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1 Story Time and the Social Antisocial Dichotomy Athna C. PattersonOrazem, University of Florida 1 6 7. The day before yesterday, I was doing a ceremony. I have a good friend who wanted to spoil the event. I am a little bone who is in the midst of fifty dogs. For all their licking, they cannot break me.1 As with many of J. L .s songs, this song feels very personal. Unlike its neighbors, this song consists of four statements, and no repetition. It reasserts an emp owering mantra and it tells a complete story The songs compact structure is in accordance with Freytags model for classic plot structure2: introduction, rising action, climax, falling action and conclusion. The songs first line serves as an introduction, establishing the setting The rising action introduces suspense in the form of a problematic friend; the falling action partially resolves the problem by providing a philosophic assessment of the overall situation; the climax has merged with these. The conclusion of the story is a resolute reassertion of the speakers own power against adversity. The power cycle is also noteworthy: the speaker empowers himself by telling the story, weakens himself in revealing his ailment, then re empowers himself by finding an explanation to the problem and reasserting his own will An o verarching metaphor of dog and bone dominates the imagery Licking is considered an affectionate action, though dogs will lick a hard bone to soften it before eating; this double edged imagery is particularly appropriate to the subject of friendship A s a small bone the speaker feels overwhelmed by outside obligations The lick ing dogs represent his friends yet on another level, they could also repres ent the lwa J.L. serves. Through this metaphor, the song vividly illustrates the difficulties of an adolescen t trying to balance the inside and outside obligations of society self identity and religion. 1 Hebblethwaite, V odou Songs in Haitian Creole and English, Chapter 6 : J.L.s Songs, p.178179 2 Freytag, MacEwan trans., F reytag s Technique of the Drama Chapter 2 : The Construction of the Drama p. 114140


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Story Time and the Social-Antisocial Dichotomy, Athéna C. Patterson-Orazem
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00001362/00021
 Material Information
Title: Story Time and the Social-Antisocial Dichotomy, Athéna C. Patterson-Orazem
Series Title: HAI3930, ANT3930, LAS3930, REL3938
Physical Description: Course Material
Creator: Raitano, Megan
Publisher: Hebblethwaite, Benjamin
Raitano, Megan
Felima, Crystal
Place of Publication: University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Megan Raitano.
Publication Status: Unpublished
General Note: This is a collection of student essays from the Haitian Vodou class offered at the Universtiy of Florida. These essays are the results of a combination of in class material and independent research on individually chosen topics. The writing styles, citation styles, and views expressed in the essays are established by the students and do not necessarily reflect those of the professor or the Archive.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00001362:00021

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Story Time and the Social-Antisocial Dichotomy
Athena C. Patterson-Orazem, University of Florida


167.
The day before yesterday,
I was doing a ceremony.
I have a good friend
who wanted to spoil the event.
I am a little bone
who is in the midst of fifty dogs.
For all their licking,
they cannot break me.



As with many of J. L.'s songs, this song feels very personal. Unlike its neighbors, this
song consists of four statements, and no repetition. It reasserts an empowering mantra and it tells
a complete story.
The song's compact structure is in accordance with Freytag's model for classic plot
structure: introduction, rising action, climax, falling action and conclusion. The song's first line
serves as an introduction, establishing the setting. The rising action introduces suspense in the
form of a problematic friend; the falling action partially resolves the problem by providing a
philosophic assessment of the overall situation; the climax has merged with these. The
conclusion of the story is a resolute reassertion of the speaker's own power against adversity.
The power cycle is also noteworthy: the speaker empowers himself by telling the story, weakens
himself in revealing his ailment, then re-empowers himself by finding an explanation to the
problem and reasserting his own will.
An overarching metaphor of dog and bone dominates the imagery. Licking is considered
an affectionate action, though dogs will lick a hard bone to soften it before eating; this double-
edged imagery is particularly appropriate to the subject of friendship. As "a small bone", the
speaker feels overwhelmed by outside obligations. The licking dogs represent his friends, yet on
another level, they could also represent the Iwa J.L. serves. Through this metaphor, the song
vividly illustrates the difficulties of an adolescent trying to balance the inside and outside
obligations of society, self-identity and religion.









1Hebblethwaite, Vodou Songs in Haitian Creole and English, Chapter 6: J.L.'s Songs, p. 178-179
2 Freytag, MacEwan trans., Freytag's Technique of the Drama, Chapter 2: The Construction of the
Drama, p. 114-140