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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00002462/00001
 Material Information
Title: Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality Syllabus
Physical Description: Syllabus
Creator: Allukian, Kristin
Publisher: Center for Women's Studies and Gender Research
Publication Date: Spring 2012
 Subjects
Genre: Syllabus
Spatial Coverage:
 Notes
Abstract: PhD candidate Kristin Allukian taught this course in Spring 2012. This course offered an introduction to foundational concepts and analytical tools in the study of gender and sexuality. The course focused on the ways in which diverse people have understood gender, sexuality, race, class, and nationhood as categories of identity. Students performed close readings of cultural representations of gender and sexuality (in literature, history, the visual arts, film, music, television, the Internet, etc.) to investigate these intersecting categories of identity. Some of the questions this course asked include: What social and cultural meanings do we attach to certain bodies? Why are certain mannerisms, activities, professions, and even objects considered either feminine or masculine? How is gender identity formed by forces such as society, language, and perception? Throughout the course, students had the chance to explore, challenge, and share their own ideas about gender and sexuality.
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Michelle Harris.
Publication Status: Unpublished
General Note: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Michelle Harris.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00002462:00001


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WST 2611, Section 0542: Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality Spring 2012, MWF Period 5, TUR 2319 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Instructor: Kristin Allukian Ema il: kallukian@ufl.edu Office: 206 Ustler Office Hours: MW 10am 11:30am and by appointment Teaching Assistant: Michelle Harris Email: mrh18@ufl.edu Office: 102A Ustler Office Hours: M 1pm 3pm and by appointment *Note: syllabus is subject to change. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Course Description This course offers an introduction to foundational concepts and analytical tools in the study of gender and sexuality. We will focus on the ways in which diverse people have understood gender, sexuality, race, class, and nationhood as categories of identity. Students will perform close read ings of cultural representations of gender and sexuality (in literature, history, the visual arts, film, music, television, the Internet, etc.) t o investigate these intersecting categories of identity. Some of the questions this course asks include: What s ocial and cultural meanings do we attach to certain bodies? Why are certain mannerisms, activities, professions, and even objects considered either feminine or masculine? How is gender identity formed by forces such as society, language, and perception? Th roughout the course, students will have the chance to explore, challenge, and share their own ideas about gender and sexuality. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Course Objectives This course is designed to do the following: Make you familiar with terminology, texts, and ideologies that are foundational to gender and sexuality studies; Give you a new and richer awareness of and compassion for how gender and sexuality shape the way ideology operates and the ways it affects your life; Acquaint you with some key issues, questions and debates in the field of gender and sexuality studies; Help you to engage criti cally with complex visual and written texts, as well as to communicate clearly, coherently, and effectively in written and oral expression. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Req uired Texts Campus Bookstore The Silent Partner by Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (1871) ISBN: 0935312080 The Will to Change by bell hooks (2004) ISBN: 0743456084 Target Copy Course pack Supplemental course pack for Week 10 Internet Sources Life as a House ( amazon.com 48 hr rental) Everyday Use by Alice Walker YouTube Videos -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Assignmen ts and Grading 1. 2. Four In 3. 4. 5. Due Date Assignment Point Value # of pages January 27 First Response Paper (chose 2 out of 3) 100 2 pages/500 words February 10 In Class Quiz 1 50 Multiple choice February 24 Second Response Paper (chose 2 out of 3) 100 2 pages/500 words March 2 In Class Quiz 2 50 Multiple choice March 23 In Class Quiz 3 50 Multiple choice March 30 Third Response Paper (chose 2 out of 3) 100 2 pages/500 words April 13 In Class Quiz 4 50 Multiple choice April 16 Final Paper 350 4 pages/1000 words April 18 25 Group Presentations (groups of 4) 150 10 minutes Two Reacti on Papers (2 pages each, 100 points each) You will complete two reaction papers over the course of the semester. This assignment asks you to respond critically to a text that we have read in class. A detailed assignment sheet will be provided on Sakai. 200 points Four In Class Quizzes (50 points each) Quizzes will be multiple choice, unit based, and closed book. 200 points

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Group Exploration This is an opportunity to identify a question, writer, or issue that you want to explore further and run wit h it. Work as a group and begin your research with a clear sense of relevance and see where it takes you. Your group will be responsible for a 10 minute in class presentation. A detailed assignment sheet will be provided on Sakai. 150 points Final Pa per (4 pages) This assignment asks you to pair one work from our course material with one work that you have found on your own. The paper requires you to analyze the cultural representations of gender and sexuality found in your sources. A detailed assignm ent sheet will be provided on Sakai. 350 points Participation All members of the class are encouraged and expected to participate in class discussion, by asking and responding to questions, by raising ideas, participating in in class activities, and con tributing observations about the course materials. Please come to class having completed all reading assignments on time and also having had time to reflect on the reading before class. The golden rule is to come to class with at least one comment or quest ion to make per class. I will be calling on people. 100 points TOTAL 1000 points Grading Scale A 940 1000 B 840 869 C 740 769 D 640 669 A 900 939 B 800 839 C 700 739 D 600 639 B+ 870 899 C+ 770 799 D+ 670 690 E 0 599 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Course Policies Absence and Tardiness Because class attendance is critical to your understanding of class material, atte ndance is mandatory and will be taken at the beginning of each class. Please come to each class with your nameplate. You are allowed three unexcused absences over the course of a semester. After three unexcused absences, your final grade will be dropped a third of a letter grade for every day missed (A to A etc). An absence due to illness or family crisis may be excused if properly documented to the instructor's satisfaction. However, prolonged absences, even for medical reasons, will not be excused, as d iscussion of reading & writing assignments is a key part of the course content. In addition, if you participate in a university sponsored event (athletics, music, theater, field trip), you must provide me with documentation from an appropriate authority, b efore the missed class. Whether or not an absence is excused, you are responsible for contacting a classmate,

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to find out what material you missed and any work that was assigned. If work is due in class on the day of the absence, the work is due in my mail box by 4:00 pm that day otherwise it will not be accepted. No student who misses more than 6 days of class (including the three unexcused absences) will pass. Tardiness is disruptive to the entire class and will not be accepted. If you are more than 5 mi nutes late to class, it will count toward an absence. Two episodes of tardiness without prior notification will equal one absence. If you must be tardy, please quietly take a seat in the back of the classroom. If you have any questions about your attendanc e record or concerns about classes you know you will be missing, please see me. Electronics Texting, surfing the internet, and any other non academic use of electronics during class time is prohibited and will results in the reduction of your participatio n points. Persistent disruption of class time due to electronics will result in being asked to leave the classroom and you will be considered absent. Late work Without permission from the instructor, late assignments will not be accepted. Exceptions dete rmined by instructor before, not after, assignment is due. Formatting All work must be in MLA format, 12 point Times New Roman font, and double spaced. Printed materials must be stapled. If your work is not formatted correctly, it will not be accepted. Se e http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/ for MLA guidelines. Gordon Rule (2,000 Gordon Rule Words) This course satisfies the requirements for General Education Credit in the f ollowing areas: 1.) Humanities and 2.) Diversity. It is also a Gordon Rule 2,000 word class. For more information, see: http://www.registrar.ufl.edu/soc/201106/gord.html Humanities (H) The humanities requirements enables students to think critically about what artists and thinkers have to teach us about the nonmaterial qualities of human beings and human values. In courses in the humanities, students become acquainted with the enduring p roducts in words, sounds, paint, stone, metal, and many other media in which thoughtful and gifted human beings have attempted to meet our individual and collective needs for emotional, spiritual, or intellectual fulfillment. Humanities courses address maj or intellectual, cultural, and aesthetic achievements. Students consider questions of ultimate meaning and study human activities, artifacts, and values in the context of the ages in which they were produced. Diversity (D) Diversity courses provide instr uction in the values, attitudes, and norms that create cultural differences within the United States. These courses encourage you to recognize

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how social roles and status affect different groups and impact U.S. society. These courses guide you to analyze and to evaluate your own cultural norms and values in relation to those of other cultures, and to distinguish opportunities and constraints faced by other persons and groups. Student Disability Services The Disability Resource Center in the Dean of Stude nts Office provides students and faculty with information and support regarding accommodations for students with disabilities in the classroom. For more information, see: http://www.dso.ufl.edu/drc/ Harassment and Classroom Behavior UF provides an educational and working environment for its students, faculty, and staff that is free from sex discrimination and sexual harassment. For more about UF policies regarding harassment, see: http://www.hr.ufl.edu/policies/policies.asp Please keep in mind that students come from diverse cultural, economic, and ethnic backgrounds. Some of the texts we will discuss and write about engage controversial topics and op inions. Diverse student backgrounds combined with provocative texts require that you demonstrate respect for ideas that may differ from your own. Lack of respect will result in dismissal from the class and possibly from the course. Academic Honesty All st udents are required to abide by the Student Honor Code. For more information about academic honesty, including definitions of plagiarism and unauthorized collaboration, see: http://www.ds o.ufl.edu/sccr/honorcodes/honorcode.php ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Course Schedule Week 1: Introduction, Theories of Gender, Theories of Sexuality Jan 9: Course introd uction and syllabus review Jan 11: Sex and Gender through the Prism of Difference Jan 13: Theoretical perspectives by Steven Seidman Week 2: Sex, Gender, and Perspective Jan 16: No Class Jan 18: Perspectives on Sex, Gender, and Difference ; Believ ing is Seeing: Biology as Ideology by Judith Lorber Jan 20: The Social Construction of Sexuality with Jeffrey Weeks; Surveying Sex with Edward Laumann Week 3: History, Gender, and Language Jan 23: rray, pp. 56 65 Jan 25: 90 Jan 27: Sharon M. Harris Writing Due: First Reaction Paper Week 4: Gender, Work, and Literature Jan 30: Limi ts of Independence in the Colonial Economy by Alice Kessler Harris, From Household Manufactures to Wage Work by Alice Kessler Harris Feb 1: The Silent Partner by Elizabeth Stuart Phelps pp. Note 70 Feb 3: The Silent Partner, pp. 70 130 Week 5: Gende r, Work, and Literature Feb 6: The Silent Partner, pp. 130 230 Feb 8: The Silent Partner, pp. 231 302 Feb 10: Quiz Week 6: Masculinity and Love Feb 13: The Will to Change by bell hooks pp. Preface 54 Feb 15: The Will to Change pp. 55 105 Feb 17: T he Will to Change pp. 107 151 Week 7: Masculinity and Love Feb 20: The Will to Change pp. 153 188 Feb 22: Life as a House Feb 24: Life as a House: Continue Discussion Writing Due: Second Reaction Paper

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Week 8: Family Relations, Gender, and Sexuali ty Feb 27: The Meaning of Motherhood in Black Culture and Black Mother Daughter Relationships by Patricia Hill Collins; Everyday Use by Alice Walker Feb 29: Queering the Family by Mary C. Burke and Kristine A. Olsen pg. 341; Lesbian and Gay Parents: Situa ted Subjects by Yvette Taylor, pg. 229; YouTube Clips Mar 2: Quiz Week 9: Spring Break Mar 5: Spring Break Mar 7: Spring Break Mar 9: Spring Break Week 10: Gender, Sexuality, and Advertising Mar 12: TBA Mar 14: TBA Mar 16: TBA Week 11: Gen der, Sexuality, and TV Talk Shows Mar 19: Secret Sex and the Down Low Brotherhood by Justin Luc Hoy; Popular Culture Constructs Sexuality with Joshua Gamson; In Class: TV Show Mar 21: Discuss articles and show Mar 23: Quiz Week 12: Gender, Sexuality, an d Literature Mar 26: Gay and Straight Rites of Passage by Chet Meeks In Class: Go over final paper assignment Mar 28: Territory by David Leavitt Mar 30: Guest lecturer: David Leavitt Writing Due: Third Reaction Paper Week 13: Gender, Sexuality, and Art Apr 2: Sexualizing Asian Male Bodies by Travis S.K. King and http://www.normyip.com/newblog/index.php/welcome/ Apr 4: Guerrilla Girls Apr 6: Discussion on Mon and Wed materials We ek 14: Race, Sexuality, and Music Apr 9: Gangsta culture: A Piece of the Action by bell hooks Queer(ing) Masculinities in Heterosexist Rap Music by Freya Jarman Ivens, Music videos and lyrics Apr 11: Punk Girls, Music videos and lyrics Apr 13: Quiz

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W eek 15: Group Presentations Apr 16: Writing Due: Final Paper Apr 18: Presentations (4 groups) Apr 20: Presentations (4 groups) Week 16: Peer Review Apr 23: Presentations (4 groups) Apr 25: Presentations (3 groups), Course Wrap Up