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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00002148/00001
 Material Information
Title: Taking a 24-Hour Food Recall
Physical Description: Fact Sheet
Creator: Hillan, Jennifer
Publisher: University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2001
 Notes
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status: Published
General Note: "Publication date: May 2001."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00002148:00001


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Full Text

PAGE 1

1.This document is FCS 8663-Eng, one of a series of the Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Publication date: May 2001. Reviewed by Isabel Valentin-Oquendo, MS, RD, LD/N, assistant-in and curriculum coordinator, Department of Family, Youth, and Community Sciences. Please visit the EDIS Web site at http://edis.ifas.ufl.eduThe Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer authorized to provide resea rch, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, se x, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Servi ce office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida / Christine Taylor Waddill, Dean 2.Jennifer Hillan, MSH, RD, LD/N, coordinator, Educational/Training Programs, Department of Family, Youth and Community Science s, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, 32611. FCS8663-EngTaking a 24-hour Food Recall1Jennifer Hillan2Accurately taking a clients 24-hour food recall requires both practice and patience! Common mistakes include omitting food items and overor underestimating portion sizes. When taking a clients 24-hour food recall, follow these guidelines for accurate results. DOsDO start the recall by asking the client to write down the first thing they had to eat or drink yesterday. DO ask the client to write down when and what he/she had to eat or drink next; repeating the request until the day is completed. DO ask the client to include beverages each time they ate food. DO ask the client if they had anything to eat or drink between main meals; including bedtime snacks and food or drinks eaten during the night. DO ask about the type of food (e.g., fat-free, 1%, 2%, or whole milk). DO use food models or empty containers to accurately estimate portion sizes. If these are unavailable, use the Size Up Your Servings leaflet. DO ask about main ingredients in mixed dishes, such as pizza, soups, sandwiches and salads. DO ask for complete descriptions of food, as needed. For example, make sure to clarify if it is fruit juice or fruit drink. DO ask the client to write down extras. For example, ask the client if they put anything on their toast or in their coffee. DO ask how food was prepared (e.g., broiled, fried, baked, etc.) and if anything was added during the preparation.

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Taking a 24-hour Food Recall Page 2 May 2001DOs DO double check the recall to make sure it is complete and readable. If you cant read something, ask the client for clarification. DO be sensitive to clients with low literacy skills who may need help completing the recall. DO ask the client if this was a typical day. If it was not typical, ask what would make it typical and adjust as needed.DONTsDONT ask about meals by name (breakfast, lunch, dinner). Instead, ask When did you first eat? or When did you eat next? DONT ask leading questions such as, Did you have whole wheat bread? Instead, ask, What kind of bread did you have? DONT make judgmental comments or gestures about your clients food choices.