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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00002249/00001
 Material Information
Title: Elder Companion: Lesson 8: Leisure Activities
Physical Description: Fact Sheet
Creator: Bolton, Elizabeth B.
Publisher: University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2004
 Notes
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status: Published
General Note: "First published: September 1999. Revised: January 2004."
General Note: "FCS5254"
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00002249:00001


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FY594Elder Companion Lesson 8 Leisure Activities1Elizabeth B Bolton21.This document is FCS5254/FY594, one of a series of the Departme nt of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, University of Flor ida, UF/IFAS, Gainesville 32611. First published: September 1999. Revised: January 2004. Reviewed by: Mary Chernesky, M.S. extension agent IV Hillsborough County, Seffner; Audrey Norman, courtesy extension agent, Palm Beach County, West Palm Beach; Meredith Taylor, M.S., extension agent IV, Suwannee County, Live Oak. Please visit th e EDIS Web site: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ 2.Elizabeth B. Bolton, Ph.D., professor, Community Development, Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, Florida Coo perative Extension Service, University of Florid a, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, 32611. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sc iences is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer authorized to provide resea rch, educational information and other services only to individuals and inst itutions that function without regard to race color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your count y Cooperative Extension Servic e office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Instit ute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida / Christine Taylor Waddill Dean.

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Lesson 8 Pg. 3AGENTS TEACHING GUIDE Leisure Activities Part 1: Why Leisure Activities? Part 2: Possible Activities for My Client Part 3: Exercises for Older Adults Time: 1 1 Hours Equipment/ Overhead projector; transparencies created from Handouts A through D Supplies: Instructor: County faculty and/or Recreation staff member Background Information Leisure and Recreation Handouts:Part 1 Handout A: Purposes of Recreational Activities Handout B: Physical Activities Handout C: Social Activities Handout D: Mental Activities Part 2 Handout E: List of Possible Activities Part 3 Exercises for Older Adults Objectives (Expected Outcomes): Participants will be able to: understand the purposes of leisure recreational activities, list the four kinds of recreation and leisure activities and examples of each, and understand the need to adapt activities to individuals. demonstrate exercises for older adults

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Lesson 8 Pg. 4Background Information: Leisure and Recreation Leisure activities are important to the well-being of ever yone at any age. It is especially important for your elderly clients. to offset empty hours, monotony, and boredom to develop a feeling of usefulness, belonging, and self-confidence to renew and refresh physical strength to stimulate social relationships to improve personal enjoyment and satisfaction to encourage creative, inventive, and expressive feelings and talents There are different kinds of recreation/leisure activities. These include: Physical Physical activities are good for our bodies and our minds. Some examples of such activities are: walking slow stretching dancing horseshoes Social Social activities are a good way to meet new friends and stay close to others. This, in turn, may help older persons feel more a part of the world around them and help their feelings of self-esteem. Some social activities are: talking on the telephone visiting with friends and family eating meals with others attending family events or parties Mental Mental activities help stimulate our minds. Some examples: reading/listening to tapes games hobbies and crafts crossword puzzles Emotional well-being is helped by all these activities. A person who stays active and involved in life will feel better. It is only natural th at long, lonely hours of doing nothing ta ke their emotional toll on an aging person. Recreation and leisure activities serve to help older persons feel better about themselves and better about the people around them. A list of possible activities for the variety of people with whom you may be working is included. Work on adding more and more ideas to this list. Your clients will have differe nt likes and dislikes, interests and needs. Remember, consider the physical, social, mental, and emotional aspects of your client before choosing or suggesting an activity; as the activity must be right for that person. A blind person could not read a magazine; yet, he could listen to it on a talking book machine. A person who cant write could send a tape recording instead. Activities can be modified and adapted to meet specific needs.

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Lesson 8 Pg. 5LESSON PLAN Part 1: Why Leisure Activities? Introduction : Leisure activities are important to the well-being of everyone at any age. It is especially important for your elderly clients. DO: Use the background information to discuss the emotional benefits provided by leisure activities. Show transparency created from Handout A, Purposes of Leisure Activities and distribute the handout. Ask the participants why they participate in leisure activities? Make a list on the chalkboard or newsprint Show transparencies for the three types of activities from created from Handouts B, Physical Activities ; C, Social Activities ; and D, Mental Activities Have the participants divide into three groups...physical, social and mental. Have them list as many activities as they can think of which fall under their heading. Have each group share their listing with the group. Talk about how each type of activity helps the individual. REFLECT:Why do we engage in leisure and recreational activities?What are some of the benefits to the person? APPLY:How will you use this information in your work with your elder?

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Lesson 8 Pg. 6 Handout APURPOSES OF RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES to offset empty hours, monotony, and boredom to develop a feeling of usef ulness, belonging, and selfconfidence to renew and refresh physical strength to stimulate social relationships to improve personal enjoyment and satisfaction to encourage creative, inventive, and expressive feelings and talents

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Lesson 8 Pg. 7 Handout BPHYSICAL ACTIVITIES Physical activities are good for our bodies and our minds. Some examples of such activities are: walking slow stretching dancing horseshoes

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Lesson 8 Pg. 8 Handout CSOCIAL ACTIVITIES Social activities are a good way to meet new fri ends and stay close to others. This, in turn, may help older persons feel more a part of the world around them and help their feelings of self-esteem. Some social activities are: talking on the telephone visiting with friends and family eating meals with others attending family events or parties

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Lesson 8 Pg. 9 Handout D MENTAL ACTIVITIES Mental activities help stimulate our minds. Some examples: reading/listening to tapes games hobbies and crafts crossword puzzles

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Lesson 8 Pg. 10LESSON PLAN Part 2: Possible Activities for Older Adults Introduction: As a companion, there will be times when you will encourage and take part in recreation activities with your clients. As you know, all older people are not alike and what works with one may not with another. Get to know your client. Find out what she/he enjoys doing and is able to do. People must always be given the chance to express themselves about their likes and dislikes, strengths and weaknesses, interests, needs, and limitations. DO:Using the same groups from the previous activity, have the participants determine which of the activities are appropriate for their elder companion.Discuss their choices and use Handout E, List of Possible Activities for them to supplement their list. REFLECT:Which of these activities do you know how to do? APPLY:Make Activity Kits for them to use with their elders. Let different people lead the rest of the group in participating in some of the activities.

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Lesson 8 Pg. 11Handout ELIST OF POSSIBLE ACTIVITIESThe following alphabetical list of ac tivities is partial and should be used to stimulate your own thinking. Do not use as a checklist. Do not use the list to ask clients which activities they wish to do. Auto rides Bird feeding Bird watching & walks Cards Checkers Chinese checkers Coffee breaks Collecting (stamps, coins, rocks, etc.) Conversation Crocheting Crossword Puzzles Exercises Hearts Dominoes Knitting Labeling family pictures Letter writing Library Making family photo albums Movies or videos Music Newspaper clippings Puzzles Reading Rummy Scrabble Solitaire Spectator sports Story telling Tatting Television (watching, playing television game shows, etc.) Toy making (cloth, wood, etc.) Walking Writing (newsletter, letters, local paper, poetry, etc.) Adapted from Adult Sitter Clinic Workbook 2nd edition, by Diane Smathers, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Georgia, Athens, 1983.

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Lesson 8 Pg. 12LESSON PLAN Part 3: Exercises for Older Adults Everyone needs physical stimulation to keep them physically and emotionally fit. The elderly are no different. Many elderly clients have physical limitations which keep them from engaging in extensive physical activity. However, there are exercises which they can do. Today, we are going to learn to do some of them. DO: Distribute Handout F, Exercises for Older Adults Divide the participants into pairs for practicing the exercises. Assign one of the exercises to each pair. Have one person read the instructions while the other person does the exercise. Then reverse the roles so each gets to practice. Have each pair demonstrate their exercise to the group. As they demonstrate, everyone practices the exercise. REFLECT:Why would you try to do these exercises with your elderly clients?Do you feel comfortable doing these exercises with other people? APPLY:Practice these exercises until you can do them without looking at the notes/illustrations.

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Lesson 8 Pg. 13Handout FEXERCISES FOR OLDER ADULTSThe following exercises are adapted from "PEP Up Your Life" from American Association of Retired Persons. They have been reviewed by Leigh Ann Ma rtin, Exercise Physiologist, and are offered here for use in work with older clients. Shoulder Shrugs: for the upper back, to tone shoulders and relax the muscles at the base of the neck. Steps:In a sitting or standing position, start with your arms resting at your sides, raise your shoulders toward your ears, hold this position for a 3 second count, and slowly lower your shoulders to the beginning position. Suggested repetition: 8-12 times. Arm Circles: to strengthen shoulders and upper back. Steps:Sit or stand erect with your arms extended to the side, elbows straight, head facing forward. Rotate arms from the shoulder in small circles. Suggested repetition: 10 forward circles, 10 backward circles. Arm Curls: to strengthen arm muscles. Steps:Use a weighted object such as a book or a can of vegetables (start with no more than 5 pounds). Stand or sit erect with arms at si des, palms facing forward, and holding weighted object. Bend your arms toward your shoulder, hold for one second at the top of the motion, and slowly lower to starting position. Suggested repetition: 8-12 times. Quarter Squat: to tone and strengthen lower leg muscles: Steps:Stand erect behind a chair, hands on chair back for balance, feet shoulder width apart. Bend knees slowly, do not let your knees go part your toes, hold in the lowered position for 1-3 seconds, and slowly rise to a normal standing position. Suggested repetition: 8-12 times. Heel Raises: to strengthen the calf muscles and ankles. Steps:Stand erect, hands on hips, or on a chair back for extra balance, and feet shoulder width apart. Slowly raise body on toes. Lower slowly to starting position. Suggested repetition: 8-12 times.