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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope ; A Lesson Plan for Farm Safety Audiences

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Title: Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope ; A Lesson Plan for Farm Safety Audiences
Physical Description: Fact Sheet
Creator: Lehtola, Carol J.
Publisher: University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.

Notes

Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status: Published
General Note: "First published April 2003. Reviewed January 2009."
General Note: "CIR 1437"

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00003311:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00003311/00001

Material Information

Title: Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope ; A Lesson Plan for Farm Safety Audiences
Physical Description: Fact Sheet
Creator: Lehtola, Carol J.
Publisher: University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.

Notes

Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status: Published
General Note: "First published April 2003. Reviewed January 2009."
General Note: "CIR 1437"

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00003311:00001


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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of HopeA Lesson Plan for Farm Safety AudiencesCarol J. Lehtola and Charles M. Brown

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 2This document is CIR 1437 one of a series of Florida AgSafe, a program in the Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS), University of Florida. First published April 2003. Additional copies of this publication are available at the Florida AgSafe Web site: . For the complete range of publications available from theFloridaCooperativeExtensionService, please visit the EDIS Web site: . The authors Carol J. Lehtola, associate professor and State Extension Agricultural Safety Specialist;andCharlesM.Brown,Coordinatorf or Information/PublicationServices; Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department, Insti tute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS), University of Florida, Gainesville, 32611. IFAS, the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals an d institutions that functi on without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other Extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Service office. Florida Cooperative Extension Serv ice / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida / Christ ine Taylor, Waddill, Dean.

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 3ContentsLesson Plan 5 Introduction Background Session Outline Learning Objectives Learning Environment/Aids Part 1 Beginning the Workshop Part 2 Introduction to Agricultural Safety Part 3 Discuss hazards in the local community Part 4 Presentation of Rhythm of the Seasons video Part 5 Discussion of Rhythm of the Seasons video Part 6 Development of an IMBY action plan Part 7 Highlight resources Part 8 Summary and wrap-up Supplemental Materials 17 Using the IMBY Farm and Home Hazard Identification and Correction Workbook19 Hazard Identification Guide21 General Precautions Farmstead Electrical Fire Lightning Machinery Tractors Buildings and Structures Animal Handling Facilities Preparedness Pre-Post Test 35 PowerPoint Slides (Summary, Masters, and Handouts)37 Resources 58

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 4

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 5Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope A Lesson Plan for Farm Safety AudiencesSUBJECT: Call to action for hazard identification and correction. GOAL: To empower families to take corrective measures at their farm/agricultural workplace or place of residence. Introduction This lesson plan is designed as the basis for the IMBY Farm and Home Hazard Workshop. IMBY stands for In My Back Yard that is where safety should begin. The lesson plan gives direction for the educational part of the workshop. The mechanics of planning, organizing and publicizing the workshop are covered in a companion publication, Toolkit for Implementing a Community-Based IMBY Safety Event (see Resources at the end of this lesson plan). The major activity of the event is the IMBY Farm and Home Hazard Hunt, in which participants develop a person alized action plan to eliminate hazards in their work or home environment. This lesson is built around the video, "Rhythm of the Seasons: A Journey beyond Loss." In this video, a mother tells the true story of the loss of her 11-year-old son in a farm-related incident. Viewers are introduced to the son, the circumstances of his death, and the mothers first year of recovery. In this way, the audience learns about the grief and other experiences that accompanied this tragedy, and they also share in the inner world of the mothers healing as she finds a sense of purpose through this sad situation. The video fosters interest and receptivity about this very serious topic, creating a teachable moment which provides an opportunity for general discussion by attendees or for use of the lesson plan described in this publication. Ei ther way, the program should be planned such that attendees can take home with them an IMBY action plan that they can implement at their own farm or place of residence. A set of PowerPoint slides has been created to use with this lesson plan. Throughout the plan, symbols ([PP]) have been placed in the right-hand margin to indicate that a PowerPoint slide is available for that section. Twohours should be allocatedfor a program inwh ichthevideo is shownand participants' action plans developed. This could be a part of a Safety Day Camp, where children go to the various stations while parents attend the "Rhythm of the Seasons" session. The video would not be appropriate for children younger than middle school.

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 6Background The video Rhythm of the Seasons: A Journey beyond Loss is based on the book of the same name by Marilyn Adams and Mary Kay Shanley. In the video, Marilyn reads from the book and certain scenes are dramatized. In 1986, Marilyns son, Keith, was killed when he was submerged in flowing corn in a gravity-flow grain wagon. At the time, this hazard was virtually unknown or thought to be a risk only in places where significan t amounts of grain were stored. In Marilyns story, she tells about the impact of this loss and her first year of recovery. At the end of that first year, she decided to start an organization, Farm Safety 4 Just Kids, in order to alert farm parents to the hazard that had killed Keith and the many other agricultural hazards that lead to the death and inju ry of children on farms. Farm Safety 4 Just Kids is now an international organization with over 140 chapters in the United States and Canada. Marilyn travels widely to give talks and presentations, and has been invited to several foreign countries to collaborate with farm safety programs. Marilyn published Rhythm of the Seasons in 1997, and in 1999, Carol Lehtola of Florida AgSafe, the Florida Agricultural Safety Program, proposed turning a reading of the book into a dramatic presentation on video. This would allow the story to be shown to a wide variety of audiences and reach many more people. The statistics of agricultural deat h and injury tell a powerful story, but it is a story in numbers. One of the most important aspects of the book and the video is that they put faces on the statistics. It is easy to dismiss talk about percentages and trends, but to look into a mother's eyes as she tells the story of her child's death is impossible to ignore. Though the kind of incident that led to Keiths death might be unlikely in some areas, each area of the country has its own agricultural dangers. The presenter should emphasize to the audience that this video is presented as a reminder of the hazards on a farm or in the home and the importance of taking the time to practice safety. When someone is killed or injured whether child or adult the entire family and community are affected.

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 7Session Outline (For a two-hour session) Part 1 Beginning the Workshop (5 10 minutes) Part 2 Introduction to AgriculturalSafety (5 10 minutes) Part 3 Discuss Hazards in theLocalCommunity (10 15 minutes) Part 4 ROS Video (25 minutes) Part 5 Discussion ofVideo (10 15 minutes) Part 6 Development of an IMBY Take-HomeActionPlan (30 40 minutes) Part 7 Highlight Resources (5 minutes) Part 8 Summary and Wrap-Up (include plans for follow-up,ifany) (5 10 minutes) Specific Learning Objectives At the end of the program, the audience will be able to: 1.Identify and discuss leading agricultural hazards. 2.Identify and discuss the five leading agricul tural hazards in their community. 3.Discuss the impact that a farm-related fatality has on a family and a community. 4.Discuss how the impact of the ROS story can lead their family into developing an action plan for their farm or home. 5.Identify five hazards on their farm or place of residence and discuss a corrective measure for each. 6.Discuss ideas for developing and implementing an action plan for a hazard identification and correction process for their farm. 7.Identify key resources they can readily access for information.

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 8Learning Environment/AidsTo complete this lesson plan, you will need: The video Rhythm of the Seasons: A Journey beyond Loss The PowerPoint IMBY slides Optional: a companion publication, Toolkit for Implementing a CommunityBased IMBY Safety Event, is available to help you develop and conduct the IMBY safety event Optional: other support materials designed to accompany this lesson plan which might be helpful learning aids or motivators (See Resources at the end of this publication to find out more about any of these materials.) To conduct this lesson, yo u will need a room with: A means to show the video: a video cassette player and either a television monitor or a video projector and screen. Keep in mind the size of the room and the number of people who will be viewing th e video. When you set up the room make sure that the video is easily vi ewed from all locations where participants will be seated in the room. A means to show the PowerPoint presentation: a computer and a digital projector (Note: PowerPoint masters are included at the end of this book, if you prefer to make overheads. A blackboard, whiteboard or easel pad and appropriate markers. As for the video, make sure that the blackboard, et c., is easily visible for all participants. Sufficient seating for all participants Each participant will need: A pen or pencil and a sheet or two of note paper An IMBY Farm and Home Hazard Identification/Correction workbook (see Resources at the end of this publication)

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 9 Before the WorkshopOn the day of the workshop, check that all the equipment you need is in place and doublecheck that all electronic equipment is working properly. Make sure that markers have plenty of ink. For whiteboards, make sure that markers will mark and are erasable.Part 1 ...Beginning the WorkshopTime: 5 minutes Focus: How is your safetyattitude? When the attendees are comfortably seated, welcome them to the IMBY Farm and Home Hazard Identification Workshop. Thank them for coming and congratulate them on taking the time to make a difference in the lives of their friends, family and community. Remind them that there are many ways to do a job, but the safe way is always the best way. This lesson plan can be used with non-farm audiences. In that case, use the PowerPoint slides, PP 2, PP 3, and PP 4, to show how the lesson relates to them. Anyone who has land, or livestock, and farm machinery (or small versions of it) needs to be aware of farm safety issues. Suggest that we often take shortcuts when were the ones doing the work because we never have accidents. Follow up on this point in a light-hearted way by asking the attendees to suggest other excuses we make for ourselves. Have some fun with it. Sum up their suggestions, and then ask them if they would accept these excuses from their employees, family members, or children. People might take some chances with their own lives, but when inattention to hazards causes someone else to get hurt, it becomes very clear how foolish it is for anyone to take needless chances. Remind the attendees that the reason they are in the workshop is because they care about safety. But they will carry th e results of the workshop ev erywhere as they display a safety attitude and set a safety example. This introduction should take no more than 5 10 minutes. This is a time when the audience is getting comfortable wi th the workshop theyve decided to attend, the surroundings and the presenter. At the same time the presenter is getting comfortable with the audience, the material to be presented and being a presenter. Pay attention to time. You may find yourself a little nervous. Sometimes, nerves make people talk faster; others forget the time and forget to move on. Even if your audience is enjoying what they are doing, they will appreciate your discipline when the workshop ends on time. As they sometimes say in show business, Always leave em wanting more![PP 1] [PP 3] [PP 4] [PP 2]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 10Part 2 ...Introduction to AgriculturalSafetyTime: 5 minutes Focus: Learning Objective 1 Identify and discuss leading agricultural hazards. Invite the audience to suggest what they believe are potential hazards in agricultural work. Use the easel pad or blackboard to record the suggestions where everyone can see them. Make a note in parentheses if the suggested hazard applies to a specific commodity. Use this suggested list of topics or other topics common to your area to discuss the hazards suggested by the audience and to fill in any gaps (N ote: Some of these topics and others are covered in detail in the Hazard Identification Guide in this publication.) Tractors Livestock Cattle and Equine Grain Handling Confinement Systems Working Environments Road Travel with Equipment Children (workplace is also a place of residence) Chemicals Invite the audience to consider the following quote: Safety is about being observant of the risks and taking action to avoid them. This is how we save lives that can be lost in just a fraction of a second. Its a two-part formula: 1) be observant of the risks, and 2) take action to avoid them. Safety is an active, positive activity when it is considered up front. This part of the lesson should take 10-15 minutes. Youll need to keep it moving. You can flex a little on the time, but that means borrowing time from one of the other parts of the lesson. When making the list of hazards, it isnt important to include every possible hazard. The idea is get people thinking about th is subject to get them warmed up mentally. With a very active group, you may have to interrupt their list making, but they are going to have an opportunity to take these ideas a step farther in the next objective.[PP 5] [PP 6]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 11Part 3 ...DiscussHazards in the LocalCommunityTime: 10 minutes Focus: Learning Objective 2 Identify and discuss the five leading agricultural hazards in your community. The audience has helped create a list of general hazards, but what about their community or their farm or property. It is time to get more specific. On the board, write down the numbers 1, 2, and 3, like this: 1. 2. 3. Next to 1, write Risks Ive done something about. Ask for two or three examples of risks and what the person did to eliminate the risk. Next to 2, write Risks that need work. Ask the audience for two or three examples of risks they know they should do something about, but maybe havent. Encourage them to be honest because were all learning from each other in this situation. Then next to 3, write Risks I dont even know about. No need to ask for examples! Make the point that we cant share about something we dont know. The point is that many times, the onl y training we receive for the work we do is exactly how to do the job. However, we cant be observant of risks if we dont know what they are. Ask for a couple of brief stories from the audience about how they came to know the risks of their work. Were there any surprises? Share with the audience the five leading local hazards in the community based on your research. Was everyone aware of these risks? Do Your Homework Consult with local Extens ion personnel or people in the medical community to learn what the five leading agricultural hazards are in your community. [PP 7]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 12Part 4 ...Presentation of Rhythm of the Seasons VideoTime: 25 minutes Audiences generally find the Rhythm of the Seasons video very moving, but not excessively sad or tragic (nevertheless, it might be wise to have some tissues available). Although the majority of the video concerns the first year of Marilyns recovery from Keiths death, the emphasis of the video is basically hopeful. The video is not suitable for children young er than middle school age as it concerns the thoughts and feelings of an adult. We recommend that you show the entire video, all the way through the epilogue and closing credits. The epilogue reinforces the messages of the video and the extra time taken during the credits gives viewers time to absorb what they have just seen. We feel that this transitional time is important, especially for those who respond to the video more deeply.

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 13Part 5 ...Discussion of Rhythm of the Seasons VideoTime: 10 minutes Focus: Learning Objective 3 Discuss the impact that a farm-related fatality has on a family and the community. Learning Objective 4 Discuss how the impact of the ROS story can lead their family into developing an action plan for their farm or home. Many points of discussion can be taken from the Rhythm of the Seasons video. Focus the audiences attention on the learning objecti ve by asking a question like, What does this video tell you about the impact that farm-related deaths or injuries have on our families and community? A couple of points you may want to introduce are: Farms experiencing a farm-related fatality frequently go out of business in the near future. A tremendous amount of resources and support can go into helping an injured person and their family after an incident. How many injuries could be prevented if those same resources were available bef ore anyone was hurt or killed? At some point, turn the audiences attention to the next learning objective with a comment like, We all know the stories, now the question is what can we and what are we going to do about it? Read the following quote from the Rhythm of the Seasons author: You have seen their faces. They could be your brother, sister, grandchild, daughter or son. This has to stop. The grief, the pain, the feelings of loss do not have to happen. We have to gather together as a stronger voice, a network of support, and a movement forward from this point on in the interest of rural America and the future of agriculture. -Marilyn Adams, in a speech at the White House on September 18, 2002. Ask the audience, how the video they have just seen motivates them to develop a plan to make their farm or home safer.[PP 8]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 14Part 6 ...Development of a Take-HomeActionPlanTime: 30 minutes Focus: Learning Objective 5 Identify five hazards on their farm or place of residence and discuss a corrective measure for each. Learning Objective 6 Discuss ideas for developing and implementing an action plan for a hazard identification and correction 'process' for their farm or home. Begin this segment of the lesson by distributing the IMBY worksheets. Read through the worksheets and discuss them with the audience using the information you gained from Using the IMBY Farm and Home Hazard Identification and Correction Workbook. Begin by discussing the contents of the worksheet on a basic level. This gives people time to get to know the worksheet. Focusing on Learning Objective 5, ask the audience to begin thinking about what area of their farm or home they might focus on and write down on the IMBY worksheet the five hazards that concern them most. Ask individuals to share one or two of the hazards they have written down, and occasionally, after someone has shared, ask if anyone else had written down that same hazard. Write down commonly shared hazards on the board. Use the Hazard Hunt Guide to suggest some additional hazards that might be relevant. Using the list youve created, get the audience to propose corrections for that hazard. Focusing on Learning Objective 6, ask the audience that now that theyve started the action plan, how can they make sure the corrections are completed. Share some of the Hints for Successful Hazard Hunting. Depending on the size of the group, you may want to teach this section with the entire group together, or you may want to break them into smaller groups to work through the IMBY worksheets. Do Your Homework In the Supplemental Materials, find Using the IMBY Farm and Home Hazard Identification and Correction Workbook and the IMBY Hazard Identification Guide. Read these materials and make notes for yourself to conduct this part of the lesson. [PP 9] [PP 10]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 15Part 7 ...Highlight ResourcesTime: 5 -10 minutes Focus: Learning Objective 7 Identify key resources they can readily access for information. The following are important sources of additional information about agricultural safety. Key Resources: Florida AgSafe The Florida Agricultural Safety Program Web site: http://www.flagsafe.ufl.edu Best Management Practices for Agricultural Safety and Health (Penn State) Web site: http://server.age.psu.edu/extension/agsafety/ National Agricul tural Safety Database Web site: http://www.cdc.gov/nasd Farm Safety 4 Just Kids Web site: http://www.fs4jk.org The National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety Web site: http://research.marshfieldclinic.org/children North American Guidelines for Ch ildren's Agricultural Tasks Web site: http://www.nagcat.org Childproofing Your Yard and Farmstead On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE166[PP 11] [PP 12]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 16Part 8 ...Summary and Wrap-UpTime: 5-10 minutes Focus: Spread the message and followthrough You and your audience have had a stimulating, thought-provoking and practical couple of hours, but it is almost over. Encourage them to think of safety as more than a bunch of precautions and warnings the safety attitude is part of taking a positive, proactive approach to life. During your summary, remind the audience that during the lesson they have learned the following: 1.The leading agricultural hazards. 2.The five leading agricultural hazards in their community. 3.The impact that a farm-related fatality has on a family and a community. 4.The ROS story has motivated them to lead their family/business into developing an action plan for their farm or home. 5.Five hazards on their farm or place of residence and a corrective measure for each. 6.Ideas for developing and implementing an action plan for a hazard identification and correction process for their farm or home. 7.Key resources they can readily access for information. Thank the audience for their attention and participation. Congratulate them on wanting to be part of the solution. Remind them of the key phrase: Follow through! Everything theyve done in the lesson today depends on that. And remember...Be Aware! Be Alert! Be Alive![PP 13] [PP 14]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 17Supplemental Materials

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 18 IMBY Workbook The upper image shows the front/back of the workbook, and the lower image shows the inside. The workbook is shown here at a reduced size. The actual size of the workbook is standard 8x11". A color version can be downloaded at the Florida AgSafe Web site: .

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 19Using the IMBY Farm and Home Hazard Identification WorkbookIntroduction Farm safety involves a complex interaction of the environment, the operator (person), and whatever one is working with, such as machines or livestock. Some factors that create hazards are beyond human control, for example, weather conditions like rain or snow. However, there are ways to work safely in these situations. More often, hazards are created by factors that can be controlled. Developing and maintaining a safe farm workplace requires recognizing these hazards and following through on a plan of action for eliminating the hazards identified. Where to start? The place to begin practicing safety is In My Back Yard (IMBY). Use of the IMBY hazard identification guide will enable one to recognize hazards, to identify available resources and methods for eliminating hazards, and to prioritize solutions for safety problems. It is important to remember that the farm is often both workplace and home. Thus all members of the family from infants to the elderly can be exposed to hazardous machinery and disease-producing agents on the farm. Education and prevention must be a family affair. Therefore, the IMBY farm safety activity sh ould involve the entire family. From hazard identification to hazard elimination, every member of the family has a valuable role to play. How to Use the Workbook A look inside the IMBY Farm and Home Safety Hazard Identification and Correction workbook may be self-explanatory for many, but lets take a look at it step by step. At the top left, a space is provided to designate the Farm or Work Area. It might be that Hazard Hunters will want to use this form to do an overall survey of a farm or workplace, but others may wish to designate a specific area, such as the grain handling system, the machine shed, and so on. A separate form could be created for each area and a different employee or family member asked to complete the hazard identification and correction for that area (write the name in the Performed by space). The major part of the worksheet is taken up with the Hazard Hunt table. It has a place to note each hazard, appropriate corrective measure, how to make the correction, where to get the materials or information needed to make corrections, and the estimated time and cost. Working through all the steps to make corrections makes the Hazard Hunt activity very practical. It is easy to make long to do lists. What will help get each of these tasks done is getting very specific about what to do and how to do it. When a family or work

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 20group sits down together to plan this work, the worksheet helps again, because everyone knows who is doing what work. The worksheet also has spaces for assigning a deadline and a person to each task. When the correction has been made, the date of completion can be noted. Schedule and prioritize hazards that will be corrected. Then, make a note when they are corrected. If the object or situation causing the hazard cannot be eliminated, safeguard it as much as possible and learn how to live with it safely and inst ruct others of the hazards. Also, reinforce good behavior look for things that are being done right and recognize people for those efforts. Hints for Successful Hazard Hunting Begin with the simpler, more 'do-able' tasks and work toward the more complex and more expensive ones. For example, for a specific farm, one may first note ten do-able items that will have an impact including cleaning up trash areas, picking up items that may lead to trips and falls, installing smoke detectors (or changing the batteries!), etc. Supplement your hazard hunt with a video camera. It makes a fun project, and other workers or family members can view the investigation. Sometimes, when hazards are seen on the TV screen, they appear more vivid and real. Establish a time-line for corrections. For example, plan to complete a set number of corrections within a month. Then go to a second list for the next month. The ultimate objective of this activity is for families to learn to recognize that elimination of hazards is a continuous, on-g oing activity that is an integral part of their everyday farming operations and activities. This "ten-at-a-time" method has the advantage of not being overwhelming and leads people by a logical progression into the practice of recognizing and removing hazards. Create a Hazard Hunt notebook. Keep Hazard Hunt forms, the Hazard Identification Guide, and other materials tha t will be helpful on your farm or in your workplace in a notebook. Keep completed forms with farm records where they will be seen and reviewed on a periodic basis. More forms can be downloaded via Internet at . Important Reminder: Once a hazard is corrected, it does not necessarily mean the hazard is eliminated forever. For example, cleaning the shop walkway is an ongoing process.

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 21Hazard Identification GuideThis Hazard Identification Guide is provided to help you recognize specific hazards. The Guide is not all-inclusive. Its purpose is to provide general guidelines that will allow you to recognize and note the correction of specific hazards. Topics included in this guide are: General Precautions Farmstead Electrical Fire Machinery Tractors Buildings and Structures Animal Handling Facilities Preparedness

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 22Safety AwarenessSafety is about being observant of risks and taking actions to avoid them. This statement describes the attitude of Safety Awareness. When safety is the top priority for any task, that task will be done just as efficiently, but with a big bonus less risk to the operator and those around the activity. Safer work promotes productivity because workers are more knowledgeable and feel more secure. Here are some questions to ask that can help cl arify family or employee Safety Awareness: Have any family members participated in formal safety programs? Is the chance of injury and severity of injury recognized and understood by operators of farm equipment? This applies to all situations. Do members of the family realize their (and their employees') limitations? Do they recognize the capabilities and limitation s of what they are working with (machines, chemicals, livestock, etc.)? Do members ofthefamilyrealizetheymustbewillingto giveup,ornotdo, any job or activity that demands more than they can give it when it can threaten their own safey or life or that of others? This includes tract or and machinery operation. Remember to tell people when they are doing things correctly and safely!

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 23General PrecautionsAre debris, downed trees, rocks and other obstacles removed from pastures, yard areas, and lanes in order that tractors and machines can be safely operated? Have pets been vaccinated for rabies? Do welding and shop areas have adequate exhaust systems or ventilation -especially if internal combustion engines are operated inside? Are flags (or other devices) used to mark stumps, holes, etc. in areas to be mowed? Are flags used to mark items that may be buried by snow? These may include obstacles to snow removal or items that may be needed. Are family members tetanus shots up to date?

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 24FarmsteadSlips/Trips/Falls Slips/falls are a leading cause of injuries on th e farm. Of course, this can be made much worse by what one slips or falls into such as an auger, moving machinery, or a livestock pen. Practicing good housekeeping around the farm can eliminate many slip-fall hazards. Equipment Storage Is equipment parked safely when not in use? Is it out of the way of traffic lanes and walkways? Is it located in an area where children will not use the equipment as a playground? When equipment is parked, is it at the lowest level or are mechanical locks/blocks in place? (A failure/loss of pressure in the hydraulic system can result in the lowe ring of equipment.) Catwalks Catwalks have several applications, for example, at grain-bin areas for loading trucks, walking from one bin to another, or feeding hogs without having to enter a pen. They should have skid-proof pads or a grated surface to prevent slippery conditions. All catwalks should have railings. Wells and Abandoned Farmsteads Are wells and cisterns guarded or covered? Are abandoned wells plugged? Are abandoned farmstead areas eliminated? Are non-used, rusty wire fences removed? Ladders Have ladders on non-used windmills, grain bins, etc. had the lower rungs removed to prevent children from entering? Lighting Is adequate lighting available in areas where work is performed at night? Are lighting circuits independent of equipment that may have to be shut down and locked out?

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 25ElectricalAre electrical cords located so that they will not be driven over or punctured by equipment, and cannot be tripped over? Are electrical motors kept clean and free of trash? If located in corrosive, dusty or damp environments, they should be the enclosed type. Are heat lamps/portable heaters kept away from flammabl e materials (including straw and dust)? Are they kept out of reach of livestock? Is overall wiring done in accordance with electrical codes, or does it look haphazard? Is a stand-by generator available in the event of a power outage? Do family members know how to operatre it? Follow the manufacturer's instructions. Remember, if the power is out due to adverse weather, the primary operator may be stranded somewhere else. Are all circuit breakers labeled clearly and properly? Do family members know where the circuit breaker boxes are and how to turn off the power supply? Does snow/ice cause overhead wires to touch buildings or metal bins? Is a map of buried lines and othe r utilities kept with farm records? Are provisions made to prevent machines from automatically starting when power is restored after a power failure or shutdown? Unsafe work habits contribute to many electrical shock cases. An example of this is intentional use ("I'll get by with it one more time...") of defective and unsafe tools or equipment, such as extension cords or power tools. Another cause is failing to lock electrical equipment in the off position so it will remain de-energized durin g repair or maintenance. One of the most frequent causes of death by electrocution on the farm involves the use of ungrounded portable power tools Tools need to be UL (Underwriters Laboratories) approved. Older model tools with only a 2-wire power cord are not properly grounded. If the tool cannot be grounded with a third wire, it should be discarded. Use tools with double insulation and install ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) receptacles. Watch for overhead power lines when working with augers, antennas, ladders, etc. When sprayer booms, planter arms, and the like are transported on a trailer or truck, they can come into contact with power lin es. It is important to know the location of overhead lines for other locations where you may work. This is especially important because some locations will have buried lines and others will have overhead lines.

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 26FireGeneral Prevent the major causes of fire. These include: overloaded, damaged or faulty electrical wiring, careless smoking or cooking, and faulty or misused heat ing equipment, all of which can be corrected by inspection, maintenance and safe practices. Gasoline and other flammable fuels should be stored in approved containers. Control static electricity and sparks. Ground electrical equipment and keep switches, motors, and connections in good condition to reduce sparking and arcing. Grinders, welders, and other spark-producing tools should not be used near flammable materials or vapors. Spontaneous Combustion Fires caused by spontaneous combustion can occur any time -day or night. Many times, these fires are already out of control by the time they are detected. Many materials -vegetable and animal oils, soft coal, or vegetable and animal fibers, such as flax, jute wool, and hay -can heat spontaneously under certain circumstances. Hay and silage often have been implicated in many high-loss farm fires. Preventive measures include: Harvest loose or chopped hay at low enough moisture content to prevent molding, a key factor in heating. Avoid storing wet hay. Check stored hay for warm spots. If hay tempoerature is noticeably warmer than when it was put in, watch it closely. If the temperature reaches 175 degrees, get the hay out or divide it into small shallow stacks. With silage, the problem is too little moisture. Watch for silage danger signs -heat, release of moisture vapor or steaming, smoke, or a charred tobacco smell. If they appear, call the fire department. Realize that there are special procedures for extinguishing silo fires. Oxygen-limiting silos should not have water applied. Store vegetable and animal oils, paint or linseed-soaked rags, etc., in sealed containers in cool, well ventilated places away from other combustibles.

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 27LightningLightning is a major cause of farm and ranch fires. Damage runs into tens of millions of dollars every year. Good lightning protection is the only means of preventing lightning fires. A properly designed, installed and maintain ed lightning protection system provides buildings with almost 100 percent protection. Check out your lightning protection system every year to see that air terminals, conductor cables, connecting clamps and grounds can provide an unbroken electrical flow to ground. If you have no system or it is inadequat e, see a qualified ligh tning protection dealer.

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 28MachineryArePTO (power take-off) driveline shaftsh ields inplace and ingood condition? Is the PTO master shield on the tractor in place? Are warning decals in place and readable? Do grain auger elevators have a properly designed intake area guard in place? Are flexible-type guards, such as chain, tarp or rubberized belt, in place and in good condition? Are hydraulic hoses in good condition, with no indication of noticeable cracks or leaks? Are slow moving vehicle (SMV) embl ems placed on all equipment used on roadways? Are SMV emblems bright in color and not obstructed when placed on equipment? Are guards in place to cover belt, chain, and gear drives?

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 29TractorsIs the tractor equipped with a rollover protective structure (ROPS) and seatbelts? Do you always wear seatbelts with ROPS? Is there a slow moving vehicle (SMV) si gn on the rear of the tractor or towed equipment for roadway travel? Are SMV signs clean, with good reflective qualities? When towing equipment, do you use safety hitch pins and chains for road traffic? Is there a first aid kit mounted on the tractor, or accessible nearby? Are regular efforts made to keep steps free of mud, tools or debris that could cause slips? Is the exhaust system on each tractor in good condition and leak-free? Do you read the operators manual or follow rules for safe operation? Before operating, do you walk around the tractor making a visual pre-operational check for bystanders and other objects? Do you enforce the rule No Extra Riders on the tractor at any time? Do you lock brake pedals together before roadway travel? Are brakes adjusted regularly? When operating a tractor in bu ildings, do you open doors or windows or start ventilation fans? Are buildings locked or keys removed from the ignition of the tractor when not in use to prevent unauthorized people from using the equipment? Do you always steer clear of hazards, such as ditches, steep hills and other areas where tractors can tip? When using front-end loaders, do you travel with the bucket lowered to avoid tipping sideways? Have all tractor operators on your farm received training on their equipment and reviewed the manual or rules for safe operation? Is mounted equipment always lowered before the operator leaves the tractor? Are towed loads always hitched to the drawbar and never higher?

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 30When towing high or wide loads, are clearances from overhead powerlines always checked? If the tractor does not have a sound-proof cab, does the operator always wear hearing protection when noise level exceeds 90 decibels for extended periods of several hours or more? If you have many tractors or several units of the same model, are they numbered to reduce errors in communication? (Especially if you have several units of the same model.) Have you developed a policy about when seatbelts and other Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) should be worn or used?

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 31Buildings and StructuresIs there sufficient ventilation for dust and fume control? Are walkways, aisles, steps, landings and traffic areas clear of any obstructions, litter and debris? Is there adequate lighting in work and travel areas? Are stairs in good condition and equipped with handrails? Are permanent ladders in good condition and checked before use? Have danger spots in floors been repaired or corrected? Are low ceilings, beams, etc., marked clearly with signs ot fluorescent materials to prevent bumping into them? Are stored materials properly stacked to prevent them from falling? Are protrusions such as nails remov ed from walls, railings, et c., to prevent contact? Is there ample walking space between parked machines where required? Are keys removed from ignition or is machinery in locked sheds? Do large doors open smoothly? If building has no windows, are there emergency lights with exit signs? Do you have a carbon monoxide detector and does it work? Are floor openings protected with barriers, lids, or safety bars, to prevent individuals from falling through them? Are gasoline tractors and other fuel-burning equipment stored away from flammables or kept in a separate building? Do you avoid bulk storage of flammable liquids in barns or other structures? Are there at least two exits available in barns and workshops? Are elevated docks and mezzanines protected by safety rails? Are all electrical outlets in the workshop properly grounded? Is Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) available (i.e., goggles, faceshields, hard hats)?

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 32Are a stocked first aid kit and fire extinguisher available? Are suitable receptacles available for oily rags, used oil, etc.? Is adequate, well-organized storage available for tools and equipment? Do you limit extension cords to temporary use? Are portable lights properly shielded to prevent breakage? Do you unplug portable tools when not in use? Are nails removed from lumber before stacking? Do you take care to adjust work practi ces on wet floors and wipe up spills immediately? Are doors with exit paddles or panic sets fully operational?

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 33Animal Handling FacilitiesDo you always avoid entering a manure pit? Are outside ramps, steps and entrance ways protected from rain or properly maintained to deal with snow? Are pens, gates, and fences in good condition, without edges that stick out (no protrusions)? Are restraining devices used, designed safely, in good condition, without protrusions and securely anchored to prevent tipping or slipping? Are ventilation fans and vents in good operating condition an d lighting adequate? Are heaters kept away from combustible materials? Are animal drugs and barn chemicals keptinsecure labeled or original containers? Do you have cattle dehorned, and swine detusked? Are children forbidden to excite, tease or abuse animals? Do you make sure you have an emergency escape route when working in close quarters with animals? Are pets and animals immunized as required? Do you use specialcareinhandling animals with newborn young? Do you make animals aware of your approach so you do not frighten them?

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 34PreparednessAre first aid kits located in standard locations for your farm, such as in the home or workshop, or on tractors or in vehicles? Are emergency numbers and farm location numbers posted by all phones? Do you have an emergency tube located on the break er pole and is information current? Is your 911 locator number used to mark your gate and posted by the phone? Are first aid kits periodically checked and replenished? Have a reasonable number of employees been trained in first aid and CPR to cover work areas? (1-day course for first aid if under 5 people; if over 15 people, someone on site should have a standard course.) Do family members and/or employees know how to call for emergency help? Do family members and/or employees know how to shut off all machinery if someone is caught up or pinned down? Do you have a system to keep track of where family members or others are playing or working and when they are expected to return? Do you routinely check with workers by phone, C.B. or radio? Do you act on issued weather warnings? Do you know what to do for poisoning?

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 35Pre-Post Test 1. Flowing grain is not a hazard. True False 2. List two things that can be incurred by family members if someone is injured or killed in a farm-related incident. _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ 3. List three leading hazards in your community. _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ 4. The organization that was founded as the result of the death of an 11year-old boy in a farm-related incident was: a) National Safety Council b) National Institute for Farm Safety c) Farm Safety 4 Just Kids d) National Childrens Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety 5. People that have only a few acres do not need to worry about hazards? True False

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 36

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 37 Summary of Power Point Slides Slide Number Slide Text PP 1Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope PP 2...but I dont farm PP 3 GOT... an acre or two? ...a couple of horses? ... an ATV? ... a small tractor? PP 4...then this program is for you too! Farm Safety... not just for farmers! PP 5Agricultural Hazards Tractors and machinery / Livestock / Grain handling / Confinement systems / Working environment / Road travel with equipment / Children (workplace is place of residence) / Chemicals PP 6Safety is about being observant of the risks and taking actions to avoid them. This is how we save lives that can be lost in just a fraction of a second. PP 7The 5 leading causes of ag related hazards in our community are: 1. ___ / 2. ___ / 3. ___ / 4. ___ / 5. ___ PP 8You have seen their faces. They could be your brother, sister, grandchild, daughter or son. This has to stop. The grief, the pain, the feelings of loss do not have to happen. We have to gather together as a stronger voice, a network of support, and a movement forward from this point on in the interest of rural America and the future of agriculture. -Marilyn Adams, in a speech at the White House on September 18, 2002. PP 95 Hazards on our farm/workplace and a corrective measure for each are: 1. ___ / 2. ___ / 3. ___ / 4. ___ / 5. ___ PP 10PersonalAction Plan/ IMBY Safety Audit Identify the hazards / Identify corrective measures / Identify who is responsible for seeing that it gets done / Set a target date PP 11Resources Florida AgSafe The Florida Agricultural Safety Program Web site: http://www.flagsafe.ufl.edu Farm Safety 4 Just Kids Web site: http ://www.fs4jk.org National Agricul tural Safety Database Web site: http ://www.cdc.gov/nasd

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope Slide Number Slide Text38 PP 12Resources (contd) The National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety Web site: http://research.marshfieldclinic.org/children North American Guidelines for Ch ildren's Agricultural Tasks Web site: http ://www.nagcat.org Childproofing Your Yard and Farmstead On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE166 Best Management Practices for Agricultural Safety and Health (Penn State) Web site: http://server.age.psu.edu/extension/agsafety/ PP 13Safety is more than preventing injury and death...it is also about taking a positive, proactive approach to life. PP 14Be Aware! / Be Alert! / Be Alive!

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope Rhythm of the SeasonsPlanting Seeds of Safety Harvesting Grains of Hope[PP 1]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope ... but I dont farm[PP 2]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope GOT... ... an acre or two? ... a couple of horses? ...an ATV? ... a small tractor?[PP 3]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope ... then this program is for you, too![PP 4]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope Agricultural Hazards! Tractors and machinery Livestock Cattle and Equine Grain handling Confinement spaces Working environment Road travel with equipment Children (workplace is also place of residence) Chemicals[PP 5]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope Safety is about being observant of the risks and taking actions to avoid them. This is how we save lives that can be lost in just a fraction of a second.[PP 6]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope The 5 leading causes of ag related hazards in our community are: 1. _____________________________ 2. _____________________________ 3. _____________________________ 4. _____________________________ 5. _____________________________[PP 7]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope You have seen their faces. They could be your brother, sister, grandchild, daughter or son. This has to stop. The grief, the pain, the feelings of loss do not have to happen. We have to gather together as a stronger voice, a network of support, and a movement forward from this point on in the interest of rural America and the future of agriculture.-Marilyn Adams, in a speech at the White House on September 18, 2002.[PP 8]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 5 Hazards on our farm/workplace and a corrective measure for each are: 1. _____________________________ 2. _____________________________ 3. _____________________________ 4. _____________________________ 5. _____________________________ [PP 9]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope Personal Action Plan / IMBY Safety Audit Identify the hazards Identify corrective measures Identify who is responsible for seeing that it gets done Set a target date[PP 10]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope ResourcesFlorida AgSafe Florida Agricultural Safety Program Web site: http://www.flagsafe.ufl.edu Farm Safety 4 Just Kids Web site: http ://www.fs4jk.org National Agricultural Safety Database Web site: http ://www.cdc.gov/nasd[PP 11]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope Resources (contd)Natl Children's Center for Rural and Ag. Health and Safety Web site: http://research.marshfieldclinic.org/children North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks Web site: http ://www.nagcat.org Childproofing Your Yard and Farmstead On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE166 Best Mgt Practices for Ag Safety and Health (Penn State) Web site: http://server.age.psu.edu/extension/agsafety/[PP 12]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope Safety is more than preventing injury and death... it is also about taking a positive, proactive approach to life.[PP 13]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope Be Aware! Be Alert! Be Alive![PP 14]

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 53 Rhythm of the SeasonsPlanting Seeds of Safety Harvesting Grains of Hope _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________...but I dont farm_______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ GOT... ... an acre or two? ... a couple of horses? ... an ATV? ... a small tractor? _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 54 ... then this program is for you, too! ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________Agricultural Hazards Tractors and machinery Livestock Grain handling Confinement systems Working environment Road travel with equipment Children (workplace is also place of residence) Chemicals ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ Safety is about being observant of the risks and taking actions to avoid them. This is how we save lives that can be lost in just a fraction of a second. ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 55 The 5 leading causes of ag related hazards in our community are: 1. _________________________ 2. _________________________ 3. _________________________ 4. _________________________ 5. _________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ You have seen their faces. They could be your brother, sister, grandchild, daughter or son. This has to stop. The grief, the pain, the feelings of loss do not have to happen. We have to gather together as a stronger voice, a network of support, and a movement forward from this point on in the interest of rural America and the future of agriculture. -Marilyn Adams, in a speech at the White House on September 18, 2002.____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ 5 Hazards on our farm/workplace and a corrective measure for each are: 1. _________________________ 2. _________________________ 3. _________________________ 4. _________________________ 5. _________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 56 Personal Action Plan / IMBY Safety Audit Identify the hazards Identify corrective measures Identify who is responsible for seeing that it gets done Set a target date ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ResourcesFlorida AgSafe The Florida Agricultural Safety Program Web site: http://www.flagsafe.ufl.edu Farm Safety 4 Just Kids Web site: http ://www.fs4jk.org National Agricultural Safety Database Web site: http____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ Resources (contd)Natl Children's Center for Rural and Ag Health and Safety Web site: http://research.marshfieldclinic.org/children North American Guidelines for Children's Ag Tasks Web site: http ://www.nagcat.org Childproofing Your Yard and Farmstead On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE166 Best Mgt Practices for Ag Safety and Health (Penn State) Web site: http://server.age.psu.edu/extension/agsafety/____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 57 Safety is more than preventing injury and death...it is also about taking a positive, proactive approach to life. ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ Be Aware! Be Alert! Be Alive! ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 58ResourcesIMBY Workshop Materials You can download all the IMBY Workshop Materials at the Florida AgSafe Web site: http://www.flagsafe.ufl.edu. Toolkit for Implementing a Community-Based IMBY Safety Event Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope Lesson Plan for Farm Safety Audiences IMBY Farm and Home Hazard Identification and Correction Workbook IMBY Invitation IMBY PowerPoint Slide Set Rhythm of the Seasons Video and Book The video Rhythm of the Seasons can be purchased by contacting UF/IFAS Extension Bookstore Building 440 Mowry Road P.O. Box 110011 Gainesville, FL 32611 Web site: http://ifasbooks.ufl.edu Telephone: (352) 392.1764 Fax: (352) 392.2628 For credit card orders only, call (800) 226.1764. The companion book to the Rhythm of the Seasons video or a book/video package can be purchased by contacting: Farm Safety 4 Just Kids P.O. Box 458 Earlham, Iowa 50072 Telephone: (515) 758-2827 or (800) 423-5437 Web site: http://www.fs4jk.org Additional Safety Web Sites Florida AgSafe The Florida Agricultural Safety Program Web site: http://www.flagsafe.ufl.edu Best Management Practices for Agricultural Safety and Health (Penn State) Web site: http://server.age.psu.edu/extension/agsafety/ National Agricul tural Safety Database Web site: http://www.cdc.gov/nasd

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 59Farm Safety 4 Just Kids Web site: http://www.fs4jk.org The National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety Web site: http://research.marshfieldclinic.org/children North American Guidelines for Ch ildren's Agricultural Tasks Web site: http://www.nagcat.org Additional Safety Information Materials from UF/IFAS and Florida AgSafe Safety Awareness Agricultural Employer's Resources for Safety (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE229) Small Farmer's Resources for Safety (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE228) Shortcuts are Short-sighted! or, Invest Seconds, Save Lives (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE179) General Precautions Protecting Children on the Farm: The North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks (NAGCAT) (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE168) Farmstead 'Childproofing' Your Yard or Farmstead (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE166) Slips/Trips/Falls Preventing Injuries from Slips, Trips, and Falls (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AS042) Ladders Portable Wood Ladders: OSHA Standard 1910.25 (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/OA126) Portable Metal Ladders -OSHA Standard 1910.26 (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/OA127)

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Rhythm of the Seasons: Planting Seeds of Safety, Harvesting Grains of Hope 60Electrical Wiring Methods, Components, and Equipment for General Use -OSHA Standard 1910.305 (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/OA064) Wiring Design and Protection -OSHA Standard 1910.304 (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/OA113) Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices -OSHA Standards 1910.331-1910.335 (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/OA114) Design Safety Standards for Electrical Systems: General Requirements -OSHA Standard 1910.303 (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/OA122) Fire Filling Gas Cans Safely (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE174) Fire Protection -Definitions: OSHA Standard 1910.155 (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/OA094) Portable Fire Extinguishers: OSHA Standard 1910.157 (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/OA095) Standpipe and Hose Systems -OSHA Standard 1910.158 (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/OA096) Automatic Sprinkler Systems -OSHA Standard 1910.159 (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/OA097) Fire Extinguishing Systems -OSHA Standards 1910.160 1910.163 (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/OA098) Fire Detection Systems -OSHA Standard 1910.164 (On the Web at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/OA099) Lightning These publications are available on the Web at: http://disaster.ifas.ufl.edu/chap8fr.htm 8.3 Backgrounder Thunderstorms and Lightning 8.4 Fact Sheet Thunderstorms and Lightning 8.5 Protecting Homes from Lightning What to Do before Lightning Strikes 8.6 Specifications for Lightning Protection