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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00002736/00001
 Material Information
Title: Scheduling Production of Florida Vegetables
Physical Description: Fact Sheet
Creator: Maynard, Donald N.
Publisher: University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2006
 Notes
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status: Published
General Note: "Original publication date May 1995. Revised August 2006."
General Note: "HS 204"
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00002736:00001


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HS 204 Scheduling Production of Florida Vegetables1 Donald N. Maynard2 1. This document is HS 204, one of a series of the Horticultural Sciences Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Original publication date May 1995. Revised August 2006. Visit the EDIS Web Site at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu. 2. Donald N. Maynard, Professor-Vegetable Crops Specialist, Gulf Coast Research and Education Center-Bradenton, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville 32611 The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Larry Arrington, Dean Experienced vegetable growers have learned to time the harvest period of the crops that they grow to avoid unfavorable weather and to take advantage of market windows. On the other hand, when alternative or new crops are introduced into a production area, there may be little information or experience on which to base planting schedules and projected harvests.Likewise, new growers or experienced growers of other crops may have difficulty in determining the correct planting date of a new crop for a particular market. Many commercial seed catalogs provide days to maturity data as part of variety descriptions. These data correct for the area where the evaluation occurred, most commonly California or the northern United States. Unfortunately, days to harvest listed in seed catalogs may be quite misleading for Florida growers. Pumpkin production for Halloween is an excellent example of this situation. The market is fixed as the last two weeks of October and the product is fairly perishable under unprotected Florida conditions. Therefore, it is important to have the crop in prime condition for harvest on about October 15. Most pumpkins varieties listed in seed catalogs have from 100 to 120 days required for maturity. Using this information, pumpkins should be planted from June 15 to July 5. However, in trails conducted in central Florida, pumpkins required only 82 to 85 days from seeding and 79 days from transplanting to reach maturity. This means that seeding July 20 or transplanting on July 26 would result in an October 15 harvest. Accordingly, there is a two to five week discrepancy between listed times to maturity and actual times to maturity under Florida summer conditions. Many Florida production areas have distinct fall and spring seasons, and time to maturity is usually less for the fall season than for the spring season. For example, cucumbers, from seeding, at Leesburg required an average of 57 day for the spring crop but only 45 days for the fall crop. At Bradenton, tomatoes required an average of 90 days in the spring and 84 days from transplanting in the fall. Time of maturity within a production season varies from south to north on the peninsula. For example, peppers in the spring season required 94 days at Boynton Beach, 84 days at Immokalee, 75 days at Bradenton, and 74 days at Quincy from transplanting. Even though all of these plantings were for the spring season harvest, plantings were later in the season from southerly to northerly locations, and

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Scheduling Production of Florida Vegetables 2 growing conditions improved as the season progressed, thereby reducing the number of days from transplanting to first harvest. In addition to the seasonal and geographic effects on maturity, varieties of nearly all vegetables may be classed as being early, midseason, or late in maturity. In some crops, early varieties may mature as much as a week or two earlier than late varieties. Because of the discrepancy between published and actual time to maturity and seasonal and site variations in days to maturity, the accompanying data were compiled from the annual Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Circulars on vegetable variety trail results that are listed in the References section. Note that the days to harvest is for the earliest-maturing varieties. When more than one years data are available, the days to harvest is an average. The range in days to maturity occurs because of year to year variation in weather and variation of planting time within a production season. References Lazin, M.B. 1983.Vegetable Variety Trial Results in Florida for 1981. Fla. Agr. Expt. Sta. Circ. S-304 Maynard, D. N. 1983 Vegetable Variety Trial Results in Florida for 1982. Fla. Agr. Expt. Stat. Circ. S-306 Maynard, D.N. 1984.Vegetable Trial Results in Florida for 1983. Fla. Agr.Expt. Sta.Circ. S-314 Maynard D.N. 1986. Vegetable Variety Trial Results in Florida for 1984. Fla .Agr. Expt. Sta. Circ. S-325 Maynard, D.N. 1987. Vegetable Variety Trial Results in Florida for 1985. Fla. Agr.. Expt. Sta. Circ. S-338 Maynard, D.N. 1987.Vegetable Variety Trial Results in Florida for 1986. Fla. Agr. Expt. Sta. Circ. S-341. Maynard, D.N. 1988 Vegetable Variety Trial Results in Florida for 1987. Fla. Agr. Expt. Stat. Circ. S-358 Maynard, D.N. 1989. Vegerable Variety Trial Results in Florida for 1988. Fla. Agr. Expt. Sta. Circ. S-363

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Scheduling Production of Florida Vegetables 3 Table 1. Days to first harvest, by season of harvest and method of stand establishment, for vegetables at several Florida locations. VegetableLocationCrop ForNo. of Days to Harvest Establishment1 Harvest2 Observations Range Average BLACK BEAN Ft. Pierce Ft. Pierce S S W S 1 2 93-94 97 94 BUSH BEANDelray Beach Delray Beach Delray Beach Ft. Pierce Homestead Quincy Quincy S S S S S S S W S F F S S F 8 5 2 1 4 1 1 60-67 48-55 45 58-66 64 51 64 61 61 50 50 BROCCLOI Belle Glade Belle Glade Bradenton Bradenton Bradenton Gainesville Gainesville Quincy Quincy S S T T T T T T T W S F W S F S F S 1 1 1 2 2 3 4 6 7 52-55 47 50-69 49-55 48-54 47-61 75 79 46 54 47 63 52 51 55 CABBAGEBradenton Ft. Pierce Sanford T T T W W W 2 1 4 52-59 75-90 56 58 84 CANTALOUPE Bradenton Gainesville Leesburg Quincy T S S S S S S S 2 4 17 5 66-77 82-96 50-99 70-88 72 87 83 77 CARROT ZellwoodS W 3 118-129 124 CAULIFLOWER Bradenton Bradenton Bradenton Gainesville Sanford T T T T T W F S F W 7 4 4 1 1 37-64 44-67 44-62 37-64 44-67 44-62 CELERY Belle Glade Belle Glade South Bay South Bay T T T T F S W S 13 13 1 1 84-103 78-93 91 82 98 99 CHINESE CABBAGE (Napa) Belle Glade Belle Glade Belle Glade Bradenton Quincy S S S T T W F S F F 2 1 1 1 2 74-77 67-69 76 55 83 70 68 CHINESE CABBAGE (Pak-choi) Bradenton Quincy T T F F 1 2 41-42 42 42 COLLARD Quincy Quincy T T F S 4 8 41-72 50-97 56 70

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Scheduling Production of Florida Vegetables 4 Table 1. Days to first harvest, by season of harvest and method of stand establishment, for vegetables at several Florida locations. CUCUMBER (slicing) Bradenton Leesburg Leesburg Sanford Sanford T S S S S F S F S F 1 12 6 3 2 37-67 40-50 44-51 42-48 29 57 45 48 45 CUCUMBER (pickling) Leesburg Leesburg S S S F 10 1 44-59 55 37 EGGPLANTBradentonT S 2 75-90 83 LEEK Bradenton T S 3 95-143 112 LETTUCE (Crisphead) Belle GladeS S 7 70-93 75 LETTUCE (Romaine) Belle Glade Belle Glade S S S F 2 1 75-78 77 65 OKRA BradentonS S 2 53-54 54 ONION Belle Glade Bradenton Bradenton Gainesville Leesburg Leesburg Quincy S S T S S T T S S S S S S S 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 78-97 155 162 123 220 189 182 88 PEA (snap) Bradenton Gainesville S S S S 1 1 42 47 PEA (Snow) Bradenton Gainesville S S S S 2 1 42-49 46 61 PEA (Southern) Ft. PierceS S 3 84-101 94 PEPPER (Bell) Bownton Beach Bradenton Delray Beach Delray Beach Delray Beach Ft. Pierce Immokalee Immokalee Immokalee Quincy T T S S S T T T T T F S S F W F S F W S 1 8 5 1 4 1 5 3 1 2 62-92 113-121 113-133 77-96 68-74 70-78 94 75 116 92 118 59 84 71 85 74 PEPPER (Cubanelle) Delray BeachS S 3 96-118 103 POTATO Hastings Homestead S S S S 16 1 97-114 106 104 PUMPKINBradenton Bradenton Leesburg Sanford S T S S F F F F 1 2 2 1 78-79 81-82 83 79 82 85 SQUASH (Winter) Leesburg S S 8 84-100 91 SQUASH (Summer) Ft. Pierce Leesburg S S F S 1 19 44-64 35 47

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Scheduling Production of Florida Vegetables 5 Table 1. Days to first harvest, by season of harvest and method of stand establishment, for vegetables at several Florida locations. SWEET CORN Belle Glade Belle Glade Bradenton Bradenton Palm Beach Sanford Zellwood S S S S S S S S F F S S S S 4 2 1 7 1 1 9 63-83 64-71 49-60 61-109 71 68 63 56 71 77 73 RADICCHIOBradenton Bradenton T T S F 1 1 63 63 RADISH Belle Glade Belle Glade Belle Glade S S S W S F 4 4 6 25-38 21-29 27-49 33 24 33 STRAWBERRYDover Gainesville Quincy T T T FW W S 8 3 3 46-103 119-148 147-171 67 137 162 TOMATO Bradenton Bradenton Ft. Pierce Ft. Pierce Gainesville Homestead Immokalee Immokalee Quincy Quincy T T T T T T T T T T S F S F S W S F S F 8 10 8 8 2 1 5 5 6 1 81-101 73-90 70-81 72-103 84-91 85-105 71-89 78-91 90 84 75 82 88 86 94 83 83 71 TOMATO (Cherry) Bradenton Bradenton T T S F 2 3 75-78 63-79 77 71 WATERMELON Leesburg Live Oak Immokalee Quincy S S S S S S S S 14 1 6 7 78-112 85-127 71-95 97 94 108 85 WATERMELON (Icebox) Bradenton Leesburg Live Oak Immokalee T S S T S S S S 3 2 1 2 73-86 77-109 83-85 78 93 91 84 WATERMELON (Seedless) Bradenton Leesburg Quincy T T T S S S 1 3 1 102-112 93 105 88 1S=direct seeding, T=transplanting. 2For harvest in the fall (F=Oct, Nov, Dec); winter (W=Jan, Feb, Mar); or spring (S=Apr, May, June).