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French Plamphlet Planning Meetings (Chicago)- Final Report

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Title:
French Plamphlet Planning Meetings (Chicago)- Final Report
Physical Description:
Conference Proceedings
Creator:
Loving, Matthew
Conference:
French Pamphlet Planning Meetings
Publication Date:

Notes

Abstract:
Report produced on June 2013 planning meetings held at the Newberry Library and convening a few days before the ALA Annual Conference in Chicago, IL. Planning partners in attendance included: Alan Leopold (Newberry Library); Besty Simpson (UF); Florence Turcotte (UF); Sue Waterman (JHU); Franck Hurinville (BNF); Jennifer Thom (Newberry Library); Judy Alspach (CRL); Karen Cook (KU); Richard Hacken (BYU); Laurie Taylor (UF); Lidia Uziel (Yale); John Schalow (UMD); James Simon (CRL); Sarah Sussman (Stanford); David Faulds (Emory); Matthew Loving (UF)
Acquisition:
Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Matthew Loving.
Publication Status:
Unpublished
General Note:
Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this report do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID:
IR00003499:00001

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
French Plamphlet Planning Meetings (Chicago)- Final Report
Physical Description:
Conference Proceedings
Creator:
Loving, Matthew
Conference:
French Pamphlet Planning Meetings
Publication Date:

Notes

Abstract:
Report produced on June 2013 planning meetings held at the Newberry Library and convening a few days before the ALA Annual Conference in Chicago, IL. Planning partners in attendance included: Alan Leopold (Newberry Library); Besty Simpson (UF); Florence Turcotte (UF); Sue Waterman (JHU); Franck Hurinville (BNF); Jennifer Thom (Newberry Library); Judy Alspach (CRL); Karen Cook (KU); Richard Hacken (BYU); Laurie Taylor (UF); Lidia Uziel (Yale); John Schalow (UMD); James Simon (CRL); Sarah Sussman (Stanford); David Faulds (Emory); Matthew Loving (UF)
Acquisition:
Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Matthew Loving.
Publication Status:
Unpublished
General Note:
Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this report do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID:
IR00003499:00001


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French Pamphlet Planning Meetings The Newberry Library Chicago, IL June 25 26th, 2013 Meeting Report M. Loving I. Meeting Summary I I. Five questions submitted by partners I II. Next Steps Attached Meeting Notes: A) J. Alspach; L. Taylor; F. Turcotte I. Meeting Summary Tuesday (July 25th) Present : Alan Leopold (Newberry Library); Besty Simpson (UF); Florence Turcotte (UF); Sue Waterman (JHU); Franck Hurinville (BNF); Jennifer Thom (Newberry Library); Judy Alspach (CRL); Karen Cook (KU); Richard Hacken (BYU); Laurie Taylor (UF); Lidia Uziel (Yale); John Schalow (UMD); James Simon (CRL); Sarah Sussman (Stanford) Following Introductions M. Loving presented on the origins, scope and state of the current planning proj ect as funded by the NEH in Spring 2013. He established that many project partners and participants have digitized portions of their pamphlet holdings but in most cases these digital copies remain either uncataloged or cannot be searched in institutional catalogs.

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However, it is often the case that corresponding s ame ( or similar ) catalog d escriptions of pamphlet titles exist in WorldCat and other catalog resources It was in searching such titles that the overlapping nature of pamphlet holding s amongst N. American libraries and archives was first realized It is hoped that this fact may lend itself to a project involving broader collaboration where catalog descriptions ( item records), digital facsimiles and monies for future description, treatm could serve to further improve access to pamphlets both locally and globally. Is it more effective to digitize all pamphlets ? L. Taylor suggested that amongst partner institutions it is not worth time/effort to be overly concerned with duplication issue and it was echoed in the group that any eventual finding aid could easily regroup multiple copies for researchers to compare for themselves. Bringing all digitized pamphlets, duplicates, etc into one place/portal/finding aid will improve overall access and usage. In terms of improving digitize d pamphlet metadata and associatin g existing catalog records with similar (or same ) digitized facsimiles questions were asked: Who decides which record/metadata is best? How are these records related to existing and future digital facsimiles? A short recorded interview with project scholarly advisor R. Darnton entitled was shown to partners. In his video interview Dr. Darnton explains that while 18th century printers (many living outside France/Paris: Amsterdam, Geneva, Basel, etc) lost money on novels and longer works, they could make money by printing multiple copies of short pamphlets. He also explains the illicit nature of pamphlets, police efforts to stop their circulation and that many of the authors remained anonymous. It was decided that the planning meetings would strive to capture the important planning questions to be worked through in the year ahead M. Loving suggested that along with notes and other meeting data participants could help by contributing five important planning questions that they believe should be a ddressed by project planning efforts. The LOC definition for a pamphlet was given and F. Hurinville as something very specific to the French Revolution and political in nature. US partners understand pamphlets to broadly includ e cultural topics in addition to political. As partners listened to presentations on partner collections, other important questions and data began to surface:

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Can the project make use of microfilm copies of the Melvin Collection made by Laurence Thompson and in the 1960 70s and that were in the past marke te d by ProQuest? (KU); Could Martin and Wal ter numbers be used to flag pamphlet titles digitized by the BNF? (BNF); End first day meetings. Wednesday (June 26) Present : Alan Leopold (Newberry Library); Besty Simpson (UF); Florence Turcotte (UF); Sue Waterman (JHU); Franck Hurinville (BNF); J ennifer Thom (Newberry Library); Judy Alspach (CRL); Karen Cook (KU); Richard Hacken (BYU); Laurie Taylor (UF); Lidia Uziel (Yale); John Schalow (UMD); James Simon (CRL); Sarah Sussman (Stanford); David Faulds (Emory) On the second day of planning partne r presentations continued and more was discovered about pamphlet collections and their existing accessibility As well, more important project questions began to surface : Would it be possible to digitize Martin & Walters for project use? (UF); Is it preferable to follow aggregation/finding aid models such as Digital Library of America? (JHU); Can the eventual portal pull from Internet Archive, Hathi Trust, etc? (UMD) Could digitized FPP member pamphlets be integrated in the La bibliothque numrique francophone (?) (BNF); As the rest of the partners presented on their holdings and collections, i

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materials are being used. This lead as well to the idea of surveying the scholarly community asking as well for their help defining the docu ment for N. American and French users. 1805. with visual imagery: What to do with pamphlets with image s ? The Newberry provides access terms such as engravings, woodcuts, etc. It was determined that info gleaned from the environmental scan (on uncataloged items, microfilm, tight binding, etc) might be entered into a Google worksheet that can be accessed or viewed by all partners (Google Docs). Questions need to be formulated to make the spreadsheet meaningful. Stanford, Kansas JHU, Maryland and Florida will be conducting an environmental scan of their collections in the months ahead. With regards to initial e survey, participants wanted to have less anecdotal and more measurable percentages/numbers/metrics moving forward. A subsequent discussion centered on outsourcing digitization and vendor selection as the New berry begins work on digitizing its collections. This lead to discussion of the proposed project portal and whether it should be aimed at researchers or as a functional tool for supporting the pamphlet project. The question was also asked: Can existing M ARC records be loaded into this resource? expected outcomes and then build backwards; Define a shared language; Identify correct bibliographies. II. Five Questions French Pamphlet Planning Meeting 2013, Newberry Library, Chicago Follow up Questions (Organized by Last Name of Institution Representative) Cook, Karen University of Kansas 1. Develop a database template for the environmental scan that will be f lexible enough for all to use but will ensure that the data from different libraries will be compatible. 2. Develop some guidelines for sampling collections for the environmental scans. Even though our differing library situations will affect what we can do, the closer we are to a consistent approach, the stronger the conclusions that can be drawn.

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3. Compile and make available to everyone lists of existing bibliographies/catalogs of French revolutionary pamphlets --and of bibliographies/catalogs of microfilm of French revolutionary pamphlets. 4. Establish best cataloging practices. 5. Co ordinate bilingual terminology. 6. Develop a strategy for promoting the French Pamphlets Project to additional libraries and scholars, who might either participate in the project and/or write letters of support for the "big" grant application to come. Leopold, Alan Newberry Library 1. How will duplicates be handled? Intellectually the case can be made, but it would be helpful to have the database facilitate retrieving and presenting dups. Laurie mentioned that a nesting method could accomplish this. Is this something to elaborate on and either demo or point to existin g examples for the group. Also, in the process of including duplicates the database will have the potential over time of becoming a census for these pamphlets. 2. How will OCR be managed? I think a value of having searchable text is being able to search all of the pamphlets or subsets by applying filters. Where does this data need to live? Can it be pulled together from the sites of the participating members or does it need to be in one location? Finally in searching about some on digital humanities and 18t h century France I came across Dan Edelstein at Stanford. His work in this area and in digital humanities could be helpful. I imagine that Sa rah is familiar with him. Here are a couple links on his work. http://www.stanford.edu/dept/DLCL/cgi bin/web/people/dan edelstein http://humanexperience.stanford.edu/edelstein Loving, Matthew University of Florida 1. Will an eventual database resource contain all catalog record content as well as full text records? 2. If yes to a mixed resource of bibliographic item records (some full text some not) how to make this resource usable to researchers?

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3. D o we need to already bring OCLC into the planning discussions and work towards a contact person at OCLC? 4. Would this project fit with what LLMC is attempting to do with other legal documentation? Should I contact Jerry Dupont? 5. Should project planners look at integrating resource records into larger collections such as Reseau francophone numerique ; LLMC ; OCLC; etc. Schalow, John M.T., Kelsey Corlett Rivera, Joanne Archer Un iversity of Maryland 1. Are there ways for us to build on each other's work to minimize duplication of effort (like digitizing, metadata best practices, other best practices) and do it in a cost effective manner? 2. Can we define the scope of the project (yea rs of coverage, subject matter, form of material including number of pages, serials, etc.) in a way which meets our researchers' needs? 3. How do our users search for these materials and how do they define pamphlets? 4. Is it better to perform the work of the project centrally or distribute the work among the institutions? What is most cost effective and efficient? 5. build a portal for these materials at one of our institutions or better to work with OCLC to create a portal/collection within WorldCat? An informal conversation by me with Theodore Fons, Executive Director, Data Services, OCLC led to this email response: Hi John It was a pleasure to meet you at the reception last n ight. I enjoyed our chat about your special collections and making them more discoverable to scholars and students. I gave a brief description of our conversation to David Whitehair and John McCullough who are my colleagues here at OCLC responsible for Collection Manager and WorldCat discovery. I encouraged them to talk to you if they want to discuss these ideas further. It seems that we have good potential for collaboration here. Sincerely, Ted Fons

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Sussman, Sarah Stanford University 1. What are the exact date range and page counts to include? 2. Do we include music/purely literary works, or are only materials of a political nature included? 3. Should we come up with a list of broad ca tegories/subjects to assign pamphlets? 4. How are we going to collect the data spreadsheet? 5. What is the process for identifying duplicates or for identifying rare or unique materials? Waterman, Sue Johns Hopkins University 1. The tricky question of duplica tes. How will we de dupe catalog records? How will we determine real dupes from variants? Do we include images of multiple copies of the same pamphlet? 2. But how exactly do we collate all the catalog records from the various institutions? Do we have 1 record per title, with multiple links out to the digital surrogates? If so, how do we come up with the best template for the ideal catalog record? 3. Format of images/scanning standa rds. Same questions really as for cataloging. How do we coordinate this work to ensure consistency, and best preservation practices? 4. Sustainability. Maybe a bit early to worry about this, but who will maintain the Web site/portal? How will the data be arch ived? Who will migrate if /when necessary? 5. Environmental scan. How do we ensure that it is performed somewhat consistently, so that we can collate the data? How do we actually collate the data? And then what exactly do we do with the data? III. Next Steps where several of the partners (Kansas, Stanford, Univ of Maryland & Johns Hopkins Univ) will begin collecting data on their collections for further plann ing in 2014. These environmental scans and assessment will allow later planning sessions to complete their analysis and help in deciding the appropriate directions and establishment of next steps in improving access to important French pamphlet materials.

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The environmental scan portion of the planning year will begin in Summer 2013 and should be completed before the start of 2014. Later planning meeting s in Spring 2014 will make use of the initial e survey, this meeting document as well as data gathered from environmental scans to work towards goals, solutions and a final proposal plan (white paper) for the project. Attached Meeting Notes: (A) J. Alspach (B) L. Taylor (C) F. Turcotte ATTACHMENT A : Notes J. Alspach Judy Alspach French Pamphlet Project Planning Meeting June 25 and 26, 2013 Newberry Library Chicago, IL Tuesday session Introductions of Meeting Attendees Alan Leopold, Newberry Library Director of Collection Services Betsy Simpson, University of Florida Cataloging Florence Turcotte, University of Florida Literary Manuscripts Archivist Sue Waterman, Johns Hopkins University Subject Librarian for French Literature also Special Colle ctions Franck Hurinville, National Library of France International Relations, especially Francophone world. Jennifer Thom, Newberry Library Director of Digital Initiatives and Services Judy Alspach, Center for Research Libraries supports world area p rograms. Karen Cook, University of Kansas Special Collections, Continental European Collections Richard Hacken, Brigham Young University European Studies Librarian Laurie Taylor, University of Florida Digital Humanities Librarian Lidia Uziel, Yale University Western European Humanities John Schalow, University of Maryland Special Collections Cataloger James Simon, Center for Research Libraries Director of International Resources. Sarah Sussman, Stanford University French and Italian Studies Curator. Overview of how project got started The University of Florida has digitized 120 pamphlets from the French Revolutionary era, but has about 2800 pamphlets in collection. These 120 pamphlets were digitized as a test, and

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helped Florida discover a nd fix some problems in the cataloging and discoverability of the pamphlets. Many of the subjects covered in the pamphlets are still important today, such as abolition of the death penalty. The test metadata at Florida was loaded into the catalog, so that the possibility to enhance it later would be available. If a better record existed in OCLC, that better record with more robust description would be pulled in. A fair amount of manipulation is required to use print record information and add it to the re cord for digital object. Florida didn't necessarily have catalog records for all print pamphlets. listed alphabetically by author and title. The collection w as purchased by UF History Dept. in 1957, and unfortunately further provenance information is unknown. Maryland, BYU and Kansas have a similar finding aid for their collections. The Catalogue de l'Histoire de la Revolution Francaise by Andre Martin and G erard Walter, published by BNF in 1936, can be very helpful in identifying French Pamphlets of this type. When reviewing WorldCat, it became clear that several titles were held at multiple institutions. Were others preparing to digitize? It would be v ery helpful to share information about each of these collections, and the plans to digitize, or not, so that institutions are not duplicating each Is it more cost effective to digitize all pamphlets? Or is it more cost effective to determin e which are duplicates before digitization? Laurie says storage is not an issue and that we should not spend a lot of time/energy to avoid duplication. Researchers may value having multiple copies to compare. We can hope to improve access by bringing th e records into one place/portal. Who decides which record is best? This is one of the questions we will need to wrestle with during this project. How are these records related to digital facsimiles? We watched a short video clip of Robert Darnton entitle borders of France, in Basel, Hague, Geneva, Amsterdam, etc. Many political songs sung in the streets of Paris were familiar tune s with new words criticizing something about the government. Printers lost money on printing novels and other longer works, but could make money by printing many copies of short pamphlets. Many authors of the pamphlets were anonymous. Review of Meeting Goals and Overview Meeting Goals (listed on Page 7 of packet): 1. Introduce year long planning process

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2. Outline participant responsibilities 3. Learn about and discuss existing partner collections 4. Address common concerns and questions 5. Prepare for environmental scan phase Meeting notes will be synthesized and sent back out to participants. Environmental scan will happen at a couple of select institutions with funding for student workers. Audrey Vigueir will be in Paris in August. She will try to c apture some data at BNF and meet with specialist there. We will review the seven questions that were part of electronic survey. We will have more specific questions later. In 2014 there will be 2 virtual planning meetings. At those meetings we will move through environmental scan information and develop questions that will become part of white paper. Planning Activities (an excerpt from the grant is on page 12) Facilitators (UF and CRL) FPP working group/US partners (Emory, Stanford, BYU, Alabama, Flori da, Kansas, Maryland, Yale) US planning participants (Brown, Ball State, Cornell, Harvard) University of California, Berkeley to join project as participant. Audrey Viguier main scholar advisor. Other scholars include Phillipe Gardy, Henri Boyer, Chantal Thomas, Robert Darnton. The expectation of this planning session is to compile a list of questions that will lead to planning process. Let's form our important questions now (How will we handle the issue of different institutions potentially having dupl icate issues of pamphlets held at other institutions?). Each meeting participant is to write down top five questions after this meeting and submit them to Matt Loving, who will aggregate these questions. CRL will create listserv and Workspace for partici pants listed on page 3. Definition of a pamphlet? Franck says that in the French context, a pamphlet is something very specific to French Revolution. Presentations about French Pamphlet Collections held at FPP partner libraries Brigham Young University (Hacken) 2300 pamphlet titles from war of religion era. 1550 1648. All are digitized. 1300 Mazarinade pamphlets (1648 1653) Not digitized.

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50 French Revolution era pamphlets. Not digitized. Stored in controlled environment. Most in good shape. Some ha ve hard binding cover. Print pamphlets are cataloged. French Revolutionary pamphlets are being placed in digitization queue. Collection has not been OCRed. University of Kansas (Karen Cook) Spencer Research Library opened in 1968. It contains Special Collections, Kansas Collection, University Archives. Melvin Collection contains most of KU's collection of French Revolutionary era pamphlets. 10,500 total French pamphlets at KU from various c ollections. 2 volume printed catalog created by Ambrose Saricks. Collection purchased in memory of Prof. Frank Melvin, who died suddenly in 1950. Dean Robert Vosper was instrumental in purchasing collection in 1952. The Melvin collection is shelved toge ther. Other French Pamphlets, not in Melvin, shelved with other items. Melvin collection needs preservation scan. Saricks catalog (finding aid for Melvin collection) is listed alphabetically by author. 7% of Melvin items have catalog records in OPAC. I tems requested through catalog are paged to reading room. Lawrence Thompson started a microfilming project in 1960s and 1970s He requested only those pamphlets not held at the University of Kentucky and not in NYPL. Unfortunately, KU did not receive a c opy of all microfilm. Proquest is now marketing it. There are many rights questions and concerns. Laurie Taylor offers assistance if people have similar situations. National Library of France BNF (Hurinville) Introduction to mission and history of BN F. 1994 Creation of new BNF, which opened in 1996. The older location is still in use and contains older documents. Much of their digital library collection was developed in a collaborative environment with partners, similar to the intention of French Pamphlet Project. National Library of France BNF (Collard) Pamphlet collections came to BNF through: legal deposit requirement, although many revolutionary era pamphlets are missing due to political unrest. Napoleon III made effort to acquire pamphlet s from the revolutionary era. Historic acquisition continues to date. All are housed in History Dept. of BNF. For the pamphlets, BNF uses cataloging scheme devised by Father Clement in some prior century. Pamphlets are found in many disparate areas of the library, and also at regional libraries in other parts of France.

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Between 2007 and 2012, BNF has digitized pamphlets in several subjects. They digitized from print and microfilm. The digitization from microfilm in many cases is poor quality, due to the uneven quality of the source microfilm. Digitization has been by subject grouping. Future digitization is planned. Recurring question is 'what is a pamphlet?' In France, it is understood to mean 1790 1810 and of a political nature. US librarian s understand pamphlets to be a broader category, and include cultural topics, in addition to political ones. Propose change start date to 1788 (uprising in Grenoble). End of Consulate (1804) is preferable to 1810. Some of BNF's pamphlets are in Gallica but they are difficult to find due to cataloging. French catalogers did not include the word 'pamphlet' in catalog record. A suggestion was made to work from Marten and Walter's index that are already in Gallica for this project. If a pamphlet held by a US institution is already in Gallica and is in good condition, this could impact how the item is handled in FPP. Some existing pamphlets are very thin, have a lot of bleed through. These pamphlets were set aside and not digitized. BNF wants to know the following: Exact time frame we will be using for this project? What kind of financing is required for digitization? There are concerns about quality of scans from microfilm. OCR may not be possible. Laurie suggests using grayscale, rather than bitonal. Cataloging needs to be upgraded. Add keyword 'pamphlet' and other upgrades. Yale University (Uziel) 21 libraries in Yale system. 13 million volumes. Pamphlets are in two locations: Sterling Memorial Library and Beinecke Library. Sterling L ibrary has French pamphlets from the years 1626 1804. Many of these pamphlets are shelved 4 miles from campus at a shelving facility that is not open to the public. Items are paged within 24 hours. Pamphlets are unbound and stored in envelopes and thei r condition varies. One MARC record for the whole pamphlet collection. Yale has a finding aid database to increase discoverability. The original finding aid on which the database is based was compiled in 1979. Beinecke pamphlets are not cataloged. 28 9 titles appear to be at Beinecke. It is possible there are more. They range from 1588 1879. 47 of them belong to French Revolutionary era. Some are bound, with 7 26 titles per bundle for bound pamphlets.

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Wednesday session University of Maryland (Sc halow) Up to 12,000 pamphlets from 1620 1966. About 7,000 from 1788 1815. Biodiversity Library selected one of digitized pamphlets to include in their collection. Collaborating with Maryland Institue for the Humanities (MITH). Digitized pamphlets are in I nternet Archive. How do we aggregate holdings in various locations? Can a portal pull from Internet Archive and other places? 10,000 of Newberry pamphlets (1/3) are not in Martin and Walter. Lauri e suggests digitizing Martin and Walter, with permission of course, and then using that as a base to attach other records or bibliography entries. Sue suggests following model of Digital Public Library of America. It is suggested that our French pamphlets are placed into Gallica. Franck suggests integrating pamphlets into Francophone library he mentioned in his presentation. Call with Audrey Viguier Audrey's research began in 2006. She focused on radical literature, including publications about Marie Antoinette. She used pamphlets from Toulouse, Montpelier, and other locations. Matt summarized Audrey's research. The materials Audrey has used are scattered all over southern France and were difficult to find. Audrey will visit BNF in August and will meet with Claude. Other key scholars include Chantal Thomas and Robert Darnton. It is suggested that we collect 'use cases' from our campuses and from o ur group of scholar advisors to show how these materials are being used by scholars and to provide examples of how difficult they are to find. David Faulds (Emory) suggests making sure users take advantage of the use of genre terms in catalog. Sue mention s user experience concept and suggests that we include input from User Experience Librarians in our planning, so that we can make the pamphlets discoverable to potential users. Sarah suggests survey to scholars. Newberry fellowship application increase 8 x since start of cataloging project. Alan suggests Linked Data. Emory University (Faulds) 3,070 pamphlets all cataloged; finished after 7 years; 3 or so per day. 1947 acquired, but provenance unclear. Date range of collection is 1789 1795. Unfortunately the pamphlets were tightly bound when acquired. 900 not bound. 89 were records.

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NYPL has huge collection. Cataloged in 1990s to a high standard. About 10,000 titles. Penn has large collection also -it was microfilmed. Johns Hopkins University (Waterman) 400K titles in Special Collections. 500 French Revolution pamphlets. JHU is very decentralized, administratively and library wise. Some pamphlets housed i n remote storage facility. Pamphlets difficult to identify in OPAC -genre field not used in catalog. 154 titles in RefWorks bibiography, done by Sue. McClure collection catalog at Penn from about 1964. In introduction, catalog describes pamphlet collect ions at various North American institutions, including Hopkins. JHU has 238 pre revolutionary pamphlets having to do with trials and they are bound in 19 volumes. JHU made a recent purchase from former visiting professor at JHU. 100 titles of French Revol ution era pamphlets. Sue is curious about the provenance of the various collections. Why do we have so many collections at US institutions? Institutional memory is lacking at many institutions regarding provenance of such collections. Suggests adding de aler information to catalog, but catalogers resist this. Make sure that terms apply both to Anglo and Francophone users. For example, the use of the created with local audience in mind. How could you merge these records? All records would have been created with one bias or another. Can texts be OCRed? Are there coming technologies that could enhance discoverability? Any portal should be bilingual. Bias of created records could be solved at authority level. Set up lexicon for portal. Build crosswalks. Ask scholars to help define 'pamphlets' for both North American and French audiences. French Revolutionary pamphlets is a redundant term as it would be us ed in French. What terms do they use for pamphlets about wars of religion or 1968 era? 'tract'? 'radical literature'? Include broadsides? Suggest 1788 1805 dates for project, based on Claude's suggestion in presentation yesterday. Center for Research Libraries (Simon) CRL was founded in 1949. Established as shared collection for libraries with important but rarely used materials. Founding members were, even at that time, running out of space. Strong emphasis on international collection, area studies collections. Mid 2000's, next generation of library collaboration supported. Digital access, databases. Global Resources Network, of which CIFNAL is a part.

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Francophone resources are usually acquired from other sources. Full set of McClure collection on microfilm held at CRL. No unique French pamphlets, most are part of a collection and cataloged as a set. CRL cooperated with ARTFL on an early digitization project of 1848 pamphlets, and hopes to have them re digitized. Stanford University (Sussman ) Strong collection of early modern French materials. 1,000 items found in catalog that are likely to be French Revolutionary Pamphlets. Most found in French History DC (LC classification system), others in Civil Engineering TA. No systematic use of gen re headings. Many of the pamphlets are in bound volumes. Some analyzed and cataloged individually, others not. Also looked in Dewey Decimal System 944. Small collections purchased recently to complement traditional strengths in economics, early trades, living conditions. Jarboe library collection acquired by Stanford around 1900. Information about the Jarboe collection was included in first Stanford's president's letter. Contains about 1,300 pamphlets. What to do with pamphlets with images? Newberry provided access terms, such as engravings, woodcuts. We need to keep in mind that our plan should be to apply for a second grant ($400k +) to do all of the work that we will plan this year. Should we aim for interactive element in project? Should ther e be an option for individuals to submit questions? dLOC has a 'contact us' button at the bottom of each page. Most questions can be answered either with canned responses, or handed off to a reference librarian. Gallica tries to cultivate user group cal led Gallicanauts. Social media is used. Younger users typically participate more than older ones. Surveys are sent to this group. Review of initial survey Begins on Packet page 16 Survey Questions and Responses Can info on individual items be entered into spreadsheet? Google docs spreadsheet? Many of the items are not cataloged, so a spreadsheet could include uncataloged material. Excel might break if too many records entered.

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Yale, Stanford, Emory, JHU, Mary land, Florida will be included in environmental scan. UC Berkeley is interested, but probably not participating in environmental scan. Karen would like money to fund students to scan a bibliography they hold at Kansas. Discussion of possibility of digiti zing Martin and Walter. Published in 1936, so permissions would be needed. Could create database from records and bibliography information. Question 2 page 22 about physical arrangement and condition of pamphlets Question 3 page 29 about binding, com pleteness, etc. The information in responses seems relatively anecdotal. Is there a way to quantify the answers? Percentages of each condition? Do you have concerns about the scanability of materials (bleed through, tightly bound)? If bound, do you h ave concerns about provenance that would influence scanability? Does preservation specialist need to evaluate? Perhaps a sample could be evaluated? We should try to get some measurable percentages/numbers/metrics that can be quantified and reported. Ho w scanable are the collections? Part of this issue includes the tight bindings of some collections. How do we register whether item is complete, and what parts are missing? Presence, or not, of pagination, as this would help determine completeness. Or signatures or 'Fin' at the end of document. Question 4 page 33 supports for bibliographic access, finding aids, catalog records, metadata, etc. Links to Martin and Walter (and other bibliographies) numbers. ESTC, Tourneau, McClure, Saricks (for KU coll ection), other? Make it more quantify able. Sue suggests spreadsheet to contain environmental scan responses. Questions would need to be formulated to make the spreadsheet meaningful. Use Google docs? Make sure survey is in French and English. Which i nstitutions have microfilm collections that have NOT been digitized? NYPL, McClure, etc. This question may need to be separated out, since we are dealing mostly with print. 1974 Thompson created bibliography on fiche. He is the one that microfilmed some material from Kansas. Question 5 page 38 about digital availability or plans to digitize.

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Compare metadata being used to see if there is overlap in fields used. Ask which institutions have access to Goldsmith Cres, Making of Modern World. Ask why digitization has not been done? Is funding needed? Existing specifications for digital collections. Keep in mind potential future needs for specifications. Should scans from microfilm be re done? Either from print or microfilm? Portal would be fin ding aid that would push users to collections. It would be like Digital Public Library of America. The link to record takes user to institution that has digitized. University of Florida Digital Collections portal for French Pamphlets already has think k ind of thing pointing to Alabama. Portal, etc. should serve multiple kinds of devices/platforms. Good to include multiple copies of the same pamphlet, so that researchers can view variant copies. This is consistent the philosophy behind with RDA. Alan asks if anyone has experience using BackStage Library Works. It would take a couple of years and cost a couple hundred thousand dollars for them to digitize Newberry's collection. Stanford sends out call for proposals with detailed specifications. Would a call for proposals be part of the result of this grant? People think this is a good idea. Alan hasn't found good information about managing mass digitization projects. Have the vendor come onsite? This is super expensive. Emory has recently sent a c ollection of 12,000 photographs to digitize both sides by BSLW. BSLW is also creating metadata. Thompson Gale came to the University of Florida to do Braga collections. They stayed for several months. At BNF, outsourced work happens when vendors come onsite. Researchers may be annoyed if items are off site for months being digitized and the researcher travelled to institution specifically to see the item. At BNF, condition of items is first evaluated before sending them offsite. About 500 items are sent out at a time. They are back on the shelf in about a month. A month later, the metadata will arrive. Can portal be set up for MARC records to be deposited? As digital connections are made, they can be added. An initial question in the history of this project (when Coulombe, Hierl, Hacken, Loving started discussing it) is whether this is a catalog or a finding aid. Is it a resource for us as we work

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through our collections? Or is it to be used by researchers? It would be difficult to be a mishm ash, since it would be confusing to users. Laurie says it may be helpful for a mixed group, as it could drive patron requested digitization. How easy would it be to load MARC records into one system? People think this is doable, BorrowDirect is one model It wouldn't need to be MARC records, necessarily. It could be XML. You would want to stack, not de dup the records. Should we limit the ingested records to those with OCLC records? Match by title or match by OCLC number? A long term data clean up a nd matching effort needed. We don't have to solve every problem. Users will be able to navigate through some of these challenges. Question 6 page 42 about research and teaching at your institution Query the faculty about how French pamphlets are used. How many classes has the collection been presented to? Citations of works that have used these materials. Names of faculty that would be interested in these collections. Grad students that would be interested. Google Scholar search. Circulation recor ds? Who has Aeon? circulation software for special collections. (parent company is Atlas systems) BNF contact assigned to do further work has many contacts with researchers using pamphlets and related materials. Biodiversity Heritage Library -how to find out who else out there is interested in our materials? If the digital library has permanent URL, u se a Google search or alert to find who is using the materials. Gallica has a way of measuring usage at title level. Can we tie the kick off of project to some historic anniversary? Ball State, Alabama, Emory, Florida already have digitized pamphlets. Could the usage statistics from these collections tell us something useful? Question 7 page 45 additional comments How strictly will we adhere to 40 page limit? Matt says we would probably have some flexibility on this, assuming it meets other criteria. We have been using LC definition, which includes 'usually' less than 40 pages. Comments from experts

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Flo preservation, storage, preparation for digitization project are her areas of expertise. Provenance, grouping of items. Disbinding of materials. Laurie scope, logistics, strategies, have been discussed. What do people need to move forward? How will project partners work with and meet the needs of local staff and researchers? Can WorldCat records be used? What kind of permission needed? Add t hem as a partner? Matt demonstrates beta portal. frenchpamphlets.org David asks what standards should be used for records to be contributed to portal. Laurie shows map of kinds of records that can be contributed to their system. Basically everything can be used. BNF has system SPAR for digital preservation. This is available for other government agencies and also French speaking nations that couldn't afford this kind of thing. Betsy 3 slides Retrieval Collection name Genre term pamphlet subject access Martin and Walter's number (also other sources) classification or accession numbers printer linked data -explore this further. Workflow Newberry CLIR procedures and best practices Challenges of version differentiation Duplicates o issue of duplicate records o how to handle duplicate items Marginalia Staffing Library Science/French Studies/French language ability Next steps Gather institutional cataloging approaches Establish best practices Develop possible workflow scenarios o distributed vs. centralization

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James Look at expected outcomes and then build backward. Primary objective is the next grant. Write it as soon as possible. In no particular order: Definition and shared language between partners Make sure we have identified correct bibliographies and finding aids. Consider them as part of final project, perhaps using portions at a time. Similar of CBSR at UC Riverside work to create early 19th century catalogs. Cataloging and metadata decisions need to be made. Propose standard o r best practices. How we link existing records to digital collections. Need to understand where records are elsewhere in commercial products, HathiTrust, libraries not yet contacted. What will we see at the end? digital representation. Learn from pre decessors. Share information about similar projects. LLMC, TRAIL, etc. Makes sure we are not duplicating or competing with Nines, Gallica, etc. Human connections and international cooperation. Outreach to other institutions. Outreach to scholars. All of this communication is very important. Wrap up Thanks to all participants, hosts. All participants to submit 5 questions. Now or soon. ATTACHMENT B : Notes L. Taylor FPP MEETING 1 NOTES Meeting 1: Day 1, photos: https://www.dropbox.com/home/FPP_mtg_June2013 Introductions by attendees included mentions of interest in: Digitization of pamphlets Connection of these as historical resources to French literary studies (JHU) Introductions, and notes on existing resources BYU, Wars of Religion Pamphlets already digitized UMD, prior student project to catalog and digitize selected group BNF, digitized 30k pamphlets Newberry, cataloged all pamphlets and lo oking at digitization UF and others with digitized and cataloged, with details in survey

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Stanford and related project UMD has materials in Internet Archive (so can do records and link OR ingest OR both) Contextual materials Film by Robert Darnton, in YouTu th Martin and Walter numbers: o Publication from 1936, many volume set on French Pamphlets core guide, and so this is the core resource o Newberry used this as core resource, but many items not in this; in cata loging, included the Martin & Walter numbers or noted if it was not in Martin & Walter Lindsay & Neu, another bibliographic resource Duvall, another resource See Newberry page for these resources: ww w.newberry.org/French pamphlets University of Kansas o Bibliography of the Frank E Melvin Collection of Pamphlets of the French Revolution o Saricks Catalog: Main finding aid for the Melvin Collection Organized by named and anonymous authors Has subject inde x in the back BYU bibliography, in PDF from their site Article by Sussman UF FPP and pub Others as mentioned in individual presentations Concerns (some of these duplicate from discussions on Day 1) and Questions: Using OCLC print records for digital is great, but issues with OCLC Digital Gateway to feed the information back in Who gets to decide what is the best record and which facsimile to associate it with? BnF does, but the group can create parameters to enable and support the community work. Best to be okay with duplicate digitization and to just do it, and sort out after Discussion of SEO and needs related to that Discussion on best to have a central portal Shared need for OCR for all items or for actionable ways to use OCR (materials digitized by I nternet Archive, so OCR, but not really handled by Internet Archive as collection/portal level) Concerns over quality of OCRed text, so need method for correcting text Questions on how to get things digitized; not all have supports locally

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Newberry Library o Information on duplicates in the holdings record, so have to pull from both MARC BIB and Holding for duplicates o 900 duplicates identified thus far (did not catch breakdown) Karen Cook: specific concern, 1960s 1970s and microfilming project; records on thi s could inform this project Scans from microfilm, are these good enough or how to do a system to replace with better scans? o Better conversation could be ensuring all partners meet digital standards for archival purposes BnF: Pamphlet definition? France: po litical and dates are 1790 1810. Project methodology? Criteria for digitization? Calendar for the project? Finances? Personnel? BnF request to change dates to 1788 1804. BnF recommendation is to work forward from M&W, checking Gallica, and then next steps if not in M&W and not in Gallica Timeframe and financing for this? Review of proposal = presentation by Matt on Pamphlets UF process history o Initial records were just FPP# (may relate to M&W numbers) o Enhanced has titles o Enhanced again then, OCLC record pulled in and enhanced further (DLC sends request list to Cataloging, Cataloging downloads MARC report, DLC imports) Gallica is doing more of a summary record, so this is an opportunity for enhancing other records Review of proposal = Discussions Best to duplicate digitize and sort out after Issues with Google and rankings with non English materials Discussion of SEO and needs related to that Discussion on best to have a central portal Discussion on role and place in history of France and bibliography and language, with other publication types, history of publishing, etc. Tour of Newberry with participants getting to know each other

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After the Newberry cataloged their pamphlets, they received 8 times more fellowship applications for these than prior LUNCH Presentations by Partners = Review of Goals Matt reviewing the project goals, working from the list on page 7 in the packet Participant responsibilities Survey Throughout the year, gathering and sharing information Audrey going to Paris in August, to hopef ully gather data points Planning process, with next phase being the environmental scan o Preparation, using online survey results to move from those into more specific questions Roles for participants o Facilitators (UF+CRL) o Project Working Group (meeting attendees) o Project participants (many) CRL will create an email list for the group CRL will add everyone to shared CIFNAL workspace French participants: pamphlet is very specific in French context; associated with Revolution, and differs from materials bef ore and after Scope is Revolutionary Period Definition of project and program Presentations by Partners (2:30 4:30pm) Partner Presentation 1: Richard Hacken, BYU Wars of Religions site and record set As part of this project, are placing Revolutionary mate rials in the queue for digitization Using ContentDM, but then additional special system functions on top with something: o Browse by Regent o Browse by Date by Regent (ruler name, and ruling date range) Students have used the pamphlets for 2 theses (to date) D esire to have more faculty use the materials

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Partner Presentation 2: Karen Cook, University of Kansas Strengths in European and American printed books, natural history collections, esp. ornithology, and others; maps NEH grant by Karen for digitization of Gould books, will complete in October Several relevant collections Melvin Collection o 9,000 French Revolution o 550 for Revolution in Belgium o X for Revolution in Geneva Bibliography of the Frank E Melvin Collection o f Pamphlets of the French Revolution French Pamphlets in other collections, outside of Melvin, are shelved with other materials Uncatalogued Melvin items need a preservation survey Summerfield collection o Pamphlets in archival envelopes Saricks Catalog (not es above) Uses Aeon; so change in stats may be possible after digitization Only 720 or approx. 7% of Melvin pamphlets are represented in the KU online catalog About 570 or 80% of pamphlets in other collections are represented Professor Bruce Hayes, brings classes in for these materials Partner Presentation 3: BnF by Franck and Claude About BnF Gallica now serves as electronic catalog/portal to other collections (and buttons for each on slide) Map of members, with active levels With members/partners, have created: www.rfnum.org o Each partner digitizes and materials available in this portal Claude BnF still actively acquiring materials for Revolutionary Pamphlets All documents within classification under Lb are pamphlets, and other pamphlets are filed in many areas Digitized items from microfilm are not of high enough quality for OCR Digitization is ongoing Questions (added to questions section) (4:46, all attendees agreed to stay until 5pm for more covera ge)

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Partner presentation 4: Yale University Many libraries Pamphlets located in 2 main locations: Sterling and Beinicke Sterling, French Government Documents, materials from 1526 1804 2 series, not counted at individual item level, but other data availabl e Many items in offsite storage (LSF= library storage facility) 1 MARC record for this as an archival collection in ORBIS and in WORLDCAT, but finding aid is available Link to PDF of full bibliography from 1979 (How does this relate to Yale ODAI?) These ma terials are used occasionally, but discrete data is not available Beinicke, 288 pamphlets identified from MARC records, 1588 1879, 59 belong to existing set of pamphlets on the French Revolution, Volumes 1+2, which is M&W Some are bound, and range from 7 2 6 titles per bundle 18 titles have been digitized and are available from Beinicke digital interface Meeting 1: Day 2 Request all to send all photos and notes to Matt and/or to post to shared workspace; same for all presentations; and same for all for per missions to post openly online (all photos will be confirmed first) Partner Presentation: John from the University of Maryland (UMD) Notes on handout and in slides (which are in English and French) Additional notes/discussion o Found many existing copies of pamphlets from Cornell, in their slavery digital collections o Difficulties with matching materials came from WorldCat with variant at head of title, initial articles in Dublin Core records, and duplicates in WorldCat o Mirbeau (sp?) materials in Japan o BHL in cluded one of their pamphlets; BHL could be a model for this o Discussing UMD MITH (no external partners) grant for DH Start up for analyzing already digitized materials and mapping conversations, people, etc., and tools for other analysis

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o Interest in analy sis of commercial databases and resources for holdings, for records and comparisons Discussion Notes Partner need for understanding how to systematically track usage in other sites like BHL (Google and other alerts, webometrics, etc.) For creating digital records that reference and use Martin & Walters, one method is to digitize those source materials, feed into a database, and then map together with other record sources, and RedCap is a resource for this: http:// project redcap.org/ Or, all records could already be available in WorldCat or other sources, so the question is where to pull from, and then making sure all unique IDs for items are included (M&W#, OCLC#, etc.) so that items can be mapped and aggregated a cross reference sources with holding and digital resources. Sue Waterman: another model to follow could be the DPLA, so OAI, could be a boutique collection in DPLA harvesting into central portal, or even to become part of them with boutique collections, or the same could be done with Gallica, or Europeana. Stanford has a large project with BnF on French Revolution primary sources, and so the pamphlets could be part of that project. Another option could be to incorporate these into the international collect ion mentioned yesterday instead of Gallica. OAI seems to be of high interest. Partner Presentation by David, Emory Over 3,000 pamphlets, came to Emory in 1949 De duped when acquired and duplicates were sold to Alabama Pamphlets were bound together, many in sets of 30 50, and very tightly bound except for 900 not bound Just completed cataloging all, so cataloging is done and analysis will be next Emory Library website, 89 digitized and online All holdings in WorldCat and local database Much easier in cata loging, still challenging, but Cornell, Berkeley, Newberry, NYPL, and others made this much less difficult than it otherwise would have been Noted false imprints where applicable

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Judith Miller has been using this in her teaching 1789 1794/5 is the majority Discussion Discussion of digitizing first, and then distributed cataloging NYPL cataloged their 10k+ collection of pamphlets in the 1990s and did a printed catalog; NYPL is a partner Penn also has a big collection, and that has a printed catalog, they h ave a microfilm Knoll, who is there, to see about being involved. Partner Presentation: Sue, JHU Very decentralized with 4 different physical locations Catalog does not use genre field, so hard to find in the online catalog because have to do by subject searches and then narrow and narrow Putting all findings in a Refworks bibliography and has 150 ish in that und the country, and states that JHU has 238 pamphlets on pre revolutionary trials; and these found and about 244 and are bound So, around 400 known and identified at this time New purchase of more, about 150 1 set that is 5 volumes that is bound Couple of bound mini collections purchased over the years Provenance is interesting to look at; where did these US collections come from and why, and how they get lost when institutional memory and documentation has issues? Institutional memory is a crucial question JHU is trying to get dealer descriptions in the catalog records to help with this, and issues because not traditional cataloging. But, this is exactly what museum systems do. Dupont Estate may also have some holdings Audrey Presentation Discussin g her research as a scholar Began her research on pamphlets in 2006, and that was her thesis, which was recently completed Her particular research is on radical literature

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Worked with faculty and looking for different resources, hard to get access to file s in many locations and difficult to travel http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0044544 is her ETD, access restricted until August 2013, but accessible at UF now Skype, polycom, and cell connections weak, and so switched t o having Matt provide an overview of her research from the library perspective in terms of researchers needing access to information on the collections, and ideally to the materials themselves, and the interest from other scholars for the materials and inf ormation. Discussion: In environmental scan, include scan of faculty who are using and/or interested in using these materials develop questions for them Genre terms and other metadata added, so is this helping scholars or how do they use User experience need feedback from scholars Develop survey to distribute to scholars at our institutions and more widely on how they do and could use these materials Newberry can survey researchers. One of the researchers presented with a Cataloger (Judith Miller from E mory, working with Jessica) and that presentation may be sharable. Interest in linked data building from catalog records, and need to be clear on mapping with LC and BnF terms Portal should be bilingual Records that are bilingual, like what LLMC has done A ND/OR doing a mapping so one shows only when on each interface Partner Presentations, James Simon for CRL About CRL and their model CRL holdings and connections and expertise ARTFL Partner Presentation, Stanford Limitations with current records Backlog of items to be cataloged Limit scope to format, but broadsides and 1788 1805 for years (or 1804) Pamphlets mix political and dramatic Some, drama materials

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Jarboe Library Terms: brochure, tracts Tourneaux, another bibliographic resource Discussion Any rep and get feedback Gallica has robust social media marketing, connects with users who are Gallica nauts who are enthusiastic and involved users LUNCH Review of E survey Results E survey results Project scope, confirming on limited date range Environmental scan will now be limited to 6 institutions: o Yale o Stanford o Emory o JHU o UMD o UF o U of Kansas (for digitizing catalog of materials) Discussion of results from packet in terms of adding questions, adapting existing questions: o Add question on if the records have links to other reference resources like Martin & Walters, Tourneaux o And, local reference resources like: Monti, McClure, Saricks o Column on existing finding aids Stanford Sarah has a spreadsheet of translations of these sorts of terms and questions that she can share for ease of translating the survey Environmental scan o Could ask what fields people are using Add question on if institution has access to Making of the Modern World Describe the digital availability of your pamphlet collections o Describe the digitized materials

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# Full images online y/n In OPAC y/n OCR text y/n Crawled by Google y/n o Describe the non digital pamphlets; if some/all materials not digitized, w hy: Funding Materiality issues Digitized but not online (if applicable) o What are your digitization plans for these materials: Not a priority Awaiting funding What are your existing technical specifications and/or best practices for these? (Survey and portal will not dictate, but could serve to support local institutions in implementing best practices, or this could be non relevant) o DPI o Color/grayscale o Teaching/Research o How many classes have come to Special Collections to look at these materials? How many in each class? o How many times has a curator gone to a class to present on this? o What publications have cited these resources? (Newberry scholar search, fellowship folks, acknowledgements) o Names of faculty and email addresses for people who might want to give feedback (to be stakeholders for this project) o Names/number of graduate students interested in these materials? o Scholars who provided supporting letters, and people they recommend? BnF subject expert has scholar network o SHARP and other scholarly s ocieties to query? o Existing teaching resources (ttp://dcc.newberry.org/collections/identity in the french revolution)? Usage: o Digital collection usage statistics, if available? o Physical collection usage statistics, any if available and not captured above? o Citations and counts? o Counts/examples of where cross listed, harvested, findable in other repositories? o Examples of unexpected uses? Needs noted:

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o Review commercial materials to assess relation, need, etc.: Lawrence Thompson did a bibliography for microfiche collections on this content material, and other guides. o Review existing bibliographies o Collect connect relate different versions of the same item within the same resource object (Like FRBR, RDA, SobekCM resource_obj, etc) o Any future grant narra tives should show interdisciplinary possibilities in the future, and should document current non traditional and/or broader impacts uses that are known now o Any new project should be tied to historic dates/anniversaries Existing humanities portal examples, needs for user side? Needs for institutional workflows? Discussion Would an RFP be included in or be a recommendation come out of the Whitepaper? Questions on mass digitization and how to best do? o Newberry is exploring. o Emory has a project with 12,000 ph otos (back and front) where the external agency, Backstage, is digitizing and creating metadata o Issues with shipping offsite, but too difficult to do locally at scale and more costly to have others come in to do on site. Portal o Should give option to search full item only, both record only and full item (and no metadata, if this does happen?) o NINES and 18 th Connect can do this o Importing from MARC, spreadsheets, EADs, etc. o Should bring together as much information toget her as possible, even if some aspects are awkward with duplication and seeming duplication, because still better serves users than current situation and enables better next steps o Browse indexes in addition to facets would be useful for this Could add OCLC as a partner, if any questions on records Comments from Experts: Defining project scope, determining project changes in logistics/strategies, prioritizing and categorizing project questions; discussion of project plan for moving forward Flo: expertise at UF in preparing materials for digitization in terms of preservation concerns, material housing, larger workflow and processes

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Laurie: concrete steps moving forward what can be done now? Questions on how to help, and available for any technical support. Integration with other systems and resources like mobile app ( www.github.com/jcoletaylor/sobekph ), NINES, 18thConnect, excellent work by and expertise from partners like Stanford. Matt: showing of beta system Discussion of BnF with SPAR for access to metadata today and tomorrow, and doing for governmental agencies and other French speaking nations, for standard for digital archiving Betsy Simpson: several slides on discussion thus far on terms, work flows, and next steps: o o Genre term o Bibliographies with related identifiers o Printer (and related Printer information) o Linked data (M&W#) o Marginalia o Staffing o Duplicates, version differentiation o Next s teps: gather institutional cataloging approaches, establish best practices, develop possible workflow scenarios (central and distributed for all aspects, LLMC with model for cataloging) Judy Alspach: will create collaborative workspace and email list, and will send information to all next week. James Simon: o Looking at goals and next steps for and from this project, with it being writing the next grant for the June 2014 deadline. o Reflections on priorities, interests, and goals: Creating shared definitions and language that might be of assistance for the overall project/program goals, and considering these as part of the full project/program (possibly including full digital files an d databasing them, like what the Center for Bibliographic Studies at the University of California has done with a number of projects in creating full databases of certain prints) Discussed a lot on cataloging and metadata concerns, so good expertise shared but we need to propose a standard and/or best practice for how those should be represented and/or added and enhanced; people will discuss with local technical services and cataloging staff (if not already represented) Discuss how we link existing records to the digital files, and how to represent in the portal itself?

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Need to do more work on where records are available elsewhere; not just known institutions; commercial products? Hathi and Google? Where else? CRL may be able to help by liaising with the co mmercial vendors to query regarding relevant holdings Digital model of existing programs and systems; learn from others; already discussed similar projects including LLMC, TRAIL (technicalreports.org), and making sure no conflicts with Gallica, NINES, and others Human connections of this program; international collaboration and outreach; outreach to faculty and scholars; outreach to other libraries; get the word out while planning, and will get more input for developing and supporting a grant proposal Final thanks and end at 5pm. ATTAC H MENT C : Notes F. Turcotte Flo Turcotte French Pamphlet Project notes and questions from meetings June 25 26 at the Newberry Library compiled by Flo Turcotte Notes on participants: Franck Hurinville is the international relations coordinator for the BNF Claude Collard is in charge of Philosophy, Religion, History, and Anthropology at the BNF. Richard Hacken (Dick) covers European Studies at BYU Library. James Simon is Director of International Resour ces at CRL. David Faulds from Emory came on day 2. Sue Waterman does Modern European Studies and Literary (?) at Johns Hopkins Library. Karen Cook is one of a staff of 2 in Special Collections at Kansas. Alan Leopold i s at the Newberry Library.

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Jennifer Thom is Director of Digital Initatives and Services in the Cataloging Projects Section of the Newberry. John (not David) Schalow is a Special Collections Cataloguer attending on behalf of Kelsey C Riviera from U Marylan d. Sarah Sussman is in charge of francophone publications in North America and curator of French and Italian Collections at Stanford. Lidia Uziel is leaving Yale and Remy Castelier? will take over from her. Discussion: as our primary reference resource. James from CRL recommended Confluence software for project management. We agreed on a targeted date range for the pamphlets: 1788 1805. We watched part of a video by Prof. Robert Darnton. Matt asked that at the end of the session, each person write down 5 questions pertaining to the project. The Newberry participants described the CLIR Award in more detail. Claude suggested we use the Martin and Walter n umber to put a flag in Gallica. The primary problems identified were deciding on standards for the collection of metadata; de Most of the partners have materials that fall outside the date ran ges we selected. Question #3 in the survey we decided to add pagination (Y/N) to the description of the pamphlets. Sue suggested that question 4 should be converted into a spreadsheet format. Matt indicated that the types of questions submitted should be classified as: Content driven Procedural; i.e. pertaining to the work plan Pertaining to the environmental scan and its data points

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About the white paper We had an extensive discussion about outreach/research relating to the pamphlet holdings at each individual institution. How do we quantify the use/potential/interest in them before moving forward with the project? It was mentioned that perhaps we should focus on not quantitative, but qualitative data when referring to the pamphlets. Each institutio n should compile a list of stakeholders, with an eye toward getting support for the follow up grant. Alan indicated that the Newberry uses Backstage software for digitization projects on a large scale. We discussed the possibility of doing in house scann ing versus sending the materials off site. Most partners would hesitate to do the latter. We discussed the nature of the portal and what format of records we should use to submit. MARC? Summing up his observations, James raised the following issues: Jun e 2014 is the deadline for the next grant application We need to identify current bibliographies and finding aids for digitized collections. What is available in Google, Hathi, or other commercial databases and at other institutions?