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Recreational Fishing License Sales in Florida: 1990-2000
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00001913/00001
 Material Information
Title: Recreational Fishing License Sales in Florida: 1990-2000
Physical Description: Fact Sheet
Creator: Stephan, Kristina
Publisher: University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2001
 Notes
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status: Published
General Note: "Published September 2001."
General Note: "FE 302"
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00001913:00001

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Recreational Fishing License Sales in Florida: 1990-20001 Kristina Stephan and Chuck Adams2 1. This is EDIS document FE 302, a publication of the Department of Food and Resource Economics, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Published September 2001. Please visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu. 2. Kristina Stephan, graduate assistant, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, and Chuck Adams, professor, Department of Food and Resource Economics, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Service office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences/University of Florida/Christine Taylor Waddill, Dean. Introduction The recreational fishing industry is an important natural resource-based industry in Florida. The tradition of recreational fishing is intrinsically linked with Florida's identity, whether it is bass fishing in the Chain of Lakes region or fishing from a charter boat in the Florida Keys. The number of saltwater anglers in Florida exceeds that of any other state in the nation (United States Department of Commerce, NMFS). During 1999, an estimated 2.4 million anglers went on 19.5 million saltwater recreational fishing trips. These anglers harvested 60 million saltwater fish, while an additional 75 million fish were caught and released. In addition, Florida ranks eighth among all states in terms of the number of freshwater anglers. During 1996 (the most recent data available), a total of 1.1 million anglers engaged in freshwater fishing activities in Florida, spending 18.4 million days fishing while taking 16.5 million freshwater fishing trips (United States Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service). The various economic activities associated with recreational fishing in Florida generate considerable contributions to Florida's economy. Individuals engaged in recreational fishing purchase a wide variety of fishing gear and supplies, including everything from fishing tackle to fishing boats. Expenditures associated with a given trip include bait, lodging, fuel, and clothing. These expenditures are made by both resident and non-resident anglers. The latter group contributes true economic impact to the Florida economy by bringing new money into the state. The freshwater recreational fishing industry is estimated to generate approximately $1 billion in economic activity to the Florida economy, while creating 18,729 jobs throughout the state. The saltwater recreational industry is much larger, generating $4.7 billion in economic activity while creating 56,270 jobs. The state of Florida has required the purchase of freshwater fishing licenses for many years. Licenses are currently required for residents and non-residents fishing in freshwater or saltwater. However the saltwater fishing license is a relatively new requirement, having been implemented in 1989. With several exceptions such as fishing from shore or bridge/pier, anyone engaging in recreational saltwater angling must have a saltwater fishing license. This applies to both Florida residents and non-residents. The purpose of this publication is to briefly document the trends in recreational fishing license sales in Florida. License sales data used in the analysis were obtained from the Bureau of Licensing and Permitting, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FFWCC).

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Recreational Fishing License Sales in Florida: 1990-2000 2 Trends in License Sales During the 1999-2000 fiscal year, a total of 1,532,000 fishing licenses were sold in Florida. The total value of license sales to the FFWCC during that period was $19.6 million. Of this amount, $7.7 million were associated with non-resident license sales, while $11.9 million were attributed to resident license sales. Disaggregated another way, $12.2 million were generated by saltwater license sales, while the remaining $7.4 million was generated by freshwater license sales. Saltwater License Sales Sales of both resident and non-resident saltwater licenses have followed an upward trend over the last 10 years (Figure 1). Florida offers a 12-month resident saltwater license, and 12-month, 7-day, and 3-day non-resident saltwater licenses. Sales of resident saltwater licenses increased from 513,000 units during the 1990-1991 fiscal year to 602,000 units during 1999-2000. Non-resident saltwater license sales have also followed an upward trend over the last 10 years, increasing from 270,000 units in 1990-1991 to 404,000 units during 1999-2000. This represents an increase of 50%, a much more dramatic increase than exhibited by the 17% increase in resident saltwater license sales over the same period. Figure 1. Ten-year trends for recreational fishing license units sold in Florida. Freshwater License Sales Sales of resident and non-resident freshwater licenses have exhibited divergent trends during the 10-year period from 1990-1991 to 1999-2000 (Figure 1). Unit sales of resident freshwater licenses have decreased from 459,000 units in 1990-1991 to 396,00 units in 1999-2000. This represents a 14% decrease over the 10-year period. Non-resident freshwater license sales have remained steady. Unit sales of non-resident freshwater licenses decreased from 158,000 units in 1990-1991 to 129,000 units in 1995-1996, then increased to 163,000 units in 1998-1999, only to decrease yet again to a 10-year low of 131,000 units in 1999-2000. Unit Sales by County Sales of recreational fishing licenses vary considerably from county to county in Florida. And as expected, sales of saltwater licenses are highest in coastal counties, while freshwater license sales are dominated by sales in the inland counties, with a few notable exceptions. The top ten counties in terms of resident saltwater license sales (revenue and units) during 1999-2000 are shown in Tables 1 through 4. Note that the counties are ranked based on revenue, not unit sales, although both data series are shown. Given that there are non-resident licenses of different duration and price, the rank ordering of the top ten counties by units sold for non-resident licenses may not mirror the ordering based on revenue (i.e., relatively more units of the lesser valued, short-term licenses may be have been sold). Resident Saltwater Licenses The top ten counties in terms of resident saltwater license revenue are shown in Table 1. Since there is only one type of resident saltwater license, counties have the same ranking either by revenue or units sold. Monroe County led the state with $401,884 (33,487 units sold). Note that all of the counties are coastal, and six of the counties are located on the east coast (Monroe County is considered a west coast county in terms of state and federal fisheries management). None of the counties are located in the Panhandle region of Florida. These top ten counties represent 46% of the total revenue generated by resident saltwater license sales in Florida.

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Recreational Fishing License Sales in Florida: 1990-2000 3 Non-Resident Saltwater Licenses The top ten counties in terms of non-resident license revenue are shown in Table 2. Again, Monroe County led the state in non-resident saltwater license sales, with $599,140 (45,543 units sold). These values exceed resident saltwater licenses both in terms of revenue and units sold by almost 50%, emphasizing the importance of the tourist industry to Monroe County's recreational fishing industry. Again, all of the top ten counties are coastal. However, all ten of the counties are located on the west coast. Three of the counties are located in the Panhandle region of the state. These top ten counties represent 71% of the total revenue generated by non-resident saltwater license sales in Florida. Resident Freshwater Licenses The top ten counties in terms of resident freshwater license revenue are shown in Table 3. The rank ordering on the basis of revenue and units sold are identical. Polk County led the state in terms of resident freshwater license sales, with $322,056 (26,838 units sold). In contrast to the saltwater licenses sales, only five of the top ten counties are coastal, with most counties located in the central Florida region. A notable exception is Broward County. These top ten counties represent 51% of the total revenue generated by resident freshwater license sales in Florida. Non-Resident Freshwater Licenses The top ten counties in terms of non-resident freshwater fishing licenses are shown in Table 4. Okeechobee County is the most important county, with non-resident license sales of $319,470 (14,724 units sold). Of the top ten counties, only one is a coastal county. And with the exception of Marion and Putnam Counties, all the remaining counties are located in the south central Florida region. These top ten counties represent 54% of the total revenue generated by non-resident freshwater license sales in Florida. Conclusion The recreational fishing industry generates considerable economic activity in the Florida economy. Approximately $5.7 billion in economic activity and 75,000 jobs result from this important natural resource-based industry. Sales of 1.5 million recreational fishing licenses during the 1999-2000 fiscal year generated $19.6 million in revenue for the FFWCC. The majority of the saltwater licenses were sold in coastal counties, primarily in south Florida, while inland counties in the south central region of the state accounted for the majority of freshwater fishing licenses. Sales of non-resident recreational fishing licenses ($7.7 million) represent 40% of the total recreational fishing revenue and provide some insight into the importance of angling by tourists in Florida. References Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Unpublished licenses sales data. Bureau of Licensing and Permitting, Tallahassee, FL. 2001. United States Department of Commerce. Fisheries of the United States, 1999. Current Fishery Statistics Number 9900. Silver Springs, MD: National Marine Fisheries Service. 2000. United States Department of the Interior. National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, FHW/96-FL. Bethesda, MD: Fish and Wildlife Service. 1996.

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Recreational Fishing License Sales in Florida: 1990-2000 4 Table 1. Top ten counties: resident saltwater fishing license sales, 1999-2000 fiscal year. Rank Florida Counties Resident Saltwater Fishing License Revenue ($) Units 1Monroe 401,844 33,487 2Dade 393,384 32,782 3Pinellas 392,676 32,723 4Hillsborough 374,316 31,193 5Duval 340,908 28,409 6Broward 335,424 27,952 7Palm Beach 319,819 26,655 8Brevard 282,156 23,513 9Lee 266,376 22,198 10 Volusia 208,836 17,403 Table 2. Top ten counties: non-resident saltwater fishing license sales, 1999-2000 fiscal year. Rank Florida Counties Non-Resident Saltwater Fishing License Revenue ($) Units 1Monroe 599,140 45,543 2Lee 454,395 32,486 3Collier 335,620 22,297 4Bay 313,945 31,737 5Charlotte 260,110 16,709 6Sarasota 214,730 16,347 7Pinellas 209,975 16,337 8Okaloosa 176,820 18,980 9Manatee 163,545 11,275 10 Franklin 154,525 16,559

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Recreational Fishing License Sales in Florida: 1990-2000 5 Table 3. Top ten counties: resident freshwater fishing license sales, 1999-2000 fiscal year. Rank Florida Counties Resident Freshwater Fishing License Revenue ($) Units 1Polk 322,056 26,838 2Broward 249,588 20,799 3Hillsborough 237,504 19,792 4Orange 218,244 18,187 5Duval 210,240 17,520 6Palm Beach 200,928 16,744 7Marion 182,940 15,425 8Volusia 140,604 11,717 9Seminole 128,568 10,714 10 Lake 128,508 10,709 Table 4. Top ten counties: non-resident freshwater fishing license sales, 1999-2000 fiscal year. Rank Florida Counties Non-Resident Freshwater Fishing License Revenue ($) Units 1Okeechobee 319,470 14,724 2Polk 208,200 9,979 3Osceola 143,040 7,804 4Lake 140,850 6,415 5Putnam 124,755 6,287 6Hendry 118,950 6,482 7Volusia 115,730 6,017 8Highlands 112,480 4,784 9Glades 96,660 4,879 10 Marion 90,620 4,957