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Florida's Environment - Central East Region

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ ( Publisher's URL )
University of Florida Institutional Repository IFAS
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00003475/00001

Material Information

Title: Florida's Environment - Central East Region
Physical Description: Fact sheet
Creator: Main, Martin B.
Publisher: University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2007

Notes

Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status: Published
General Note: "Publication date: July 2007. Reviewed November 2010."
General Note: "WEC 235"

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00003475:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00003475/00001

Material Information

Title: Florida's Environment - Central East Region
Physical Description: Fact sheet
Creator: Main, Martin B.
Publisher: University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2007

Notes

Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status: Published
General Note: "Publication date: July 2007. Reviewed November 2010."
General Note: "WEC 235"

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00003475:00001


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Martin B. Main and Ginger M. Allen2 1. This document is Fact Sheet WEC 235, one of the Florida's Environment series of the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Publication date: July 2007. Reviewed November 2010. Please visit the Edis website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edun. 2. Martin B. Main, associate professor, wildlife extension specialist, and Ginger M. Allen, senior biologist, Southwest Florida Research and Education Center, Immokalee, FL; Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0304. Florida's Environment Series The central east region extends from Volusia County in the north to St. Lucie County in the south (Fig. 1). Despite tremendous residential and urban growth, this region has preserved approximately 1/3 of the area in conservation lands ( Table 1). Central east Florida region with counties. Credits: UF/IFAS Scrub plant communities rooted on ancient sand dunes or ridges once formed a continuous zone from north to south through this region. Now they rank among the region's most endangered habitat. Among the sand pines, scrubby oaks, and a host of very rare plants, occur many unique native animals that are adapted to scrub habitats and found. Extensive marshes of the St. Johns River form much of the western portion of the region. The salt and freshwater marshes along the coast provide diverse wildlife habitat and coastal beaches provide improtant nesting sites for sea turtles, seabirds, and shorebirds. This document summarizes major rivers, lakes and springs, featured natural areas, and cultural aspects of Florida's central east region. For information on other regions in Florida, refer to "The Florida Environment: An Overview" and the other seven regional profiles available online (http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu).

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Florida's Environment Central East Region 2 Conservation land acreage in Florida's central east region Brevard 252,660 39% Indian River 74,190 23% Okeechobee 85,100 17% St. Lucie 25,750 7% Volusia 184,500 26% Based on 2006 Florida Natural Areas Inventory Managed Conservation Lands. Florida State University. The Indian River Lagoon (IRL) is a shallow estuary that is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a series of protective barrier islands (Fig. 2). The IRL system is actually made up of three distinct water bodies the Mosquito Lagoon, the Banana River, and the Indian River Lagoon proper. The IRL covers a full 40 percent of Florida's east coast and stretches 156 miles, from Ponce De Leon Inlet at the northern end to Jupiter Inlet at the southern end. The IRL is the nation's most biologically diverse estuary, largely due to the fact that this extensive ecosystem spans both temperate and subtropic zones and includes species typical of each. The Indian River Lagoon is the wintering home to many species of migratory waterfowl. Central east Florida conservation lands. Credits: UF/IFAS The St. Johns River flows north for approximately 310 miles from its origin in east central Florida to its final destination, the Atlantic Ocean, making it the longest river completely contained within Florida. Only the St. Johns and the St. Marys rivers drain into the Atlantic. The Tomoka River also flows north and travels through Volusia County before entering the Halifax River just north of Daytona Beach at Tomoka State Park. Historically, the Kissimmee River coursed 98 miles between Lake Kissimmee and Lake Okeechobee. In 1970 the river became a 56-mile long canal named C-38 by the US Army Corps of Engineers. The majority of the former river floodplain is used for cattle ranching, although there are some conservation areas. In 1992 the Kissimmee River became the site of the largest river restoration project in the world. The River Restoration Project will restore over 40 square miles of river/floodplain ecosystem including 43 miles of meandering river channel and 27,000 acres of wetlands. East central Florida contains the two largest lakes in the state, Lake Okeechobee and Lake George. Lake Okeechobee is the 4th largest lake contained entirely within the boundaries of the continental United States and provides vital ecological, commercial, and cultural benefits to the entire south and central Florida region.

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Florida's Environment Central East Region 3 Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (Fig. 2) is regarded as one of Florida's premiere wildlife viewing areas and borders the Canaveral National Seashore. The 140,000-acre refuge encompasses the John F. Kennedy Space Center and administers Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Lake Wales Ridge NWR, and St. Johns NWR as part of a NWR complex. Although dominated by coastal wetlands, the refuge also supports coastal scrub, pinelands, and palm and oak hammocks. The combination of habitats attracts abundant bird life. Pelican Island Wildlife Refuge was created as the first National Wildlife Refuge by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1903 for the purpose of protecting nesting birds from plume hunters. Encompassing about 5,000 acres in the Indian River Lagoon, Pelican Island NWR provides important bird nesting and marine mammal habitats. Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park encompasses nearly 54,000 acres and protects the largest remaining tract of dry prairie habitat in Florida including a breeding population of the endangered Florida grasshopper sparrow. The prairie supports between 100-200 plant species per acre, making it one of the most diverse plant communities in North America. Lyonia Preserve in Volusia County includes pineland habitats and restored scrub where Florida scrub-jays, sand skinks, blue-tailed mole skinks, six-lined race runners, Florida scrub lizards, and gopher tortoises may be found. Tomoka Marsh Aquatic Preserve is an estuarine system comprised of six distinct areas that include portions of the Halifax River, Smith Creek, Bulow Creek, the Tomoka River, and the Tomoka Basin. The Tomoka River and its tributaries Strickland, Thomson and Dodson Creek are designated as a Manatee Sanctuary. Prehistoric Indian sites, middens (trash heaps) and mounds (burial sites), are found along many of east central Florida's rivers. For example, the North Fork of the St. Lucie River, Spruce Creek, and the Tomoka River all have early inhabitant evidence. Reflecting the diverse history of the region, many of Florida's rivers and lakes hold names of Indian or Spanish origin. The word Okeechobee comes from the Seminole Indian language meaning big water. The Tomoka River is a derivation of the Spanish name 'Rio de Tumucuas'. Daytona Beach was named for pioneer settler Mathias Day and was known as Daytona. Henry Flagler's East Coast Railroad opened the region to winter tourists in large numbers. Daytona Beach, famous for its auto racing, began its long history with the automobile as early as 1902. Alden, P., R. Cech, G. Nelson. 1998. National Audubon Society Field Guide to Florida. Chanticleer Press, New York. Carter, E., Glaros, L. and D. Sphar. 1985. A Canoeing and Kayaking Guide to the Streams of Florida, Vol. 2. Central and South Peninsula. Menasha Ride Press, Birmingham, Alabama Cerulean, Susan & Ann Morrow. Florida Wildlife Viewing Guide. 1998. Falcon Publishing. Helena, MT. Florida Department of Natural Resources. Florida Rivers Assessment. 1989. Florida Department of Natural Resources. Tallahassee, FL. Gannon, M., ed. 1996. The New History of Florida. University Press of Florida. Gainesville, FL. Kavanagh, J. ed. 1997. The Nature of Florida : An Introduction to Common Plants & Animals n& Natural Attractions (Field Guides Series) Waterford Press, Phoenix, AZ.

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Florida's Environment Central East Region 4 Recreational and cultural opportunities in natural areas in central east Florida. n(NWR=National Wildlife Refuge) Brevard River Lakes Conservation Area (407) 676-6614 http://sjr.state.fl.us/recreationguide/ riverlakes/index.html Brevard Buck Lake Conservation Area (407) 893-3127 http://www.cfbw.com/bucklake.shtml Brevard Banana River Aquatic Preserve (321) 953-5004 http://www.dep.state.fl.us/coastal/sites/ banana/ Brevard Archie Carr NWR (407) 861-0667 http://www.fws.gov/archiecarr/ Brevard Sebastian Inlet State Park (321) 984-4852 http://www.floridastateparks.org/ sebastianinlet/ Brevard St. Johns NWR (407) 861-0667 http://www.fws.gov/merrittisland/ subrefuges/SJ.html Brevard Canaveral Marshes Conservation Area (407) 568-5893 http://sjr.state.fl.us/recreationguide/ canaveralmarshes/index.html Brevard Merritt Island NWR (321) 861-0667 http://www.fws.gov/merrittisland/ index.html Brevard Brevard Museum of History and Natural Science (321) 632-1830 http://nbbd.com/godo/BrevardMuseum/ index.html n Brevard Enchanted Forest Nature Sanctuary (321) 633-2016 http://www.nbbd.com/godo/ef/scrub/ index.html Brevard Turkey Creek Sanctuary (321) 952-3442 http://www.myfwc.com/Recreation/ View_Destinations_site-ec07.htm Indian River Fort Drum Marsh Conservation Area (407) 676-6614 http://sjr.state.fl.us/recreationguide/ fortdrummarsh/index.html Indian River Lake Blue Cypress (561) 778-0150 http://www.myfwc.com/RECREATION/ FW_forecasts_ner.htm#blue_cyp Indian River Environmental Learning Center (561) 589-5050 http://www.discoverelc.org/ Indian River Pelican Island NWR (561) 589-2089 http://www.fws.gov/pelicanisland/ index.html Indian River Julian W. Lowenstein nFlorida History & (561) 770-5060 http://www.rootsweb.com/~flindian/ircl/ Okeechobee Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail (800) 871-4403 http://www.dep.state.fl.us/gwt/guide/ regions/south/trails/ 6_lake_okeechobee_scenictra.htm n Okeechobee Kissimmee River Paradise Run (850) 250-4250 https://my.sfwmd.gov/portal/ page?_pageid=2236, 4736545&_dad=portal&_schema=PORT AL Okeechobee Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Pake 863-467-8497 http://www.floridastateparks.org/ kissimmeeprairie/ Okeechobee OrdwayWhittell Kissimmee Prairie 863-467-8497 http://www.audubonofflorida.org/ specialplaces_lakeO.html St. Lucie Adams Ranch (772) 461-6321 http://www.adamsranch.com/ home_page St. Lucie North Fork St. Lucie Aquatic Preserve (561) 8736590 http://www.dep.state.fl.us/coastal/sites/ northfork/ St. Lucie Fort Pierce Inlet State Park (561) 468-3985 http://www.floridastateparks.org/ fortpierceinlet/default.cfm

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Florida's Environment Central East Region 5 Recreational and cultural opportunities in natural areas in central east Florida. n(NWR=National Wildlife Refuge) Volusia Tomoka River Canoe Trail (386) 676-4050 http://www.dep.state.fl.us/gwt/guide/ regions/eastcentral/trails/tomoka.htm Volusia Tomoka State Park (386) 676-4050 http://www.floridastateparks.org/tomoka/ default.cfm Volusia Spruce Creek Canoe Trail (386) 255-0415 http://www.dep.state.fl.us/gwt/guide/ regions/eastcentral/trails/spruce.htm Volusia Haw Creek Conservation Area (386) 446-6786 http://www.flaglercounty.org/ index.aspx?NID=126 Volusia Lake George State Forest (386) 329-4404 http://www.fl-dof.com/state_forests/ lake_george.html Volusia Lake Monroe Conservation Area (407) 668-6522 http://sjr.state.fl.us/recreationguide/ lakemonroe/index.html Volusia Lake Woodruff NWR (386) 985-4673 http://www.fws.gov/lakewoodruff/ Volusia Hontoon Island State Park 386) 736-5309 http://www.floridastateparks.org/ hontoonisland/ Volusia Lyonia Preserve (386) 736-5927 http://www.myfwc.com/Recreation/ View_Destinations_site-ec03.htm Volusia De Leon Springs State Park (386) 985-4212 http://www.floridastateparks.org/ deleonsprings/default.cfm Volusia Blue Springs State Park (904) 775-3663 http://www.floridastateparks.org/ bluespring/default.cfm Volusia Bulow Creek State Park (386) 676-4050 http://www.floridastateparks.org/ bulowcreek/ Volusia Dunlawton Plantation Sugar Mills Ruins (386) 255-0415 http://www.volusiahistory.com/ plantation.htm Volusia Turtle Mound State Archaeological Site (904) 255-0415 http://volusiahistory.com/turtle.htm Volusia Henry A. Deland nHistorical Museum (386) 740-6813 http://www.delandhouse.com/ deland.htm Volusia Green Mound Archaeological Site (386) 255-0415 http://volusiahistory.com/green.htm Kleinberg, E. 1997. Historical Traveler's Guide to Florida. Pineapple Press, Sarasota, FL. Laurie M., and D. Bardon. 1998. Florida's Museums and Cultural Attractions. Pineapple Press, Sarasota, FL. Meyers, Ronald L. & John J. Ewel, eds. 1990. Ecosystems of Florida. University of Central Florida Press, Orlando, FL. Ohr, T. 1998. Florida's Fabulous Natural Places. World Publications, Tampa, FL. Perry J., and J. G. Perry 1992. The Sierra Club Guide to the Natural Areas of Florida. Sierra Club Books, San Francisco, CA. Randazzo, A. F. and D. S. Jones, eds. 1997. The Geology of Florida, University of Florida Press, Gainesville, FL. Ripple, J. 1997. Florida: The Natural Wonders. Voyageur Press, Osceola, WI. Winsberg, M. D. 1997. Florida's History Through Its Places: Properties in the National Register of Historic Places, University Press of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

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Florida's Environment Central East Region 6 Adams Ranch, http://www.adamsranch.com Florida Division of Historical Resources, http://www.flheritage.com/ Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission Wildlife Viewing Sites, http://www.myfwc.com/recreation/View_index.htm Florida's Historic Places, http://fcit.coedu.usf.edu/florida/lessons/places.htm Florida's Museum of Natural History, http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/ Florida Natural Areas Inventory, http://www.fnai.org Florida's Scenic Highways, http://www.floridascenichighways.com/ Florida State Parks, http://www.floridastateparks.org/ Florida Water Management Districts, http://dlis.dos.state.fl.us/fgils/wmd.html Historical Contexts, east central Florida http://dhr.dos.state.fl.us/facts/reports/contexts/ History of Indian River County, http://www.rootsweb.com/~flindian/history.htm P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/index.html U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, http://www.fws.gov/ Visit Florida, http://www.visitflorida.com