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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00002934/00001
 Material Information
Title: Design Safety Standards for Electrical Systems: Hazardous (classified) Locations -- OSHA Standard 1910.307
Physical Description: Fact Sheet
Creator: Lehtola, Carol J.
Publisher: University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2000
 Notes
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status: Published
General Note: "Original publication date December 2000. Reviewed February 2008."
General Note: "AE287"
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00002934:00001


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ABE287 Design Safety Standards for Electrical Systems: Hazardous (classified) Locations -OSHA Standard 1910.3071Carol J. Lehtola, Charles M. Brown, and William J. Becker2 1. This document is AE287, one of a series of the Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Original publication date December 2000. Reviewed February 2008. Visit the EDIS Web Site at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu. 2. Carol J. Lehtola, assistant professor and Extension Agricultural Safety Specialist; Charles M. Brown, coordinator information/publication services; William J. Becker, professor emeritus; Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Larry Arrington, DeanThe Impact of Safety on Florida AgricultureFlorida agriculture, including forestry and fishing, made an annual economic impact of $53 billion in 1998. More than 81,000 people work on the 40,000 farms in the state, and more than 50,000 are employed in other activities related to agriculture. The state's agricultural enterprises range from large citrus, vegetable and cattle operations to small family-operated farms. From 1989 to 1998, there were approximately 240 deaths related to agriculture in Florida, according to data compiled by the Deep-South Agricultural Health and Safety Center. In addition, agriculture has one of the highest injury and death rates among U.S. industries. Safety in Florida agriculture is challenging because: the state's agricultural enterprises are diverse, safety knowledge among workers varies, manual labor is used extensively, the climate creates year-round heat stress. Therefore, it is vital to assist the public in learning about OSHA documents related to agriculture. More related information is available at the following Web sites: Florida AgSafe: OSHA Regulations: OverviewThis document, a condensation of Section 1910.307 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (29 CFR), is not intended to be totally inclusive but rather to highlight the information and requirements in the complete OSHA standard that owners and

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Design Safety Standards for Electrical Systems: Hazardous (classified) Locations -OSHA.... 2managers of agricultural businesses should understand. Refer to the OSHA Web site given above for the complete standard and for court interpretations of the standard.Contents of OSHA Standard 1910.307 Section 1910.307(a) -Scope Section 1910.307(b) -Electrical Installations Section 1910.307(c) -Conduits Section 1910.307(d) -Equipment in Division 2 Locations Definitions of Classes from OSHA Standard 1910.399 NOTE: Some sections of OSHA standards are labeled "Reserved." This label implies either that information has been deleted from the previous version of the standard or that additions to the standard are anticipated. Because standards often reference other standards, it is important that paragraph numbers remain consistent.Section 1910.307(a) -ScopeThis section covers the requirements for electric equipment and wiring in locations which are classified depending on the properties of the flammable vapors, liquids or gases, or combustible dusts or fibers which may be present therein and the likelihood that a flammable or combustible concentration or quantity is present. Hazardous (classified) locations may be found in occupancies such as, but not limited to, the following: aircraft hangars, gasoline dispensing and service stations, bulk storage plants for gasoline or other volatile flammable liquids, paint-finishing process plants, health care facilities, agricultural or other facilities where excessive combustible dusts may be present, marinas, boat yards, and petroleum and chemical processing plants. Each room, section or area shall be considered individually in determining its classification. These hazardous (classified) locations are assigned six designations as follows: Class I, Division 1 Class I, Division 2 Class II, Division 1 Class II, Division 2 Class III, Division 1 Class III, Division 2. For definitions of these locations see 1910.399(a). (Class definitions are included at the end of this publications.) All applicable requirements in this subpart shall apply to hazardous (classified) locations, unless modified by provisions of this section.Section 1910.307(b) -Electrical InstallationsEquipment, wiring methods, and installations of equipment in hazardous (classified) locations shall be intrinsically safe, approved for the hazardous (classified) location, or safe or for the hazardous (classified) location. Requirements for each of these options are as follows: 1910.307(b)(1) -Intrinsically Safe. Equipment and associated wiring approved as intrinsically safe shall be permitted in any hazardous (classified) location for which it is approved. 1910.307(b)(2) -Approved for the Hazardous (Classified) Location (i) -Equipment shall be approved not only for the class of location but also for the ignitable or combustible properties of the specific gas, vapor, dust, or fiber that will be present. Note: NFPA 70, the National Electrical Code, lists or defines hazardous gases, vapors, and dusts by "Groups" characterized by their ignitable or combustible properties. (ii) -Equipment shall be marked to show the class, group, and operating temperature or temperature range, based on operation in a 40 degrees C ambient, for which it is approved. The temperature marking may not exceed the ignition temperature of the specific gas or vapor to be encountered. However, the following provisions modify this marking requirement for specific equipment: (A) -Equipment of the non-heat-producing type, such as junction boxes, conduit, and fittings, and equipment of the heat-producing type having a maximum temperature not more than 100 degrees C (212 degrees F) need not have a marked operating temperature or temperature range.

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Design Safety Standards for Electrical Systems: Hazardous (classified) Locations -OSHA.... 3(B) -Fixed lighting fixtures marked for use in Class I, Division 2 locations only, need not be marked to indicate the group. (C) -Fixed general-purpose equipment in Class I locations, other than lighting fixtures, which is acceptable for use in Class I, Division 2 locations need not be marked with the class, group, division, or operating temperature. (D) -Fixed dust-tight equipment, other than lighting fixtures, which is acceptable for use in Class II, Division 2 and Class III locations need not be marked with the class, group, division, or operating temperature. 1910.307(b)(3) -Safe for the Hazardous (Classified) Location. Equipment which is safe for the location shall be of a type and design which the employer demonstrates will provide protection from the hazards arising from the combustibility and flammability of vapors, liquids, gases, dusts, or fibers. Note: The National Electrical Code, NFPA 70, contains guidelines for determining the type and design of equipment and installations which will meet this requirement. The guidelines of this document address electric wiring, equipment, and systems installed in hazardous (classified) locations and contain specific provisions for the following: wiring methods, wiring connections; conductor insulation, flexible cords, sealing and drainage, transformers, capacitors, switches, circuit breakers, fuses, motor controllers, receptacles, attachment plugs, meters, relays, instruments, resistors, generators, motors, lighting fixtures, storage battery charging equipment, electric cranes, electric hoists and similar equipment, utilization equipment, signaling systems, alarm systems, remote control systems, local loud speaker and communication systems, ventilation piping, live parts, lightning surge protection, and grounding. Compliance with these guidelines will constitute one means, but not the only means, of compliance with this paragraph.Section 1910.307(c) -ConduitsAll conduits shall be threaded and shall be made wrench-tight. Where it is impractical to make a threaded joint tight, a bonding jumper shall be utilized.Section 1910.307(d) -Equipment in Division 2 LocationsEquipment that has been approved for a Division 1 location may be installed in a Division 2 location of the same class and group. General-purpose equipment or equipment in general-purpose enclosures may be installed in Division 2 locations if the equipment does not constitute a source of ignition under normal operating conditions.Definitions of Classes from OSHA Standard 1910.399The following class definitions are taken from OSHA Standard 1910.399 -Definitions Applicable to Subpart S: Electrical General. Class I Locations Class I locations are those in which flammable gases or vapors are or may be present in the air in quantities sufficient to produce explosive or ignitable mixtures. Class I locations include the following: (i) Class I, Division 1. A Class I, Division 1 location is a location: (a) in which hazardous concentrations of flammable gases or vapors may exist under normal operating conditions; or (b) in which hazardous concentrations of such gases or vapors may exist frequently because of repair or maintenance operations or because of leakage; or (c) in which breakdown or faulty operation of equipment or processes might release hazardous concentrations of flammable gases or vapors, and might also cause simultaneous failure of electric equipment. Note: This classification usually includes locations where volatile flammable liquids or liquefied flammable gases are transferred from one container to another; interiors of spray booths and areas in the vicinity of spraying and painting operations where volatile flammable solvents are used; locations containing open tanks or vats of volatile flammable liquids; drying rooms or compartments for the evaporation of flammable solvents; locations containing fat and oil extraction

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Design Safety Standards for Electrical Systems: Hazardous (classified) Locations -OSHA.... 4equipment using volatile flammable solvents; portions of cleaning and dyeing plants where flammable liquids are used; gas generator rooms and other portions of gas manufacturing plants where flammable gas may escape; inadequately ventilated pump rooms for flammable gas or for volatile flammable liquids; the interiors of refrigerators and freezers in which volatile flammable materials are stored in open, lightly stoppered, or easily ruptured containers; and all other locations where ignitable concentrations of flammable vapors or gases are likely to occur in the course of normal operations. (ii) Class I, Division 2. A Class I, Division 2 location is a location: (a) in which volatile flammable liquids or flammable gases are handled, processed, or used, but in which the hazardous liquids, vapors, or gases will normally be confined within closed containers or closed systems from which they can escape only in case of accidental rupture or breakdown of such containers or systems, or in case of abnormal operation of equipment; or (b) in which hazardous concentrations of gases or vapors are normally prevented by positive mechanical ventilation, and which might become hazardous through failure or abnormal operations of the ventilating equipment; or (c) that is adjacent to a Class I, Division 1 location, and to which hazardous concentrations of gases or vapors might occasionally be communicated unless such communication is prevented by adequate positive ventilation from a source of clean air, and effective safeguards against ventilation failure are provided. Note: This classification usually includes locations where volatile flammable liquids or flammable gases or vapors are used, but which would become hazardous only in case of an accident or of some unusual operating condition. The quantity of flammable material that might escape in case of accident, the adequacy of ventilating equipment, the total area involved, and the record of the industry or business with respect to explosions or fires are all factors that merit consideration in determining the classification and extent of each location. Piping without valves, checks, meters, and similar devices would not ordinarily introduce a hazardous condition even though used for flammable liquids or gases. Locations used for the storage of flammable liquids or a liquefied or compressed gases in sealed containers would not normally be considered hazardous unless also subject to other hazardous conditions. Electrical conduits and their associated enclosures separated from process fluids by a single seal or barrier are classed as a Division 2 location if the outside of the conduit and enclosures is a nonhazardous location. Class II Locations Class II locations are those that are hazardous because of the presence of combustible dust. Class II locations include the following: (i) Class II, Division 1. A Class II, Division 1 location is a location: (a) In which combustible dust is or may be in suspension in the air under normal operating conditions, in quantities sufficient to produce explosive or ignitable mixtures; or (b) where mechanical failure or abnormal operation of machinery or equipment might cause such explosive or ignitable mixtures to be produced, and might also provide a source of ignition through simultaneous failure of electric equipment, operation of protection devices, or from other causes, or (c) in which combustible dusts of an electrically conductive nature may be present. Note: This classification may include areas of grain handling and processing plants, starch plants, sugarplants, malting plants, hayplants, coal pulverizing plants, areas where metal dusts and powders are produced or processed, and other similar locations which contain dust producing machinery and equipment (except where the equipment is dustor vented to the outside). These areas would have combustible dust in the air, under normal operating conditions, in quantities sufficient to produce explosive or ignitable mixtures. Combustible dusts which are electrically nonconductive include dusts produced in the handling and processing of grain and grain products, pulverized sugar and cocoa, dried egg and milk powders, pulverized spices, starch and pastes, potato and woodflour, oil meal from beans and seed, dried hay, and other organic materials which may produce combustible dusts when processed or handled. Dusts containing magnesium or aluminum are particularly hazardous and the use

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Design Safety Standards for Electrical Systems: Hazardous (classified) Locations -OSHA.... 5of extreme caution is necessary to avoid ignition and explosion. (ii) Class II, Division 2. A Class II, Division 2 location is a location in which: (a) combustible dust will not normally be in suspension in the air in quantities sufficient to produce explosive or ignitable mixtures, and dust accumulations are normally insufficient to interfere with the normal operation of electrical equipment or other apparatus; or (b) dust may be in suspension in the air as a result of infrequent malfunctioning of handling or processing equipment, and dust accumulations resulting therefrom may be ignitable by abnormal operation or failure of electrical equipment or other apparatus. Note: This classification includes locations where dangerous concentrations of suspended dust would not be likely but where dust accumulations might form on or in the vicinity of electric equipment. These areas may contain equipment from which appreciable quantities of dust would escape under abnormal operating conditions or be adjacent to a Class II Division 1 location, as described above, into which an explosive or ignitable concentration of dust may be put into suspension under abnormal operating conditions. Class III Locations Class III locations are those that are hazardous because of the presence of easily ignitable fibers or flyings but in which such fibers or flyings are not likely to be in suspension in the air in quantities sufficient to produce ignitable mixtures. Class III locations include the following: (i) Class III, Division 1. A Class III, Division 1 location is a location in which easily ignitable fibers or materials producing combustible flyings are handled, manufactured, or used. Note: Such locations usually include some parts of rayon, cotton, and other textile mills; combustible fiber manufacturing and processing plants; cotton gins and cottonmills; flaxplants; clothing manufacturing plants; woodworking plants, and establishments; and industries involving similar hazardous processes or conditions. Easily ignitable fibers and flyings include rayon, cotton (including cotton linters and cotton waste), sisal or henequen, istle, jute, hemp, tow, cocoa fiber, oakum, baled waste kapok, Spanish moss, excelsior, and other materials of similar nature. (ii) Class III, Division 2. A Class III, Division 2 location is a location in which easily ignitable fibers are stored or handled, except in process of manufacture.