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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00002211/00001
 Material Information
Title: Stress Management: Preventing Stress Through Lifestyle Management
Physical Description: Fact Sheet
Creator: Smith, Suzanna
Publisher: University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2006
 Notes
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status: Published
General Note: "Original publication date February 27, 2003. Revised May 11, 2006."
General Note: "FCS2077B"
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00002211:00001


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FCS2077B Stress Management: Preventing Stress Through Lifestyle Management1 Suzanna Smith and Joe Pergola2 1. This document is FCS2077B, one of a series of the Family Youth and Community Sciences Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Original publication date February 27, 2003. Revised May 11, 2006. Visit the EDIS Web Site at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu. 2. Suzanna Smith, associate professor, Human Development, Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, and Joe Pergola, extension agent nIV, Hillsborough County, Sefner, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Larry Arrington, Dean In today's world, most of us can't avoid stress. We can learn ways to take care of ourselves so stress does not become a problem. Taking care of yourself is the first step in stress management. Some basic lifestyle practices can keep you healthy and strong so you can prevent stress. Are You Vulnerable to Stress? Start by asking yourself, "How vulnerable am I to stress?" People most at risk of stress are those who eat npoorly, chain smoke, drink a lot of beverages with caffeine, sleep a few hours a night, and never exercise. People may not feel much stress when they have a healthy diet, take time to relax, get plenty of sleep, and exercise nregularly. If they do, they manage it so it does not become a problem. They have the physical and mental energy to handle stress. A Healthy Lifestyle There are many possible lifestyle guidelines that keep you healthy and prevent stress. Here we highlight the most important ones. Avoid cigarettes. Cigarette smoking is the single most important preventable cause of illness and nearly death and the effects of smoking can be reversed. People tend to smoke more when under nstress. Exercise regularly. Regular exercise helps people of all ages look and feel better. Different kinds nof exercise provide specific health benefits. Eat sensibly. A nutritious diet is essential for maintaining good health and proper weight. A nbalanced diet, especially one low in fat or sugar, helps to prevent stress. Get plenty of rest. Restful sleep helps you maintain health and cope better with problems. If you drink, drink only in moderation. Alcohol is frequently used to reduce stress because it nhas a relaxing effect. Regular, heavy use of alcohol leads to disease. Drinking and driving often nleads to fatal or crippling accidents.

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Stress Management: Preventing Stress Through Lifestyle Management 2 Avoid too much caffeine. Caffeine is in many products such as coffee, tea, sodas and chocolate. It nspeeds up the body and can exaggerate the effects of stress. Use care in taking drugs. Although drugs may provide temporary relief from stress symptoms nthey may not solve ongoing problems and tensions. Excessive or continued use of either nprescription or illegal drugs may cause physical and mental problems, and absenteeism from work. Be safety conscious. Falls and injuries from auto or pedestrian accidents can lead to nhospitalization and disability. Good safety at home, work, and on the road prevents accidents and ninjuries. Get health care. Regular health care helps prevent disease by catching problems early and keeps nthem from getting worse. Have friends you can talk to. People who give and receive affection regularly, who can let out ntheir feelings to someone who cares tend to have fewer health problems and cope better with nstress. Learn to manage stress. Some stress is a normal part of living. Three steps keep daily stress nfrom becoming a problem: take time to relax, talk with a friend, and learn to keep a perspective non things that are important and those that are not. Conclusions The first thing you can do to manage stress is to prevent it. A healthy lifestyle builds your physical and mental nenergy. Each of these behaviors helps prevent stress and makes a person less vulnerable to stress when it does noccur. References Gevirtz, R. 2000. The physiology of stress. In D. T. Kenny, J.G. Carlson, E. J. McGuigan, and J. L. Sheppard (eds.), Stress and health: Research and clinical applications (pp. 53-72). Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers. James, J.E. 2000. Caffeine and stress. In D. T. Kenny, J.G. Carlson, E. J. McGuigan, and J. L. Sheppard (Eds.), Stress and health: Research and clinical applications (pp.335-355). Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers. McKinley Health Center. How vulnerable are you to stress? Accessed June 14, 2002 at http://www.mckinley.uiuc.edu/health-info/stress/ vulstre.html Sears, S. June 2002. Balancing work and family. Presentation for in-service training on Balancing Work and Family, Florida Cooperative Extension Service. Gainesville, FL: University of Florida. Seward, B.L. 1999. Managing Stress: Principles and Strategies for Health and Well-being (2nd ed.). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett. The Healthy Habit Test. June 2002. Accessed June 14, 2002 at http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~drstall/ healthy_habit_test.html U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, USDHHS, Public Health Service. Healthstyle. Washington, DC: DHHS Pub. No. PHS 81-50155. Wellmark. July 2002. Healthstyle Self-Test. Accessed July 15, 2002. http://www.bcbsia.com/health_improvement/ managing_health/selftest.asp Whole Hearted Living. 2002. Healthy lifestyle choices can make a difference. Accessed July 15, 2002. http://www.ohhn.ca/lifestyle/ Publications in the Stress Management Series For more information see your county Extension Agent and related publications in the Stress Management series: Stress Management: Strategies for Individuals. Pergola, Joe and Suzanna Smith. (2006). EDIS. Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida. FCS2077A, http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/FY515

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Stress Management: Preventing Stress Through Lifestyle Management 3 Stress Management: Preventing Stress through Lifestyle Management. Smith, Suzanna and Joe Pergola. (2006). EDIS. Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida. FCS2077B, http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/FY516 Stress Management: Ways to Cope. Smith, Suzanna and Joe Pergola. (2006). EDIS. Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida. FCS2078, http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/FY517 Stress Management: Understanding Stress. Smith, Suzanna and Joe Pergola. (2006). EDIS. Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida.FCS2077B, FCS2080, http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/FY518 Stress Management: Your Lifelines. Pergola, Joe and Suzanna Smith. (2006). EDIS. Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida. FCS2081A, http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/FY519