<%BANNER%>

Ormond, James III, Miscellaneous

A Guide to the Ormond Family Papers ( Related URL )
National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) UFPKY
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Ormond, James III, Miscellaneous
Series Title:
Ormond Family Papers (1784-1909)
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
English
Creator:
Ormond family
Donor:
Bettie Massengale Edwards
Publication Date:
Physical Location:
Box: 4
Divider: Ormond, James III
Folder: Ormond, James III, Miscellaneous

Subjects

Genre:
Spatial Coverage:

Notes

Scope and Content:
Correspondence, business account notebooks, official marriage, deed, estate records, and a manuscript memoir. Collection includes family correspondence ranging from James I in 1884 to James III in 1882, the bulk (3 boxes) of which chronicles the business and personal affairs of James III. Major subjects covered include the Second Seminole War in Florida, the Civil War, the Andersonville Prison in Georgia, and business operations characteristic of the nineteenth century. Other topics include yellow fever outbreaks in Florida, frontier life in north Florida, Spanish land grant claims, and family history. Researchers may find the ongoing, regular correspondence between James III and McNaught useful for topics relating to business practices of the period. Of particular note is the handwritten autobiography of James III, dictated in the year before his death. The collection is arranged chronologically.
Abstract:
The collection includes correspondence, business letters, account books, and a memoir manuscript created by members of the Ormond family of Florida.
Biographical:
Captain James Ormond I (175?-1819), born in Scotland, commanded the brig Somerset. He owned a plantation on Exuma in the Bahamas, but then took advantage of Spanish land grants in Florida. He settled near New Smyrna, Florida, where he was later killed by a neighbor's slave. James Ormond II (179?-1829), also born in Scotland, came to Florida with his wife, Isabella (neé Christie), and their four children after a failed business venture. They lived on the Damietta plantation, near St. Augustine, Florida. James Ormond III (1815-1892) was born in Mayfield, Scotland. During the Second Seminole War, he volunteered in the Mosquito Roarers militia as a sergeant. Ormond married Elizabeth Chaires in 1844, with whom he had nine children. His business ventures included the Atlanta Paper Mill, one of the first paper mill operations in the South and other enterprises with his partner William McNaught. During the Civil War, Ormond worked as an adjutant at Andersonville Prison. He moved his family to Canada and England after the war, returning to Atlanta in 1867. He later came back to Florida and settled near the remains of his former plantation, Damietta. The town of Ormond, named for him, was incorporated in 1880. Source: "James Ormond, Merchant and Soldier," by Alice Strickland, The Florida Historical Quarterly, (41):209-222
Preferred Citation:
Identification of item, Ormond Family Papers, Special and Area Studies Collections, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
Donation:
Gift of Ms. Bettie Massengale Edwards, 1979.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - http://uf.catalog.fcla.edu/uf.jsp?st=UF001925427&ix=pm&I=0&V=D&pm=1
System ID:
IR00003201:00045

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Ormond, James III, Miscellaneous
Series Title:
Ormond Family Papers (1784-1909)
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
English
Creator:
Ormond family
Donor:
Bettie Massengale Edwards
Publication Date:
Physical Location:
Box: 4
Divider: Ormond, James III
Folder: Ormond, James III, Miscellaneous

Subjects

Genre:
Spatial Coverage:

Notes

Scope and Content:
Correspondence, business account notebooks, official marriage, deed, estate records, and a manuscript memoir. Collection includes family correspondence ranging from James I in 1884 to James III in 1882, the bulk (3 boxes) of which chronicles the business and personal affairs of James III. Major subjects covered include the Second Seminole War in Florida, the Civil War, the Andersonville Prison in Georgia, and business operations characteristic of the nineteenth century. Other topics include yellow fever outbreaks in Florida, frontier life in north Florida, Spanish land grant claims, and family history. Researchers may find the ongoing, regular correspondence between James III and McNaught useful for topics relating to business practices of the period. Of particular note is the handwritten autobiography of James III, dictated in the year before his death. The collection is arranged chronologically.
Abstract:
The collection includes correspondence, business letters, account books, and a memoir manuscript created by members of the Ormond family of Florida.
Biographical:
Captain James Ormond I (175?-1819), born in Scotland, commanded the brig Somerset. He owned a plantation on Exuma in the Bahamas, but then took advantage of Spanish land grants in Florida. He settled near New Smyrna, Florida, where he was later killed by a neighbor's slave. James Ormond II (179?-1829), also born in Scotland, came to Florida with his wife, Isabella (neé Christie), and their four children after a failed business venture. They lived on the Damietta plantation, near St. Augustine, Florida. James Ormond III (1815-1892) was born in Mayfield, Scotland. During the Second Seminole War, he volunteered in the Mosquito Roarers militia as a sergeant. Ormond married Elizabeth Chaires in 1844, with whom he had nine children. His business ventures included the Atlanta Paper Mill, one of the first paper mill operations in the South and other enterprises with his partner William McNaught. During the Civil War, Ormond worked as an adjutant at Andersonville Prison. He moved his family to Canada and England after the war, returning to Atlanta in 1867. He later came back to Florida and settled near the remains of his former plantation, Damietta. The town of Ormond, named for him, was incorporated in 1880. Source: "James Ormond, Merchant and Soldier," by Alice Strickland, The Florida Historical Quarterly, (41):209-222
Preferred Citation:
Identification of item, Ormond Family Papers, Special and Area Studies Collections, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
Donation:
Gift of Ms. Bettie Massengale Edwards, 1979.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - http://uf.catalog.fcla.edu/uf.jsp?st=UF001925427&ix=pm&I=0&V=D&pm=1
System ID:
IR00003201:00045

Full Text
Ormond, James III
Misc.


Stamps
Certificate of death
Map:Atlanta,Ga.
Atlanta Paper Mill cards
MapeJaok-cn-ilieITe palay;LUI Syulu
Plat:Ormond Grove, Atlanta
Southern Express Co. receipt for trunk


Gould,Cora Smith
Birth and christening of Ormond

Undated correspfodence











I.--


9


402 lRarny Street Corner Pine
or to any of the agents of the Company.
*,, *i"Jt


be made with passengers or shippers. A limited amount
of general freight will be taken direct for Dawson or
aty Yukon River points.
It will be useless to attempt to secure passage upon
any reliable line, if you delay booking, as the wild rush
of travel to the greatest gold country in the world' will
be so great next season that not one person in twenty
will be able to secure passage by the comfortable river
route. For this reason secure your passage and freight
transportation without delay.
However much we may dislike to outfit a passenger,
yet, upon special request, we will purchase for him a
year's supplies upon receipt of the amount which he
proposes to spend. Arrangements have been made
with the leading firms of this city for the purchase of
goods at wholesale.prices. Our Mr. F. de Journel
brings to this corporation the result of his thirteen
years experience in the Canadian Northwest, and will
give his special attention to the purchase of the proper
c'ass of goods and their safe packing. This gentleman
will accompany the expedition, and being a Canadian at-
torney, will give our patrons all tbe'information regard-
iug the mining and real estate laws of his country as
w. ll as the benefit of his personal practical experience.
This Company has also secured the services of Capt.
NN m. C. MacLyon, who will be in command of the des-
p itch river steamer "Clara." Capt. MacLyon, like
Messrs. McQueston, Harper and others, has been for
11t years one of the features of the Yukon. The"
gt nial and popular "Captain Mac" has spent 21 years
of his life in Alaska, 19 of which were in the employ of
tbh Yukon Transportation Companies as pilot of their
bo us. We call the attention of our patrons to the
fat t that under the guidance of men of such wide ex-
pe ience in the northern regions, they will avoid having
to purchase their own experience.
It is surmised that no sensible per however ad-
venturous, will deliberately put his li e .d property in
jeopardy by undertaking to reach tL 'old fields via
Dyea and the passes when he can reach his objective
point by the all water route via St. Michael with all the
accommodations ap4 comfort that civilization can pro-
cure, and with a lesser outlay of money.
Call or write; information cheerfully given; through
passages from all points in United States and Europe.
For passages and freight, apply at the office of the

CALYOUI& and NORTEWWST TRADING
AIND rMrn COMPAIT


THEODORE SoB&BF R
P. HAUSSLEB -
H. LAc -
Da. C. W. RiOBAUDe
S. Davis
GEO. J. KNox -


San
San
San
San


San Francisco-J. F. FuoAz[ & Co., 5
New York-EDWIN HAWLEY, ESQ.,
Traffic Manager Southern Paci.
Broadway.
A. FoRGEr, ESQ., Agent Cie Generale
3 Bowling Green.
Chicago-J. F. F .AzzI & Co., Chicagi
Depot.
New Orleans-S. F. B. Monsr, Genera
Atlantic System Southern Paoif
London-BuDOLPr. FALOx, 49 Leadenh
Liverpool-RUDOLPw FALO., 25 Watei
Paris-Cie Generale Transatlantique,
H. ZusBs, 3 Rue de Strasbourg.

CATr. WM. 0. MAoLYow, Superintend
FERNAND DE JOURNaL, General Manag
0. W. Nerln & 0(,., Printen, bDA Loam
IT


-------------------------


o alifornia and Norm

Trading and f


INCORPORATEDD )
CAPITAL, 5100,000.

OFFICERS AND DIRECT
President ALFRED RONCOVIE
Vice-President Da. 0. Gao
Secretary D. M. RaMus
Treasurer CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPros


00

roRS
aI, San Francisco
ss, San Francisco
LY, San Francisco
IT AND TansT Co.
San Jose
San Jose
Francisco
Francisco
Francisco
Francisco


Montgomery Ave.
Assistant General
fie R. R. Co., 349

Transatlantique,

i & Rook Island i

I Passenger Agaet
fiec R. R. Co.
all St., E. .
r St.
6 Rue Auber. -


ent of Navigation
or, San Francisco
mierual.Br.
-----ar


Built expressly for service on the Yukon R


Cor. Pi


PRINCIPAL OFFICE,
402 KEARNY STREET,
tie, SAN FRANCISCO.


TELEPHONE MA.I 5599
Correspondence Solicited.


river.




), CAL.
* * ,


- 3 ,w


in


caliornia and Nouhwest



Trading and 0 ining Go.
tINCORPOn ATED)
SAILING from San Francisco, Cal., on or about
MAY 25th, 1S98, for

SDAV SON%+

AND YUKON RIVER POINTS VIA

ST. M I IIA.EL'-

The NEW, A I, Ocean Steamer
"SA.M OA"


To connect with the NEW Dispatch River Steamer
.0-__'iA 7
~d~f~ --








Transportation and Freight

Depa rtment.


i


The California and Northwest Trading and Mining
Co. will despatch from the port of San Francisco for
St. Michael on or about the 25th day of May, 1898. the
NEW high speed, 800 ton steamer

"SA_1VOA_" Classed Al
Fitted with superior passenger accom modations (electric
lighting throughout), making the run from San Francisco
to St. Michael in from 12 to 14 days, and making close
connection with the Company's NEW stern wheel river
steamer
CTOLAA."
This staunch and elegant boat, has been specially de-
signed for Yukon River navigation to draw barely 16
inchesand will consequently be able to navigate the Yukon
River in high or low water. Her engines are compound
and the most powerful for her size of any vessel now
plying on the Yukon, thereby insuring the speediest trips
We call the attention of the travelling public to the
imperative necessity of choosing a reliable transpor-
tation concern, which, like this Company, has NEW
ocean and river steamers specially built for this service.
We call attention to the following excerpt from the
San Franci Examiner" of a recent date.
"No manle values his life should trust himself in
any but sound and well built vessels. " When the
spring navigation opens, we are going to see the rush of
last summer multiplied many fold. Every tub that can
float and hold men will be put into service. *
Steamers that were worn out in the transatlantic service,
and have been rusting and rotting at their docks for
years, are being brought out. " The rush for the
Northern gold fields should not be saddened by the un-
necessary tragedies of the drowning of a few shiploads
of men."
- The "Samoa" will be launched in January, and make a
trial trip on the bay in February.


4.- ---- --------

The Proper Time of Departure.
The most reliable records for over 25 years show that
the mouth of the Yukon River is not clear of ice, nor
are any of the streams in shape to be profitably pros-
pected before the latter. part of June. It is therefore
useless to start from San Francisco before the twenty-
fifth of May. This Company's steamers being entirely
new and fitted with the most improved machinery insures
your arrival among the first at the gold fields in ample
time for the season's work, havingavoided the hardships
of the perilous overland route.
In order to achieve success in his undertaking,
the experienced northern traveler well knows that there
are three main objects for him to attain, which, in
a great measure, will win the battle for him:
1st. He must insure his arrival at destination with the
smallest possible outlay of money.
2d. He must make sure of getting there with his
supplies in good order.
3d. He must do so with the least possible hardship
and risk of life and property.
The All-Water Route is the Safest, Cheapest and
Most Comfortable.
It is a well known fact that the cheapest and most
comfortable route to the gold fields is by way of St.
Michael and the Yukon River. Professor Qeorge Da-
vidson, the eminent authority on Alaska, says in the
Ovtrlanid Monthly AMugazine for November, after describ-
ing the dangerous journey via the mountain passes:
'-Away from this region of arduous travel and con-
siderable risk is the route by sea from San Francisco
via St. Michael. This is the safest, the cheapest and the
meost comfortable means of reaching the heart of Alas-
ka." Speaking of the many new routes proposed, he
says "these schemes are of the wildest and3most im-
practicable character." So much for comfort and
safety, and now as to cheapness. The following figures
are submitted to all careful men who intend to journey
to the new El Dorado:
Rates from San Francisco to Dawson and Yukon
River Points by the ALL WATER ROUTE
via St. Michaels.
Personal passage from San Francisco to Dawson
including first-class berth and meals and
150 lbs. of baggage free. .................. 300.00
Freight on 2,000 lbs. of supplies at 10 ots. per
lb................................ .... 200.00

Total................. $50000


Lx


L


T Via Dyea and the Mountain Passes.
Personal passage, San Francisco to Dyea with
150 Ibs. baggage ...... ... .............. $ 50.00
Freight on 2,000 Ibs. of supplies to Dye a...... 16.00
Lighterage fees on 2,150 ]bs. from steamer to
shore @ 2 cts. per lb ...................... 43.00
Packing of 2,150 Ibs. by Indians or otherwise
over the pass at 25 cts per lb. (low) ....... 537.50
i Last season puckers charged as high as 50 ets. per lb.)
Cost of small row boat and necessary outfit for
river voyage at Lake Lindeman. .......... 100.00
One month's board on the way to Dawson, in-
cluding stoppage at Dyes and back tripping. 50.00

Total ...............$796.50
As will be seen by the above figures, there is a differ-
ence of $296.50 in favor of the all-water route, br-
sides other advantages which we will point out for the
benefit of our readers.
THE CONDITION OF AFFAIRS AT DYEA is but-
ter described in the following extract from the lust
official report of the Hon. John G. Brady, Governor of
Alaska, to the Secretary of the Interior:
"Shipload after shipload of gold seekers and their
freight has been rushed to the extreme limit of salt
water navigation (Lynn Canal), and there they have
been dumped upon the beach, some above high water
and ,,any belo w as they learned to their sorrow when
the water covered them while they slept. The gold
se-keis have bad a terrible time. The tide rises and
full 2.3 feet at Dyes. Freight is dumped at a distance
of over one mile fiom shore."
If, however, you have already set your mind on
traveling via Dyea and the mountain passes, go ii light
marching order, and send your freight by the all water
route. This C 1pany especially solicits the freight
I of all persons mplating to enter the Yukon valley via
Dyva and the m4antain passes, and will warehouse the
i same in Dawson City at reasonable rates. You ran thus
ship a surplus of supplies which will arrive in Dawson
when most needed, and sell for many times the entire
cost of the trip. This Company wishing to insure a
pleasant and comfortable trip will spare neither pains
nor expense to make their expeditions the most select
and exclusive, and will positively limit the passenger
I list, thereby insuring courteous treatment. The cuisine
will be unexcelled; French chef in attendance. This
Company will not impose upon its passengi rs any
ready-mnde stock of old goods with the price of a
passage, but will sell straight passages for $300.00,
- including berths and .meals and 150 lbs. of personal
baggage free. Excess baggage or freight will be charged
10 cis. per pound. Special contracts for the same will






Dag 0 _



0410

-40

p4co

P41 .
gas j.1
<^IS








O34ertificat f bD th.

(To be exchanged when properly filled out, at Board of Health
Ofice, Olt.y Hall, for burial permit.) All tblanks to be jlkd
-77,



Age. .. .years. months.... .. .ays
Sex.' .Color...



NJfarried, y 0 ''.^ .
Residence: A / .
Cause of death ... .L.-


1 hereby certify that the above
described person died, a fcerein started, on the
.... /.. .. .day of. .D... .
'la^^^.. i.^^^...m. D.





Physicians are requested, in certifying the cause of death,
to avoid the use of such terms as "congestion," "natural
causes," "teething," "bowel trouble," "liver disease," "lung
disease," "kidney disease," etc., and when possible, of all
merely symptomatic features, as "dropsy," "debility,"
albumi The following general terms, to insure
unifo y -it as far as they may apply, to be
qua ed by sl[titi4 hen practicable :
Abo *on-mii ci ge, o/4 ia,
Aooin t, i cephalus,
Absce 'o. i < -; -(?o ii,
Alcobo i' *, 1091a?
Anmmia. . 4/ Inani n,
Anasaroa, e Infle a,
Aneurism, r. c Lary itis,
Apoplexy, Imution.
Asphyxia, ania,
Asthenia, Measles,
Asthma, Meningitis,
Bright's Disease, MetriLis,
Bronahitisl Myaelitis,
Cancer, 'Nephritis,
Carbunole, Neuralgia,
Collulitis, Obstruction bowels,
Cerebral congestion, Paralysis,
Cerebritie, Pericarditis, -
Childbirth, Petitonitis,
Cholera infantum, Pleuritis,
Consumption, Pneumonia,
Convulsions, Poisoning,
Group, Premature,
Diabetes, Pymmia,
Diarrhea, Rheumatism,
Diphtheria, Septicemia,
Dysentery, Scrofula, "
Enteritia, Small-pox,
Epilepsy, Still-born,
Erysipelas, Syphilis,
Fever-malarial, Tetanus,
Fever-puerperal, Tonsilitis,
Fever-scarlet, Tumor-variety,
Fever-typhoid, Unknown,
Heart, disease of Ureemia,
Hemorrhage. Violence-kind,
Hepatitis, Whooping cough,
(OVER) Etc etc eto.
Franklin Publishing House, Atlanta.




















6

~ ~< A~< ~


a~-~~- ~2~
~ ee~





3~ZZ7A~2X~
~ ~


~ ~ 4~1









6~Zi~L. 6 62,










~j ~17 ~J







7~z ~ ~ ~

~ >~ A<~


/
A



~ ~y1~U~










~



















I 4,, ,- -

9- ...



9-.



7.

-9






--7- .4
.9 ~ -

___ __ ~ e~ c--- ~ -~ -~ ~, -
4'- -4~

9-;





.- ... .4-

4-- -~ 4- --.9 4-*4 *..,.. -4-







-9-- -
4-.--
-4-
4- -~ --.4- **~4,--. - - 4- '-4-- -
-9
/

-4- 4 .9. -4- -4





-
.4- .4 4,


9-
- -. a-- -~ ~ -~ -




__ __ -, -e~.-i~4L.-.- ~- -Z~--- ~:-~-~--~-------




-~

L- 4< 9
~ -9-
.-4-994~ 4--~ -7
-4--

-~ -



-.4-- .-
~ ..
-4 -~---- -4 9.- 4-. 9-




.9-. -----4
ei--~.~-- 9 ~ 4
-~ -4~4. -- 4~-7- --
-4-. -.9-










4' iz-'* -





~



-4
4-
a- ~






-4-







-' -
4- -4-







4-


.4- p




.4-.- 4. 4--





.- *<.- -.-....-. - 4--.----


-4-


-~- .- __










-.4--

4-
4.













-- 4-




-- ...-


-- -4.-. -



4-

A'.
-5* . '4






4<4'~ -










-~---------..
~. ~


- I-
-

-







.- -~



*.:





--~. ---




--- -~-- ~-








r -.




*-





c*.



__ .- -. -

.-- F

-




--~ -.



-- -S:
















-I---- -








A--





----, 6





.- , .










-. *. -~~--.












.~- -.










-~ -- -------- -. -


-

-
-



f -












- -- -~-- ~ -


.. -





-





.* .- -







--V. *- V
7 V.'
__ -~-'--.-- .-~--------.-~.



~--1~~- -









-
-V.
- er- *-- .~2-.. ___





V.- V.-





'--7 .5-
-7- -7.




-~--7- -

.7
7- -7 4" -

I ,,* .- -~ -~--2--~ -






-7-
-7, -
.7-


-

-7 --7-












* ~ - --- 7---
--7



-z ~ ~ - ~-- -~Z--- -


7- _______

/







~-~iz -7------ -

-7-- ---,

--:.~ --'

7- >~~~'~


- -.~-- e~2~~-- -




-~-~---~


-7-
7--


-
-7--- 7- ---7 -7- -




.-.-:~.7~- 6:$~7-~ /. 6
----7----
-7
.7- 72'~~~




p -7
f ~ ..~,7- -,-~-- --,_.- 7~,~~-777'777I~ -7----'~ -




--- ~ C

~


~













'-I.-


7


e2 7 -
~
I' -






j 2
~~%73~j, ~___ ~


-

--


'~-~---~- ~-~---~--- I-. -
-~- I-



.--- -



-- -
-~- ~ -








I /

~










..
'' "



-. ). <_. .




.-s-* -7' .// - ~ : --'- -









y 1-- ;' ; ,d 4L 7 (








;- ..







1/ ~ t a~-~- ~4 -4'-~r 6~Z'? ~

4 ;-1 ~i- z2- ~
/
7~ ~+44 >p~( ~
-I
~:%V- -,~/


/
62 ~ -4 z~

2,;j~~5/?r




>7 -2

~/ /~- ~ ?
7


~

AY~ ':,- 4K7~ 6z~4~&
7...

A' >2


62 ~







7 u-... -.





/~j~ a~e-~Y /
? 1-
1~

















(".. .. ='-^&^ ^<- .f .^-. -- % -f-- 2^-
-d- ,--
i'/ /1 -






,/ -z- -
/ t^ -f f A'





1 y^
* L'-C- f- : ~-- '' L^^ .i ^- ^y'- '^z$/Ae ^ *^^^ ^

"4 9^ -/' // r '2
fi *^'' t^^^-
y1 ^ A /


Sl-. /y^^> Z^ ^-^ < -'-^--

^ .J-^ '




. ~ .,, -< -- ..<,, '* .,

7 / "Z _..- ,- _



,A... -.
5'* 9-^ 'r y '
^*.^. ., A .'": <
i / .- .,.- .- ,,,_.

^ -" "/ "j;,--" ^.-- ^-^ ^>"



( -// 7- -
:i. -' -" -" -" ~

^^ ^ g' 2 S- / --' - /.-


.i^b / .-/ ,.. ?,--, --- .. -'.. s< .-, '-
.- l ,/"; /



-.. .1. _- ., ,.2 .. ,
i. -^. ..^ /_ / ._.,. i-
--.--7+ ..: _- .. ._f-' ,,- - <- i t- -'7 -
.- .y^ '-' '-<- --"^ ... ^ -L- _.,7. -*. -; ^" -^ 't. *^-
,,,'/. y .. .7-' ,

" ", '' ^ ^ ^


/h^^^ ^^^ -=== .. '
... ., .





r
11.

V ~A~t~; q


/ ~9
I












3 -


I -. j









N a













f 9-






.,
=,. .-t a-- *^ ( t -^ ii / T i^z_- --- -a '- ^




^.*.i f^ ^- 4/ ^.^ ^_, 4-^-._
.., .' -- / ,. ..^





"=i. .;".." .- ./ L-'"I ./-i v t^t ^^ -- -^ C J -i 0_, "-^-o

,,, ..d~ :. .: ,
.,; {... :.. ...-- -zi .v c~ ., ^ ,; :..: -,^i e ^t a-e / -~
*" /)
* ^ ^ - A ^ - o f / E ^ "

-'. eL^ .* .-
|a^,.^'z.^^,:c.^~~/ ^e












I ^T~a-e-- fAWt .












------.--- .












- - , .
S L LP^ ^ 2y




--z -y -. < 0 rzi ^ y^ t- - C/ li-~ -
AL X x / .- ./], .,












ra.
,9,

















" - - L



S' _'- ^I2 -- -/ .

^, Z. __

iitz o- /^ 'nt






J -/-/I I1






























.1*.
' .., ^ ^ ^ ^
"> 7f f

7 "'i~ '^


'S -Z '*:*. K











_^ Z^ ^^1
^^^ -^C A^ ^-

*' fe \
^^f ^^1-^^^^- -

-^ ^-'( ^

*.^-^^ -t~^- ^*-C^i^^S!>C -^-?^^-/

^'s ^^ ^.
^^^i.^^ t-e-c. />'^-^o~i^ -i'-e A -<:

*~ ~ -t % t 4? "'1 ^, ^ ' .-








^t Aoi^ -<^ ---^ ..* -4^




^^!_-f~^< __^^ ^^^< ,

/{ ^^ ^^ y
^^t-i''Z^^c^^- ^^^C4^-t e~l- e .

^'-^^ ^ "-L-^ ^ -
















S ~ . ^
-^ -'.a^ ^C -
'^s^^ if~Z^ 4^^~a-<<- .ase..y ^s~^te*^^
*k .% ,A'* $





_^ '^ A ^^- 2^e p^










- *
















x -4 J-c -
^^a^^'^t^^ -^-^S' E^zt g4'l




LZ~L


72~' ~g4A;~


C


d~~6


n1X0,
y e^fy







<^< -^% ^-e --


^ ^^ ^^ f^M;















/


*


4i~.


Y- ^








U- ~
I!
i r ..


-

p.
'I
'.4


4-..


, .


.q.f~.

L













7~6~









A






v r ^-^ ^ - -- ^y>c--c----'y ^'-'- ^-- '-^t^^f^y ,-- /%-