<%BANNER%>
UFIR
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00003189/00001
 Material Information
Title: Smathers Libraries FY 2012-2013 Program Review
Physical Description: Report
Creator: Russell, Judith
Botero, Cecilia
Bruxvoort, Diane
Keith, Brian
Publisher: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Florida
 Notes
Abstract: This is the annual program review for the Smathers Libraries, addressing questions posed by the Provost. It summarizes our accomplishments, and identifies our major goals, as well as opportunities and threats.
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Judith Russell.
Publication Status: Published
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00003189:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:

Smathers Libraries 2012-2013 Program Review ( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

The Foundation for The Gator Nation An Equal Opportunity Institution George A. Smathers Libraries 535 Library West Office of the Dean of University Libraries PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7 000 352 273 2505 352 392 7251 Fax www.uflib.ufl.edu Smathers Libraries FY 2012 2013 Program Review June 2013 1. Identify i mportant advances/achievements made by your unit in FY 20 12 20 13 A. In October 2012, the George A. Smathers Libraries were awarded a 3 year National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to preserve, digitize and offer access to over 20,000 museum items received from the transfer of the Panama Canal Museum, in its entirety, to the University of Florida. The grant was the fourth largest in the Nation. The first year of the grant has resulted in an online inventory of items, plan ning for the 2014 Panama Canal Centennial Celebration at UF, partnerships with the Harn, FLMNH, Phillips, and international collaborators in Panama and The Netherlands. A Faculty Enhancement Opportunity was submitted and approved towards support of the Cen tennial, exhibits, and the Center for Latin American Studies 62 nd Conference on Panama and the Canal (March 2014). B. As data/digital curation takes center stage across the country, Smathers Libraries has been working to ensure full support for all digital/da ta curation needs for all fields and areas The Data Management Committee was initiated by the Libraries, but includes representatives from Research Computing and the Department of Sponsored Research. The committee is charged with assess ing needs, making recommendations, and develop ing support for the role of the Libraries in campus wide data management and curation. C. The Libraries are w orking within SURA and ASERL to develop local collaborative data management models that can be used or adapted at any res earch university and are capable of feeding into a national data infrastructure. D. The renovation of the first floor of HSCL aimed at creating a more suitable space for the contemporary needs nated for collaborative study, is a venue for interaction with others and for unique spontaneous teaching moments that are so crucial to the learning experience. The redesign of the space emphasized increased access to technology and power, improved natur al lighting, and informal casual seating, resulting in a more inviting and comfortable atmosphere. E. During the spring semester, we began to implement an 18 month plan to repurpose space in the Smathers Library (Library East) to provide the best use of buil ding for students, staff, and faculty. F. During FY 2012 2013, we c ontinued planning for a statewide shared collection of library materials, now identified as the FL orida A cademic RE pository (FLARE ), and the high density storage facility to house the collec tion and make it accessible to the participating libraries, including: i. Completed r apid development of the plans for the High Density Facility so the project will be shovel ready and capable of rapid implementation if PECO funds can be obtained ; ii. Leas ed an interim storage facility to address immediate space pressure at UF and other SUS Libraries and preparing for occupancy; iii. Negotiat ed an agreement with the University of Miami to establish a shared collection in Gainesville for long term preservation and r etention of low use or duplicate library materials and received the first shipment of 138,000 volumes from UM ; and iv. Continued the Develop ment of software to identify titles and holdings in the Florida and ASERL shared journal collections and facilitate th e identification and replacement of missing volumes.

PAGE 2

Page 2 G. The Libraries increased digital access to important, and often unique, content from the UF Libraries and partner institutions. The Digital Library Center (DLC) added over 843,000 pages to UF Digital Col lections, increasing the total collection to over 8.5 million pages. Usage views for the fiscal year exceeded 53 million. Hosting digital copies of this content improves access for UF faculty and students and for scholars worldwide. Examples of new collect ions include: i. Panama and the Canal: Panama and the Canal is a joint project of George A. Smathers Libraries and the Panama Canal Museum. This digitized collection is part of the larger project Panama Canal: Preserving a Legacy funded by a $500,000 mul ti year grant from Institute of Museum and Library Science (IMLS). The collection contains 4,711 items totaling 158,822 pages with more in process. In FY 20 12 20 13, the collection was viewed over 1.28 million times. ii. Unearthing St. Augustine: Jointly fun ded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and George A. Smathers Libraries, the project is digitally preserving a collection of hidden and fragile resources dating from the 16th century onward related to colonial St. Augustine. The digital col lection will consist of 10,000 maps, drawings, photographs and documents available freely online. Partners in this project include the City of St. Augustine departments of Heritage Tourism and the Archaeology Program, the St. Augustine Historical Society, and Government House. The collection contains 468 items totaling 3,667 pages with more in process. Launched in October 2012, the collection had over 42,000 views in the first 6 month s iii. The Vodou Archive: Curating and Sharing the Sources of Vodou Religion and Cultur e University of Florida and Duke University researchers and librarians have spearheaded a collaborative partnership project with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). The collection is presented and catalogued in English Spanish and French. The collection contains 357 items totaling 5,570 pages with an equal number of pages in process. In FY 20 12 20 13 the collection was viewed over 112,000 times. iv. Pioneer Days in Florida: Diaries and Letters from Settling the Sunshine S tate, 1800 1900 Collection The Pioneer Days in Florida project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) will digitize 36,530 pages of diaries and le tters describing frontier life in Florida from the end of the colonial period to the beginnings of the modern state. With the project officially launching in April 2013, there are already 31 items totaling 4,874 pages in the collection, which have been vie wed over 4,000 times in FY 20 12 20 13, a promising start for a new collection. H. The Libraries e xpanded use of t he Sobek software to other institutions Sobek is the current platform for the digital repository for the Wolfsonian Museum, as well as several di gital repositorie s at the University of Florida. Additionally, we are in discussion with the Frost Museum of FIU and the Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education at the University of Southern California. I. Supported campus open access init iatives, including: i. Administered the UF Open Access Publishing Fund to support faculty and student publication of open access scholarly journal articles and successfully completed the two year pilot project ; ii. Participated with the University Librar ies Committee in the drafting of a campus wide Open Access Policy in response to a request from the Faculty Senate; the draft will be presented to the Faculty Senate at the September meeting, initiating a discussion and debate prior to action; iii. Coordinated with the University Libraries Committee to obtain Faculty Senate endorsement (April 2012) of the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities, which resulted in a letter from the UF President requesting that the University of Florida become a signatory (July 2012); iv. Facilitated hosting of 171 open access journals and newsletters edited by UF faculty or sponsored by UF departments using the Open Journal Systems (OJS) platform at FCLA; and v. Digitized and facilitated conversio n to open access of current publication of Chemical Engineering Education a publication of the Chemical Engineering Division of the American Society for Engineering Education and the premier archival journal for chemical engineering educators with a one y ear rolling embargo.

PAGE 3

Page 3 2. and describe your plans to foster their success. A. FL orida A cademic Re pository (Section 1. C ): FLARE is already recognized as a model for statewide and regional collaboration for retention of low use print materials. I will continue active participation in a national planning group that is sharing information about models for collaboration and tools for implementation. Leasing t he interim storage buildings allows us to begin implementing FLARE before the HDF is built. The MOU with Miami will continue to attract attention statewide and encourage other participants. The software developed by the Libraries to support the statewide p rogram and the regional program managed by ASERL will be implemented this year. It is also being evaluated as a tool for print storage projects of the Center for Research Libraries, the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), and the Greater Western Library Alliance (GWLA) B. Retrospective Digitization of UF Theses and Dissertations : Many universities now accept electronic theses and dissertations and archive them in institutional repositories. The UF program is unique; we are implementing a plan for systematic digitization of the retrospective theses and dissertations for preservation received affirmative permission from the author. While the ra te of agreement was extremely high among those who responded to a request for permission, it required multiple contacts and the rate of non response was high. Additionally, there were many graduates for whom we did not have current contact information, so we could not include their thesis or dissertation in the program. We have developed a new policy, reviewed and approved by the university counsel, which uses an opt out, rather than opt in, approach. Where contact information cannot be obtained with reason able effort, we are proceeding to digitize these materials as copy) should the author or authorized representative contact us. This will allow the p rogram to be far more comprehensive and proceed more rapidly and cost Libraries. C. Virtual B usiness Library : The Economist recently ranked UF as having the top Online MBA Program. A vital component of the program's success is MBA students' access to the Virtual Business Library's subscriptions to online journals, electronic books and business dat abases. The Libraries intend to build our electronic business resources to be among the best in the world and continue to develop the platform for delivery and use of those resources, as well as training and related services. A strong partnership with the Business School helps fund many of the most important and expensive electronic resources. We plan to build up on this partnership and seek a substantial endowment for the online business library to achieve parity with the resources available at the best pub lic business schools. The Business Librarian is a liaison to the Innovation Hub and other incubator enterprises sponsored by UF. D. ASERL Guidelines for Managing FDLP Collections in the Southeast Region (Section 1. H ): This project is already transforming the way depository libraries in the SE collaborate to manage their print government documents and is poised to have a major role in the effort to create a comprehensive public domain digital collection of federal documents. The strategies and polices in the AS ERL Implementation Plan are being evaluated by other states, regions and multi state organizations and are widely recognized as an innovative approach to improve depository service while reducing the burdens of serving as a depository library. The software tools that have been developed by the UF Libraries are already in widespread use in the SE and others are interested in utilizing them as well. The Gap Analysis software will facilitate matching print collections with digital copies to improve access to t itles that are already digitized and facilitate identification of the ones that remain to be done. A joint initiative of the GWLA CIC, ASERL, and the California Digital Library is planning to use the UF software to improve management of print collections and initiate a program for comprehensive digitization. Our activities will result in one of the few fully cataloged regional Federal Depository Library documents collection s in the country and provide significant support to users throughout Florida and oth er parts of the southeast.

PAGE 4

Page 4 3. Indicate advances in achieving diversity among faculty, staff, and students within your unit. A. The Libraries ensure all Search Committees and hiring authorities are aware of, and conform to, the applicable UF policies and proc edures with regards to inclusivity and seeking a broad and diverse pool of applicants. For each search, staff are specifically encouraged to nominate and circulate position vacancies to maximize exposure and diversity. The Libraries publicize vacant libra rian positions in over one hundred locations including the following specifically focused on diversity: The Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual Librarians Network; Latinos in Higher Ed; ALA/LAMA Diversity Officers Discussion Group; ACRL African American Librarians List; and Joint Conference of Librarians of Color List. As a result of these efforts, 18% of the faculty and non OPS staff hired by the Libraries between July 1, 2011, and May 30, 2012, are from underrepresented groups. 72 % are women. The composition of the fa culty at the George A. Smathers Libraries is 69% women (compared to 64% in 2011) and 14% from underrepresented ethnic groups (compared to 12.5% in 2011). B. In 2012, the Libraries established the Services for Students with Disabilities Task Force. This group is charged with assisting in the evaluation of current library policies and procedures relating to services for students with disabilities, and to develop prioritized plans relating to programs and services for students with disabilities. The recommendat ions will be delivered in FY 2013 2014. C. George A. Smathers Libraries Committee on Diversity is a newly created standing committee. It is charged es focus on developing concrete steps for staff to increase their understanding of diversity issues and facilitating opportunities for broadening awareness of diversity as an essential way of creating a fair and open minded work environment. The external d iversity initiatives seek to inform library user oriented practices, assessment endeavors, collection development, provision of services and of course, customer service. D. With support from a F aculty E nhancement O pportunity library faculty have established the ongoing Academic Library Recruitment Efficacy and Outcome Study. This is a national longitudinal study to investigate the efficacy of employee recruitment techniques used by academic libraries. This study focuses on the advertising of vacancies, the so licitation of applications, and the recruitment outcomes resulting from these activities. It affords an opportunity to evaluate the use of specific advertising venues and practices intended to increase applications from traditionally underrepresented group s. 27 institutions are participating in the study. Beyond these advances, the Libraries are in a key and unique position to enhance the awareness and acceptance of diversity of the campus through targeted sponsored research and services, and by organizin g, hosting and participating in relevant exhibits, events and projects. Several examples are provided below. E. May 1, 2013. Nina Stoyan spring semester as part of the Honors Program offering IDH3931. Additional programing associated with the exhibit included: i. Molecular anthropologist Dr. Koji Lum (University of Binghamton) presente d on health transition related to modernization in indigenous Pacific populations ii. Winston Nagan (UF College of Law) presented on land rights of indigenous peoples F. E xhibits, events and projects that enhance the diversity of the campus include: i. Authors@UF: B enjamin Hebblethwaite Creole texts can impact both the language and people of Haiti. ii. Author s@UF: Paul Ortiz statewide civil rights movement against Jim Crow. iii. Arabic Fi lm Month: Two nights of Arabic films co sponsored with the Arabic Cultural Association at UF Latin American Film Festival: Two days of film on the Casualties of Neoliberalism in the Spanish speaking World iv. ollywood Chinese: The Chinese in American Feature

PAGE 5

Page 5 v. Public reading of Martin Luther King, Jr. Letter from Birmingham Jail. The George A. Smathers Libraries joined the 50th anniversary celebration of the day that Martin Luther King, Jr. began writin g his Letter from Birmingham Jail. A reading of the Letter took place in front of Library West with volunteers each reading portions of the letter. Co sponsored by the UF African American Studies Program and the Institute for Black Culture. vi. Exhibit: Testi mony. Inspired by recent donations to the Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica, Testimony showcases primary sources that bear witness to Holocaust. Testimony documents the impact of the Holocaust on the victims and survivors, and it gives voice to the af tershock felt by subsequent generations. vii. Exhibit: Values in Action: 75 Years of the Visionaires. Celebrating the lives of eight young female activists who founded Gainesville's first formal organization for African American women, and how they and their s uccessors have enriched the civic, social and educational lives of African Americans over the past seventy five years. viii. Online exhibit: The Gathering Storm Jewish Life in Germany and Eastern Europe in the 1930s. Features items produced by or pertaining to European Jewry before WWII, including rare German and Yiddish newspapers, as well as ephemeral publications such as calendars, yearbooks and other communally inspired commemorative works. ix. Online exhibit: About Face independence exhibition to tour Europe. 4. Indicate notable successes in interdisciplinary [ and interdepartmental or interorganizational ] collaboration in the past year. A. Kuali Open Library Environment (OLE) : The Smathers Libraries are the lead partner for 8 academic libraries in Florida and FCLA for the development of the OLE, a new open source library management system. The Florida Partners are a part of a broader consortium of academic research libraries, including Indiana University, Duke University, North Carolina State University, University of Pennsylvania, University of Chicago, University of Maryland, Lehigh University, and the University of Michiga n. With match funding from the Mellon Foundation, OLE has finished the first two years of development and plans a third year to complete its first release, provide support for implementation for early adopters and transform the project from its early, exp erimental stage into a sustainable system. Outcomes from OLE include providing an open source, community based alternative to current commercially produced library m anagement s ystems. B. College of Curriculum Redesign Planning Retreat : Librarians from the HSCL have become classes of 2015, 2016 and 2017. C. Team Based Learning Workshops : The HSCL hosted two Team Based Learning Workshops sponsored by the College of Medicine Society of Teaching Scholars and the College of Pharmacy. The workshops focused on the development of Team Based learning, a co mprehensive small group based instructional process that is now being used in over 100 academic disciplines and on over 200 campuses in the US and in eight foreign countries. D. The Florida Newspaper Collection: Broadening Access and Users : In partnership wi th the Jewish Museum local and ethnic Florida newspapers. Funding by Florida Department of State Division of Library & Information Services Library Services & Technology Act Grants. E. Collaborating with Strangers Workshop Series (Phase II) : The project team present collaboration development workshops f or UF undergraduate, graduate, Post Docs, and faculty with interdisciplinary themes including: NSF/NIH grant applications, Sustainability, and Digital Projects in Sciences and Humanities. This fosters interdisciplinary networking skills while participants are increasing their knowledge of available resources/assets on campus and beyond. Funding by Creative Campus Committee Catalyst Fund.

PAGE 6

Page 6 F. Digital Scholarship : C reation, online publication, and on demand print publication of Diaries of a Prolific Professor ( http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00007589 ). Diaries of a Prolific Professor represents a new intellectual contribution developed created with the African American Studies Senior Seminar class in spring 2011. The book represents the collaborative work undertaken by teaching and library faculty and students G. Music/Architecture & Fine Arts Libraries Consolidation: Music research collections (books, scores, recordings) and the Music Librarian are now part of the Architecture & Fine Arts Library. This complex move, planned in close consultation with faculty and administrators from the Libraries, the College of Fine Arts and the College of Design Construction & Planning, involved comprehensive collection analys is, transfer of materials to other campus libraries and offsite storage, and facilities renovation. H. Journalism & Communications Library/Library West Consolidation: Journalism & Communications research collections as well as the Journalism Librarian ar e now part of Library West. This complex move, planned in close consultation with faculty and administrators from the Libraries and the College of Journalism & Communications, involved comprehensive collection analysis, and transfer of some materials to o ffsite storage. I. grant from 5. ars? Aside from budget, are there major impediments to reaching those goals? A. Utilize offsite storage to maximize available library space for students while reducing duplication of low use print materials in the SUS Libraries. i. Need support from the SUS pr esidents and provosts to make funding for the High Density Storage Facility a priority; ii. Need BOG and Legislative action to provide funding for the High Density Storage Facility; iii. Need to retain support from SUS Libraries for implementation of statewide coll aboration policies and practices for FLARE, and expand financial support for the interim storage facility ; and iv. Need to submit a FY 2014 2015 Legislative Budget Request for operation of the interim storage facility; and v. Need non recurring funding for movin g and processing the low use print materials and for repurposing the on campus space for student use. B. Expand access to electronic information resources through collaborative collection development and use of i. External partnersh ips like HathiTrust and the Center for Research Libraries require investment of staff time and financial resources, but greatly expand the print and electronic materials available to our users; ii. Participation in the development of the Kuali Open Library Env ironment ( OLE ) also requires a significant investment of staff time and financial resources, but has the potential to provide an open source option for the next generation library management system that will be required for the SUS and FCS libraries, but b udget constraints throughout the SUS and the creation of FLVC make holding together the coalition more difficult; iii. Student government funded the pilot project for the use of Summon, a next generation discovery tool that improves access to and utilization o f our electronic resources, especially for undergraduate students, but such tools compete for funding against the content they help to deliver; and iv. There are appropriate and highly relevant electronic resources available that our users request, but we ha ve no resources to add them, so we are falling behind in providing research level electronic resources for graduate students and faculty compared to many of our peer institutions C. Offer specialized, enhanced services in support of the research enterprise. i. Tracking the intellectual product of the institution is increasingly important in both positive and negative situations. The Libraries contribute to understanding and demonstrating the impact of the research performed at UF such as the impact of the Cl inical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) Using bibliometric and citation analysis tools allows the tracking of research dissemination, including research that has been determined to have fraudulent or erroneous data, an increasingly difficult pro blem that threatens the integrity and standing of the institution.

PAGE 7

Page 7 ii. We are partnering with UF Research Computing to support data management for the campus. Together we are participating with external organizations such as SURA and services such as DPN. We are already training library staff to prepare for these new roles, but will need additional staff with specialized knowledge and training to provide effective service. iii. Now that the university has created an Office of Post Doc Affairs, the Libraries are able to reach out to post docs and offer specialized services. The HSCL and Marston Science Library are collaborating on workshops specifically for this audience in order to better serve them. For example, we will be teaching them to use advanced research tools, including bioinformatics resources, data management techniques, and literature searching in support of IACUC and IRB protocols. 6. List any major threats to your [ support for ] graduate or undergraduate programs or to your research programs. A. Collecti on budget shortfalls, including the steadily decreasing value of the materials budget due to lost purchasing power, threaten support of teaching and research because the libraries cannot sustain the current suite of information resources or meet the demand for new ones. The gap in FY 2013 2014 will be $1.6 million and that gap will widen each year as prices go up and the materials budget remains flat or declines. B. The demand for enhanced library services, such as systematic reviews, bibliometric and citati on analysis, and data manage ment services noted in Section 5 C above, require additional staff and retraining of current staff for new skills as well as access to specialized databases that facilitate tracking and analysis C. rograms being handled by UF will result in increased demands for electronic resources and specialized services to meet the needs of the new cohorts of distance education students. D. Loss of services and support from FLVC at the levels previously provided by FCLA will increase the need for currently unfunded local activities and acquisitions It also threaten s collaboration among SUS Libraries and with the FCS Libraries as the competition for scarce resources drive s FLVC toward the lowest common denominator of service and support. E. After working for several years to increase DSR funding for the libraries from $1 million to $1.4 million, we have been informed that DSR cannot sustain its current level of contribution. This loss of funding will add to the alre ady substantial materials budget shortfall, making it more and more difficult for the libraries to provide the appropriate and essential resources to support research, teaching and clinical practice. F. Demand for student space in the Libraries for study, co llaboration and research is incre asing. As described in Section 5 .A above, we have plans to address this by utilizing offsite storage for low use print materials in order to maximize on campus library space available for students. Given the number of stude nts on campus, it will be difficult to meet the demand even with these efforts to clear space, so t here is a need to maintain public space that is gained in the future from moving less used materials off campus and to allocate funding for the removal of lo w use collections and renovation of user space as it becomes available The conversion of Newell Hall into a student learning commons, if funded, will provide additional space for study, collaboration and research. 7. Please describe the current state of g A. Not applicable 8. Indicate current and planned projects [ or methods ] to develop alternative revenue streams. Discuss any plans to initiate distance education programs. In order to e xpand library services to support the full breadth and depth of this university, the Libraries need additional sources of funding to supplement the amount available from appropriated funds. This is particularly important for the materials budget, which con tinues to be eroded by lost buying party when the Libraries should be adding content to support scholarship and research throughout the university. A lternatives are described below. Implementation of one or more of these options would provide additional cr itically needed funding for the Libraries.

PAGE 8

Page 8 A. Increase DSR Funding : Unfortunately, the current allocation from DSR is not sufficient to cover the subscription to the most heavily used online e journal package for research, Elsevier Science Direct. Having DSR fully fund the Elsevier Science Direct electronic journal package would not only more appropriately reflect the Libraries contribution to sponsored research, but also allow the Libraries to increase access to other material of significant value to researc hers. Instead, we have been notified that DSR support will be reduced in FY 2013 2014. B. Dedicate a Library Allocation from the Existing Student Technology Fee : The Libraries maintain the largest number of public workstations on campus, at least comparable t o all of the CIRCA labs and instruction facilities, but currently receive no centralized IT funding. The Student Technology Fee is a relatively new source of revenue for student oriented technology expenses, and a portion should be allocated to the Librari es to maintain our public service technology, as commonly occurs at other universities. C. Dedicate a Library Allocation from Annual Tuition Increases academic and research enterprise. As peer review analysis has s hown, the Libraries are also chronically and historically underfunded, even when considering the underfunding of the University as a whole compared to its peer institutions. This compromises the Libraries ability to meet the service and information resourc e needs of UF students, faculty and researchers. Dedicating a portion of any additional revenue generated by the tuition increases as new recurring funding for the Libraries would benefit all campus programs by allowing for predictable growth and planned s trategic investment in appropriate library services and resources. Over time, this would correct the disparity in access to library resources experienced by UF students, faculty and researchers compared to those at peer institutions. D. Establish a Student L ibrary Fee : Other than DSR funding, there is currently no mechanism for expanding library resources over time. A Library Fee, applied to student credit hours or by FTE, should be established to ensure a new and sustainable source of funding for the Librari es in addition to the appropriated funds now received. This is a relatively common fee at other universities. Students initiated a library fee at the University of Arizona and recently the graduate student council at UF expressed interest in requesting suc h a fee to expand library services. Although the BOG has not historically supported such fees, it is possible that UF and FSU could jointly seek such a fee as part of the preeminence initiatives. [A report on the fee levels and uses from other institution s was prepared in 2010 and could be updated if that would be helpful.] E. SEC Television Revenue: The recent expansion of the SEC and renegotiation of the television contract will bring increased revenue to UF. Dedicating a portion of the additional revenu e as new recurring funding for the Libraries would benefit all campus programs by allowing for predictable growth and planned strategic investment in appropriate library services and resources and, at the same time, demonstrate a significant and visible co ntribution of athletics to the academic mission of the university. Since the libraries serve all students, faculty, and clinicians, such an allocation could be promoted as a contribution that benefits overall university Alternatively, UF could follow the model established at Duke and increase ticket prices for all ticketed athletic events by $1 with that revenue assigned to the Libraries; the SEC library deans are considering an SEC wide proposal for such an initiative. F. Rebalanc e the Allocation of Costs f or Electronic Resources Among the SUS Libraries : Receiving approval from the CAVP to establish and implement more equitable formulas for sharing the costs of consortial purchases of electronic resources among SUS Libraries will provide some temporary relie f to the escalating costs of the most r esearch intensive e resources Submitting a Legislative Budget Request to cover the two or three most research intensive electronic resources would relieve the system wide pressure and allow the SUS Libraries to real locate existing funds to other much needed e resources. G. Expand Development Grants and Collaboration : Working with donors to establish endowments for specific positions, collections and services, remains an important strategy for augmenting direct funding from the University. Similarly, the Libraries are aggressively seeking grants that will assist in funding strategic initiatives. We are also seeking collaborations with other academic libraries, within and outside Florida, to reduce the costs of library co llections and services. This is exemplified by the bilateral program with FSU for acquisition of e books, described in Section 8. D above, where our cost of acquisition is 75 percent of what we would have paid if we were purchasing these same titles individ ually.

PAGE 9

Page 9 H. Develop and Offer For Credit Courses : Offering courses that support information literacy in general and effective use of increasingly sophisticated tools for analysis of and access to electronic resources would provide a revenue stream for the Lib raries from both on campus and distance education students. This would be particularly valuable for distance education students who do not have easy access to other on campus instruction and interaction with library subject specialists. Students enrolled i n these courses would have full access to library resources and services. 9. Please list new degrees and/or programs that you plan to create in the next 3 years. A. The Smathers Libraries are partnering with UF Research Computing to organize data management s ervices for the entire campus, with a heavy emphasis on E Science. This will serve current researchers, and those who have already collected data, by describing, preserving and providing access. This service will enhance faculty applications for sponsored research by facilitating the development and implementation of data management plans and assure that future research can rely on and reuse data when that is appropriate. B. The Libraries are developing a series of online and in person one credit courses to s upport information literacy in general and effective use of increasingly sophisticated tools for analysis of and access to electronic resources. The first such course is a one credit undergraduate information literacy course, IDS 4930 Introduction to In formation Resources, developed through collaboration and coordination with CLAS (Dial Center, the Associate Dean of the Humanities, and the Associate Dean of Student Affairs) to be offered fall 2012. At the present time, this is not envisioned as a certifi cate program, but it is possible that these courses could become key components of discipline specific degree and certificate programs. NOTE: Questions 4, 6 and 8 have been amended slightly by words inserted in brackets and italicized to make the quest ions more relevant to the Libraries as a service and support unit.



PAGE 1

The Foundation for The Gator Nation An Equal Opportunity Institution George A. Smathers Libraries 535 Library West Office of the Dean of University Libraries PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7 000 352 273 2505 352 392 7251 Fax www.uflib.ufl.edu Smathers Libraries FY 2012 2013 Libraries Program Review June 2013 1. Identify i mportant advances/achievements made by your unit in FY 20 12 20 13 A. In October 2012, the George A. Smathers Libraries were awarded a 3 year National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to preserve, digitize and offer access to over 20,000 museum items received from the transfer of the Panama Canal Museum, in its entirety, to the University of Florida. The grant was the fourth largest in the Nation. The first year of the grant has resulted in an online inventory of items, plan ning for the 2014 Panama Canal Centennial Celebration at UF, partnerships with the Harn, FLMNH, Phillips, and international collaborators in Panama and The Netherlands. A Faculty Enhancement Opportunity was submitted and approved towards support of the Cen tennial, exhibits, and the Center for Latin American Studies 62 nd Conference on Panama and the Canal (March 2014). B. As data/digital curation takes center stage across the country, Smathers Libraries has been working to ensure full support for all digital/da ta curation needs for all fields and areas The Data Management Committee was initiated by the Libraries, but includes representatives from Research Computing and the Department of Sponsored Research. The committee is charged with assess ing needs, making recommendations, and develop ing support for the role of the Libraries in campus wide data management and curation. C. The Libraries are w orking within SURA and ASERL to develop local collaborative data management models that can be used or adapted at any res earch university and are capable of feeding into a national data infrastructure. D. The renovation of the first floor of HSCL aimed at creating a more suitable space for the contemporary needs nated for collaborative study, is a venue for interaction with others and for unique spontaneous teaching moments that are so crucial to the learning experience. The redesign of the space emphasized increased access to technology and power, improved natur al lighting, and informal casual seating, resulting in a more inviting and comfortable atmosphere. E. During the spring semester, we began to implement an 18 month plan to repurpose space in the Smathers Library (Library East) to provide the best use of buil ding for students, staff, and faculty. F. During FY 2012 2013, we c ontinued planning for a statewide shared collection of library materials, now identified as the FL orida A cademic RE pository (FLARE ), and the high density storage facility to house the collec tion and make it accessible to the participating libraries, including: i. Completed r apid development of the plans for the High Density Facility so the project will be shovel ready and capable of rapid implementation if PECO funds can be obtained ; ii. Leas ed an interim storage facility to address immediate space pressure at UF and other SUS Libraries and preparing for occupancy; iii. Negotiat ed an agreement with the University of Miami to establish a shared collection in Gainesville for long term preservation and r etention of low use or duplicate library materials and received the first shipment of 138,000 volumes from UM ; and iv. Continued the Develop ment of software to identify titles and holdings in the Florida and ASERL shared journal collections and facilitate th e identification and replacement of missing volumes.

PAGE 2

Page 2 G. The Libraries increased digital access to important, and often unique, content from the UF Libraries and partner institutions. The Digital Library Center (DLC) added over 843,000 pages to UF Digital Col lections, increasing the total collection to over 8.5 million pages. Usage views for the fiscal year exceeded 53 million. Hosting digital copies of this content improves access for UF faculty and students and for scholars worldwide. Examples of new collect ions include: i. Panama and the Canal: Panama and the Canal is a joint project of George A. Smathers Libraries and the Panama Canal Museum. This digitized collection is part of the larger project Panama Canal: Preserving a Legacy funded by a $500,000 mul ti year grant from Institute of Museum and Library Science (IMLS). The collection contains 4,711 items totaling 158,822 pages with more in process. In FY 20 12 20 13, the collection was viewed over 1.28 million times. ii. Unearthing St. Augustine: Jointly fun ded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and George A. Smathers Libraries, the project is digitally preserving a collection of hidden and fragile resources dating from the 16th century onward related to colonial St. Augustine. The digital col lection will consist of 10,000 maps, drawings, photographs and documents available freely online. Partners in this project include the City of St. Augustine departments of Heritage Tourism and the Archaeology Program, the St. Augustine Historical Society, and Government House. The collection contains 468 items totaling 3,667 pages with more in process. Launched in October 2012, the collection had over 42,000 views in the first 6 month s iii. The Vodou Archive: Curating and Sharing the Sources of Vodou Religion and Cultur e University of Florida and Duke University researchers and librarians have spearheaded a collaborative partnership project with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). The collection is presented and catalogued in English Spanish and French. The collection contains 357 items totaling 5,570 pages with an equal number of pages in process. In FY 20 12 20 13 the collection was viewed over 112,000 times. iv. Pioneer Days in Florida: Diaries and Letters from Settling the Sunshine S tate, 1800 1900 Collection The Pioneer Days in Florida project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) will digitize 36,530 pages of diaries and le tters describing frontier life in Florida from the end of the colonial period to the beginnings of the modern state. With the project officially launching in April 2013, there are already 31 items totaling 4,874 pages in the collection, which have been vie wed over 4,000 times in FY 20 12 20 13, a promising start for a new collection. H. The Libraries e xpanded use of t he Sobek software to other institutions Sobek is the current platform for the digital repository for the Wolfsonian Museum, as well as several di gital repositorie s at the University of Florida. Additionally, we are in discussion with the Frost Museum of FIU and the Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education at the University of Southern California. I. Supported campus open access init iatives, including: i. Administered the UF Open Access Publishing Fund to support faculty and student publication of open access scholarly journal articles and successfully completed the two year pilot project ; ii. Participated with the University Librar ies Committee in the drafting of a campus wide Open Access Policy in response to a request from the Faculty Senate; the draft will be presented to the Faculty Senate at the September meeting, initiating a discussion and debate prior to action; iii. Coordinated with the University Libraries Committee to obtain Faculty Senate endorsement (April 2012) of the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities, which resulted in a letter from the UF President requesting that the University of Florida become a signatory (July 2012); iv. Facilitated hosting of 171 open access journals and newsletters edited by UF faculty or sponsored by UF departments using the Open Journal Systems (OJS) platform at FCLA; and v. Digitized and facilitated conversio n to open access of current publication of Chemical Engineering Education a publication of the Chemical Engineering Division of the American Society for Engineering Education and the premier archival journal for chemical engineering educators with a one y ear rolling embargo.

PAGE 3

Page 3 2. and describe your plans to foster their success. A. FL orida A cademic Re pository (Section 1. C ): FLARE is already recognized as a model for statewide and regional collaboration for retention of low use print materials. I will continue active participation in a national planning group that is sharing information about models for collaboration and tools for implementation. Leasing t he interim storage buildings allows us to begin implementing FLARE before the HDF is built. The MOU with Miami will continue to attract attention statewide and encourage other participants. The software developed by the Libraries to support the statewide p rogram and the regional program managed by ASERL will be implemented this year. It is also being evaluated as a tool for print storage projects of the Center for Research Libraries, the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), and the Greater Western Library Alliance (GWLA) B. Retrospective Digitization of UF Theses and Dissertations : Many universities now accept electronic theses and dissertations and archive them in institutional repositories. The UF program is unique; we are implementing a plan for systematic digitization of the retrospective theses and dissertations for preservation received affirmative permission from the author. While the ra te of agreement was extremely high among those who responded to a request for permission, it required multiple contacts and the rate of non response was high. Additionally, there were many graduates for whom we did not have current contact information, so we could not include their thesis or dissertation in the program. We have developed a new policy, reviewed and approved by the university counsel, which uses an opt out, rather than opt in, approach. Where contact information cannot be obtained with reason able effort, we are proceeding to digitize these materials as copy) should the author or authorized representative contact us. This will allow the p rogram to be far more comprehensive and proceed more rapidly and cost Libraries. C. Virtual B usiness Library : The Economist recently ranked UF as having the top Online MBA Program. A vital component of the program's success is MBA students' access to the Virtual Business Library's subscriptions to online journals, electronic books and business dat abases. The Libraries intend to build our electronic business resources to be among the best in the world and continue to develop the platform for delivery and use of those resources, as well as training and related services. A strong partnership with the Business School helps fund many of the most important and expensive electronic resources. We plan to build up on this partnership and seek a substantial endowment for the online business library to achieve parity with the resources available at the best pub lic business schools. The Business Librarian is a liaison to the Innovation Hub and other incubator enterprises sponsored by UF. D. ASERL Guidelines for Managing FDLP Collections in the Southeast Region (Section 1. H ): This project is already transforming the way depository libraries in the SE collaborate to manage their print government documents and is poised to have a major role in the effort to create a comprehensive public domain digital collection of federal documents. The strategies and polices in the AS ERL Implementation Plan are being evaluated by other states, regions and multi state organizations and are widely recognized as an innovative approach to improve depository service while reducing the burdens of serving as a depository library. The software tools that have been developed by the UF Libraries are already in widespread use in the SE and others are interested in utilizing them as well. The Gap Analysis software will facilitate matching print collections with digital copies to improve access to t itles that are already digitized and facilitate identification of the ones that remain to be done. A joint initiative of the GWLA CIC, ASERL, and the California Digital Library is planning to use the UF software to improve management of print collections and initiate a program for comprehensive digitization. Our activities will result in one of the few fully cataloged regional Federal Depository Library documents collection s in the country and provide significant support to users throughout Florida and oth er parts of the southeast.

PAGE 4

Page 4 3. Indicate advances in achieving diversity among faculty, staff, and students within your unit. A. The Libraries ensure all Search Committees and hiring authorities are aware of, and conform to, the applicable UF policies and proc edures with regards to inclusivity and seeking a broad and diverse pool of applicants. For each search, staff are specifically encouraged to nominate and circulate position vacancies to maximize exposure and diversity. The Libraries publicize vacant libra rian positions in over one hundred locations including the following specifically focused on diversity: The Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual Librarians Network; Latinos in Higher Ed; ALA/LAMA Diversity Officers Discussion Group; ACRL African American Librarians List; and Joint Conference of Librarians of Color List. As a result of these efforts, 18% of the faculty and non OPS staff hired by the Libraries between July 1, 2011, and May 30, 2012, are from underrepresented groups. 72 % are women. The composition of the fa culty at the George A. Smathers Libraries is 69% women (compared to 64% in 2011) and 14% from underrepresented ethnic groups (compared to 12.5% in 2011). B. In 2012, the Libraries established the Services for Students with Disabilities Task Force. This group is charged with assisting in the evaluation of current library policies and procedures relating to services for students with disabilities, and to develop prioritized plans relating to programs and services for students with disabilities. The recommendat ions will be delivered in FY 2013 2014. C. George A. Smathers Libraries Committee on Diversity is a newly created standing committee. It is charged es focus on developing concrete steps for staff to increase their understanding of diversity issues and facilitating opportunities for broadening awareness of diversity as an essential way of creating a fair and open minded work environment. The external d iversity initiatives seek to inform library user oriented practices, assessment endeavors, collection development, provision of services and of course, customer service. D. With support from a F aculty E nhancement O pportunity library faculty have established the ongoing Academic Library Recruitment Efficacy and Outcome Study. This is a national longitudinal study to investigate the efficacy of employee recruitment techniques used by academic libraries. This study focuses on the advertising of vacancies, the so licitation of applications, and the recruitment outcomes resulting from these activities. It affords an opportunity to evaluate the use of specific advertising venues and practices intended to increase applications from traditionally underrepresented group s. 27 institutions are participating in the study. Beyond these advances, the Libraries are in a key and unique position to enhance the awareness and acceptance of diversity of the campus through targeted sponsored research and services, and by organizin g, hosting and participating in relevant exhibits, events and projects. Several examples are provided below. E. May 1, 2013. Nina Stoyan spring semester as part of the Honors Program offering IDH3931. Additional programing associated with the exhibit included: i. Molecular anthropologist Dr. Koji Lum (University of Binghamton) presente d on health transition related to modernization in indigenous Pacific populations ii. Winston Nagan (UF College of Law) presented on land rights of indigenous peoples F. E xhibits, events and projects that enhance the diversity of the campus include: i. Authors@UF: B enjamin Hebblethwaite Creole texts can impact both the language and people of Haiti. ii. Author s@UF: Paul Ortiz statewide civil rights movement against Jim Crow. iii. Arabic Fi lm Month: Two nights of Arabic films co sponsored with the Arabic Cultural Association at UF Latin American Film Festival: Two days of film on the Casualties of Neoliberalism in the Spanish speaking World iv. ollywood Chinese: The Chinese in American Feature

PAGE 5

Page 5 v. Public reading of Martin Luther King, Jr. Letter from Birmingham Jail. The George A. Smathers Libraries joined the 50th anniversary celebration of the day that Martin Luther King, Jr. began writin g his Letter from Birmingham Jail. A reading of the Letter took place in front of Library West with volunteers each reading portions of the letter. Co sponsored by the UF African American Studies Program and the Institute for Black Culture. vi. Exhibit: Testi mony. Inspired by recent donations to the Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica, Testimony showcases primary sources that bear witness to Holocaust. Testimony documents the impact of the Holocaust on the victims and survivors, and it gives voice to the af tershock felt by subsequent generations. vii. Exhibit: Values in Action: 75 Years of the Visionaires. Celebrating the lives of eight young female activists who founded Gainesville's first formal organization for African American women, and how they and their s uccessors have enriched the civic, social and educational lives of African Americans over the past seventy five years. viii. Online exhibit: The Gathering Storm Jewish Life in Germany and Eastern Europe in the 1930s. Features items produced by or pertaining to European Jewry before WWII, including rare German and Yiddish newspapers, as well as ephemeral publications such as calendars, yearbooks and other communally inspired commemorative works. ix. Online exhibit: About Face independence exhibition to tour Europe. 4. Indicate notable successes in interdisciplinary [ and interdepartmental or interorganizational ] collaboration in the past year. A. Kuali Open Library Environment (OLE) : The Smathers Libraries are the lead partner for 8 academic libraries in Florida and FCLA for the development of the OLE, a new open source library management system. The Florida Partners are a part of a broader consortium of academic research libraries, including Indiana University, Duke University, North Carolina State University, University of Pennsylvania, University of Chicago, University of Maryland, Lehigh University, and the University of Michiga n. With match funding from the Mellon Foundation, OLE has finished the first two years of development and plans a third year to complete its first release, provide support for implementation for early adopters and transform the project from its early, exp erimental stage into a sustainable system. Outcomes from OLE include providing an open source, community based alternative to current commercially produced library m anagement s ystems. B. College of Curriculum Redesign Planning Retreat : Librarians from the HSCL have become classes of 2015, 2016 and 2017. C. Team Based Learning Workshops : The HSCL hosted two Team Based Learning Workshops sponsored by the College of Medicine Society of Teaching Scholars and the College of Pharmacy. The workshops focused on the development of Team Based learning, a co mprehensive small group based instructional process that is now being used in over 100 academic disciplines and on over 200 campuses in the US and in eight foreign countries. D. The Florida Newspaper Collection: Broadening Access and Users : In partnership wi th the Jewish Museum local and ethnic Florida newspapers. Funding by Florida Department of State Division of Library & Information Services Library Services & Technology Act Grants. E. Collaborating with Strangers Workshop Series (Phase II) : The project team present collaboration development workshops f or UF undergraduate, graduate, Post Docs, and faculty with interdisciplinary themes including: NSF/NIH grant applications, Sustainability, and Digital Projects in Sciences and Humanities. This fosters interdisciplinary networking skills while participants are increasing their knowledge of available resources/assets on campus and beyond. Funding by Creative Campus Committee Catalyst Fund.

PAGE 6

Page 6 F. Digital Scholarship : C reation, online publication, and on demand print publication of Diaries of a Prolific Professor ( http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00007589 ). Diaries of a Prolific Professor represents a new intellectual contribution developed created with the African American Studies Senior Seminar class in spring 2011. The book represents the collaborative work undertaken by teaching and library faculty and students G. Music/Architecture & Fine Arts Libraries Consolidation: Music research collections (books, scores, recordings) and the Music Librarian are now part of the Architecture & Fine Arts Library. This complex move, planned in close consultation with faculty and administrators from the Libraries, the College of Fine Arts and the College of Design Construction & Planning, involved comprehensive collection analys is, transfer of materials to other campus libraries and offsite storage, and facilities renovation. H. Journalism & Communications Library/Library West Consolidation: Journalism & Communications research collections as well as the Journalism Librarian ar e now part of Library West. This complex move, planned in close consultation with faculty and administrators from the Libraries and the College of Journalism & Communications, involved comprehensive collection analysis, and transfer of some materials to o ffsite storage. I. grant from 5. rs? Aside from budget, are there major impediments to reaching those goals? A. Utilize offsite storage to maximize available library space for students while reducing duplication of low use print materials in the SUS Libraries. i. Need support from the SUS pre sidents and provosts to make funding for the High Density Storage Facility a priority; ii. Need BOG and Legislative action to provide funding for the High Density Storage Facility; iii. Need to retain support from SUS Libraries for implementation of statewide colla boration policies and practices for FLARE, and expand financial support for the interim storage facility ; and iv. Need to submit a FY 2014 2015 Legislative Budget Request for operation of the interim storage facility; and v. Need non recurring funding for moving and processing the low use print materials and for repurposing the on campus space for student use. B. Expand access to electronic information resources through collaborative collection development and use of i. External partnershi ps like HathiTrust and the Center for Research Libraries require investment of staff time and financial resources, but greatly expand the print and electronic materials available to our users; ii. Participation in the development of the Kuali Open Library Envi ronment ( OLE ) also requires a significant investment of staff time and financial resources, but has the potential to provide an open source option for the next generation library management system that will be required for the SUS and FCS libraries, but bu dget constraints throughout the SUS and the creation of FLVC make holding together the coalition more difficult; iii. Student government funded the pilot project for the use of Summon, a next generation discovery tool that improves access to and utilization of our electronic resources, especially for undergraduate students, but such tools compete for funding against the content they help to deliver; and iv. There are appropriate and highly relevant electronic resources available that our users request, but we hav e no resources to add them, so we are falling behind in providing research level electronic resources for graduate students and faculty compared to many of our peer institutions C. Offer specialized, enhanced services in support of the research enterprise. i. Tracking the intellectual product of the institution is increasingly important in both positive and negative situations. The Libraries contribute to understanding and demonstrating the impact of the research performed at UF such as the impact of the Cli nical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) Using bibliometric and citation analysis tools allows the tracking of research dissemination, including research that has been determined to have fraudulent or erroneous data, an increasingly difficult prob lem that threatens the integrity and standing of the institution.

PAGE 7

Page 7 ii. We are partnering with UF Research Computing to support data management for the campus. Together we are participating with external organizations such as SURA and services such as DPN. We are already training library staff to prepare for these new roles, but will need additional staff with specialized knowledge and training to provide effective service. iii. Now that the university has created an Office of Post Doc Affairs, the Libraries are a ble to reach out to post docs and offer specialized services. The HSCL and Marston Science Library are collaborating on workshops specifically for this audience in order to better serve them. For example, we will be teaching them to use advanced research t ools, including bioinformatics resources, data management techniques, and literature searching in support of IACUC and IRB protocols. 6. List any major threats to your [ support for ] graduate or undergraduate programs or to your research programs. A. Collectio n budget shortfalls, including the steadily decreasing value of the materials budget due to lost purchasing power, threaten support of teaching and research because the libraries cannot sustain the current suite of information resources or meet the demand for new ones. The gap in FY 2013 2014 will be $1.6 million and that gap will widen each year as prices go up and the materials budget remains flat or declines. B. The demand for enhanced library services, such as systematic reviews, bibliometric and citatio n analysis, and data management services noted in Section 6. C above, require additional staff and retraining of current staff for new skills as well as access to specialized databases that facilitate tracking and analysis C. ograms being handled by UF will result in increased demands for electronic resources and specialized services to meet the needs of the new cohorts of distance education students. D. Loss of services and support from FLVC at the levels previously provided by FCLA will increase the need for currently unfunded local activities and acquisitions It also threaten s collaboration among SUS Libraries and with the FCS Libraries as the competition for scarce resources drive s FLVC toward the lowest common denominator of service and support. E. After working for several years to increase DSR funding for the libraries from $1 million to $1.4 million, we have been informed that DSR cannot sustain its current level of contribution. This loss of funding will add to the alrea dy substantial materials budget shortfall, making it more and more difficult for the libraries to provide the appropriate and essential resources to support research, teaching and clinical practice. F. Demand for student space in the Libraries for study, col laboration and research is increasing. As described in Section 6.A above, we have plans to address this by utilizing offsite storage for low use print materials in order to maximize on campus library space available for students. Given the number of studen ts on campus, it will be difficult to meet the demand even with these efforts to clear space, so t here is a need to maintain public space that is gained in the future from moving less used materials off campus and to allocate funding for the removal of low use collections and renovation of user space as it becomes available The conversion of Newell Hall into a student learning commons, if funded, will provide additional space for study, collaboration and research. 7. Please describe the current state of gr A. Not applicable 8. Indicate current and planned projects [ or methods ] to develop alternative revenue streams. Discuss any plans to initiate distance education programs. In order to ex pand library services to support the full breadth and depth of this university, the Libraries need additional sources of funding to supplement the amount available from appropriated funds. This is particularly important for the materials budget, which cont inues to be eroded by lost buying party when the Libraries should be adding content to support scholarship and research throughout the university. A lternatives are described below. Implementation of one or more of these options would provide additional cri tically needed funding for the Libraries.

PAGE 8

Page 8 A. Increase DSR Funding : Unfortunately, the current allocation from DSR is not sufficient to cover the subscription to the most heavily used online e journal package for research, Elsevier Science Direct. Having DSR fully fund the Elsevier Science Direct electronic journal package would not only more appropriately reflect the Libraries contribution to sponsored research, but also allow the Libraries to increase access to other material of significant value to research ers. Instead, we have been notified that DSR support will be reduced in FY 2013 2014. B. Dedicate a Library Allocation from the Existing Student Technology Fee : The Libraries maintain the largest number of public workstations on campus, at least comparable to all of the CIRCA labs and instruction facilities, but currently receive no centralized IT funding. The Student Technology Fee is a relatively new source of revenue for student oriented technology expenses, and a portion should be allocated to the Librarie s to maintain our public service technology, as commonly occurs at other universities. C. Dedicate a Library Allocation from Annual Tuition Increases academic and research enterprise. As peer review analysis has sh own, the Libraries are also chronically and historically underfunded, even when considering the underfunding of the University as a whole compared to its peer institutions. This compromises the Libraries ability to meet the service and information resource needs of UF students, faculty and researchers. Dedicating a portion of any additional revenue generated by the tuition increases as new recurring funding for the Libraries would benefit all campus programs by allowing for predictable growth and planned st rategic investment in appropriate library services and resources. Over time, this would correct the disparity in access to library resources experienced by UF students, faculty and researchers compared to those at peer institutions. D. Establish a Student Li brary Fee : Other than DSR funding, there is currently no mechanism for expanding library resources over time. A Library Fee, applied to student credit hours or by FTE, should be established to ensure a new and sustainable source of funding for the Librarie s in addition to the appropriated funds now received. This is a relatively common fee at other universities. Students initiated a library fee at the University of Arizona and recently the graduate student council at UF expressed interest in requesting such a fee to expand library services. Although the BOG has not historically supported such fees, it is possible that UF and FSU could jointly seek such a fee as part of the preeminence initiatives. [A report on the fee levels and uses from other institutions was prepared in 2010 and could be updated if that would be helpful.] E. SEC Television Revenue: The recent expansion of the SEC and renegotiation of the television contract will bring increased revenue to UF. Dedicating a portion of the additional revenue as new recurring funding for the Libraries would benefit all campus programs by allowing for predictable growth and planned strategic investment in appropriate library services and resources and, at the same time, demonstrate a significant and visible con tribution of athletics to the academic mission of the university. Since the libraries serve all students, faculty, and clinicians, such an allocation could be promoted as a contribution that benefits overall university Alternatively, UF could follow the m odel established at Duke and increase ticket prices for all ticketed athletic events by $1 with that revenue assigned to the Libraries; the SEC library deans are considering an SEC wide proposal for such an initiative. F. Rebalanc e the Allocation of Costs fo r Electronic Resources Among the SUS Libraries : Receiving approval from the CAVP to establish and implement more equitable formulas for sharing the costs of consortial purchases of electronic resources among SUS Libraries will provide some temporary relief to the escalating costs of the most r esearch intensive e resources Submitting a Legislative Budget Request to cover the two or three most research intensive electronic resources would relieve the system wide pressure and allow the SUS Libraries to reall ocate existing funds to other much needed e resources. G. Expand Development Grants and Collaboration : Working with donors to establish endowments for specific positions, collections and services, remains an important strategy for augmenting direct funding f rom the University. Similarly, the Libraries are aggressively seeking grants that will assist in funding strategic initiatives. We are also seeking collaborations with other academic libraries, within and outside Florida, to reduce the costs of library col lections and services. This is exemplified by the bilateral program with FSU for acquisition of e books, described in Section 1.E above, where our cost of acquisition is 75 percent of what we would have paid if we were purchasing these same titles individu ally.

PAGE 9

Page 9 H. Develop and Offer For Credit Courses : Offering courses that support information literacy in general and effective use of increasingly sophisticated tools for analysis of and access to electronic resources would provide a revenue stream for the Libr aries from both on campus and distance education students. This would be particularly valuable for distance education students who do not have easy access to other on campus instruction and interaction with library subject specialists. Students enrolled in these courses would have full access to library resources and services. 9. Please list new degrees and/or programs that you plan to create in the next 3 years. A. The Smathers Libraries are partnering with UF Research Computing to organize data management se rvices for the entire campus, with a heavy emphasis on E Science. This will serve current researchers, and those who have already collected data, by describing, preserving and providing access. This service will enhance faculty applications for sponsored r esearch by facilitating the development and implementation of data management plans and assure that future research can rely on and reuse data when that is appropriate. B. The Libraries are developing a series of online and in person one credit courses to su pport information literacy in general and effective use of increasingly sophisticated tools for analysis of and access to electronic resources. The first such course is a one credit undergraduate information literacy course, IDS 4930 Introduction to Inf ormation Resources, developed through collaboration and coordination with CLAS (Dial Center, the Associate Dean of the Humanities, and the Associate Dean of Student Affairs) to be offered fall 2012. At the present time, this is not envisioned as a certific ate program, but it is possible that these courses could become key components of discipline specific degree and certificate programs. NOTE: Questions 4, 6 and 8 have been amended slightly by words inserted in brackets and italicized to make the questi ons more relevant to the Libraries as a service and support unit.