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FE675 Economic Impacts of the Florida Environmental Horticulture Industry in 20051 Sponsored Project Report to the Florida Nursery, Growers and Landscape Association Alan W. Hodges and John J. Haydu2

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Economic Impacts of the Florida Environmental Horticulture Industry in 2005 Sponsored Project Report to the Florida Nursery, Growers and Landscape Association Table of Contents

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List of Tables and Figures

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List of Tables and Figures (continued)

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Executive Summary Implan Keywords: Implan

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Acknowledgments

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1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.795969798990001020304pBillion Dollars (2004) Introduction: The Florida Envi ronmental Horticulture Industry Figure 1. Hort Technology Economic Information Report EI02-3 Census of Agriculture, 2002. Floriculture and Nursery Crops Situation and Outlook

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Methods Survey Design and Implementation Dun and Bradstreet

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Table 1.

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Table 2. Number of calls Survey Data and Economic Impact Analysis Microsoft Excel

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Table 3. IMPLAN Pro IMPLAN IMPLAN IMPLAN Table 4. Implan Implan Professional Social Accounting and Impact Analysis Software, User's Guide, Analysis Guide and Data Guide

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. Annual Benchmark Report for Retail Trade Table 5. Using Implan to Assess Local Economic Impacts.

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Survey Results Longevity of Industry Firms Figure 2. 0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%40%45%50% Less than 1 1 5 6 10 11 19 20 or more Percent of Respondents Nursery Landscape Retail Production Area Managed Figure 3. 54.8% 31.6% 14.5% 14.9% 12.3% 8.8% 1.8% 13.2%0%10%20%30%40%50%60%Less than 10,000 10,000 to 49,000 50,000 to 99,000 100,000 to 199,000 200,000 to 499,000 500,000 to 999,000 1,000,000 or more Refused or Don't knowSquare feetPercent of Respondents

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Figure 4. 0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%40%None Less than 5 5 9 10 19 20 49 50 99 100 or more Refused/Not AvailableAcresPercent of Respondents Container Field Table 6. Employment Table 7.

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Sales of Environmental Horticul tural Products and Services Figure 5. 0%10%20%30%40%50% less than $100 thousand $100 to $249 thousand $250 to $499 thousand $500 to $999 thousand $1 to $2.4 million $2.5 to $4.9 million $5 to $9.9 million $10 to $14.9 million $15 to $24.9 million $25 million or more Refused or Don't knowPercent of Respondents Nursery Landscape Retail Table 8.

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Figure 6. 32% 26% 14% 12% 8% 6% 1% 1% 0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%Local area Florida Southeast states Northeast states Midwest states Western states Canada Other foreign countriesPercent of Sales Reported Figure 7. 578 437 389 307 297 281 220 147 133 96 66 540100200300400500600 Shrubs Tropical Foliage Deciduous Trees Turfgrass Liners Potted Flowering Plants Palms Evergreen trees Flowering trees Cut Foliage or Flowers Ground Covers Other Plantsmillion dollars

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Table 9. Nurseries Landscape Services Retailers Market Channels and Practices for Horticultural Products

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Figure 8. 22% 21% 19% 9% 7% 6% 4% 4% 2% 2% 1% 1%0%5%10%15%20%25%Other Growers Rewholesalers Landscape Contractors Mass merchandise stores Independent Retailers Interiorscapers Landscape Maintenance Supermarkets Home Improvement Stores Homeowners Builders & Developers Other Type(s) Customer Percent of Sales Reported Figure 9. 29% 24% 23% 12% 9% 3% 1%0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%Governments Homeowners Builders & Developers Commercial Establishments Apartments & condominiums Other Landscapers Other Type(s) Customer Percent of Sales Reported Figure 10. 63% 15% 9% 5% 4% 2% 1%0%10%20%30%40%50%60%Homeowners Apartments & condominiums Commercial Establishments Landscapers Governments Other Retailers Other Type(s) Customer Percent of Sales Reported

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Figure 11. 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%Other Growers Rewholesalers Landscape Contractors Interiorscapers Landscape Maintenance Independent Retail Mass Merchandise Stores Home Improvement Supermarkets Developers Homeowners Other Market Percent of Respondents All Nursery Products Tropical Foliage Figure 12. 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70% Personal selling Salesperson Promotions Trade shows Direct mail Trade magazine Print media Radio, Television Internet website Charitable contributions Other practice Percent of Respondents Nursery Landscape Retail

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Impacts of Hurricanes on the Environmental Horticulture Industry in 2004 and 2005 Figure 13. 0%20%40%60%80%100%Charley (Aug. 2004) Frances (Sep. 2004) Ivan (Sep. 2004) Jeanne (Sep. 2004) Dennis (July 2005) Katrina (Aug. 2005) Rita (Aug. 2005) Wilma (Oct. 2005) At least one hurricanePercent of Respondents Nursery Landscape Retail Table 10.

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Figure 14. 0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%40%45% None Less than $1 thousand $1 to $9 thousand $10 to $99 thousand $100 to $499 thousand $500 to $999 thousand $1 million or more Refused or Don't know Percent of Respondents Nursery Landscape Retail Figure 15. 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%None Less than $1 thousand $1 to $9 thousand $10 to $99 thousand $100 to $499 thousand $500 to $999 thousand $1 million or more Refused or Don't know Percent of Respondents Nursery Landscape Retail Figure 16. 0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%40% None Less than $1 thousand $1 to $9 thousand $10 to $99 thousand $100 to $499 thousand $500 to $999 thousand $1 million or more Refused or Don't know Percent of Respondents Nursery Landscape Retail

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Figure 17. 0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35% Not at all A few days 1 to 2 weeks 3 to 4 weeks 2 to 3 months 4 months or more Refused or Don't know Percent of Respondents Nursery Landscape Retail Issues and Threats to the Environmental Horticulture Industry Figure 18. 0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%Increasing costs of production Drought, water use restriction Increasing energy costs Lack of professionalism Low prices for products General economic recession Labor shortage Government regulations Poor worker education or skills Market power of large retail chains Restrictions on availability/use of chemicals Competition by growers in other states Competition by plant substitutes Percent of Respondents Nursery Landscape Retail

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Financial Borrowing Characteristics and Needs for Wholesale Nurseries

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Table 11. Does Company Borrow Credit? Factors for Selecting a Lender Satisfaction with Lender Change in Credit Need s Expected Next Year Consider Electronic Banking Consider Loan Application on Internet

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Economic Impact Results State Impacts Implan Implan Table 12. Comparison with Previous Studies for 1997 and 2000

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Figure 19. 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 199719981999200020012002200320042005Billion Dollars ( 2005) Nursery & greenhouse Landscape Services Retail/Trade Table 13. Sales (million $) Direct Output (million $) Output Impacts (million $) Value Added Impacts (million $) Labor Income Impacts (million $) Indirect Business Tax Impacts (million $) Employment Impacts (jobs)

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Regional and County Economic Impacts Figure 20. 051015202530354045Miami-Dade Palm Beach Orange Hillsboroug Broward Duval Volusia Lee Pinellas Lake Polk Collier Seminole Sarasota Leon Brevard Alachua Escambia Marion Manateethousand jobs Nursery Landscape Retail

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Table 14.

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Table 15.

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Figure 21. Survey of Current Business

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Figure 22. 01020304050Miami-Fort Lauderdale Orlando Tampa-St. Petersburg Sarasota-Bradenton Jacksonville Tallahassee Gainesville Pensacola Panama Citythousand j obs Nursery Landscape Retail Table 16. Sales (million $) Output Impact (million $) Value Added Impact (million$) Employment Impact (jobs)

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Impacts on Allied Suppliers for Nursery Producers Table 17. Conclusions Economic Information Report 00-5r

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Appendix: Telephone Survey Questionnaire