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Style Guide : Guidelines for Transcribing and Editing Oral Histories

University of Florida Institutional Repository
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00002513/00001

Material Information

Title: Style Guide : Guidelines for Transcribing and Editing Oral Histories
Physical Description: guidelines
Creator: Samuel Proctor Oral History Program
Publisher: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Place of Publication: University of Florida
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Genre: guidelines

Notes

Abstract: Provides consistent, efficient guidelines on how to transcribe and edit oral histories collected. Adapted from “Style Guide: A Quick Reference for Editing Oral Memoirs.” © 2007 Baylor University Institute for Oral History
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Marilyn Ochoa.
Publication Status: Published

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00002513:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00002513/00001

Material Information

Title: Style Guide : Guidelines for Transcribing and Editing Oral Histories
Physical Description: guidelines
Creator: Samuel Proctor Oral History Program
Publisher: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Place of Publication: University of Florida
Publication Date: 2007

Subjects

Genre: guidelines

Notes

Abstract: Provides consistent, efficient guidelines on how to transcribe and edit oral histories collected. Adapted from “Style Guide: A Quick Reference for Editing Oral Memoirs.” © 2007 Baylor University Institute for Oral History
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Marilyn Ochoa.
Publication Status: Published

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00002513:00001


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STYLE GUIDE : Guidelines for T ranscribing and Editing Oral Histories Adapted from "Style Guide: A Quick Reference for Editing Oral Memoirs." 2007 Baylor University Institute for Oral History

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! TABLE OF CONTENTS Transcripts and Transcript Summary ................................ ................................ ............... 2 Formatting Guidelines ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 3 Completing a Transcript .. 4 Sample Transcript ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 5 6 Transcripts 101 .7 Inaudible Spots ................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 7 Brackets ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................... 7 Common Questions ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 7 Improper Grammar ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 8 Dashes ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................. 8 Ellipses ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................. 8 False Starts ................................ ................................ ................................ ...................... 9 Feedback Words ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 9 Fil ler Words ................................ ................................ ................................ ...................... 9 Dates ................................ ................................ ................................ .............................. 10 Spelling Guidelines ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 10 Proofreading ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 11 Abbreviations ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 11 Capitalization ................................ ................................ ................................ .................. 12 Commas ................................ ................................ ................................ ......................... 14 Grades (Scholastic) ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 14 Hyphens ................................ ................................ ................................ ......................... 14 Italics ................................ ................................ ................................ .............................. 1 5 Numbers ................................ ................................ ................................ ......................... 16 Paragraphs ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 17 Plurals ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 1 7 Punctuation ................................ ................................ ................................ .................... 18 Audit Editing ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 19 Work log and Project log ................................ ................................ ................................ 2 0

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# TRANSCRIPTS Completing a transcript requires two documents: 1. The draft transcript o To access audio: Share Projects XYZ Project XYZ Audio o To save document : Share Projects XYZ Project XYZ Transcripts XYZ # Name Date dr/ae/final Dr: draft, ae: audit edit, final: final copy Complete the draft transcript according to the steps outlined on the following pages. 2. The transcript summary detailing significant themes of the interview and including 4 5 keywords. o To save document : Share Projects XYZ Project XYZ Transcripts XYZ # Name Date summary Complete the transcript summary referring to this example: Dr. Richard Lee Bucciarelli talks about his work in neonatology and his experience working in the Pediatrics Department at Shands Hospital. He saw the creation of the Children's Medical Services program which provided care to children in low income families. Bucciarelli also was heavily involved in advocacy in Washington DC and the Tallahassee. Bucciarelli worked as Chair of the Department of Pediatrics and pushed for a creation of a children's hospital at Shands, and finally saw the building of the Shands Hospital for Children. Key Terms: Advocacy, Pediatrics, Shands Hospital for Children, Pedicare

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$ FORMATTING A TRANSCRIPT The first page's h eader Should be on the top left of only the first page and should contain the project code number, the name of the interviewee, the interviewer, and the date of the interview. It should look like this: UF 999 Interviewee: Roberta Peacock Interviewer: Paul Ortiz Date: July 11, 2006 How to add a header in Microsoft Word 1. on the top left of the toolbar click the "Insert tab 2. then click "Headers" 3. Select the first item in the drop down box with the text on the left hand side. 4. Also make sure you select "different first page" so that when you start adding page numbers on the second page it will not delete your first page header. 5. T he headers should be in Arial 12 pt. font When you are finished adding the header, click "close header" on the top right hand side of the paper so you can begin typing in the body of the document. The header on every other page should follow this format: The header on every subsequent page should be on the top right hand side in this format: Project Code N u mber; Interviewee's Last Name; P age N umber. It should look like this UF 999; Peacock; Page 2 To insert the header and page number on the second page, 1. go back under "insert," tab 2. then click "Page Number." 3. Click on "Top of Page," and select the third item in the drop down box that displays a number on the right hand side. 4. within the header, type the project code number; person's last name; page

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% (the number will automatically be added) The body of the document The body should be double spaced and in Arial 12 pt. font. The paragraph format should be a "hanging" indent. To select a "hanging" indent 1. Click the "Home" tab 2. Click the small arrow to the right of the "paragraph" section. A dialog box should pop up. 3. In the "indentation" section, click the drop down box under "special" 4. Change from "none" to "hanging" Initials Use the first letter of the last name to denote who is speaking. Follow the letter with a colon press tab to create a large space. If we apply this format to Roberta Peacock and Paul Ortiz it would look like this: O: When were you born? P: I was born November 12, 1921. If both people's last names start with the same letter, use the first letter of the first name also. SE: When were you born? FE: I was born January 31, 1953. If someone has a hyphenated last name, use the first letter of the first word. For example, John Tomlinson Smith would be: T: Completing a t ranscript Complete a transcript by marking [End of i nterview] and signing the document for the stage that you worked on it. It should look like this: [End of interview] Transcribed by: Scott Kraff, August 1, 2012

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& Audit edited by: Diana Dombrowski, August 2, 2012 Final edited by: Isht Vatsa, August 3, 2012 Here is a sample of what the formatted pages should look like.

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'

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( TRANSCRIBING : FORMAT TING and GUIDELINES INAUDIBLE SPOTS IN RECORDING When speech on a recording is inaudible try play ing it at higher volume and/or slower or faster speed. If the interviewer works for SPOHP, ask her or him for help! If you can make an educated guess, type the closest possible approximation of what you hear and bold it the first time it appears. If you can, Google your approximation to try to verify your guess (usually for names or plac e names). I went to school in Maryville Jane Krackow used to be the department head in English If you cannot make a guess as to what is said note "inaudible" and the time elapsed in brackets We'd take our cotton to Mr. [inaudible 33:07 ] gin in Cameron. BRACKETS Use brackets to around anything the transcriber adds to the document. a pause in recording, when recording is turned off and then on again, when sound fades out, et cetera: [ B reak in r ecording] the end of the interview: [E nd of i nterview] **Don't forget to leave a signature of the document in your work! See above section for instructions. D escriptive terms: [L augh ter ] [Crying] [Telephone R ings] COMMON QUESTIONS DO DON'T okay OK, O.K. a lot alot et cetera etc. yeah ya, yea World War II WWII, World War Two, for a while for awhile awhile ago a while ago all right alright until, till til

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) nowadays now a days apiece a piece inasmuch as in as much as insofar as in so far as I MPROPER GRAMMAR Do not change improper grammar said by the speaker. It is okay to leave the following as is: Kinda Gonna Wanna Fella Double negatives I ain t never been in that kinda situation before. DASHES Instances to use the dash ( ) an interruption by another speaker P: I am from a small town near O: What is the name of the town? P: Gainesville. before and after someone interrupts himself D: That was back in July no wait it was August of 1960. ELLIPSES Use the ellipses ( . ) when the speaker trails off resulting in a long pause. The ellipses consists of three periods, each separated by a space, and separated from the word it follows by a space Correct: B: That was a long time ago, but . A: What were you going to say? B: I can't really remember that well because it was so long ago. FALSE STARTS In general, do not include false starts or repeated phrases. The only exception is if the false start enhances the statement. Use your judgment to determine if this rule applies.

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* Incorrect with false start: R: We went we were going south to the warmer climates. Corrected: R: We were going south to the warmer climates. Incorrect repeated phrase: J: I went to the University of Florida. I went to the University of Florida to study mathematics. Corrected: J: I went to the University of Florida to study mathematics. FEEDBACK WORDS AND SOUNDS Too many interruptions in the flow of a speaker's remarks with feedback (such as um hm and yeah) is not necessary unless those words are used to answer a direct question Incorrect: S: That was the craziest thing I ever heard! D: Uh huh. (D's response is NOT necessary in the final transcript, so it should be omitted). Correct: S: That was the craziest thing I ever heard! Don't you think so? D: Uh hu h. (In this care D's response is necessary in the final trans cript, so it should be left in.) How to spell common feedback or crutch words uh uh huh = agreement um hm unh uh = disagreement FILLER WORDS If the speaker is constantly using filler words like "you know," or "uh," in speech, these can be omitted. Incorrect: K: You know, I never thought about it that way, but, you know, I can see how, you know, some people might do that. Correct:

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!+ K: I never thought about it that way, but I can see how some people might do that. DATES Write full dates as follows: January 1, 2003 If the speaker omits the century and just says the decade, write out the full year with the omitted numbers in brackets. [19]67 not '67 The [19]50s, not the fifties *note no apostrophe before the "s" The mid [19]50s, not the mid fifties Al ways use numerals for years, even at the beginning of a sentence. 1962 was an important year for me. Use numerals for days when they include the month and the year; follow this form even when the speaker says, "August the fifth, nineteen eighty seven." Instead write August 5, 1987. Spell out the words for the day when the year is not expressed and the speaker uses the ordinal number: My birthday is August fifth. My birthday is August the fifth. Spell out the word for the day when the day precedes the month: the fifth of August SPELLING Use the spell checking function in Microsoft Word. However, it does not catch every err or, so it is important to proofread. U se the dictionary ( or go online to w ww.merriam webster.com) or G oogle terms to verify prop er spelling. COMMON MISTAKES all right ( alright is not a word) all together The children were all together again for Molly's birthday. altogether (adverb: wholly, entirely, completely) That is altogether unfair. here I like it here. hear I can't hear what they said on the tape. every day I eat lunch every day. everyday (adjective: common) I think I'll use my everyday dishes for the dinner party. its (possessive) The cat was chasing its tail. it's (contraction of it is ) It's cold outside. onto (preposition: to a place or position on; upon; on) Paste the label onto the top. on to Let's go on to Dallas since we've come this far already. they're (contraction of they are ) They're going to play rugby in the fall. there (indicates location) Could you sit over there, please? their (possessive) The children took off their coats. to Are you going to school today? too Did you graduate from UF too? (Note the comma.) web site ( Web site is not a word, capitalized or not. Updated AP 2009 style guide )

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!! whenever (conjunction: at whatever time; at any time when) Visit us whenever you like. whichever Do whichever is easiest. Whichever task you do, do it well. who's (contraction of who is or who has ) Who's that girl sitting over there? whose (pronoun, possessive of who or which) Whose umbrella is that? yeah Note this preferred spelling. ABBREVIATIONS In general, avoid abbreviation in oral history transcripts. Do not abbreviate: A civil or military title unless appearing immediately before a person's full name: Governor Perry, but Gov. Rick Perry names of countries, territories, provinces, states, or counties docto r when used without an accompanying name ( The doctor said, but Dr. Smith said) Senator Judge Bishop General Professor or any other political, academic, civic, judicial, religious, or military title when it is used alone or when it precedes a surname alone, i.e., Judge McCall the Reverend or the Honorable when the is part of the title preceding the name books of the Bible names of the months and days terms of dimension, measurement, weight, degree, depth, et cetera: inch, foot, mile part of a book: Chapter 3 Section A, Table 7 word elements of addresses: Avenue, Building North South excep t NW NE SE, and SW portions of company names, unless the actual company name uses an abbreviation: Brother, Brothers Company, Corporation, Incorporated Limited, Railroad Senior or Junior when following partial names: Mr. Miller, Junior Mr. Toland, Senior Do abbreviate the following when they precede a given name and/or initial(s) plus surname: Ms. Rev. Mr. Mrs. Dr. Jr. or Sr. after given name and/or initial(s) plus surname: John H. Smith Jr. (note that the comma is no longer required around Jr and Sr .) NE NW SE SW in addresses given in text (note no periods) points of the compass: N, E, S, W, NE, SE, NNW, WSW et cetera era designations: AD 70, 753 BC time designations a.m., p.m. Agencies and various types of organizations are referred to by acronyms or using an abbreviation from an organization's initials :

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!# SPOHP, NATO, UN, SEC, AFL CIO, or AF of L CIO, SMU, Texas A&M CAPITALIZATION As a rule of thumb, when in doubt, do not capitalize. Check with Chicago Manual of Style or the dictionary to check if it should be capitalized. Proper names of institutions, organizations, persons, places, and things follow standard English practice. Partial names of institutions, organizations, or places are usually written in lower case. Do capitalize: names of particular persons, places, organizations, historical time periods, historical events, biblical events and concepts, mov ements, calendar terms ref erring to specific days, and months. titles of creative works references to athletic, national, political, regional, religious, and social groups: Florida Gators Congress, Democrats, Daughters of the American Revolution, the Ma sons Capitalize Internet and Web always: She suggested that he search the Internet for more information. He found a Web site that answered many of his questions. Note that website is not a word; use Web site Capitalize Lowercase Board of Trustees of Baylor board of trustees, the board, the trustees the University of Florida the university Department of History the history department School of Nursing The nursing school Course titles: History 1301 Courses : economics, history, philosophy but History of Texas Proper nouns like French, Spanish Microeconomics and English are capitalized Alachua County, City of Gainesville, the state bird of Florida the New York Times ; the Times the newspaper regional designations: the West, the Southwest d irectional terms: to travel west, to face southwest Central Florida t he central region of F lorida an Easterner, Western American a western university West Coast, Gulf Coast t he coast Interstate 35, IH35 or I 35 t he interstate, the highway Eighth Street t he street Bible Scripture(s) b iblical work scriptural passage Veterans Administration t he university administration Veterans Administration Hospital a veterans hospital

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!$ the Institute for Oral History t he institute the Texas Collection t he collection the Word of God t he words of the song the Fall (of Man) t he fall of 1992 the Gospel of Luke t he gospel the Book of Daniel a book of poetry McLennan County Court c ounty court Washington Street Bridge t he bridge American Revolution t he revolution of the colonies World War I, First World War t he war General of the Army Douglas MacArthur MacArthur, a general, U.S. Army President Harry Truman t he president of the USA, presidency the Bronze Age t he third of the four ages of man the Democratic Party the party that won in that precinct; a democratic form of government the Democrats (party members) democracy Great Depression (referring to 1930s), the Depression depression Sherman Antitrust Act an act of Congress Grandmother, Grandpa Smith, Dad (when substituted for a given name) my grandmother, Elizabeth; my mother U.S. Senate Florida senate Capitol (referring to a building) the capital of Florida (referring to a city) COMMAS No, sir. Yes, sir. Oh, yes. Oh, no. Thanks, Mrs. Pool. Yeah, that's right. (Note correct spelling of yeah ) Well, I'm from California originally. I was born in Dallas, Texas, in 1904. I mean, what are you going to do about it? So we, you know, went back home. *note that "you know" is set off by commas And, of course, we were pretty angry. She was, like, my best friend. Direct addresses are set off by commas Pam, I know you will enjoy this. SCHOLASTIC GRADES Type letter grade s in capital letter s with no period following, no italics, and no

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!% quotation marks. Show number grade in Arabic numerals with no quotation marks Plural should be formed only by adding s ( no apostrophe) except where confusion with another word is possible. I made all A's by earning 100s on all my exams, but my roommate made only B s. HYPHENS For guidance on use of hyphens to form compound words and phrases, please refer first to The Chicago Manual of Style and then to the dictionary. Hyphenate to indicate division or separation in the following: spelling out a name or words, as in H o r a c e Capitalize only where appropriate. a fraction expressed in words one fifth Hyphenate to indicate combination as follows: nouns made up of two or more nouns which imply the combination of two or more linked things or characteristics astronaut scientist AFL CIO when two essential adjectives describe a noun He is a small business owner (both words describe the business) modifiers and adjectival compounds when used before the noun being modified, including those formed with numbers: a one of a kind student a 56 year old woman Do not hyphenate a compound modifier that follows the noun it modifies unless hyphenated in dictionary: Her argument was well balanced. She was good natured. a compound modifier that includes an adverb ending in ly: wholly fictitious a proper noun except when absolutely unavoidable contractions, such as: can't, wouldn't, don't, didn't, wasn't, he'll, they're, she'd chemical terms, as in sodium nitrate, sodium silicate, bismuth oxychloride ITALICS Italics should be used sparingly, and they are typically only used when referring to a title of a work. Italicize: titles of whole published works, such as Plain Speaking

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!& titles of books, bulletins, periodicals, pamphlets newspaper names and the city na mes that accompany them: New York Times Note: d o not italicize any articles preceding a newspaper name. Example: the Times titles of long poems titles of plays and motion pictures titles of long musical compositions: operas, musical comedies, oratorios, ballets, tone poems, concertos, s onatas, symphonies, and suites t itles of paintings, sculptures, drawings, mobiles: You may know that da Vinci's Mona Lisa is actually La Gioconda Italicize titles of legal cases, with v. for versus: Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas ; the Miranda case names of spacecraft, aircraft, and ships, except for abbreviations preceding the names, such as designations of class or manufacture, as follows: SS Olympic HMS Queen Elizabeth USS Lexington Friendship VII Consult the dictionary; do not italicize a quotation in a foreign language. a foreign word or phrase when followed by a translation; enclose translation in quotation marks and precede translation by a comma: J'ai mal ˆ la tte "I have a headache." NUMBERS In general, spell out whole numbers, whether cardinal or ordinal, from one to ninety nine, and any of those numbers followed by hundred, thousand, hundred thousand, million, and so on, hyphenated or not. sixty nine seventy fifth twenty two hundred, but 2,367. Note: When there are several numbers in a sentence or a group of numbers includes numbers over one hundred, you may use numerals for brevity and consistency. Always spell out the number if it is the first word in a sentence. A: How old are you? B: Fifty years old. Exception: I f the year is the first word in a sentence do not spell it out. A: When were you born? B: 1906. Spell out the number if it is the name of a street and under one hundred. 454 Fourth Street For percentages, u se numerals and spell out percent ." Only 45 percent of board members approved of the measure. D o not spell out: street address numbers, highway numbers 10 Downing Street 304 Carroll Library IH35

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!' telephone numbers fractional sums of money above one dollar: $2.98 (not 2.98 dollars) dates: 735 BC ; mid 1950s ; AD 1066 1990s February 24, 1997 July 1997 (no comma) time of day use numerals when a.m. or p.m. follow or when typing a whole plus a fraction of an hour: 8:20 p.m. but eight o'clock 7:30 but seven in the morning number elements in names of government bodies and subdivisions of 100th and higher, all union locals and lodges Thirty sixth Infantry 139th Tactical Wing parts of a book, such as chapter numbers, verse numbers For consistency any sentence which contains numerals pertaining to the same category should have all numerals. The report stated that 7 [instead of seven] out of 265 students voted in the campus elections. Exceptions: The sentence begins with a number: Seven out of 265 students voted. Numbers representing different categories: In the past ten years five new buildings of over 125 stories have been erecte d in the city. Plurals of numbers: Numerals form plurals by adding s alone, with no apostrophe: 1920s and 1930s When connecting figures with a prefix or suffix, add the hyphen in the appropriate place if the compound word is adjectival. Connect numbers expressed in words to a prefix or suffix with a hyphen: twenty odd The suffix fold is an exception threefold PARA GRAPHS The Samuel Proctor Oral History Program does not break up its transcriptions into paragraphs. Everything said should be one block of text, even if topics change or new dialogue is introduced. The only time one should press the "enter" key is if some one new is speaking, and it is never indented. See formatting and page setup for more guidelines. PLURALS Compound words formed with prepositions are pluralized by forming the plurals of the first nouns in the compounds:

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!( fathers in law Capital letters of the alphabet are pluralized by adding s or 's : Zs Use the apostrophe only where confusion is possible: A's not As Lowercase letters form the plural by adding 's: p's and q's Acronym a bbreviations are pluralized by adding s GREs W hen periods are used, add an apostrophe: B. K.'s Proper nouns: Add s to the singular if the addition does not make an extra syllable: six King Georges Add es to the singular form if the addition creates an extra syllable: six King Charleses Nouns including names of persons that end in s take addition of es to form the plural: The three Loises are friends with the three Marys. The hall was full of Joneses and Martins. Note that the apostrophe is never used to denote the plural of a personal name. QUOTATION MARKS Generally speaking, the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program does not use quotation marks. Q uotation marks are only used in speech that can be verified, such as presidential speeches, famous speeches or quotes, and direct quotes from books or publications. Martin Luther King Jr. said, "I have a dream." If the speech is NOT verifiable, then do not use quotation marks, even when a direct expression is used by one of the speakers. Instead of using quotes, set the expression apart with commas. When I was little my mom used to say, if you study hard in school I will take you to get ice cream. He said, you're fired, and I said, we'll just see about that. DO use quotes for the names of articles, essays, radio programs, television sh ows, book chapter titles, et cetera. Have you seen the article "Sharks" in National Geographic ? The television show, "Dr. Who," ran for several seasons. Interviewees occasionally coin words, either humorously or to convey a meaning for which they cannot find an existing word. If you cannot find a word in any dictionary but can hear it clearly and can devise a reasonable spelling for it, transcribe it and p lace it in quotation marks the first time it occurs. Do not use quotation marks for every occurrence of the coined word, however, as it makes for tedious reading.

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!) PROOFREAD! Proofread your transcript. Look for words that the spell checker may have misse d: form instead of from though instead of thought you instead of your et cetera. If you make a decision on a matter of style in cases where the rules provide no clear guidance or allow for discretion, make sure you follow that decision throughout the transcript. If you verify and correct the spelling of a name, be sure to correct every occurrence.

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!* GUIDE TO AUDIT EDITING The purpose of audit editing is to make the transcript as accurate as possible and to add in ext ra information to contextualize both historically and socially topics the speaker is referenci ng Steps in Audit E diting: Read the docum ent as you listen to the audio and correct any typos or mistakes where the original transcriber may have not understood what the interviewer was real ly saying. If there are blanks or bolded words in the document and you still cannot tell what the person says listen to the audio several times on faster and slower speeds for those moments Al so try G oogling what you think the words might be to see if you can deduce the true meaning. When trying to the correct spelling of someone's name and that person works for a company or inst itution, try a Google search. Ex: Paul Ortiz UF If you still cannot determine the word keep it bolded. If you canno t make a determination after research and re listening, note "inaudible" and the time elapsed on the audio in brackets. We went to [inaudible 33:05] yesterday. Remember, d o not change improper grammar that was said by the speaker I don't never want to go there again. NOTE: SPOHP is no longer contextualizing in its transcripts.

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#+ WORK LOG AND PROJECT LOG WORK LOGS When you finish your work each day, you must fill out a work log. Accessing the Work Log 1. Click "My computer" on the desktop 2. Click "Share (S:) 3. Click "Oral History" 4. Click "Oral History New May 2006" 5. Scroll down and click on the "Work Log" folder 6. Click on the excel document "Work Logs" 7. Click on the tab at the bottom with your name on it 8. Fill in the date, your time in, time out, w hat project you worked on, and how many hours you worked. 9. Save the document and c lose the file when you are finished. Be sure to fill out the work log every day that you work. PROJECT LOG Project logs should be completed every time you finish a task. For example, when you completely finish transcribing a document, you would fill out the project log so SPOHP can keep track of which tasks are complete. Accessing the project log 1. Follow steps 1 4 from the "work log" directions until you are within he "Oral History New May 2006" folder 2. Click on the "Project Log" folder 3. Click on the excel document "Project Log In" 4. Use the arrow buttons on the bottom left to scroll sideways until you see the proje ct code on a tab at the bottom of the page 5. Click on the project code tab for whatever project you have been working on

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#! 6. Find the specific person the transcription is about on the left hand side, and enter your initials, the date, and the total pages (if the re is a section for that) under either the "transcription complete" or "audit edit" column depending on which task applies to you. 7. Save the document and close the file when you are finished. Each time you finish a project, be sure to e mail the undergraduate coordinators to let them know and so they can assign a new task.