<%BANNER%>
UFIR IFAS
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00002330/00001
 Material Information
Title: Diversity Training: A Way to Increase Organizational Support for Sexual Minority Adolescents
Physical Description: Fact Sheet
Creator: Regan, Christine
Publisher: University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2007
 Notes
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status: Published
General Note: "Original publication date February 22, 2007."
General Note: "FCS2268"
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00002330:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:

FY87500 ( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

FCS2268 Diversity Training: A Way to Increase Organizational Support for Sexual Minority Adolescents1 Christine Regan, Mickie Swisher, Rosemary Barnett, Jane Luzar, and Jeanna Mastrodicasa2 1. This document is FCS2268, one of a series of the Family Youth and Community Sciences Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Original publication date February 22, 2007. Visit the EDIS Web Site at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu. 2. Christine Regan, MS; Mickie Swisher, associate professor; Rosemary Barnett, assistant professor, all of the Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32611; Jane Luzar, Provost Fellow and Professor, Department of Food and Resource Economics, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences; and Jeanna Mastrodicasa, University of Florida Honors Office. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Larry Arrington, Dean Introduction Previous research posits that it is crucial for educators and administrators to become more culturally aware, responsive, and competent if programs are to effectively serve an increasingly diverse population (Guion, Goddard, Broadwater, Chattaraj, & Sullivan-Lytle, 2003). The purpose of this publication is to provide administration and staff with specific ways to effect change in order to create a welcoming, safe environment for sexual minority adolescents. Organizational support for sexual minority adolescents may be difficult for some organizational settings and stakeholders. Community organizations are not always supportive or inclusive of gay and lesbian issues (Keefer & Reene, 2002). The first programmatic decision that needs to be made is whether the organization and its stakeholders are prepared to openly offer support to sexual minority, or LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender), youth (Regan & Fogarty, 2006). Diversity Training Diversity trainings generally have three objectives (Cox, 1993; Hanover & Cellar, 1998; Roberson, Kulik, & Pepper, 2001; Sanchez & Medkick, 2004): 1) To increase knowledge and awareness about diversity issues 2) To reduce biases and stereotypes 3) To change behaviors of individuals In reference to diversity training for administration and staff about LGBT issues, youth-serving organizations could: Include experiential or hands-on exercises that deal with LGBT issues. Talking about issues helps reveal unrecognized prejudices and misconceptions. For example, have each participant pick a card out of a deck. Then tell them that each suit represents a different sexual orientationfor instance, clubs for heterosexual, hearts for homosexual or lesbian, spades for bisexual, and diamonds for transgender. This will

PAGE 2

Diversity Training: A Way to Increase Organizational Support for Sexual Minority.... 2 help participants imagine what it would be like to have a different sexual orientation. Include opportunities for trainers who are LGBT to share their experiences. Research shows this has been effective in dealing with racial diversity issues (Bond, 1999; Kirkland & Regan, 1997). Include LGBT leaders in your list of examples when discussing leadership. These leaders could include people such as Virginia Woolf, Harvey Milk, and Oscar Wilde. Highlighting esteemed leaders promotes positive youth development. Include LGBT history when discussing the culture and background of the United States. Highlighting historical social movements and grassroots action surrounding LGBT issues can also help promote positive youth education. Include "safe space" cards for staff to put up in their offices after they attend training sessions. This will encourage adolescents to feel supported and share their feelings openly. Discuss the negative effects of homophobia on youth development. Use real-life examples, such as the death of Matthew Shephard, a gay teenager who was killed in a violent hate crime. Develop talking points based on the different stages of homosexual identity formation and share this information with adult and youth audiences. Knowledge of these stages improves youth workers' ability to support LGBT adolescents. Facilitate participants' developing a plan of action for individual and organizational changes. Finally, there is a caveat regarding diversity training. Diversity training by itself cannot sustain long-term change. In order to transfer training objectives into reality, there must be an action plan (created by participants at the end of the training) and a supportive work environment that will allow change to take place. As shown in previous research, this supportive work environment should facilitate behavioral change by providing peer support, opportunities to learn new skills, positive consequences for the newly learned behaviors, and adequate organizational policies and procedures (Rynes & Rosen, 1995; Sanchez & Medkick, 2004). References Bond, M. A. (1999). Gender, race, and class in organizational contexts. American Journal of Community Psychology, 27(3), 327. Cox, T. (1993). Cultural diversity in organizations: Theory, research and practice. San Francisco, CA: Berret-Koehler. Guion, L. A., Goddard, H. W., Broadwater, G., Chattaraj, S., & Sullivan-Lytle, S. (2003). Strengthening programs to reach diverse audiences. Gainesville: Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Retrieved, October 4, 2006, from http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/FY754. Hanover, J. M. B., & Cellar, D. F. (1998). Environmental factors and the effectiveness of workforce diversity training. Human Resource Development Quarterly, 9(2), 105. Keefer, B. P., & Reene, K. (2002). Female adolescence: Difficult for heterosexual girls, hazardous for lesbians. Annual of Psychoanalysis, 30, 245. Kirkland, S. E., & Regan, A. M. (1997). Organizational racial diversity training. In C. E. Thompson & R. T. Carter (Eds.), Racial identity theory: Applications to individual, group, and organizational interventions (pp. 159). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. Regan, C., & Fogarty, K. (2006). Community support of sexual minority adolescents (FCS9234). Gainesville: Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Retrieved October 4, 2006, from http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/FY775. nRoberson, L., Kulik, C. T., & Pepper, M. B. (2001). Designing effective diversity training: Influence of group composition and trainee

PAGE 3

Diversity Training: A Way to Increase Organizational Support for Sexual Minority.... 3 experience. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 22(8), 871. Rynes, S., & Rosen, B. (1995). A field survey of factors affecting the adoption and perceived success of diversity training. Personnel Psychology, 48(2), 247-271. Sanchez, J. I., & Medkick, N. (2004). The effect of diversity awareness on differential treatment. Group and Organizational Management, 29, 517.