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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00003237/00001
 Material Information
Title: Peanut Variety Performance in Florida, 2005 - 2008
Physical Description: Fact Sheet
Creator: Tillman, Barry
Publisher: University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
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Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status: Published
General Note: "Original publication date, July 2009."
General Note: "SS-AGR-323"
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Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00003237:00001


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Barry Tillman, Mark Gomillion, George Person, Justin McKinney and Bill Thomas2 1. This document is SS-AGR-323, one of a series of the Agronomy Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Original publication date, July 2009. Visit the EDIS Web site at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu. 2. Barry Tillman, assistant professor, Agronomy Department, North Florida Research and Education Center (NFREC)--Marianna, Fla.; Mark Gomillion, biological scientist, NFREC--Marianna, Fla.; George Person, senior biological scientist, NFREC--Quincy, Fla.; Justin McKinney, senior biological scientist, Agronomy Department, Research and Demonstration Site--Citra, Fla.; and Bill Thomas, agronomy extension agent IV, Columbia County Extension Office, Lake City, Fla., Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla. Variety choice is a critical management decision in producing a peanut crop. Several good peanut varieties are available to choose from, so it is essential to know the attributes of each variety and how various varieties might fit into a farm plan. When trying a new peanut variety for the first time, plant a relatively small test plot (20-50 acres) to make sure you see the differences between varieties first-hand. When choosing which varieties to plant, consider pod yields and grades, but also consider a variety's disease resistance, maturity, seed supply, and anticipated planting dates. Growers planting more than 100 acres of peanuts should plant at least two varieties. Planting more than one variety can help to spread risk of losses from weather, reduce opportunities for disease, and limit delays in harvest operations. For example, if a field has a history of white mold, use varieties that have a better resistance to that disease compared to other varieties. Use the Peanut Disease Risk Index to evaluate variety disease resistance -http://www.caes.uga.edu/commodities/fieldcrops/ peanuts/2009peanutupdate/peanutrx.html. Your county agent can provide other useful resources. A summary table from the Peanut Disease Risk Index is included in Table 5. The potentially devastating effects of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in the southeastern United States are another reason variety choice is very important. Severity of TSWV varies from year to year, and scientists are unable to predict disease levels for a coming crop season. Because TSWV is unpredictable, planting a peanut variety with good resistance to TSWV can significantly reduce the risk of losses from that disease. Among the sites in Florida where peanut-variety resistance to TSWV has been tested, TSWV is usually most severe in Marianna, so variety performance in that location will give a good indication of the TSWV resistance of a given variety. Results often are very different between Marianna, Gainesville, and Jay, depending on TSWV pressure, other disease pressure within those areas, and environmental conditions, including soil type and rainfall. Variety resistance to TSWV is summarized in Table 5, which is from the 2009 Peanut Disease Risk Index.

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida, 2005 2008 2 This report provides data from University of Florida trials conducted in Florida at IFAS research centers located in Gainesville (Citra), Marianna, and Jay from 2005-2008. Tests in Marianna and Gainesville were grown with irrigation. The tests at Jay were not irrigated. All tests were managed for optimum production, including the use of pesticides to control various diseases, insects and weeds. In-furrow insecticides (Temik or Thimet) were used in Gainesville and Jay and were used in 2008 in Marianna. Certified Seed Acreage in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia in 2005. Credits: Chart developed by Barry Tillman with data from the Southern Seed Certification Association and the Georgia Crop Improvement Association. Historically, peanut acreage in the southeastern United States has been dominated by one variety during a given time period. For about 20 years, from the early 1970s and continuing through the early 1990s, 'Florunner' was the dominant peanut variety grown in this region of the United States. In the mid 1990s, however, TSWV began to cause severe losses in Florunner and in other varieties used at the time that did not have TSWV resistance. Since the late 1990s, 'Georgia Green' has been the dominant cultivar planted in this region. The main reasons for the popularity of Georgia Green were its moderate resistance to TSWV, good grades and good pod yield. In 1996, when Georgia Green was released, it was the

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida, 2005 2008 3 only medium-maturity runner variety with resistance to TSWV. As the TSWV epidemic of the 1990s demonstrated, the practice of relying heavily on one cultivar at a time is dangerous for the peanut industry. Like Florunner before it, Georgia Green in 2005 occupied about 75 percent of the certified seed acreage in Alabama, Florida and Georgia (Figure 1). In the 10 or more years before 2005, Georgia Green had also occupied at least that amount of acreage in these states. In 2006, however, other peanut varieties began to displace Georgia Green in certified seed acreage in this region. By 2008, Georgia Green occupied about 38 percent of the seed acreage in Alabama, Florida and Georgia (Figure 2). Certified Seed Acreage in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia in 2008. Credits: Chart developed by Barry Tillman with data from the Southern Seed Certification Association and the Georgia Crop Improvement Association. On an industry-wide scale, it seems preferable that no one variety occupy more than 50 percent of the certified seed acreage. Diversity in peanut varieties planted can reduce the risk of losses from disease and provide a buffer against differential environmental impacts on a given variety. Considering that the seed-increase ratio of peanuts is low, having several varieties in seed production at significant levels allows a much quicker shift to different varieties if needed. Using the information on variety performance provided below, it is possible to devise a plan that uses several varieties so to spread risk of losses from disease. This information also helps in choosing varieties based on their relative maturity and disease resistance to help spread harvest and planting operations over a longer period of time.

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida, 2005 2008 4 Several new runner varieties were released in 2007 and 2008. The University of Florida released 'Florida-07', 'McCloud', 'York' and 'AP-4'. Florida-07 is a mediumto medium-late maturing, large-seeded runner with excellent resistance to TSWV, good resistance to white mold, and some tolerance to leaf spots. Florida-07 has high oleic oil chemistry and has demonstrated excellent yield potential and good grades. McCloud is a medium-maturity, large-seeded runner with high oleic oil chemistry. McCloud has better TSWV resistance than Georgia Green and is similar to Georgia Green in its resistance to other diseases. McCloud has demonstrated good yield potential and excellent grades. York is a late-maturing runner with typical runner seed size, similar to Georgia Green. York has an excellent disease-resistance package with a high level of resistance to TSWV, white mold and leaf spots. York has high oleic oil chemistry and has demonstrated excellent yield potential and good grades. Seed of Florida-07, York and McCloud should be readily available for the 2009 season. AP-4 is a large-seeded runner with good resistance to TSWV and moderate resistance to white mold. AP-4 is better than Georgia Green in both of these important measures. AP-4 has also demonstrated excellent pod yield and very good grades. AP-4 has normal oleic oil chemistry. Seed of AP-4 should be available for the 2010 season. The new virginia variety, 'Florida Fancy', was released by the University of Florida in 2007. Florida Fancy has high oleic oil chemistry and standard virginia pod and seed size. Florida Fancy has demonstrated very good yield potential and has among the best resistance to TSWV available in a virginia variety. Seed of Florida Fancy should be available for the 2010 season. The University of Georgia has three new runner varieties, 'Georgia-06G', which was released in 2006, and 'Georgia Greener' and 'Georgia-07W', which were released in 2007. All three of these varieties have normal oleic oil chemistry, excellent grades, medium maturity and competitive pod yield. Georgia-06G is a large-seeded runner with very good TSWV resistance. Georgia Greener has normal runner size seed and very good resistance to TSWV. Georgia-07W has large seed and very good resistance to TSWV and white mold. Seed of Georgia-06G should be generally available for the 2009 season, whereas seed of Georgia Greener should be available in 2010, and seed of Georgia-07W should be generally available in 2011. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) released a new runner variety in 2007 -'Tifguard'. It is a medium-maturing, large-seeded runner and the first variety to combine resistance to TSWV and a high level of resistance to root knot nematode. That combination of resistance to disease and nematodes will allow growers in the southeastern United States to take advantage of the same root knot nematode resistance as in 'NemaTam', a peanut variety developed in Texas and released in 2002. Seed of Tifgaurd should be generally available for the 2010 season. Growers who normally use Telone to control nematodes should be able to use Tifguard on nematode-infested site without using Telone. Golden Peanut Company released two runner types, 'AT215' and 'AT3085RO'. AT215 is a large-seeded runner type with early relative maturity, similar to 'Andru II' and 'Virugard', and with high oleic oil chemistry. AT215 is susceptible to TSWV, so is not a candidate for early planting. However, AT215's early maturity could be a benefit in situations that require planting in late May or early June. Seed of AT215 should be available in 2010 and beyond. AT3085RO is a medium-maturity, large-seeded runner with good resistance to TSWV and high oleic oil chemistry. Seed of AT3085RO should be generally available for the 2009 season.

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida, 2005 2008 5 Table 1 details pod yields, total sound mature kernels percentage (TSMK), maturity and TSWV ratings for tests at three locations in Florida in 2008. Each entry was harvested (dug) at its apparent optimum-maturity stage, i.e., E = 125-130 days after planting (DAP); M = 133-139 DAP; L = 145-155 DAP. Ratings for TSWV were on a 1-10 scale, where 1 = no disease, and 10 = all plants with severe damage or dying. Spotted wilt was nearly non-existent in 2008, and yields were relatively high compared to previous years (Table 2). Only two early-maturing varieties were tested, Andru II and Virugard, and yields of these varieties were similar. Among the medium-maturity varieties tested, Florida-07, Georgia -06G, Georgia-07W, 'Carver' and AP-4 had a statistically greater yield that year than did Georgia Green. Georgia-06G had the highest average yield, and Florida-07, Gerogia-07W, Carver, AP-4 and AT3085RO were not statistically lower in yield. Among the virginia varieties, VAC92R, 'Gregory', Florida Fancy, and 'Georgia-05E' had the highest pod yield in 2008. Averaging over two or more years and locations is a powerful method of determining how a peanut variety will perform over a wide array of environments. The performance of runner market-type peanut varieties in Florida over the past four years (2005-2008) is shown in Table 2. Among the medium-maturity cultivars tested during 2007 2008, Florida-07, AP-4, Georgia-06G, Georgia-07W and Georgia Greener had the highest pod yield. Georgia-06G and Georgia Greener had the highest TSMK grade among the medium maturity types. In the three-year (2006-2008) and four-year (2005-2008) test averages, Florida-07 had the highest pod yield. With the exception of Georgia Green, the resistance to TSWV among the medium maturity group is very good. Pod yield among the late-maturing varieties tested from 2005-2008 was similar. The grade of York was less than the other three late-maturing varieties. High TSMK is a strength of both Georgia-01R and Georgia-02C, and TSMK percentage, averaged over 2005 2008, was around 79 percent for those varieties. Acreage of Georgia-01R has been limited because of poor seed quality, a problem shared by several late-maturing varieties. The performance of virginia market-type varieties in Florida over the four-year period 2005-2008 is shown in Table 3. Most of these varieties are more susceptible to TSWV than the popular runner varieties. If these TSWV-susceptible varieties contract the disease, yield losses could be substantial. Two new virginia varieties -Georgia-05E and Florida Fancy -appear to have better TSWV resistance than the others. Georgia-05E and Florida Fancy also have very competitive pod yield. Florida Fancy has high oleic oil chemistry which is a significant benefit for virginia types when they are prepared by salting and roasting in-shell. This preparation significantly hastens oxidation and rancidity of normal oleic types, but high oleic types do not oxidize as quickly which preserves their flavor longer. The pod yield of peanut cultivars grown at three Florida locations is shown in Table 4. In general, the highest-yielding entries in one location also did well in the other locations. Yields are generally lower in Jay because the peanuts are not irrigated. Pod yields in Gainesville are generally higher because TSWV is very mild in this area. In Marianna, yields can be severely limited by TSWV. For that reason, varieties that are most resistant to TSWV usually have the highest yield in Marianna. In 2006 and 2008 TSWV pressure in Marianna was much lower compared to 2005 and 2007.

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida, 2005 2008 6 Disease resistance is a very important factor in choosing a peanut variety. The reaction of most varieties to the most prevalent peanut diseases in Florida is detailed in Table 5. To optimize the disease-resistance benefits of these varieties, choose varieties based on their disease resistance in relation to diseases known to be problematic or suspected of being problematic in a particular field or farm. Use Table 5 to find a variety with the right disease package for your situation. If white mold is a problem in some of your fields, the following varieties would be good choices: AP-3, AP-4, C-99R, Florida-07, Tifguard, York, Georgia-06G, Georgia-07W, or Georgia-02C. For another example, York, C-99R, Tifgruard and Georgia-07W are varieties with good leafspot resistance. Use of these varieties in fields with a history of leaf spot and/or in situations that could allow for a reduction in the frequency of fungicide sprays needed for leaf-spot control, compared to the need for use of such sprays with leaf-spot susceptible varieties. The new variety, Tifguard, has resistance to root knot nematode and so would be a good choice in fields with a history of that disease pest; AP-3 has also demonstrated tolerance to root knot nematode. Varieties that have enough resistance to TSWV to be planted relatively early include the following: AP-3, Florida-07, Georgia-06G, Tifguard, Georgia-07W, and York. During the four-year period that includes 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008, scientists conducted farm-scale variety tests in Columbia County, Fla., using a limited number of peanut varieties. These tests consisted of replicated plots of one to two acres within a peanut field managed under conditions normal for the farmers who cooperated in the tests. Management included a full-season fungicide program. The typical rotation on this farm is two to three years of peanut followed by four to five years or more of bahiagrass. Soil-borne disease pressure is usually low, but leaf spot disease pressure can be intense. These tests were helpful to verify results from research trials under low disease pressure. Over the four years of the test of the medium-maturity varieties, AP-3 and Georgia Green had similar average yield (Figure 3). Georgia-03L yielded well in 2007 and 2008 and was similar to AP-3 and Georgia Green. Yields of two tons per acre are well above the state average of 2,500 2,800 pounds even though in some cases the tests were planted the season after a previous peanut crop. The results show that the yield potential of these varieties is similar under near-ideal conditions with little or no TSWV. The value of the long-term bahiagrass rotation with peanuts is especially striking. In 2008, three new varieties were added. Of these, Georgia-06G and Florida-07 yielded more than 6,000 lbs. per acre. These results corroborate results from the small-plot tests described above and show excellent yield potential of Florida-07 and Georgia-06G. Variety choice is a critical management decision for peanut production. Many varieties with good to excellent resistance to TSWV are suitable for production in the southeastern United States. Additionally, several of these TSWV-resistant varieties also have resistance to other diseases. Growing disease-resistant varieties can reduce risk and production cost. The varieties C-99R, York, and Georgia 01R all have considerable resistance to leaf spot. Use of these varieties, in combination with good crop rotation, might allow for reduced use of fungicide sprays and, therefore, lower production costs. Some of the cultivars Florida-07, Georgia-07W, AP-4, Georgia-06G, Georgia-03L, C-99R, and AP-3 have good resistance to soil-borne diseases, such as white mold (S. rolfsii). Additionally, Georgia 01R, Georgia 02C, and Carver have some resistance to Cylindrocladium black rot (CBR). When choosing a variety and making arrangements for seeds of the varieties that best fit your needs, evaluate your production and marketing situation. Seed of Florida-07, York, Georgia-06G and McCloud should be readily available for the 2009 season. Seed of AP-4, Georgia Greener, Tifguard, and Florida Fancy should be available for the 2010 season.

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida, 2005 2008 7 Performance of Six Medium Maturity Varieties in 1-2 Acre Replicated Plots in Columbia County, Fla., in 2005-2008. (The fields were not irrigated, and 2005 and 2008 were the first year of peanut following four to five years of bahiagrass. The 2006 and 2007 tests were planted in the same field following four to five years of bahiagrass.)

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida, 2005 2008 8 Performance of Peanut Varieties in Three Locations in Florida in 2008 (Varieties are sorted by market type, maturity and then yield in descending order.) Market Pod Yield (lbs./A) TSWV (1-10 rating***) TSMK % (grade) Type Maturity* MR GV JY AVG MR GV JY AVG MR GV AVG Andru II** R ME 4669 4398 3728 4265 2.0 1.3 3.0 2.1 73.6 73.5 73.5 Virugard R E 5369 3243 3282 3965 2.0 4.0 2.3 2.8 77.3 77.5 77.4 Georgia-06G R M 5960 6053 5484 5832 1.0 2.7 1.7 1.8 79.4 81.8 80.6 Georgia-07W R M 5934 6118 5292 5781 1.0 1.7 1.7 1.4 76.3 80.4 78.3 Florida-07** R M 5779 6260 4650 5563 1.0 2.7 2.0 1.9 73.5 78.7 76.1 Carver R M 5527 6272 4589 5463 1.0 1.7 1.7 1.4 76.8 79.1 77.9 AP-4 R M 5343 5808 5215 5456 1.3 1.7 2.0 1.7 76.0 78.0 77.0 AT3081R R M 5298 5772 4992 5354 1.0 1.0 2.3 1.4 75.1 75.8 75.4 Georgia Greener R M 5653 5337 5060 5350 1.0 3.3 1.3 1.9 77.6 81.1 79.3 McCloud** R M 5434 5669 4332 5145 1.0 1.0 2.0 1.3 76.1 77.7 76.9 AT3085A** R M 5004 5689 4569 5087 1.0 1.3 1.2 1.2 74.8 76.6 75.7 AP-3 R M 5076 4808 5185 5023 1.0 2.0 1.3 1.4 72.0 77.3 74.6 Georgia-03L R M 5014 4256 5669 4980 1.0 1.7 2.0 1.6 73.5 76.2 74.8 Georgia Green R M 4830 5279 4575 4895 1.3 2.0 2.0 1.8 78.2 79.7 78.9 C-99R R L 4966 5498 4147 4870 1.3 1.3 2.7 1.8 77.5 77.9 77.7 York** R L 4682 5127 4229 4679 1.0 1.0 2.0 1.3 75.3 75.3 75.3

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida, 2005 2008 9 Performance of Peanut Varieties in Three Locations in Florida in 2008 (Varieties are sorted by market type, maturity and then yield in descending order.) Market Pod Yield (lbs./A) TSWV (1-10 rating***) TSMK % (grade) Type Maturity* MR GV JY AVG MR GV JY AVG MR GV AVG Georgia-02C** R L 4588 5240 4049 4626 1.0 1.7 2.3 1.7 80.3 81.1 80.7 Georgia-01R R L 4372 4521 3996 4296 1.0 1.0 2.0 1.3 78.4 79.4 78.9 VAC92R V E 5650 4791 4627 5023 2.0 1.3 2.0 1.8 73.6 73.5 73.5 Gregory V ME 5498 5182 3523 4734 2.0 1.0 2.3 1.8 71.0 73.1 72.0 NCV11 V E 5379 5063 3652 4698 2.0 1.3 2.0 1.8 73.0 72.0 72.5 Brantley V E 5253 5472 3125 4617 2.3 1.3 2.3 2.0 71.1 75.1 73.1 CHAMPS V E 5005 5018 3751 4591 2.0 1.0 2.7 1.9 74.7 74.7 74.7 VC2 V E 5305 4217 4219 4580 1.7 2.0 3.3 2.3 74.3 72.9 73.6 NC12C V E 4601 4533 3461 4198 2.0 1.0 2.0 1.7 73.5 74.5 74.0 Florida Fancy** V M 5298 6125 4968 5464 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.6 72.5 78.4 75.4 Georgia-05E V M 5398 5285 5245 5309 1.0 1.3 1.7 1.3 79.9 83.0 81.4 C.V 8 12 11 12 17.5 35.1 27.3 38.0 1.5 2.2 2.1 LSD 561 836 696 479 0.3 0.8 0.8 0.5 1.9 2.9 1.9 E = 125-130 days after planting, DAP; M = 133-139 DAP; L = 145-155 DAP **High Oleic ***Ratings for TSWV were on a 1-10 scale, where 1 = no disease, and 10 = all plants severely diseased or dying.

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida, 2005 2008 10 Performance of Runner Market-Type Peanut Varieties in Two or Three Florida Locations over Four Years -2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008. (Entries are sorted by maturity and the four-year average yield in descending order.) YIELD (lbs./acre) TSMK % (grade) TSWV (1-10)*** Name Maturity* 2008 2-YR 3-YR 4-YR 2008 2-YR 3-YR 4-YR 2008 2-YR 3-YR 4-YR Andru II** ME 4265 4098 4076 3665 73.5 74.2 74.7 72.5 2.1 3.6 3.4 3.6 Virugard ME 3965 3579 3878 3440 77.4 77.9 77.3 75.8 2.8 4.4 4.1 4.1 Florida-07** M 5563 5061 5127 4859 76.1 76.2 76.8 76.2 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.3 Georgia-03L M 4980 4177 4287 4197 74.8 76.2 76.5 76.0 1.6 2.7 3.0 3.1 AT3085A** M 5087 4411 4489 4186 75.7 75.6 75.7 75.0 1.2 2.9 2.9 2.9 AP-3 M 5023 4313 4336 4047 74.6 74.9 74.5 73.8 1.4 2.4 2.4 2.5 McCloud** M 5145 4274 4248 3986 76.9 77.4 76.7 76.3 1.3 2.4 2.6 3.0 AT3081R M 5354 4345 4220 3890 75.4 75.5 75.2 73.8 1.4 3.0 3.3 3.5 Carver M 5463 4447 4411 3889 77.9 77.2 77.2 75.7 1.4 2.8 2.7 3.2 Georgia Green M 4895 4228 4066 3647 78.9 78.3 78.1 77.0 1.8 3.0 3.5 3.8 AP-4 M 5456 4907 4743 77.0 77.0 77.4 1.7 2.4 2.5 Georgia-06G M 5832 4893 80.6 80.3 1.8 2.6 Georgia Greener M 5350 4862 79.3 79.7 1.9 2.4 Georgia-07W M 5781 78.3 1.4 C-99R L 4870 4434 4423 4344 77.7 78.1 77.1 76.6 1.8 2.6 2.6 2.7 Georgia-01R L 4296 4083 4383 4279 78.9 79.1 79.0 78.5 1.3 1.8 1.9 2.2 York** L 4679 4261 4348 4193 75.3 75.0 74.9 74.5 1.3 1.8 1.9 1.9 Georgia-02C** L 4626 4205 4316 4009 80.7 80.6 80.8 79.6 1.7 2.2 2.2 2.6 C.V. 12 15 14 15 2.1 1.9 2.4 2.6 38.0 36.5 33.3 31.8 LSD 479 505 354 336 1.9 1.2 1.3 1.2 0.5 0.6 0.4 0.5 E = 125-130 days after planting, DAP; M = 133-139 DAP; L = 145-155 DAP **High oleic Average of 2007 and 2008 test data. Average of 2006, 2007, and 2008 test data. Average of 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008 test data.

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida, 2005 2008 11 Performance of Virginia Market-Type Peanut Varieties in Two or Three Florida Locations over Four Years -2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008. (Entries are sorted by maturity and the four-year average yield in descending order.) Pod Yield (lbs./acre) TSMK % (grade) TSWV (1-10***) Name Maturity* 2008 2-YR 3-YR 4-YR 2008 2-YR 3-YR 4-YR 2008 2-YR 3-YR 4-YR Gregory ME 4734 4428 4307 3840 72.0 72.1 71.8 71.3 1.8 3.4 3.1 3.3 VC2** E 4580 3848 4001 3669 73.6 74.2 74.4 73.8 2.3 3.5 3.3 3.4 VAC92R E 5023 4181 4009 3651 73.5 73.2 72.2 71.5 1.8 3.6 3.8 4.1 NCV11 E 4698 3675 3769 3478 72.5 72.4 72.9 71.8 1.8 3.5 3.6 3.9 NC12C E 4198 3556 3570 3219 74.0 74.0 74.2 73.5 1.7 3.6 3.6 4.3 CHAMPS E 4591 3926 74.7 74.4 1.9 3.2 Brantley E 4617 3664 73.1 72.4 2.0 3.9 Georgia-05E M 5309 4842 4584 81.4 81.1 80.4 1.3 1.5 2.0 Florida Fancy** M 5464 4649 4531 75.4 74.1 73.3 1.6 2.6 2.7 C.V. 12 15 14 15 2.1 1.9 2.4 2.6 38.0 36.5 33.3 31.8 LSD 479 505 354 336 1.9 1.2 1.3 1.2 0.5 0.6 0.4 0.5 E = 125-130 days after planting, DAP; M = 133-139 DAP; L = 145-155 DAP **High oleic Average of 2007 and 2008 test data. Average of 2006, 2007, and 2008 test data. Average of 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008 test data.

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida, 2005 2008 12 Pod Yield of Peanut Varieties in Three Florida Locations over Four Years -2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008. (Entries are sorted by market type, maturity and the overall average yield in descending order. Compare variety performance within columns and within in the location average when tested in the same number of years.) Markettype 2005 2006 2007 R 2239 4369 2975 4669 3563 1765 3311 4142 3728 3237 3285 4420 4675 4398 4195 3665 R 2052 4856 2610 5369 3722 1236 3940 2636 3282 2774 3094 4630 4333 3243 3825 3440 R 4311 5915 4456 5779 5115 3204 4424 3924 4650 4051 4940 5440 5295 6260 5484 4883 R 3198 4860 2530 5014 3901 2943 3985 3907 5669 4126 5637 4675 3688 4256 4564 4197 R 3298 5660 2810 5004 4193 2510 3340 3272 4569 3423 4020 4934 5124 5689 4942 4186 R 3417 5595 3472 5076 4390 2639 3333 3185 5185 3586 3475 4221 4153 4808 4164 4047 R 2878 5027 2497 5434 3959 2533 3372 3114 4332 3338 4188 4188 4598 5669 4661 3986 R 2807 4901 2452 5298 3865 2388 2817 2604 4992 3200 3501 4191 4951 5772 4604 3890 R 1997 5544 2449 5527 3879 1471 3088 3435 4589 3146 3491 4392 4408 6272 4641 3889 R 1736 4107 2204 4830 3219 2100 2578 3491 4575 3186 3333 4540 4989 5279 4535 3647 R 5308 4111 5343 4921 3175 3982 5215 4124 4762 4985 5808 5185 4743 R 2946 5960 4453 3672 5484 4578 5247 6053 5650 4894 R 4214 5653 4934 3988 5060 4524 4921 5337 5129 4862 R 5934 5934 5292 5292 6118 6118 5781 R 4046 4747 3049 4966 4202 3875 3633 -4147 3885 4401 4818 5285 5498 5001 4363

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida, 2005 2008 13 Pod Yield of Peanut Varieties in Three Florida Locations over Four Years -2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008. (Entries are sorted by market type, maturity and the overall average yield in descending order. Compare variety performance within columns and within in the location average when tested in the same number of years.) Markettype 2005 2006 2007 R 4598 5037 3669 4682 4497 3795 3930 3350 4229 3826 4062 4598 4508 5127 4574 4299 R 3636 4937 3486 4372 4108 3162 4566 3314 3996 3760 5105 5446 4879 4521 4988 4285 R 2581 4882 3656 4588 3927 3078 3491 3023 4049 3410 3607 5240 4676 5240 4691 4009 V 2055 4869 3130 5498 3888 1568 3627 4093 3523 3203 3688 3878 5143 5182 4473 3855 V 2285 4643 2281 5305 3629 1868 3449 2650 4219 3047 3859 4834 4414 4217 4331 3669 V 2249 4320 2965 5650 3796 1707 2578 2776 4627 2922 3775 4095 4279 4791 4235 3651 V 2114 4824 1339 5379 3414 1717 2791 1985 3652 2536 3985 4226 4779 5063 4513 3488 V 1739 3788 1839 4601 2992 1497 2552 2776 3461 2572 3252 4459 4124 4533 4092 3218 V 1901 5005 3453 2633 3751 3192 5250 5018 5134 3926 V 1378 5253 3316 2554 3125 2840 4204 5472 4838 3664 V 5085 4472 5398 4985 3020 4401 5245 4222 4098 4253 5285 4545 4584 V 4533 3356 5298 4396 3078 3252 4968 3766 5272 4892 6125 5430 4530 C.V. 12 12 21 8 16 14 11 11 16 12 9 12 LSD 427 794 861 561 520 612 493 696 808 756 546 836

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida, 2005 2008 14 Disease Resistance of Major Peanut Varieties in the Southeastern United States. (Adapted from the University of Georgia Disease Risk Index2009. Fewer points mean better resistance.) Flavorunner 4582 50 unknown unknown unknown NC-V 11 35 30 30 25 AT-215*,2 30 unknown unknown unknown Georgia Green 30 20 25 15 Andru II2 25 30 25 25 Florida Fancy*,2 25 unknown unknown unknown McCloud2 20 25 20 unknown AP-4* 20 20 15 unknown C-99R4 20 15 15 25 AT 3085 RO2 15 30 25 unknown Georgia-05E 15 20 25 unknown Georgia Greener* 15 20 25 unknown Georgia-02C2,3,5 15 20 10 20 Georgia-03L5 15 15 10 20 AP-34 10 25 10 25 Georgia-06G 10 20 20 unknown Florida-072 10 20 15 unknown Georgia-07W* 10 15 10 unknown Tifguard3,6 10 15 10 unknown York2 10 10 5 unknown Georganic 5 10 10 unknown *Data for these new varieties is limited, and risk ratings will undergo changes as needed in the future. 1Adequate research data is not available for all varieties with regards to all diseases. Additional varieties will be included as data to support the assignment of an index value are available. 2High oleic variety. 3Varieties GA-02C and TifGuard appear to have increased resistance to Cylindrocladium black rot (CBR) than do other varieties commonly planted in Georgia. 4Varieties AP3 and C-99R are less resistant to CBR and are not recommended for fields where this disease is a problem. 5The malady referred to as funky or irregular leaf spot tends to be more severe in GA02C and GA03L than in other varieties. Although this condition can look like early leaf spot (Cercospora arachidicola), the cause of funky leaf spot is unknown. Disease losses are not typically associated with funky leaf spot. 6The new variety Tifguard has excellent resistance to the peanut root-knot nematode.