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UFIR UFAFRICANA
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00003162/00001
 Material Information
Title: African Studies Digital Collections Presentation
Physical Description: Presentation
Language: English
Creator: Reboussin, Daniel
Publisher: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, FL
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Competencies
SobekCM
 Notes
Abstract: Dan Reboussin introduces the African Studies digital collections he has developed at the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries. As with related materials in other formats, these digital collections are managed to support a large and diverse academic program (the largest US Department of Education Title VI awardee for African Studies in the current grant cycle), as well as to serve the southeastern region, national research needs, and as an international resource. The site at http://ufdc.ufl.edu/africa1 includes over 2000 titles, attracted well over 50,000 monthly views in 2013 (twice that in April), and for the first time surpassed one million cumulative total views in February. Collection materials representing the arts, languages and literature, science, history, and culture are highlighted and the functions and features of the Sobek/CM interface that supports this digital scholarly information resource demonstrated. UFDC as a whole presented its 100 millionth view in February.
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Daniel Reboussin.
Publication Status: Unpublished
Venue: First presented to the Tampa Bay Library Consortium, July 8, 2013.
General Note: Video presentation slides: http://floridalibrarywebinars.org/african-studies-collections/
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: UF
Rights Management:
This item is licensed with the Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License. This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon this work even for commercial reasons, as long as they credit the author and license their new creations under the identical terms.
System ID: IR00003162:00001

Full Text

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TBLC presentation script: African Studies digital collections at UF Slide 1 : Title (0:00) Thank you for joining me today. first like to mention that all of the images in this presentation (with the exception of the two introductory photos on the next slide) are available as Open Access resources in the University of Florida Digital Collections ( UFDC ) Please feel free to visit, browse, and study them in their full context at the url on the bottom of this slide Links to all UFDC images in this presentation are available on the slides themselves or in the notes of the PowerPoint file, which itself is l ocat ed in the UF Institutional Repository under a Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License (along with t he notes, this script, audio, etc.) provide the URL on the final slide Slide 2: I ntroduc tion (1:10) Dan Reboussin, African Studies Librarian at the University of Florida. I work in the George A. Smathers Libraries and support UF teaching and research relat ing ing an overview of African Studies digital collection s in the UFDC

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TBLC script on UFDC African Studies Collections: Dan Reboussin 2 Slide 3 : Overview & a genda (1:30) Is it all right to have favorite items in a collection? T his portrait of a young Liberian woman with her face powdered from a Sande s ociety initiation ceremony immediately seize d my attention when I first encountered it in a donated scrapbook The background image on the left is a Sande helmet mask, the only African mask traditionally worn by women. Statistics on c ollection size and usage lack the qualitative impact of even a few unique and br illiant images like this one reason why I enjoy working with manuscript collection s and consider them an important part of my work. My overall goal in presenting today is to introduce the online Open Access African Studies collections in UFDC ( totaling about 2,000 titles and over 4,2 00 items comprised by over 156,000 pages ): prepare you by offer ing a sense of the stat us and goals of the collection; embark on a whirlwind tour of the various sub collections and see some examples of the individual contents ; Next, significance of the se collections ; take a quick look at the search and view functions available through the SobekCM software interface, and; C onsider the value of several of these features for assisting researchers ; review a few frequently asked questions and then I invite your questions ; Finally, suggest how we can continue our conversation by providing several points of contact A re there a ny questions or technical problems before we begin?

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TBLC script on UFDC African Studies Collections: Dan Reboussin 3 Slide 4: Collection status & goals (3:00) UF i s one of the top ranked federally funded Title VI National Resource Centers and Foreign Language Area Studies centers for Africa Our g oal in the libraries is to build and manage collections in all formats to support the ongoing and future needs of scholars engaged in African related research and teaching We support over 100 UF faculty affiliates of the Center for African Studies in ten with many visitors, students, and (as a regional resource center) many others beyond our own campus This multidisciplinary collection development effort leaves a fascinating legacy: layers of materials that were once consi dered state of the art, but which now may take on an embarrassing or humorous aspect T hese can have educational value in reminding us to stay humble about the state of our own knowledge and aware of potential biases in current intellectual trends In part because of the limitations of copyright and permissions for online distribution, our digital collections reflect some of these earlier perspectives more than we might otherwise choose to represent but we make an effort to select materials that ha ve current relevan ce and are useful to existing academic programs and interests. With ove r one and a quarter million views (since the UFDC launch in 2006 ), supporting public and research needs

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TBLC script on UFDC African Studies Collections: Dan Reboussin 4 Slide 5. Significance (4:35) Our African Studies digital collections are significant in that they derive from a library collection of African Studies that is distinctive as a regional resource unmatched south of North Carolina and east of Kansas or perhaps even California). Many of our holdings (in print and online) are unique, rare, or scarce This rare item with such a dramatic illustrated front board is held by about two dozen libraries worldwide, but in the US only at Stanford University, UCLA, the University of Notre Dame, Bosto n University, and the University of Florida. The collection supports a large and diverse set of academic programs, giving it a measure of cohesion and focus in several areas that are not well represented elsewhere in the US or internationally.

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TBLC script on UFDC African Studies Collections: Dan Reboussin 5 Slide 6: S ub collections (5:30) One of the ways we have arrange d digital collection materials is by creating sub collections and landing pages Current African Studies sub collections are represented by the vertical column of five icons here : 1) The Arts of Africa is comprised of materials from the Harn Museum of Art libraries are able to cura te archiv es in support of the ir research and interpretive work, fundamental f o r creating public exhibit later, our D igital Services production shop has provide d museum quality images for the Harn site, which we can also display in the UFDC 2) Moving down the column, t he George Fortune Collection is represented by the second box I 3) The Derscheid Collection includes about 800 mostly French language, colonial and pre colonial Rwandan history research Previously only available on microfilm which was privately shot by one of our faculty members in 1965 W e secure d permission from the original family to scan and distribute these materials online to a scholarly community that considers th e set as an important resource across several disciplines. W e provide these ( admittedly ) arcane materials in a setting that makes them easily discoverable by those who need them while offer i ng a scholarly context to support learning, research, and interpretation 4) I enjoy talking about another favorite set, the Onitsha Market Literature of

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TBLC script on UFDC African Studies Collections: Dan Reboussin 6 which we have about a dozen pieces online Th ese pamphlets represent the reading interests of the first literate generation of Igbo people who learn ed English in mission schools in the mid Twentieth Century Book stall entrepreneurs produced from the late 1940s until the market in which they were sold was destroyed during the Nigeri a n Biafra n War in 1968. So t he s e cheap books are both tragic (because of the circumstances of their sudden demise) as well as fun ( because they present a nave approach to familiar genres like romance, social or moral advice, and thrillers ) At the same time, serious s cholars have compared them to early English popular books and have applied various bibliographic techniques to analyze their creation, letter press printing and distribution. Several authors were both the publishers and sellers of their own work, so they were close to their readers, knowing firsthand what they would buy from the book stalls on market day with a few spare coins. (8:20) 5) Last here is the largest of these sub collections Photographs of Africa is a catch all title for several substantial albums and scrapbooks, as well as many images without a good deal of context W e are currently working to improve the present ation of the Rikli albums, in particularly, but still all functional and accessible : a) I just mentioned the Martin Rikli collection of Ethiopian photographs few comments on this set of albums after the following slide b) Eugene Manis was a plant breeder who in 1941 travelled to Liberia for his first job created an interesting scrap book, and in several letters described his life on a Firestone plantation offering insight into the work and living conditions of the rubber tappers among other things H e collected a number of masks, o ne of which is a

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TBLC script on UFDC African Studies Collections: Dan Reboussin 7 compl ete Deangle masquerade (full costume) now housed in the Harn Museum In the scrapbook a photograph of the collector standing beside the full y costume d dancer ( an extreme rar ity to have documented in this way a very special image ) c) Lewis Berner was a n entomologist best known f or his work on mayflies. He did all of his post secondary education at UF and was a UF faculty member for his entire career. He took several albums of photographs during his World War Two military service He wa s assigned to a malaria control unit in West Africa. He also did contract work after the war both in Ghana and then ( later ) in Malawi with Archie Carr (best known for his work on sea turtle conservation). d) Finally among the se sub collection s are the studio photographs t aken in Greytown, KwaZulu Natal ( South Africa ) by Richard Ndimande have good information on which were taken by him, his father, or his wife) The black and white negatives all date from before 1973. The collector Frank Jolles, has written about how these images continue a tradition of courtship messages formerly expressed through bead work (and later, he argues, transferred as text messages via mobile phones) a few of these images on my final slide (where the citation is available in the notes with a link to the full text which I just discovered is available as Open Access ).

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TBLC script on UFDC African Studies Collections: Dan Reboussin 8 Slide 7: Fortune (11:00) I mention ed I to the Fortune sub collection, which brings together a small set of published and manuscript materials from his scholarly research for Shona the major language spoken in Zimbabwe. A small representation of the print and manuscript collection is available online but, for example, an index of the cataloged books in his collection provides researchers with an overview of the books that can be found in our Online Public Access Catalog. While the language primers are technically published, they are extremely ra re: early editions were manually produced locally, in small quantities for mission schools using letter presses. School children are known to be tough on books. Few examples of these have survived, but they document the development of standard orthograph ies for several Southern African languages and regional dialects. Slide 8 : Rikli (11:45) Some of the most popular resources on our site are the three Martin Rikli photo albums, which document defensive preparations for the Italian invasion of Ethiopia and its capital city Addis Ababa in 1936 along with some images of the early days of the military occupation As one League of Nations member attacked by another, the only substantial defensive action at the time came from Nazi Germany suggestion of noble intent Hitler was interest ed in weakening Mussolini before Italy joined the Axis pact in 1937). So, while intended for propaganda purposes, t hese high quality well preserved ima ges by a professional filmmaker offer a uniq ue, insider view of the court of Haile Selassie I, Emperor of Ethiopia from 1930 1974 F or example,

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TBLC script on UFDC African Studies Collections: Dan Reboussin 9 notice the dog under foot in the image on the right Chihuahuas ha d the run of h is imperial palace and show up in many of these photos The collection has truly interdisciplinary research value, document ing many civil institutions and events, offering insight into the historical moment, and presenting an astonishing wealth of images of everyday life, both in the city and throughout the Ethiopian countryside I guess you could call this one another of my favorite children. Slide 9: Digital African collections have been built collaboratively (13:00) The digital African Studies materials comprise a collaborative, diverse collection with original sources from locations such as the Harn Museum of Art (as mentioned earlier), the Map & Imagery Library, Rare Books & Manuscripts, as well as (in some cases) our main print books collection though materials considered for digitization from circulating locations are generally relocated during the process. [ If we have an extra moment I like to preview for you one feature of the can see the

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TBLC script on UFDC African Studies Collections: Dan Reboussin 10 Slide 10 : Materials diversity (13:30) The range of materials available in terms of subjects, time period, format, and location is extremely broad. Subjects include the arts, languages and literature, science, history, and culture. One of the earliest digitized African related items is the 1544 Munster map of the continent ( not the West African woodcut map on the previous slide which is also from the 16 th century but not as old ). S elf submission materials from the Ins titutional Repository represent the most current scholarship and projects Among the many f ormats represented are books, journals, gray literature, pho to graphs prints, maps, plasti c arts, scrapbooks with rea lia manuscripts, primary research materials, journal article s, preprint draft s, thes es, student class projects, and more. Slide 11: Science materials (14:30) Our focus in digitizing science materials is (at least in part) the history of UF faculty and other scientists working in Africa. These include such areas as field and conservation biology, entomology disease control, and agricultural development. The pink page on the left is one of the Ian Park er elephant data sheets, part of a small grant project just getting underway to transcribe biological data collected in the 1960s Making these data machine readable will support new research in veterinary medicine and other fields. I mentioned the anti ma laria work of Lewis Berner, but other entomological work i s represented by this map of Tse Tse fly distribution Finally, many a gricultural development materials are donated office collection.

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TBLC script on UFDC African Studies Collections: Dan Reboussin 11 Slide 1 2 : Content materials not found under sub collections (15:20) T hat was rushed but I did call it a whirlwind tour P lease remember that all of these collection s are online along with many others that touched on L just catch our breath for a moment, and ask : w s n o t represented by the se s ub collections ? These thematic groups absolutely do n t represent the complete contents of the African Studies collection s in UFDC simply convenient starting points for researchers to get oriented to the collection noting that overall, o nly one percent of our collections are digitized. to know more, please visit and s earch, browse, and explore on your own to help if you have any questions or encounter any problems. Slide 1 3 : Functions & features : browse (16:30) UFDC is crawled regularly and extensively by Google an d other search engines, so all of the se materials are available to general web searches, but you may find that getting into the database itself produces some good ideas and materials that you can This quick introduction to some of the functions and features of the UFDC database should help you navigate within the site Many of these features are situation, but the fact that may also stump you from time to time. I fi nd that as I go back to a page more than once, I get used to the functions and features available there.

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TBLC script on UFDC African Studies Collections: Dan Reboussin 12 much effective searching begins with browsing. Once you select a sub s a list with several alternative views (as upside down tabs for Index, Table, and Thumbnails ). Notice the facets on the left for narrowing results. You can browse at the full c ollection level too, using the facets on the left to limit your results. I find th at browsing (all items, new items, and the map browse if applicable) helps me to familiar ize myself with the contents of a sub collection allow ing for serendipity in ways that searching m ay not The m ap browse is a cool feature available for some collections, but for any African materials yet. Slide 1 4 : Functions & features : search (18:00) Search is a nother valuable tool. Simple text search and advanced text search are available within the sub collection or for the full UFDC collection, using the labeled tabs you see here You can choose to limit the fields searched for individual terms using the Advanced Search tab (author, title, etc.) or allow the search to cut across all fields. There are radio buttons to control precision, too. The effectiveness of the se options is limited by the availability of sufficient metadata, so just because your initial that the target ed resource other means, such as browsing or contacting the subject specialist for assistance W e know this as librarians, but it can be helpful to remind ourselves that digital collection metadata

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TBLC script on UFDC African Studies Collections: Dan Reboussin 13 Sl ide 1 5 : Functions & features : working with search results (19:00) So, you manage or manipulate the results? As you can see here, users can switch the screen presentation among the Brief, T able, and T humbnail views I find that switching back and forth helps me notice different aspects of materials ( even when the contents of a collection ) Again, this allows for serendipity and enhances opportunities for discovery. Th e various view s also allow for sorting by various criteria ( such as Rank, Title, and Date) Within a volume, there are additional display controls for thumbnail size, number of thumbnails displayed per page, a page selection dropdown, and (where available) a page turner view. Once you select an individual page or image, tabs are available for re viewing the Citation information, the Page Image, (as we saw) a 360 degree view in some cases, or enabling the Zoomable view (with image tools). These allow detail ed views, selection and composition for jpeg downloads and further work in your own graphics application. For more demanding needs such as creating illustrations for publication, you may use on the bottom left footer to request higher resolution files (the link preserves the page context for the recipient, so there is no nee d to cut and paste url s ).

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TBLC script on UFDC African Studies Collections: Dan Reboussin 14 Slide 1 6 : Functions & features : Zoom quality and image rotation (20:15) The 360 degree image rotation view that we previewed earlier is available only for 3 dimensional objects, allowing users to select the portion of a piece to study with the zoom tool. Here is an example of the level of z oom available the bottom line is that it gets really close. T ogether, t h ese are important feature s for the research use of the se collections. A rt historians for example with this image, can document the wear on individual beads and study their attachment to the object substrate, which is a woven hat. Slide 1 7 : Functions & features : Citation information tab (20:45) The Citation bibliographic and metadata information hub It displays all of the item and collection information available and needed for complete scholarly attribution purposes (including the permanent url address) Usage information for individual items is also publically available in the upside down tab to the right. Slide 1 8 : Research resources (21:15) There are a few additional points to make for research users of these online collections. This image i ndicates where to find additional information on Fair Use and Source Attribution ( notice the link on the left of each page footer Also notice which allows researchers to create an account to save item links searches, and to organize their results.

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TBLC script on UFDC African Studies Collections: Dan Reboussin 15 Slide 19: FAQ (22:00) Three common questions are : Q: Can I print an image for personal or scholarly use? A: Yes. Images and contents are provided as O pen A ccess resources, so they are available for personal and scholarly use with proper attribution. Q: When w ill more material be digitized? A: Materials are digitized based on collection development needs, research activities, preservation considerations, staff time, and funding av ailable. If you need something particular for your research, please contact the collection curator or subject specialist. Q: How do I access print materials? A: Search for print and other format library materials in the Online Public Access Catalog availa ble at: http:// uf.catalog.fcla.edu/uf.jsp o r contact the collection curator or subject specialist W e have plenty of time so p lease feel free to raise any of your own questions now. Slide 20: Thank you (23:00) visit the African Studies Collections at the url shown here. any further questions now or contact me personally later. This entire presentation is available online in the UF Institutional Repository as shown on the bottom right of this slide ( at http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00013641 ). (24:00)



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http://ufdc.ufl.edu/africa1

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Presenter Introduction Dan Reboussin, Ph.D African Studies Librarian University of Florida danrebo@ufl.edu http ://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/african_studies

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Collection status & goals Overview of collection contents Significance Functions & features Research resources FAQ Continuing our conversation Agenda Manis Scrapbook : http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074840

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Status: Service across 10 UF colleges, for 100+ faculty affiliates, to Title VI National Resource Center, totaling 1.25 + million views since 2006. Original materials located in many branches and at the Harn Museum of Art. Goals: Develop and manage collections to support past, ongoing, and future needs of scholars. Collection status & goals http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093606

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Distinctive: only African collection south of North Carolina and east of Kansas Unique: many items are unique, rare, or scarcely held Coherent: selection in support of a large and diverse academic program http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026731 Significance

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The Arts of Africa: Harn Museum of Art George Fortune Collection : Shona language, Southern Bantu linguistics Derscheid Collection : Rwanda colonial and pre colonial history Onitsha Market Literature : first literate generation of Igbo people Photographs of Africa: Rikli (Ethiopia ); Manis (Liberia ); Berner (Gold Coast / Ghana); Ndimande (South Africa ). http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00004587 Collection Contents Landing pages: sub collections

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Collection Contents George Fortune Collection: Shona language, Southern Bantu linguistics http:// ufdc.ufl.edu/fortune

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Collection Contents Martin Rikli Photographs, 1935 1936 http:// ufdc.ufl.edu/fortune

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Collection Contents Woodcut map of West Africa, 1575. Onitsha Market Chapbook (Nigeria). Kuba ceremonial mpaan hat, Dem. Rep. Congo (360 view). Map and Imagery Library http:// ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083065 Harn Museum of Art http:// ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075574 Rare Books http:// ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00004290

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Collection Contents Materials diversity: Subject matter Time Span: 1544 present Formats Original collection location Major Marable & violin http ://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098458/00226

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Collection Contents Scientific research: historic and current publications http:// ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073319 http:// ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00013409 http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00096126

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Books : dictionaries, histories, Journals : peer reviewed, historic newspapers, popular Technical reports : census, conservation, agriculture, urban issues, health Maps : antique, historical, current ( topos charts, GIS) Manuscripts : photo albums, scrapbooks, card collections IR materials : current journals, collection brochure, class materials, preprints, ETDs (dissertations and theses) Monte Belo lighthouse, Limpopo bar http ://ufdc.ufl.edu/l/UF00095434/00005/ Collection Contents Landing pages not comprehensive:

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Functions & features Browse: All Items Thumbnail view Background image, slides 11 13, 15 & 16: Disk pendant ( akrafokonmu ): http:// ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00096997

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Functions & features Advanced Search Specific Search

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Functions & features Items returned in search for: haile selassie Image file controls for zoom functions

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Zoom q uality, rotation Functions & features N ote signs of wear. Some images offer 360 view. The Arts of Africa: Between the Beads http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083064

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Research resources Citation tab

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student Research resources Copyright, fair use, attribution, myUFDC

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Can I print an image for personal or scholarly use? When will more material be digitized? How do I access print materials? FAQ http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00000209

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This presentation is available in the UF Institutional Repository: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00003162/ Studio photographs of Z.J.S. Ndimande & Son. Greytown Natal. South Africa. Visit our collections at: http :// ufdc.ufl.edu/africa1 Thank you.