Library Enhancement Program in the Humanities $5000 grant awarded by the UF Center for the Hu manities and Public Sphere, with the support of the Robert and Marg aret Rothman Endowment for the Humanities. This enabled the library to acquire the entire print archive of an important annual Sinological bibliography from Japan. CoPrincipal Investigator with Profe ssors Sean Macdonald and Richard Wang, Chinese Language and Literature Department. 2. 2007 – 08 Smathers Libraries Mini-G rant “Digital Collection in Asian Studies – A Catalog of Chinese Bronzes .” This beautifully illustrated 19th Century 24-volume set of "Qin ding xi Qing gu jian" can be accessed via the Chinese Art History label at: http://ufdcweb1.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?c=asia1 Co-Principal Investigator with Jane Pen, Digital Library Center. 3. 2006 2010 North American Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources (NCC) Multi-Volume Set (MVS) awards to assist the purchase of cassette and DVD series unavailable from any other North American East Asian libra ry collection. UF compet ed with the likes of Cornell, Illinois, Princeton and UC LA for the 2006 award. Co-Principal Investigator with East As ian Cataloger Hikaru Nakano. 4. 2002 – 2005 Freeman Foundation Grant for East Asian Studies: supplemental funding of $45,000 per year for the four years to enhance Smathers Libraries East Asian holdings. Michael Tsin, 2000 – 2003 Director of the Asian Studies Program was the Principal Investigator for this grant. Oversaw which libr ary materials were purchased, and whether they complied with the restrictions of the library portion of this grant. Responsible for writing annu al reports on the disposition of library funds. Exhibits: 1. November 12 – 19, 2010, “Chinese Printing from Typeset to Digital Access: Samples from the University of Florida Chinese Studies Collections,” First Floor Smathe rs Library Lobby exhibit case. 2. June – August 2009, “Smathers Libraries Chinese Artifacts, Literary and Otherwise,” Second Floor Smathers Li brary Exhibit Gallery and Special & Area Studies Collections Research Room exhibit cases. Featured were donations from the private collection of Dr. and Mrs. David Owens, formerly of Winter Par k, including a Yuan Dynasty (1279 – 1368) massive head of Guanyin, the Goddess of Mercy.

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7 3. January – February 2004, “Selected Asian Studies Holdings in the George A. Smathers Libraries,” co-presentation w ith Rare Books Curator Jeffrey Barr, coinciding with the annual meeting of the Southeast Conference of the Associati on of Asian Studies held locally. Featured were portions of the late University of Mi ami Professor John Knoblock’s personal Chinese Studi es library worth $25,000, which was received as a gift from the Knobloc k family after months of negotiation in April 2001. 4. May – September 2002, “Asian American Writers,” co-presentation with Marilyn Ochoa, Library West Display Case, 15 items. 5. November-December 2000, “Gao Xingjian: Nobel Prize Winner in Literature 2000,” Library We st Display Case, 8 items. National Organizations: Association for Asian Studies (AAS), 1974 – present, member. 1. Association for Asian Studies (AAS), Council on East Asian Libraries (CEAL): Elected by the national membership to be Chair of the CEAL Public Services Committee (CPS) 2005-2008; 2008 – 2010 Ex-officio member of CPS. Organized and m oderated the annual CPS program at the San Francisco CEAL meetin g, April 5, 2006, and created the Committee’s web pages and blog ( http://cealpublicse rvice.blogspot.com ). April 2005 – 2008, as Chair of one of the six major Standing Committees, member of the CEAL Executive Board. Selected as one of a small number of “experts” in the field of Asian Studies Librarians hip to rate the value of the Journal of Asian Studies August 2012. 3. Online Computer Library Center, In c. (OCLC): Chinese-JapaneseKorean Users Group, 1997 – present, member. 4. North American Coordinating Committee on Japanese Library Resources (NCC), 1997present, member. 5. AAS CEAL “Small-to-Medium East Asian Collection Librarians Roundtable” at each Annual Confer ence meeting, 2004 – present, member. 6. AAS CEAL, April 2002 – March 2004, el ected Member-at-Large. As Member-at-Large, member of the CEAL Executive Board.

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8 7. AAS CEAL Executive Board, Fall 2003 – Spring 2004, appointed member of the three-person Nominating Committee for ViceChair/President-Elect and two Member-at-Large positions. 8. AAS CEAL Executive Board, Apri l 2002 – March 2004, appointed member of four-person Ad Ho c Committee on ByLaws Revision; contributed in the work of drafting and implementing the new organizational Bylaws. 9. AAS CEAL Information Literacy Task Force for East Asian Libraries, 2001 – 2004, member. Chinese American Library Association (CALA), 2004 – present, member. In an appointed role as one of four editorial staff members of CALA’s Occasional Paper Series (OPS), act as peer revi ewer and style editor for submitted manuscripts. The resulting academic papers have appeared between 2008 and the present on the OPS website http://www.calaweb.org/node/157 American Library Association (ALA), 1975 – present, member. 1. ALA International Relations Round Table (IRRT), May 2003 present, member. IRRT International Visitors’ Center Planning Committee, May 2010 – present, 2013 – 2016 Co-Chair; IRRT International Exchanges Committee, June 2006, temporary acting Chair. 2. ALA Association for College and Re search Libraries (ACRL), Asian, African and Middle Eastern Section, May 2003 – 2008, member. 3. ALA International Relations Council (IRC), East Asia and the Pacific Subcommittee, 2003 – 2006, member. “Going Digital: Experiences from East Asia and the Pacific” pa nel, June 27, 2005. One of four who organized and implemented this landmark program at the Chicago ALA Annual Meeting. 4. ALA Library Administra tion and Management Association (LAMA) Systems and Services Section: Publications Committee, July 1999 – 2002, member. April 2000 – June 2 000, Chair. “Communicating by EMail: How We Use It and How We Can Improve It” panel, June 15, 2002 Atlanta ALA Annual Meeting, pr ogram planning and logistics assistant. 5. ALA LAMA: Storage Discussion Group, 1995 – 2001, member. July 2000 – June 2001, Chair.

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9 6. ALA LAMA Statistics Section (now called Measurement, Assessment and Evaluation Section): Nomi nating Committee for 1998 Section Elections, July 1997 – December 1998, Chair. Regional/ State Organizations 1. East-West Center/University of Hawaii Alumni Association Florida Chapter, 1996 – present, founding member and ongoing Treasurer. Organized receptions for Florida alum ni at such events as the August 2009 Ho’ike Hawai’i Hula Competition held at the Disney World Hilton and before the UF – UH football game August 2008. As organizational co-sponsor with Florida Atlantic Un iversity and Florida Institute of Technology, collaborated on planning and implementing two East-West Center Asian Studies Development Program (ASDP) Workshops: “Asian Values,” April 29 – 30, 2002, Fort Lauderdale, and “Riding the Chinese Dragon: Culture, Nature and Technology,” November 4 – 5, 1999, Melbourne. 2. Southeast Conference of the Associa tion for Asian Studies (SEC/AAS), 1997 – present, member. 2004 A nnual Meeting, Gainesville, Book Exhibit Coordinator. 3. Southern Japan Seminar, a Southeastern U. S. semi-annual academic faculty colloquium, 1997 – present, member. 4. Florida-China Linkage Institute Sixth, Seventh and Eighth Conferences on Chinese Studies, 2000 – 2004, member. University Service 1. Elected member of the Preservation of Historic Buildings and Sites Senate-Presidential Committee. 2010 present 2. Selected by the Provost to serve fo r three years in a Presidential Committee appointment to the UF Property Management Board, 2009. 3. Elected member of the Lakes, Vege tation and Landscaping Joint SenatePresidential Committee (LVL), and since Nov. 2008, serve as a member of the Landscaping Subcommittee, acting as the monthly meeting’s back-up chair on occasion. 2007 – present. 4. Member, Organizing Committee of the UF Chapter of United Faculty of Florida, 2002 – present; 2009 pr esent, elected UFF-UF Chapter Secretary and regional senator. Responsible for social events coordination.

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10 5. University of Florida Faculty Senate, 2000 – 2002, elected member. 6. UF Faculty Senate/United Faculty of Florida Collective Bargaining Task Force on Benefits, 2001 – 2002, member a nd co-drafter of final report. Library Service 1. “Ask-a-Librarian” Reference Inst ant Messaging and Humanities and Social Sciences Services Referen ce Desk Groups, 2000 – present, team member. 2. Tenure and Promotion Support Committee, 2012 – present. 3. Mentor to junior li brarian, 2011 – present. 4. International Education Week at the Libraries Planning Committee, 2011 – present, member. 5. Search and Selection Committee for Special & Area Studies Collections Department Baldwin Historic Childre n’s Collection Curator, November 2010, member. 6. Market Equity Review Committee, May 2009 – present, appointed Chair. Head the five-man committee charged by the Administration and the Library Faculty Assembly to review requests for faculty salary adjustments to meet current market levels, per the ARL statistics and guidelines. 7. Library Faculty Assembly, Septem ber 2006 2009, elec ted Secretary. 8. Faculty Shared Governance Working Group for the Libraries, November 2005 – January 2006, member. 9. Search and Selection Committee for East Asian Cataloger, March August 2005, Chair. 10. Smathers Libraries Serials Comm ittee/Periodicals Improvement Group, 1995 – 2004, member. 11. Closed Stacks Task Force of Smathers Libraries, May – August 1999, Chair. 12. Community Campaign Smathers Libr aries Committee, May – October 1998, Co-Coordinator.